National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for outlook marginally reduced

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 projects reduced need for U.S. oil...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Annual Energy Outlook 2014 projects reduced need for U.S. oil imports due to tight oil production growth U.S. production of tight crude oil is expected to make up a larger share ...

  2. Key Milestones/Outlook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Key Milestones/Outlook per the Department of Energy 2015 Congressional Budget Request, Environmental Management, March 2014

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  4. Reduced Order Model Implementation in the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis L.; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua J.; Talbot, Paul W.; Rinaldi, Ivan; Maljovec, Dan; Wang, Bei; Pascucci, Valerio; Zhao, Haihua

    2015-09-01

    The RISMC project aims to develop new advanced simulation-based tools to perform Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) for the existing fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs). These tools numerically model not only the thermo-hydraulic behavior of the reactor primary and secondary systems but also external events temporal evolution and components/system ageing. Thus, this is not only a multi-physics problem but also a multi-scale problem (both spatial, µm-mm-m, and temporal, ms-s-minutes-years). As part of the RISMC PRA approach, a large amount of computationally expensive simulation runs are required. An important aspect is that even though computational power is regularly growing, the overall computational cost of a RISMC analysis may be not viable for certain cases. A solution that is being evaluated is the use of reduce order modeling techniques. During the FY2015, we investigated and applied reduced order modeling techniques to decrease the RICM analysis computational cost by decreasing the number of simulations runs to perform and employ surrogate models instead of the actual simulation codes. This report focuses on the use of reduced order modeling techniques that can be applied to any RISMC analysis to generate, analyze and visualize data. In particular, we focus on surrogate models that approximate the simulation results but in a much faster time (µs instead of hours/days). We apply reduced order and surrogate modeling techniques to several RISMC types of analyses using RAVEN and RELAP-7 and show the advantages that can be gained.

  5. Annual Energy Outlook2014

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014) was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti...

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook 2015 AEO Annual Energy Outlook AEO2015 Annual Energy Outlook 2015 API American Petroleum Institute bbl Barrels bbl/d Barrels per day Brent North Sea Brent Btu British thermal unit(s) CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CHP Combined heat and power CO2 Carbon dioxide CPI Consumer price index CSAPR Cross-State Air Pollution Rule CTL Coal-to-liquids E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol EIA U.S. Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced

  7. Tribal Economic Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by Northern Arizona University, the Tribal Economic Outlook Conference will preview the conditions that will impact business and economy in the year ahead. Hear what the experts are predicting for 2016 at the tribal, state, and local level.

  8. China Energy Outlook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    X I A O J I E X U C H A I R F E L L O W , W O R L D E N E R G Y C H I N A O U T L O O K I N S T I T U T E O F W O R L D E C O N O M I C S A N D P O L I T I C S , C H I N E S E A C A D E M Y O F S O C I A L S C I E N C E S China Energy Outlook 2020 2014-7-15 Washington DC World Energy China Outlook | Xiaojie Xu and Chen Tangsi | xuoffice@vip.sina.com 1 World Energy China Outlook 2014-2015 Annual interactive Energy Outlook Mid-year Updates IWEP Energy Chinese Academy of Social Sciences 2014-7-15

  9. Energy Market Outlook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Energy Market Outlook: Helping Customers Meet Their Diverse Energy Goals, held on May 22-23, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

  10. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    band is very wide 2 WTI price dollars per barrel Source: EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2015 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Apr Jul Oct...

  11. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    band is very wide 2 WTI price dollars per barrel Source: EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2015 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Apr Jul Oct...

  12. Summer_Gas_Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) 1 Summer 2001 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary April 2001 For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to once again exhibit a very tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.49 per gallon, slightly lower than last summer's average of $1.53 per gallon, but still above the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of

  13. International Energy Outlook 2016

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    484(2016) I May 2016 International Energy Outlook 2016 ~ Independent Statistics & Ana[ysis e~ ~* a~ 1 U.S. ~~ergy. Information Administration Contacts The International Energy Outlook 2016 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis (john.conti@eia.gov, 202-586-2222); Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team (paul.holtberg@eia.gov, 202-586-1284); Jim Diefenderfer, Director, Office

  14. Modifications to incorporate competitive electricity prices in the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Market Module (EMM) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. It describes revisions necessary to derive competitive electricity prices and the corresponding reserve margins.

  15. Annual Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. For the first time, the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is presented as a shorter edition under a newly adopted two-year release cycle. With this approach, full editions and shorter editions of the AEO will be produced in alternating years. This approach will allow EIA to focus more resources on rapidly changing energy markets both in the United States and internationally, and to consider how they might evolve over the next few years.

  16. International energy outlook 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-07-01

    This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

  17. International Energy Outlook 2016-World energy demand and economc outlook -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration Analysis & Projections International Energy Outlook 2016 Release Date: May 11, 2016 | Next Release Date: September 2017 | | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2016) Chapter 1. World energy demand and economic outlook print version Overview The International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case projects significant growth in worldwide energy demand over the 28-year period from 2012 to 2040. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 549

  18. International energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015) was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202/586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@ eia.gov, 202/586-1284), Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis; James R. Diefenderfer (jim.diefenderfer@eia.gov, 202/586-2432), Director, Office of

  20. Internatioanl Energy Outlook 2016

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Chapter 6 Buildings sector energy consumption Overview Energy consumed in the buildings sector consists of residential and commercial end users and accounts for 20.1% of the total delivered energy consumed worldwide. Consumption of delivered, or site, energy contrasts with the use of the primary energy that also includes the energy used to generate and deliver electricity to individual sites such as homes, offices, or industrial plants. In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016)

  1. International energy outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-15

    This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

  2. Natural Gas Winter Outlook 2000-2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This article is based on the Winter Fuels Outlook published in the 4th Quarter Short-Term Energy Outlook and discusses the supply and demand outlook from October 2000 through March 2001.

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... power Liquid biofuels Wood biomass Hydropower Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, August 2016. Note: Hydropower excludes pumped storage generation. Liquid biofuels include ...

  4. 2015 Trilateral Energy Outlook Project

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2015 Trilateral Energy Outlook Project December 2015 Prepared by: The National Energy Board Canada Secretara de Energa de Mxico U.S. Energy Information Administration 2015 ...

  5. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A15. Coal supply, disposition, and prices ...

  6. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price

  7. Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets will likely remain tight through most of 2003, as petroleum inventories and global spare production capacity continue to dwindle amid blasts of cold weather and constrained output from Venezuela. OPEC efforts to increase output to make up for lower Venezuela output has reduced global spare production capacity to only 2 million barrels per day, leaving little room to make up for unexpected supply or demand

  8. Energy Markets Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Markets Outlook For National Association for Business Economics March 7, 2016 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Forecast -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 2011-Q1 2012-Q1 2013-Q1 2014-Q1 2015-Q1 2016-Q1 2017-Q1 Implied stock change and balance (right axis) World production (left axis) World consumption (left axis) world supply and demand million barrels per day implied stock change million barrels per day Global oil inventories are forecast to

  9. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review provides a yearly comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO) beginning with 1982. This edition of the report adds the AEO 2012 projections and updates the historical data to incorporate the latest data revisions.

  10. International energy outlook 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

  11. International energy outlook 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

  12. The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030 The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030 Presents an outlook on the future supply and demand for energy until the year 2030, with a major focus on oil, natural gas, coal, and renewable sources of energy. deer08_tunison.pdf (288.67 KB) More Documents & Publications Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of Reducing It Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

  13. International Energy Outlook 2016 - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Energy Outlook 2016 Release Date: May 11, 2016 | Next Release Date: September 2017 | | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2016) Preface International Energy Outlook 2014 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) presents an assessment by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2040. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2016 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015). IEO2016 is

  14. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3

  15. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F11. Delivered energy consumption in Russia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.7 Natural gas 2.8 2.7 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.5 0.8 Coal 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 -1.5 Electricity 0.4

  16. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8

  17. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F15. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Asia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.7 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4

  18. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F17. Delivered energy consumption in Africa by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.5 Natural gas 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 3.4 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 2.5 Electricity 0.6

  19. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F19. Delivered energy consumption in Other Central and South America by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 3.2 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

  20. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6

  1. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2

  2. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F7. Delivered energy consumption in Japan by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 -1.2 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.3 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 1.1 1.2

  3. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 --

  4. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4

  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999-Summer Gasoline Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook This year's base case outlook for summer (April-September) motor gasoline markets may be summarized as follows: * Pump Prices: (average regular) projected to average about $1.13 per gallon this summer, up 9-10 cents from last year. The increase, while substantial, still leaves average prices low compared to pre-1998 history, especially in inflation-adjusted terms. * Supplies: expected to be adequate, overall. Beginning-of-season inventories were even with the 1998

  6. Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Provides instructions for remote Outlook...

  7. Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for the Transport Sector Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector PDF icon deer10karsner.pdf More Documents & Publications The ...

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook April 2015 1 April 2015 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights * On April 2, Iran and the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany (P5+1) reached a framework agreement that could result in the lifting of oil- related sanctions against Iran. Lifting sanctions could substantially change the STEO forecast for oil supply, demand, and prices by allowing a significantly increased volume of Iranian barrels to enter the

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2016.  December was the sixth consecutive month in which monthly average Brent prices decreased, falling $17/barrel (bbl) from November to a monthly average of $62/bbl, the lowest since May 2009. The December price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production, strong global supply, and weakening outlooks for the global economy and oil demand growth.  EIA forecasts

  10. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Outlook September 2015 1 September 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $47/barrel (b) in August, a $10/b decrease from July. This third consecutive monthly decrease in prices likely reflects concerns about lower economic growth in emerging markets, expectations of higher oil exports from Iran, and continuing growth in global inventories. Crude oil price volatility increased significantly, with Brent prices showing daily changes of more

  11. International energy outlook 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

  12. seismic margin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... event tree SMA seismic margins analysis SNF spent nuclear fuel SRTC site rail transfer cart SSC ... Safeguards and Security System Safeguards and Security Entire NA NA NA NA System ...

  13. INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook December 12, 2012 - 2:15pm Addthis According to a new report commissioned by the Energy Department, a U.S. ...

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 1 January 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015. After falling to the...

  15. LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    December 2014 LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy LD+A Magazine

  16. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement - June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2010 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 27, 2010, predicted that the Atlantic basin will likely experience above-normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1

  17. Review of EIA Oil Production Outlooks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Review of EIA oil production outlooks For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Samuel Gorgen, Upstream Analyst Overview Gorgen, Tight Oil Production Trends EIA Conference, July 15, 2014 2 * Drilling Productivity Report performance review - Permian - Eagle Ford - Bakken * Crude oil production projections - Short-Term Energy Outlook - Annual Energy Outlook - International tight oil outlook * New DPR region highlights: Utica Drilling Productivity Report review - major tight

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Crude oil prices fell sharply at the onset of war in Iraq, but the initial declines probably overshot levels that we consider to be generally consistent with fundamental factors in the world oil market. Thus, while near-term price averages are likely to be below our previous projections, the baseline outlook for crude oil prices (while generally lower) is not drastically different and includes an average for spot West Texas

  19. 2015 Outlook for NERSC Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Outlook for NERSC Systems 2015 Outlook for NERSC Systems January 6, 2015 by David Turner, Richard Gerber NERSC staff member David Turner put together the following nice summary of NERSC systems schedule for the next year: The year 2015 promises to be a busy one for NERSC! After almost 15 years in downtown Oakland, NERSC will be moving back to the main Berkeley Lab site in the hills above the UC Berkeley campus. We will take up residence in a brand-new, purpose-built facility: the

  20. The outlook for natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The proceedings of the Institute of Gas Technology`s Houston Conference on the Outlook for Natural Gas held October 5, 1993 are presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Annual energy outlook, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-02-11

    The forecast summary highlights the principal components of the Energy Information Administration's projections of energy supply, demand, and prices. Key issues are addressed for each of the major energy markets (petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity), along with the developments anticipated for end-use energy consumption and new technologies. The overview lists the principal conclusions followed by discussions of the important elements of the projections. This information revises production forecasts for 1986, 1987, and 1988, but its effect on later years should be much less, because some portion of the production fall amounts to production delays (Table 1). Lower well completions and delayed work-overs remove production from significantly sized wells, but little of this production is lost permanently. To the extent that higher prices encourage higher development activity, well completions and work-overs should resume at a more normal level. In the short run, shut-in wells, which are mostly marginal stripper wells, can also be returned to production. With the liberalization of State and Federal regulations on when shut-in wells must be permanently abandoned, a window of about one year exists during which these stripper wells can be restored. Some of these wells will never resume production, but with prices in the $18 plus range, most will again be economic.

  2. GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook 2015 GRC GTO Current Outlook final.pdf (3.38 MB) More Documents & Publications Geothermal Technologies Office Current Outlook GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook 2015 Annual Report, Geothermal Technologies Office 2015 Peer Review | Plenaries

  3. Geothermal Technologies Office Current Outlook | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current Outlook Geothermal Technologies Office Current Outlook 2015 GRC GTO Current Outlook final.pdf (3.38 MB) More Documents & Publications GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook Geothermal Technologies Office Current Outlook 2015 Annual Report, Geothermal Technologies Office FORGE, 2015 Peer Review Plenary

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 1 October 2014 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas, heating oil, electricity, and propane will decrease this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter, which was 11% colder than the previous 10-year average nationally. Projected average household expenditures for propane and heating oil are 27% and 15% lower, respectively, because of lower heating demand and prices.

  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 October 2015 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas, heating oil, and propane during the upcoming winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) will be 10%, 25%, and 18% lower, respectively, than last winter, because of lower fuel prices and lower heating demand. Forecast lower heating demand and relatively unchanged prices contribute to electricity expenditures that are 3% lower than last winter

  6. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Full Release Date: Mid September 2016 Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer By Section Issues in Focus Annual Energy Outlook 2016 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) focus on the factors expected to shape U.S. energy markets through 2040. The projections provide a basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serve as a starting point for analysis

  7. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1 June 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2008 Outlook for Hurricane Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted above-normal hurricane activity in its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook released on May 22, 2008. 1 NOAA projects 12 to 16 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin, including 6 to 9 hurricanes, of which 2 to 5 will be intense, during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November

  8. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 1 June 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2009 Outlook for Hurricane Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted in its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook released on May 21, 2009 that the Atlantic basin will most likely experience near-normal activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects 9 to 14 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin over the next 6

  9. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2010 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 27, 2010, predicted that the Atlantic basin will likely experience above-normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 14 to 23 named storms will form within the

  10. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2012 1 June 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 24, 2012, predicts that the Atlantic basin likely will experience near- normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 9 to 15 named storms will form within the Atlantic

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2015 Reference case Table A12. Petroleum and other liquids prices (2013 dollars per gallon, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 ...

  12. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table C1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise ...

  13. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    B-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table B1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise ...

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix D

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    D-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table D1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise ...

  15. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2013 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise noted) ...

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figure F5. Natural gas transmission and distribution model regions 218 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Figure F5. Natural Gas Transmission and ...

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information ...

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    F-3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, ...

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless ...

  20. Reduced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season December 5, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce waste and save money. | Photo courtesy of istockphoto/diane555 Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce waste and save money. | Photo courtesy of istockphoto/diane555 Paige Terlip Paige Terlip Former Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory What are the key facts? Reduce waste and save energy this holiday

  1. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) ... 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow). ...

  2. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Abbreviations

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AEO: Annual Energy Outlook AEO2012: Annual Energy Outlook 2012 AFUE: Average Fuel Use Efficiency ANWR: Artic National Wildlife Refuge ARRA2009: American Recovery and...

  3. International energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1997 (IE097) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2015.

  4. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    change the pattern of annual demand shifts reported in earlier Outlooks. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2002 History Projections Sep-02 Oct-02 Nov-02...

  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    market outlook and drivers for Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum (OMFIF) July 14, 2016 | St. Louis, MO by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Forecast -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 2011-Q1 2012-Q1 2013-Q1 2014-Q1 2015-Q1 2016-Q1 2017-Q1 Implied stock change and balance (right axis) World production (left axis) World consumption (left axis) world supply and demand million barrels per day implied stock change million barrels per day OMFIF l Third Main

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices fell by more than 15% in November, declining from $85/barrel (bbl) on November 3 to $72/bbl on November 28. Monthly average Brent crude oil prices have declined 29% from their 2014 high of $112/bbl in June to an average of $79/bbl in November, the lowest monthly average since September 2010. The November price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production along with weakening

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 2014 1 June 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices increased from a monthly average of $108/barrel (bbl) in April to $110/bbl in May. This was the 11 th consecutive month in which the average Brent crude oil spot price fell within a relatively narrow range of $107/bbl to $112/bbl. The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged more than $13/bbl from November through January, fell below $4/bbl in

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    March 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $58/barrel (bbl) in February, an increase of $10/bbl from the January average, and the first monthly average price increase since June 2014. The price increase reflects news of falling U.S. crude oil rig counts and announced reductions in capital expenditures by major oil companies, along with lower-than-expected Iraqi crude oil exports.  EIA forecasts that Brent crude oil prices will average

  9. DOE Acquisition Outlook and Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acquisition Outlook and Challenges DOE Acquisition Outlook and Challenges Presentation from the 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop by John Hale, Director, Office of Small And Disadvantaged Business Utilization. DOE Acquisition Outlook and Challenges (489.45 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE-National-Cleanup-Workshop-Outlook-and-Challenges-John-Hale-III Webinar Presentation: Doing Business with Us Small Business Webinar: March 7 2013

  10. Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-06

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  11. Short-term energy outlook, annual supplement 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (Supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  12. Annual outlook for US electric power, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-24

    This document includes summary information on the ownership structure of the US electric utility industry, a description of electric utility regulation, and identification of selected factors likely to affect US electricity markets from 1985 through 1995. This Outlook expands upon projections first presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1985, offering additional discussion of projected US electricity markets and regional detail. It should be recognized that work on the Annual Energy Outlook 1985 had been completed prior to the sharp reductions in world oil prices experienced early in 1986.

  13. EM's Budget Outlook by Terry Tyborowski

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assistant Secretary for Program Planning and Budget April 18, 2012 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 EM's Budget Outlook: FY 2013, FY ...

  14. 2016 NASEO Energy Policy Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NASEO’s Energy Policy Outlook Conference is the national forum to connect with and learn from state energy officials working on innovative energy policies and programs, and to engage with federal officials on priority energy issues.

  15. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual ...

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A-3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise ...

  17. 2015 NASEO Energy Policy Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BETO Director Jonathan Male will be speaking at the National Association of State Energy Organization Energy Policy Outlook Conference, which will be taking place from February 3–6 at the Washington, D.C.

  18. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration ‹ Analysis & Projections Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Release Date: March 25, 2015 | Next Release Date: April 2017 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0640(2014) Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy production, consumption and prices each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). Each year, EIA also produces an AEO Retrospective Review document, which presents a

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    23 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A11. Petroleum and other liquids supply and disposition (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A11. Petroleum and other liquids supply and disposition (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Supply and disposition Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Crude oil Domestic

  20. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators

  2. Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary For the upcoming summer season (April to September 2003), high crude oil costs and other factors are expected to yield average retail motor gasoline prices higher than those of last year. Current crude oil prices reflect a substantial uncertainty premium due to concerns about the current conflict in the Persian Gulf, lingering questions about whether Venezuelan oil production will recover to near pre-strike

  3. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 September 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or

  4. DOE/EIA-0202(84/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook pn Quarterly Projections August 1984 Published: September 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t- jrt .ort lort .iort .iort iort iort iort ort Tt jm .erm -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  5. DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  6. DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  7. DOE/EIA-0202(85/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1985 Published: August 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort iort iort '.ort ort Tt .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  8. INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING HSPD-12 AUTHENTICATED OUTLOOK WEB ACCESS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    172013 Page 1 INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING HSPD-12 AUTHENTICATED OUTLOOK WEB ACCESS (OWA) Outlook Web Access provides access to unencrypted email only and is suitable for use from any ...

  9. Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Analysis & Projections Glossary › FAQS › Overview Projection Data Monthly short-term forecasts to 2016 Annual projections to 2040 International projections All projections reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Annual Energy Outlook related Congressional & other requests International Energy Outlook related Presentations Recurring Short-Term Outlook Related Special outlooks Testimony All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud ‹ Analysis &

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.58 0.41 0.39 0.38 0.36 0.35 -1.8% Commercial (biomass)

  11. August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    August 2012 1 August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  EIA projects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average about $103 per barrel during the second half of 2012, about $3.50 per barrel higher than in last month's Outlook. The forecast Brent crude oil spot price falls to an average of $100 per barrel in 2013. The projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price discount to Brent crude oil narrows from about $14 in the third quarter of 2012 to $9 by late 2013.

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2016

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook Highlights  During the 2016 April-through-September summer driving season, U.S. regular gasoline retail prices are forecast to average $2.04/gallon (gal), compared with $2.63/gal last summer (see EIA Summer Fuels Outlook presentation). For all of 2016, the forecast average price is $1.94/gal, which if realized would save the average U.S. household about $350 on gasoline in 2016 compared with 2015, with annual average motor fuel expenditures at the lowest level in 12

  13. DOE/EIA-0202|83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    |83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook Volume 1-Quarterly Projections May 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort lOrt iort '.ort- ort Tt . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by

  15. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY ...

  17. Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the AEO using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO projections.

  18. DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  19. Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-17

    The Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993 is a companion document to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 1993 (AEO). Supplement tables provide the regional projections underlying the national data and projections in the AEO. The domestic coal, electric power, commercial nuclear power, end-use consumption, and end-use price tables present AEO forecasts at the 10 Federal Region level. World coal tables provide data and projections on international flows of steam coal and metallurgical coal, and the oil and gas tables provide the AEO oil and gas supply forecasts by Oil and Gas Supply Regions and by source of supply. All tables refer to cases presented in the AEO, which provides a range of projections for energy markets through 2010.

  20. Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This section of the Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 present the major assumptions of the modeling system used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in Appendix B. A synopsis of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented. The NEMS is developed and maintained by the office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projection of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by various government agencies and the private sector.

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    August 14, 2012 | Washington, DC Annual Energy Outlook 2013: Modeling Updates in the Transportation Sector WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview 2 AEO2013 Transportation Model Updates Washington, D.C., August 2012 Discussion purposes only - Do not cite or circulate * Light-duty vehicle - Light-duty vehicle technology update based on EPA/NHTSA Notice of Proposed Rule for model years 2017 through 2025 * Heavy-duty vehicle

  2. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Modeling Updates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Analysis; Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 23, 2013 | Washington, DC Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Modeling Updates in the Transportation Sector Overview 2 AEO2014 Transportation Model Updates Washington, D.C., July 2013 Discussion purposes only - Do not cite or circulate * Light-duty vehicle - Vehicle miles traveled by age cohort, update modeling parameters, employment and VMT - E85 demand - Battery electric vehicle cost, efficiency, and availability * Heavy-duty vehicle, rail,

  3. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Preliminary Results

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Working Group 2 September 25, 2013 | Washington, DC By Trisha Hutchins and Nicholas Chase Office of Transportation Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Annual Energy Outlook 2014: transportation modeling updates and preliminary results Overview 2 AEO2014 Transportation Working Group 2: Modeling updates and preliminary results Washington, D.C., September 25, 2013 Discussion purposes only - Do not cite or circulate * Macroeconomic drivers - GDP, population, world oil price * Light-duty

  4. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Electricity trade Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Interregional electricity trade Gross domestic sales Firm power .......................................................... 156 157 122 63 28 28 28 -6.2% Economy

  5. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Reference case Table A14. Oil and gas supply Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A14. Oil and gas supply Production and supply Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Crude oil Lower 48 average wellhead price 1 (2013 dollars per barrel) ...................................... 96 97 75 87 101 117 136 1.3% Production (million barrels per day) 2 United States total ............................................... 6.50 7.44

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Reference case Table A19. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end use (million metric tons) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A19. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end use (million metric tons) Sector and end use Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Space heating ........................................................ 228 293 248 236 228 218 207 -1.3% Space cooling

  7. Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. February crude oil prices moved higher than expected pushed by fears of a war in Iraq, low inventories, slow recovery in Venezuelan exports, continued cold weather and sharply higher natural gas prices in the United States. West Texas Intermediate prices averaged close to $36 for the month (Figure 1), a level not seen since October 1990. Oil inventories continued lower through the month resulting in a cumulative reduction in

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 1 February 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  Temperatures east of the Rocky Mountains have been significantly colder this winter (October - January) compared with the same period both last winter and the previous 10- year average, putting upward pressure on consumption and prices of fuels used for space heating. U.S. average heating degree days were 12% higher than last winter (indicating colder weather) and 8% above the previous 10-year average. The Northeast was 11% colder

  9. Preliminary Results for Annual Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Results for Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group AEO2014 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas & Biofuels Analysis September 19, 2013 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview 2 Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, & Biofuels Analysis Working Group Presentation for Discussion Purposes Washington DC, September 19, 2013 DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE

  10. Short-term energy outlook, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Short-term energy outlook, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  12. International energy outlook 1995, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1995 (IEO95) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the international energy market outlook through 2010. The report is an extension of the EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). US projections appearing in the IEO95 are consistent with those published in the AEO95. IEO95 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projects are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 295(c). The IEO95 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1994. IEO95 displays projections according to six basic country groupings. The regionalization has changed since last year`s report. Mexico has been added to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and a more detailed regionalization has been incorporated for the remainder of the world, including the following subgroups: non-OECD Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China is included in non-OECD Asia. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are combined in the EE/FSU subgroup.

  13. Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 October 7, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on November 1 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Originally scheduled for October 8, the conference has been

  14. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - August 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook - Regional Enhancements Starting with this edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA is introducing regional projections (the scope of which will vary by fuel) of energy prices, consumption, and production. The addition of regional data and forecasts will allow us to examine regional fuel demands and prices, regional fuel inventory trends, the interaction between regional electricity demand shifts, and regional

  15. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 October 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook October 12, 2005 Release (Next Update: November 8, 2005) Overview Warnings from previous Outlooks about the potential adverse impacts of an active hurricane season on domestic energy supply and prices are unfortunately being reflected in the challenging realities brought about by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The impact of the hurricanes on oil and natural gas production, oil refining, natural gas processing, and pipeline systems

  16. United States Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentunited-states-annual-energy-outlook-2 Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible...

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Flex-Fuel Vehicle Modeling in the Annual Energy Outlook John Maples Office of Energy Consumption and Energy Analysis March 20, 2013 | Washington, DC Light duty vehicle technology ...

  18. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  19. SEP Special Projects Report: Future Outlook and Appendix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-07-01

    The Sharing Success appendix provides the future outlook for SEP as well as charts and graphs for grants and Special Projects.

  20. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emission intensity index, 20051 Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case History Projections 2013 Carbon dioxide emissions per 2009 dollar GDP Energy use per 2009...

  1. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, October 2003 History Projections Jul-03 Aug-03 Sep-03...

  2. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, November 2003 History Projections Aug-03 Sep-03 Oct-03...

  3. Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Provides instructions for remote Outlook access using HSPD-12 Badge. HSPD-12 Badge Instructions (388.34 KB) More Documents & Publications User Guide for Remote Access to VDI...

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights * The market's perception of reduced risk to Iraqi oil exports and news regarding increasing Libyan oil exports contributed to a drop in the Brent crude oil spot price to an average of $107 per barrel (bbl) in July, $5/bbl lower than the June average. EIA projects Brent crude oil prices to average $107/bbl over the second half of 2014 and $105/bbl in 2015. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices fell from an average of $106/bbl in June to $104/bbl in July, despite record

  5. DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- <ort- ort Tt- .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term Term .-Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  6. U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market ...

  7. DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  8. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ‹ Analysis & Projections AEO2016 Early Release: Summary of Two Cases Release Date: May 17, 2016 | Full Report Release Date: July 7, 2016 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2016) This release is an annotated PowerPoint summary and the data for two cases from the Annual Energy Outlook 2016-the Reference case and the No Clean Power Plan case. The AEO2016 full version, including additional cases and discussion, will be released July 7, 2016. Download the AEO2016 Early Release: An Annotated

  9. International Energy Outlook 2016-Electricity - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration 5. Electricity print version Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world net electricity generation increases 69% by 2040, from 21.6 trillion kilowatthours (kWh) in 2012 to 25.8 trillion kWh in 2020 and 36.5 trillion kWh in 2040. Electricity is the world's fastest-growing form of end-use energy consumption, as it has been for many decades. Power systems have continued to evolve from isolated, small grids to integrated national markets and

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 13.7 15.6 22.2 21.5 21.1 19.8 19.9 0.9% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 3.3 3.6 5.5 5.7 5.7 5.6

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20 Reference case Table A9. Electricity generating capacity (gigawatts) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A9. Electricity generating capacity (gigawatts) Net summer capacity 1 Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Electric power sector 2 Power only 3 Coal 4 .................................................................... 300.2 296.1 255.4 252.8 252.8 252.8 252.9 -0.6% Oil and natural gas steam 4,5

  12. Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans Tancred Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Supply and Demand 3. Ethanol Supply 4. Gasoline Supply 5. Gasoline Prices A. Long-Term Equilibrium Price Analysis B. Short-Term Price Volatility 6. Conclusion 7. Appendix A. Estimating MTBE Consumption by State 8. Appendix B. MTBE Imports and Exports 9. Appendix C. Glossary of Terms 10. End Notes 11. References 1. Summary The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories

  13. Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices fell by about $2.50 per barrel between October and November in response to continued high production levels from OPEC 10 countries (Figure 1). However, by the end of November oil prices had risen to end-October levels as concerns over the situations in Iraq and Venezuela pushed prices up. Oil inventories, which are currently in the lower portion of the previous 5-year range, are poised to

  14. Short Term Energy Outlook, January 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The oil market is vulnerable to a number of forces that could cause substantial price volatility over the coming months. The combination of a sustained loss of most of Venezuela's exports, risk of increased tensions in the Middle East and low oil inventories could cause oil prices to spike at least temporarily above our base case. The average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price, which stood at $27.27 per barrel on December 2,

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights * During the April-through-September summer driving season this year, regular gasoline retail prices are forecast to average $3.57/gallon (gal). The projected monthly national average regular retail gasoline price falls from $3.66/gal in May to $3.46/gal in September. EIA expects regular gasoline retail prices to average $3.45/gal in 2014 and $3.37/gal in 2015, compared with $3.51/gal in 2013. The July 2014 New York Harbor reformulated blendstock for

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015.  After falling to the lowest monthly average of 2013 in November, U.S. regular gasoline retail prices increased slightly to reach an average of $3.28 per gallon (gal) during December. The annual average regular gasoline retail price, which was $3.51/gal in 2013, is expected to fall to $3.46/gal in 2014 and $3.39/gal in 2015.  The North Sea Brent crude oil spot price in December

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. This forecast assumes there are no disruptions to energy markets arising from the recent unrest in Egypt. After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 June 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May. EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * EIA expects the price of regular gasoline will average $3.53 per gallon over the summer driving season

  19. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

  1. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook_v3.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2007 1 June 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2007 Outlook for Hurricane Impacts on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts above-normal hurricane activity in the May 22, 2007 version of its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook. They project 13 to 17 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin, including 7 to 10 hurricanes of which 3 to 5 will be intense. 1 * Above-normal hurricane

  2. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

  3. Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-01

    This report is a companion document to the Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94), (DOE/EIA-0383(94)), released in Jan. 1994. Part I of the Supplement presents the key quantitative assumptions underlying the AEO94 projections, responding to requests by energy analysts for additional information on the forecasts. In Part II, the Supplement provides regional projections and other underlying details of the reference case projections in the AEO94. The AEO94 presents national forecasts of energy production, demand and prices through 2010 for five scenarios, including a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. These forecasts are used by Federal, State, and local governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers in the public and private sectors.

  4. IN-SPIRE: Creating a Visualization from Microsoft Outlook

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31

    IN-SPIRE can harvest text from Microsoft Outlook e-mail messages via a simple drag-and-drop mechanism. This is great for mailing lists or systems that send search results via e-mail.

  5. Oil and natural gas market outlook and drivers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFS | Oil and natural gas market outlook and drivers, May 18, 2016 Global supply has ... WTI price dollars per barrel EIA expects WTI oil prices to remain low compared to recent ...

  6. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    63 and 2.72 per MMBtu during the months through October without the wide variations that occurred over the spring and early summer months (Short-Term Energy Outlook, August 2002)....

  7. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the rest of the winter and perhaps well into spring, with prices averaging 4.90 per MMBtu through March and 4.45 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2003). Wellhead...

  8. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    the rest of the winter and the first part of spring, with prices averaging 5.19 per MMBtu through March and 4.58 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2004). Wellhead...

  9. Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook was undertaken to characterize the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market and to examine recent trends and future prospects in the LNG market.

  10. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    commercial sector demand are offset by lower demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, September 2003 History Projections Jun-03 Jul-03 Aug-03...

  11. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by 1.8 percent as the economy continues to expand and prices ease slightly. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2004 History Projections Oct-03 Nov-03 Dec-03...

  12. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    economy. In 2003, natural gas demand growth is expected across all sectors. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2002 History Projections Apr-02 Ma May-02 Jun-02...

  13. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004 and relatively lower fuel oil prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, April 2004 History Projections Jan-04 Feb-04 Mar-04...

  14. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    should relieve some of the potential upward price pressure on the domestic market Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2003 History Projections Oct-02 Nov-02 Dec-02...

  15. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    because of somewhat weaker prices and higher demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2003 History Projections Apr-03 May-03 Jun-03 Jul-03...

  16. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than those of 2003, when stocks after the winter of 2002-2003 were at record lows. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2003 History Projections Sep-03 Oct-03 Nov-03...

  17. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    power sector eases and relative coal and fuel oil spot prices decline somewhat. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, May 2004 History Projections Feb-04 Mar-04 Apr-04 May-04...

  18. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    demand in the first quarter of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, March 2004 History Projections Dec-03 Jan-04 Feb-04...

  19. Instructions for Using Secure Email via Outlook Web Access |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Outlook Web Access provides access to unencrypted email only and is suitable for use from ... DOEnet or Internet access and a supported web browser Secure Email Login Procedure: Enter ...

  20. Short-Term Outlook for Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Outlook for Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids March 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook for Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee

  1. The Outlook for Renewable Electricity in the United States

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The Outlook for Renewable Electricity in the United States For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 14, 2014 | Washington, DC By Gwen Bredehoeft Assessing the role of policy and other uncertainties Renewables have accounted for an increasing share of capacity additions over the last decade U.S. annual electricity generation capacity additions gigawatts Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2014 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Other renewables Solar Wind Hydropower and other Natural gas and

  2. International Energy Outlook 2016-Buildings sector energy consumption -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    484(2016) I May 2016 International Energy Outlook 2016 ~ Independent Statistics & Ana[ysis e~ ~* a~ 1 U.S. ~~ergy. Information Administration Contacts The International Energy Outlook 2016 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis (john.conti@eia.gov, 202-586-2222); Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team (paul.holtberg@eia.gov, 202-586-1284); Jim Diefenderfer, Director, Office

  3. International Energy Outlook 2016-Executive Summary - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration Executive Summary print version The outlook for energy use worldwide presented in the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) continues to show rising levels of demand over the next three decades, led by strong increases in countries outside of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) [3], particularly in Asia. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, account for more than half of the world's total increase in energy consumption over the 2012 to

  4. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2006

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 1 April 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook April 11, 2006 Release Contents Overview Global Petroleum Markets U.S. Petroleum Markets Motor Gasoline Diesel Fuel Natural Gas Markets Electricity Markets Coal Markets Overview Continued steady world oil demand growth, combined with only modest increases in world spare oil production capacity and the continuing risks of geopolitical instability, are expected to keep crude oil prices high through 2006. The price of West Texas

  5. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with

  6. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2015 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2014 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  9. Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update The original estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level (as reported in the Marginal Energy Prices ...

  10. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the first quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  11. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    April 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook (Figure 1) Gasoline prices in 2005 are projected to remain high, at an expected average of $2.28 per gallon for the April to September summer season, 38 cents above last summer. Similar high motor gasoline prices are expected through 2006. Monthly average prices are projected to peak at about $2.35 per gallon in May. Summer diesel fuel prices are expected to average $2.24 per gallon. As in 2004, the primary

  12. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - July 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    July 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) Retail regular-grade gasoline prices moved up from about $2.12 per gallon at the beginning of June to $2.33 on July 11. Gasoline pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.25 per gallon, 8 cents per gallon higher than last month's projection and about 35 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep quarterly

  13. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - June 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) In May, while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices oscillated from the low $50s range to $47 and back again, retail gasoline prices declined steadily from about $2.24 per gallon at the beginning of the month to $2.10 on May 30. On June 6, average retail prices were $2.12 per gallon. Pump gasoline prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, similar to last

  14. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - May 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Update (Figure 1) A considerable break in the expected strength of near-term crude oil prices has resulted in a lower forecast for retail gasoline prices this spring. Gasoline prices may well have seen their peak for the year, barring sharp disruptions in crude oil supply or refinery operations. Pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, still high by historical standards

  15. Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drazga, B.

    2006-08-15

    The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.

  17. An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Reflecting Provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and Recent Changes in the Economic Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report updates the Reference Case presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 based on recently enacted legislation and the changing macroeconomic environment.

  18. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    for many years as utilities make investments to replace aging or failing equipment. Smart grid technologies also have the potential to reduce peak demand through the...

  19. Biodiesel Outlook- An Engine Manufacturer's Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The engine's fuel systems and the fuels they deliver are increasingly critical to the overall performance as engines change to reduce levels of both regulated and non-regulated emissions.

  20. Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2005-09-01

    The Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis (PDF347 KB) identifies opportunities for developing advanced technologies and estimates both the necessary funding and the potential payoff. This analysis determines what portion of the energy bandwidth can be captured through the adoption of state-of-the-art technology and practices. R&D opportunities for addressing the remainder of the bandwidth are characterized and plotted on a marginal opportunity curve.

  1. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

    2011-02-15

    As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic expansion and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both a short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as a long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study presents a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. Over the past few years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced its China End-Use Energy Model which is based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. In addition, this analysis also evaluated China's long-term domestic energy supply in order to gauge the potential challenge China may face in meeting long-term demand for energy. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not necessarily be the case because saturation in ownership of appliances, construction of residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and

  2. International Energy Outlook 2016-Natural gas - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration 3. Natural gas print version Overview Consumption of natural gas worldwide is projected to increase from 120 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2012 to 203 Tcf in 2040 in the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case. By energy source, natural gas accounts for the largest increase in world primary energy consumption. Abundant natural gas resources and robust production contribute to the strong competitive position of natural gas among other resources. Natural gas

  3. International Energy Outlook 2016-Transportation sector energy consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - Energy Information Administration 8. Transportation sector energy consumption print version Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, transportation sector delivered energy consumption increases at an annual average rate of 1.4%, from 104 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2012 to 155 quadrillion Btu in 2040. Transportation energy demand growth occurs almost entirely in regions outside of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

  4. Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 Tancred Lidderdale and Aileen Bohn (1) Contents * Summary * Introduction * Reformulated Gasoline Demand * Oxygenate Demand * Logistics o Interstate Movements and Storage o Local Distribution o Phase 2 RFG Logistics o Possible Opt-Ins to the RFG Program o State Low Sulfur, Low RVP Gasoline Initiatives o NAAQS o Tier 2 Gasoline * RFG Production Options o Toxic Air Pollutants (TAP) Reduction o Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Reduction o

  5. Microsoft Word - Summer 2004 Motor Gasoline Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    April 2004 Summer 2004 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary * Gasoline markets are tight as the 2004 driving season begins and conditions are likely to remain volatile through the summer. High crude oil costs, strong gasoline demand growth, low gasoline inventories, uncertainty about the availability of gasoline imports, high transportation costs, and changes in gasoline specifications have added to current and expected gasoline costs and pump prices. * For the upcoming summer driving season (April to

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2000--STEO Preface

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    April 2000 Summer 2000 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to exhibit an extraordinarily tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.46 per gallon, 25 percent higher than last summer's average of $1.17 per gallon. That projection also exceeds the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of $1.35 recorded in 1981. Nominal prices are expected to reach a

  7. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly

  8. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, first quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the fourth quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the first quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook.

  10. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, first quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1998 through the fourth quarter of 1999. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the first quarter 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, fourth quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-14

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for printed publication in January, April, July, and October in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates on or about the 6th of each interim month, are available on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the fourth quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. 19 tabs.

  12. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, third quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the second quarter of 1996, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the third quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  13. Short-term energy outlook, Annual supplement 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-25

    This supplement is published once a year as a complement to the Short- Term Energy Outlook, Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts. Chap. 2 analyzes the response of the US petroleum industry to the recent four Federal environmental rules on motor gasoline. Chap. 3 compares the EIA base or mid case energy projections for 1995 and 1996 (as published in the first quarter 1995 Outlook) with recent projections made by four other major forecasting groups. Chap. 4 evaluates the overall accuracy. Chap. 5 presents the methology used in the Short- Term Integrated Forecasting Model for oxygenate supply/demand balances. Chap. 6 reports theoretical and empirical results from a study of non-transportation energy demand by sector. The empirical analysis involves the short-run energy demand in the residential, commercial, industrial, and electrical utility sectors in US.

  14. Heavy Vehicle Technologies Program Retrospective and Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James J. Eberhardt

    1999-04-10

    OHVT Mission is to conduct, in collaboration with our heavy vehicle industry partners and their suppliers, a customer-focused national program to research and develop technologies that will enable trucks and other heavy vehicles to be more energy efficient and able to use alternative fuels while simultaneously reducing emissions.

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Special Analysis + EXPAND ALL Feature Articles The Short-Term Outlook for Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids March 2016 PDF Changes to the Natural Gas Storage Regions December 2015 PDF 2015 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2015 PDF Weather Sensitivity in Natural Gas Markets October 2014 PDF 2014 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2014 PDF Uncertainties in the Short-Term Global Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply Forecast February 2014

  16. DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013 DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013 September 26, 2013 - 11:12am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. This supply and

  17. Building America Research: Part I – Update and Outlook Webinar (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar "Building America Research: Part I – Update and Outlook," presented in August 2016. Watch the video.

  18. Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman Regarding EIA's Updated Annual Energy Outlook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - Earlier today the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration released their Annual Energy Outlook 2008. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman made the following statement...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - BP 2030 Outlook (EIA conference Apr 2011).ppt

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BP Energy Outlook 2030 Washington, DC 26 April 2011 Energy Outlook 2030 2 © BP 2011 Global trends US particulars What can bend the trend? Outline Energy Outlook 2030 3 © BP 2011 Non-OECD economies drive consumption growth Billion toe Billion toe 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 OECD Non-OECD 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Renewables Hydro Nuclear Coal Gas Oil * * Includes biofuels Energy Outlook 2030 4 © BP 2011 Gas and renewables win as fuel shares

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Coal Supply, Demand, and Prices

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    The coal module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of U.S. production, consumption, imports, exports, inventories, and prices.

  1. Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-09-30

    The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

  2. The outlook for US oil dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

    1995-05-11

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  3. Outlook and Challenges for Chinese Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina

    2008-06-20

    China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. The rapid growth of coal demand since 2001 has created deepening strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about supply security. Although China's coal is 'plentiful,' published academic and policy analyses indicate that peak production will likely occur between 2016 and 2029. Given the current economic growth trajectory, domestic production constraints will lead to a coal gap that is not likely to be filled with imports. Urbanization, heavy industry growth, and increasing per-capita consumption are the primary drivers of rising coal usage. In 2006, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement accounted for 71% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units could save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand. If China follows Japan, steel production would peak by 2015; cement is likely to follow a similar trajectory. A fourth wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. New demand from coal-to-liquids and coal-to-chemicals may add 450 million tonnes of coal demand by 2025. Efficient growth among these drivers indicates that China's annual coal demand will reach 4.2 to 4.7 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not been able to reduce China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Few substitution options exist: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth would require over 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas, 48 GW of nuclear, or 86 GW of hydropower capacity. While these alternatives will continue to grow, the scale of development using existing technologies will be insufficient to substitute significant coal demand before 2025. The central role of heavy industry in GDP growth and the difficulty of substituting other fuels suggest that coal consumption is inextricably entwined with

  4. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, second quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates, are available on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The paper discusses outlook assumptions; US energy prices; world oil supply and the oil production cutback agreement of March 1998; international oil demand and supply; world oil stocks, capacity, and net trade; US oil demand and supply; US natural gas demand and supply; US coal demand and supply; US electricity demand and supply; US renewable energy demand; and US energy demand and supply sensitivities. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Outlook optimistic for 1997 E and P industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popov, S.

    1997-01-01

    The ninth annual Arthur Andersen Oil and Gas Industry Outlook Survey of company executives` forecasts for the US exploration and production industry were presented last month at the 17th Annual Energy Symposium. The consulting firm surveyed the chief financial officers of more than 350 US E and P companies, with 92 companies responding, including 8 majors, 9 large and 75 small independents. Overall, top E and P company executives predict 1997 to be a healthy year for the oil and gas industry. The paper discusses demand and supply, oil and gas prices, capital spending, employment, rig counts and availability, problems and opportunities.

  6. International Energy Outlook 2016-Petroleum and other liquid fuels - Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration 2. Petroleum and other liquid fuels print version Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, worldwide consumption of petroleum and other liquid fuels increases from 90 million barrels per day (b/d) in 2012 to 100 million b/d in 2020 and 121 million b/d in 2040. Much of the growth in world liquid fuels consumption is projected for the emerging, non-Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD) economies of Asia,

  7. April 2013 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  During the April-through-September summer driving season this year, regular gasoline retail prices are forecast to average $3.63 per gallon. The projected monthly average regular retail gasoline price falls from $3.69 per gallon in May to $3.57 per gallon in September. EIA expects regular gasoline retail prices to average $3.56 per gallon in 2013 and $3.39 per gallon in 2014, compared with $3.63 per gallon in 2012. The July 2013 New York harbor

  8. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - September 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2005 Hurricane Katrina (Figures 1 and 2) The Gulf of Mexico coast region is a major oil and natural gas supply center for the United States with significant offshore oil and natural gas production, refining capacity, and petrochemical facilities, and serves as a major import hub and nexus for pipeline infrastructure. In the Gulf coast region, Federal offshore crude oil production accounts for 1.5 million barrels per day (29 percent of total U.S.

  9. Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-12

    This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

  10. Annual energy outlook 1994: With projections to 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents projects and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based for the first time on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is the latest in a series of computer-based energy modeling systems used over the past 2 decades by EIA and its predecessor organization, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze and forecast energy consumption and supply in the midterm period (about 20 years). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1994 and 1995 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1994). Forecast tables for 2000, 2005, and 2010 for each of the five scenarios examined in the AEO94 are provided in Appendices A through E. The five scenarios include a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO94 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly described the NEMS and the major AEO94 forecast assumptions. Appendix H summarizes the key results for the five scenarios.

  11. Annual energy outlook 1995, with projections to 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents projections and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1995 and 1996 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1995). Forecast tables for the five cases examined in the AEO95 are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendix A gives historical data and forecasts for selected years from 1992 through 2010 for the reference case. Appendix B presents two additional cases, which assume higher and lower economic growth than the reference case. Appendix C presents two cases that assume higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix D presents a summary of the forecasts in units of oil equivalence. Appendix E presents a summary of household energy expenditures. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO95 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO95 forecast assumptions. Appendix H presents a stand-alone high electricity demand case. Appendix 1 provides a table of energy conversion factors and a table of metric conversion factors. 89 figs., 23 tabs.

  12. Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    J:marginalFinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd DRAFT Marginal Energy Prices Report July 1999 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of ...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Predicting Performance Margins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predicting Performance Margins Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Top Predicting Performance Margins Project Organization PPM Team Members Publications Future Directions News Predicting Performance Margins Predicting Performance Margins Texture density plots EBSD measurements and CP-FEM predictions of tantalum oligocrystal. Texture density plots Strain field A comparison of measured and predicted surface strain fields at 4.3% applied strain. Strain field Grain boundary structure

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    : Electricity Working Group Meeting September 25, 2013 Electricity Analysis Team Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Office of Energy Analysis WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Key Modeling updates from AEO2013 * Revised Reserve Margin and Capacity Market Methodology - Explicit Reserve Margin, Explicit Capacity Payment - Results in 3-5 mill higher electric prices * Operating/Spinning reserve

  15. EPRI conference proceedings: solar and wind power - 1982 status and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.A.

    1983-02-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 18 papers in this proceedings. Not separately abstracted are speeches and presentations covering: past progress and future directions in solar and wind power research and development, new directions in Federal solar electric programs, Solar Energy Research Institute status and outlook, ARCO Solar Industries' involvement in the production of potential solar electric technologies, wind power status and outlook, utility requirements, roles and rewards, and a panel discussion on solar and wind power status and outlook as viewed from industrial, utility, financial, and government perspectives. (LEW)

  16. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2013 Data Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3,405 3,901 4,133 4,041 2000's 8,829 8,050 10,938 10,551 7,292 7,223 15,647 16,102 46,437 43,953 2010's 44,470 44,836 46,069 53,679 64,072 67,144

    Drivers of Future Energy Demand in China Asian Energy Demand Outlook 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 14, 2014 Valerie J. Karplus MIT Sloan School of Management 2 www.china.org.cn www.flickr.com www.wikimedia.org globalchange.mit.edu Global Climate Change Human

  17. Pattern of Failure After Limited Margin Radiotherapy and Temozolomide for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Curran, Walter J.; Crocker, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the pattern of failure after limited margin radiotherapy for glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 62 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated between 2006 and 2008 with standard fractionation to a total dose of 60Gy with concurrent temozolomide (97%) or arsenic trioxide (3%). The initial clinical target volume included postoperative T2 abnormality with a median margin of 0.7cm. The boost clinical target volume included residual T1-enhancing tumor and resection cavity with a median margin of 0.5cm. Planning target volumes added a 0.3- or 0.5-cm margin to clinical target volumes. The total boost planning target volume (PTV{sub boost}) margin was 1cm or less in 92% of patients. The volume of recurrent tumor (new T1 enhancement) was categorized by the percent within the 60-Gy isodose line as central (>95%), infield (81-95%), marginal (20-80%), or distant (<20%). For comparison, an initial planning target volume with a 2-cm margin and PTV{sub boost} with a 2.5-cm margin were created for each patient. Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months, radiographic tumor progression developed in 43 of 62 patients. Imaging was available for analysis in 41: 38 (93%) had central or infield failure, 2 (5%) had marginal failure, and 1 (2%) had distant failure relative to the 60-Gy isodose line. The treated PTV{sub boost} (median, 140cm{sup 3}) was, on average, 70% less than the PTV{sub boost} with a 2.5-cm margin (median, 477cm{sup 3}) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: A PTV{sub boost} margin of 1cm or less did not appear to increase the risk of marginal and/or distant tumor failures compared with other published series. With careful radiation planning and delivery, it appears that treatment margins for glioblastoma can be reduced.

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Petroleum Product Prices Module

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The petroleum products price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. average wholesale and retail price forecasts for motor gasoline, diesel fuel, heating oil, and jet fuel.

  19. Impacts of Unconventional Gas Technology in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to represent unconventional gas technologies and their impacts on projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000).

  20. Workshop to Examine Outlook for State and Federal Policies to Promote Geothermal Energy in the West

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experts from around the country will discuss the outlook for state and federal policies to help expand geothermal energy at an all-day workshop scheduled for Reno, Nevada on October 4.

  1. Measuring Changes in Energy Efficiency for the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used to develop the National Energy Modeling System estimate of projected aggregate energy efficiency and to describe the results of applying it to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) reference case.

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Previous Short-Term Energy Outlook reports are available in the original Adobe Acrobat PDF file with text, charts, and tables, or just the monthly data tables in an Excel file. +...

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Motor Gasoline Consumption Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The motor gasoline consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of total U.S. consumption of motor gasolien based on estimates of vehicle miles traveled and average vehicle fuel economy.

  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids Supply and Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The hydrocarbon gas liquids (ethane, propane, butanes, and natural gasoline) module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of U.S. production, consumption, refinery inputs, net imports, and inventories.

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  7. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 foresees growth of LNG as a fuel for railroads

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14, 2014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 foresees growth of LNG as a fuel for railroads The U.S. Energy Information Administration expects liquefied natural gas, or LNG, to play an increasing role in powering freight locomotives in the coming years. EIA's Reference case, in its recently released Annual Energy Outlook 2014 indicates that growing natural gas production and lower natural gas spot prices compared to crude oil prices could provide significant cost savings for locomotives that use LNG as a

  8. NETL Collaborates with Partners to Produce Global Outlook on Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrates | Department of Energy Collaborates with Partners to Produce Global Outlook on Natural Gas Hydrates NETL Collaborates with Partners to Produce Global Outlook on Natural Gas Hydrates March 17, 2015 - 10:53am Addthis Researchers at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) were part of an international team, including the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP), that contributed to a newly released report explaining the prospect of gas hydrates

  9. Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 10, 2012 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0, 2012 Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 10, 2012 September 12, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the National Association of State Energy Officials are hosting the 2012 - 2013 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 in Washington, DC. This important supply and demand forecast event will

  10. Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2, 2011 Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 September 19, 2011 - 4:55pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the National Association of State Energy Officials invite you to participate in the 2011 - 2012 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference. This important supply and demand forecast event will be held on Wednesday, October 12,

  11. FROZEN HEAT A GLOBAL OUTLOOK ON METHANE GAS HYDRATES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROZEN HEAT A GLOBAL OUTLOOK ON METHANE GAS HYDRATES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Beaudoin, Y. C., Boswell, R., Dallimore, S. R., and Waite, W. (eds), 2014. Frozen Heat: A UNEP Global Outlook on Methane Gas Hydrates. United Nations Environment Programme, GRID-Arendal. © United Nations Environment Programme, 2014 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form for educational or non-profit purposes without special permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgement of the

  12. Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities | Department of Energy Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities This report prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory examines the progress that has been made in U.S. non-automotive fuel cell

  13. Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Gasoline and distillate demand impact of the Energy Independance and Security Act of 2007 deer08_shore.pdf (228.14 KB) More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Power - Committee on Energy and Commerce Drop In Fuels: Where the Road Leads Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 with Projections to 2035

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-04-01

    The projections in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. Under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain unchanged throughout the projections, the AEO2011 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy production, consumption, technology, and market trends and the direction they may take in the future. It also serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in energy policies. But AEO2011 is not limited to the Reference case. It also includes 57 sensitivity cases (see Appendix E, Table E1), which explore important areas of uncertainty for markets, technologies, and policies in the U.S. energy economy. Key results highlighted in AEO2011 include strong growth in shale gas production, growing use of natural gas and renewables in electric power generation, declining reliance on imported liquid fuels, and projected slow growth in energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions even in the absence of new policies designed to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. AEO2011 also includes in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect the energy outlook. They include: impacts of the continuing renewal and updating of Federal and State laws and regulations; discussion of world oil supply and price trends shaped by changes in demand from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development or in supply available from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries; an examination of the potential impacts of proposed revisions to Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for light-duty vehicles and proposed new standards for heavy-duty vehicles; the impact of a series of updates to appliance standard alone or in combination with revised building codes; the potential impact on natural gas and crude oil production of an expanded offshore resource base

  15. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  16. Impact of oxygenates on petroleum refining part 2: Future outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unzelman, G.H.

    1995-07-01

    With the move to a more conservative political outlook in the U.S. in 1995, some have voiced the opinion there may be resistance to the Clean Air Act and specifically to reformulated gasoline (RFG). There has been some evidence that substantiates early resistance to RFG, brought about by price hikes as high as 10 cents/gal at the pump. Pennsylvania, Maine, New York and Wisconsin have elected to {open_quotes}opt out{close_quotes} about 200,000 b/d of RFG. Certainly a move of this nature may slow the {open_quotes}opt in{close_quotes} movement in other areas of the U.S. On the other hand, the basic RFG program for nine critical areas in the U.S. will remain in place, and as air-quality limits are exceeded in other regions, they will be forced into the program. The movement toward cleaner air is worldwide, and the U.S. has been a leader in fuel reformulation for the past 25 years. While the movement may falter for various reasons, and fine tuning of regulations is inevitable, the ultimate result will be a U.S. gasoline pool that is largely reformulated - and the presence of oxygenates is fundamental to reformulation.

  17. Annual energy outlook 1998 with projections to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) is the first AEO with projections to 2020. Key issues for the forecast extension are trends in energy efficiency improvements, the effects of increasing production and productivity improvements on energy prices, and the reduction in nuclear generating capacity. Projections in AEO98 also reflect a greater shift to electricity market restructuring. Restructuring is addressed through several changes that are assumed to occur in the industry, including a shorter capital recovery period for capacity expansion decisions and a revised financial structure that features a higher cost of capital as the result of higher competitive risk. Both assumptions tend to favor less capital-intensive generation technologies, such as natural gas, over coal or baseload renewable technologies. The forecasts include specific restructuring plans in those regions that have announced plans. California, New York, and New England are assumed to begin competitive pricing in 1998. The provisions of the California legislation for stranded cost recovery and price caps are incorporated. In New York and New England, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008.

  18. Annual energy outlook 2005 with projections to 2025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-02-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modelling System (NEMS). The report begins with an 'Overview' summarizing the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, 'Legislation and Regulations', discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues in the USA. Issues in Focus includes discussions on key energy market issues and examines their potential impacts. In particular, it includes a discussion of the world oil price assumptions used in the reference case and four alternative world oil price cases examined in AEO2005. 'Issues in Focus' is followed by 'Market Trends', which provides a summary of energy market trends in the AEO2005 forecast. The analysis in AEO2005 focuses primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and four alternative oil price cases, a low world oil price case, an October oil futures case, and two high world oil price cases. Forecast tables for those cases are provided in Appendixes A through D. The major results for the alterative cases, which explore the impacts of varying key assumption in NEMS (such as rates of technology penetration), are summarized in Appendix E. Appendix F briefly describes NEMS and the alternative cases. 115 figs., 38 tabs., 8 apps.

  19. Annual energy outlook 1999, with projections to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an Overview summarizing the AEO99 reference case. The next section, Legislation and Regulations, describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. Issues in Focus discusses current energy issues--the economic decline in East Asia, growth in demand for natural gas, vehicle emissions standards, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO99 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present a summary of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. The AEO99 projections are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1998. Pending legislation and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the forecasts. Historical data used for the AEOI99 projections were the most current available as of July 31, 1998, when most 1997 data but only partial 1998 data were available.

  20. Annual energy outlook 2009 with projections to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-15

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO009), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an 'early release' version of the AEO009 reference case in December 2008. The report begins with an 'Executive Summary' that highlights key aspects of the projections. It is followed by a 'Legislation and Regulations' section that discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including a summary of recently enacted legislation, such as the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (EIEA2008). The next section, 'Issues in Focus,' contains discussions of selected topics, including: the impacts of limitations on access to oil and natural gas resources on the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS); the implications of uncertainty about capital costs for new electricity generating plants; and the result of extending the Federal renewable production tax credit (PTC). It also discusses the relationship between natural gas and oil prices and the basis of the world oil price and production trends in AEO2009.

  1. Annual energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2015 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). These projections are based on results of EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report begins with a summary of the reference case, followed by a discussion of the legislative assumptions and evolving legislative and regulatory issues. ``Issues in Focus`` discusses emerging energy issues and other topics of particular interest. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO97 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present summaries of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. Twenty-three other cases explore the impacts of varying key assumptions in NEMS--generally, technology penetration, with the major results shown in Appendix F. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO97 assumptions, with a summary table. 114 figs., 22 tabs.

  2. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 with Projections to 2040

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013), prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2040, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System. The report begins with an “Executive summary” that highlights key aspects of the projections. It is followed by a “Legislation and regulations” section that discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues, including a summary of recently enacted legislation and regulations, such as: Updated handling of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for industrial boilers and process heaters; New light-duty vehicle (LDV) greenhouse gas (GHG) and corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards for model years 2017 to 2025; Reinstatement of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) after the court’s announcement of intent to vacate the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR); and Modeling of California’s Assembly Bill 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32), which allows for representation of a cap-and-trade program developed as part of California’s GHG reduction goals for 2020. The “Issues in focus” section contains discussions of selected energy topics, including a discussion of the results in two cases that adopt different assumptions about the future course of existing policies, with one case assuming the elimination of sunset provisions in existing policies and the other case assuming the elimination of the sunset provisions and the extension of a selected group of existing public policies—CAFE standards, appliance standards, and production tax credits. Other discussions include: oil price and production trends in AEO2013; U.S. reliance on imported liquids under a range of cases; competition between coal and natural gas in electric power generation; high and low nuclear scenarios through 2040; and the impact of growth in natural gas

  3. NP2010: An Assessment and Outlook for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, James

    2014-05-22

    This grant provided partial support for the National Research Council’s (NRC) decadal survey of nuclear physics. This is part of NRC’s larger effort to assess and discuss the outlook for different fields in physics and astronomy, Physics 2010, which takes place approximately every ten years. A report has been prepared as a result of the study that is intended to inform those who are interested about the current status of research in this area and to help guide future developments of the field. A pdf version of the report is available for download, for free, at http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13438. Among the principal conclusions reached in the report are that the nuclear physics program in the United States has been especially well managed, principally through a recurring long-range planning process conducted by the community, and that current opportunities developed pursuant to that planning process should be exploited. In the section entitled “Building the Foundation for the Future,” the report notes that attention needs to be paid to certain elements that are essential to the continued vitality of the field. These include ensuring that education and research at universities remain a focus for funding and that a plan be developed to ensure that forefront-computing resources, including exascale capabilities when developed, be made available to nuclear science researchers. The report also notes that nimbleness is essential for the United States to remain competitive in a rapidly expanding international nuclear physics arena and that streamlined and flexible procedures should be developed for initiating and managing smaller-scale nuclear science projects.

  4. Propane Market Outlook Key Market Trends, Opportunities, and Threats Facing the Consumer

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane Market Outlook Key Market Trends, Opportunities, and Threats Facing the Consumer Propane Industry Through 2025 Prepared for the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) by: ICF International, Inc. 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 Tel (703) 218-2758 www.icfi.com Principal Author: Mr. Michael Sloan msloan@icfi.com P R E S E N T E D B Y : Propane Market Outlook at a Glance ¡ ICF projects consumer propane sales to grow by about 800 million gallons (9 percent) between 2014 and

  5. SunShot Grand Challenge Summit: Bright Outlook to Achieve SunShot Goal |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Grand Challenge Summit: Bright Outlook to Achieve SunShot Goal SunShot Grand Challenge Summit: Bright Outlook to Achieve SunShot Goal May 30, 2014 - 2:15pm Addthis Watch the video above to learn more about the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, a national collaborative effort to make solar energy cost-competitive with other forms of electricity. Minh Le Minh Le Deputy Director, Solar Energy Technologies Office Last week, hundreds of solar energy leaders gathered in

  6. U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Biofuels Market | Department of Energy Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market January 29, 2008 - 10:53am Addthis Remarks as Prepared For Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you very much, Bruce, for that kind introduction. My thanks also to Tom Donahue and the leadership of the Chamber for inviting me to be with you today. I was quite pleased to

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook: Changes to the Natural Gas Storage Regions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Short-Term Energy Outlook: Changes to the Natural Gas Storage Regions December 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook: Changes to the Natural Gas Storage Regions 1 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  8. July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for

  9. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

    2009-06-01

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

  10. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Name Assessment of...

  11. ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005 ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005 steelmarginalopportunity.pdf (346.86 KB) More Documents & Publications ...

  12. Growth Rates of Global Energy Systems and Future Outlooks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeoek, Mikael; Li, Junchen; Johansson, Kersti; Snowden, Simon

    2012-03-15

    The world is interconnected and powered by a number of global energy systems using fossil, nuclear, or renewable energy. This study reviews historical time series of energy production and growth for various energy sources. It compiles a theoretical and empirical foundation for understanding the behaviour underlying global energy systems' growth. The most extreme growth rates are found in fossil fuels. The presence of scaling behaviour, i.e. proportionality between growth rate and size, is established. The findings are used to investigate the consistency of several long-range scenarios expecting rapid growth for future energy systems. The validity of such projections is questioned, based on past experience. Finally, it is found that even if new energy systems undergo a rapid 'oil boom'-development-i.e. they mimic the most extreme historical events-their contribution to global energy supply by 2050 will be marginal.

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Petroleum Products Supply Module

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The Petroleum Products Supply Module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model provides forecasts of petroleum refinery inputs (crude oil, unfinished oils, pentanes plus, liquefied petroleum gas, motor gasoline blending components, and aviation gasoline blending components) and refinery outputs (motor gasoline, jet fuel, distillate fuel, residual fuel, liquefied petroleum gas, and other petroleum products).

  14. Biodiesel Supply and Consumption in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The historical biodiesel consumption data published in the Energy Information Administration's Monthly Energy Review March 2009 edition were revised to account for imports and exports. Table 10.4 of the Monthly Energy Review was expanded to display biodiesel imports, exports, stocks, stock change, and consumption. Similar revisions were made in the April 2009 edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO).

  15. Changes in Natural Gas Monthly Consumption Data Collection and the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Beginning with the December 2010 issue of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) will present natural gas consumption forecasts for the residential and commercial sectors that are consistent with recent changes to the Form EIA-857 monthly natural gas survey.

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Other Petroleum Products Consumption Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The other petroleum product consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. consumption forecasts for 6 petroleum product categories: asphalt and road oil, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, refinery still gas, unfinished oils, and other miscvellaneous products

  17. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2007-10-04

    This report provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis ofenergy consumption in China. It recalibrates official Chinese governmentstatistics by reallocating primary energy into categories more commonlyused in international comparisons. It also provides an analysis of trendsin sectoral energy consumption over the past decades. Finally, itassesses the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020,based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity,availability of energy services, and energy intensities. The followingare some highlights of the study's findings: * A reallocation of sectorenergy consumption from the 2000 official Chinese government statisticsfinds that: * Buildings account for 25 percent of primary energy, insteadof 19 percent * Industry accounts for 61 percent of energy instead of 69percent * Industrial energy made a large and unexpected leap between2000-2005, growing by an astonishing 50 percent in the 3 years between2002 and 2005. * Energy consumption in the iron and steel industry was 40percent higher than predicted * Energy consumption in the cement industrywas 54 percent higher than predicted * Overall energy intensity in theindustrial sector grew between 2000 and 2003. This is largely due tointernal shifts towards the most energy-intensive sub-sectors, an effectwhich more than counterbalances the impact of efficiency increases. *Industry accounted for 63 percent of total primary energy consumption in2005 - it is expected to continue to dominate energy consumption through2020, dropping only to 60 percent by that year. * Even assuming thatgrowth rates in 2005-2020 will return to the levels of 2000-2003,industrial energy will grow from 42 EJ in 2005 to 72 EJ in 2020. * Thepercentage of transport energy used to carry passengers (instead offreight) will double from 37 percent to 52 percent between 2000 to 2020,.Much of this increase is due to private car ownership, which willincrease by a factor of 15 from 5.1 million in 2000 to 77

  18. Risk Informed Margins Management as part of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith

    2014-06-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

  19. Anisotropic Margin Expansions in 6 Anatomic Directions for Oropharyngeal Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yock, Adam D. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Beadle, Beth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Lifei [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dong.lei@scrippshealth.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the expansions in 6 anatomic directions that produced optimal margins considering nonrigid setup errors and tissue deformation for patients receiving image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: For 20 patients who had received IGRT to the head and neck, we deformably registered each patient's daily images acquired with a computed tomography (CT)-on-rails system to his or her planning CT. By use of the resulting vector fields, the positions of volume elements within the clinical target volume (CTV) (target voxels) or within a 1-cm shell surrounding the CTV (normal tissue voxels) on the planning CT were identified on each daily CT. We generated a total of 15,625 margins by dilating the CTV by 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm in the posterior, anterior, lateral, medial, inferior, and superior directions. The optimal margins were those that minimized the relative volume of normal tissue voxels positioned within the margin while satisfying 1 of 4 geometric target coverage criteria and 1 of 3 population criteria. Results: Each pair of geometric target coverage and population criteria resulted in a unique, anisotropic, optimal margin. The optimal margin expansions ranged in magnitude from 1 to 5 mm depending on the anatomic direction of the expansion and on the geometric target coverage and population criteria. Typically, the expansions were largest in the medial direction, were smallest in the lateral direction, and increased with the demand of the criteria. The anisotropic margin resulting from the optimal set of expansions always included less normal tissue than did any isotropic margin that satisfied the same pair of criteria. Conclusions: We demonstrated the potential of anisotropic margins to reduce normal tissue exposure without compromising target coverage in IGRT to the head and neck.

  20. Focus on Venezuelan heavy crude: refining margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-25

    Of six crudes refined in the US Gulf Coast, heavy Venezuelan crude Lagunillas (15/sup 0/ API) provides the best margin per barrel. Data for end of December 1983 and the first three weeks of January show that margins on all crudes are on the rise in this market, due to a turnaround in product prices. The lighter crudes are showing the greatest increase in Gross Product Worth. This is having a modest shrinking effect on the margin differential between light and heavy crudes in this market. The domestic crude West Texas Intermediate, at 40/sup 0/ API, provides the highest GPW in this crude slate sample, over US $31 per barrel, compared to GPW of under US $28 per barrel for Lagunillas. Still, as Lagunillas cost about US $8 less than does WTI, refiners with sufficient residue conversion capacity can be earning about US $3.50 more in margin per barrel than they can with WTI. Although few refiners would be using a 15/sup 0/ API crude exclusively for any length of time, heavier oil's inclusion in modern refiners' diets is enhancing their competitive position more than any other single factor. This issue of Energy Detente presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for January 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Uncertainties in the Short-Term Global Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply Forecast

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Weather Sensitivity in Natural Gas Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Weather Sensitivity in Natural Gas Markets October 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Weather Sensitivity in Natural Gas Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: September 7, 2016 | Next Release Date: October 12, 2016 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Petroleum and Other Liquids U.S. Petroleum and Other Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and Carbon Dioxide Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special

  4. Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Early Release: Annotated Summary of Two Cases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Impact of the Clean Power Plan Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Reference/Alternative Cases 2016 EIA Energy Conference July 11, 2016 | Washington, D.C. by Thaddeus J. Huetteman, Senior Electricity Analyst Key conclusions: variety of potential impacts of Clean Power Plan (CPP) in AEO2016- Reference Case vs. Alternatives * How the states implement the Clean Power Plan influences its impact on the power sector * CO2 emission reduction requirements under Clean Power Plan accelerate a shift in generation

  5. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2015: Oil and Gas Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2016: Oil and Gas Working Group AEO2016 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis December 1, 2015| Washington, DC http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/workinggroup/ WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE We welcome feedback on our assumptions and documentation * The AEO Assumptions report http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/assumptions/

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Outlook Release Date: August 9, 2016 | Next Release Date: September 7, 2016 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Petroleum and Other Liquids U.S. Petroleum and Other Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and Carbon Dioxide Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Real Prices Viewer Real

  7. QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1Q) 1991 1 QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION February 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: August 9, 2016 | Next Release Date: September 7, 2016 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Petroleum and Other Liquids U.S. Petroleum and Other Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and Carbon Dioxide Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial production indices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy-weighted industrial production indices December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial production indices i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

  10. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections March 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Early Release: Annotated Summary of Two Cases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Early Release: Annotated Summary of Two Cases May 17, 2016 The Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) Early Release features two cases: the Reference case and a case excluding implementation of the Clean Power Plan (CPP) Reference case: A business-as-usual trend estimate, given known technology and technological and demographic trends. The Reference case assumes CPP compliance through mass-based standards that establish caps on CO2 emissions from fossil-fired generators covered by the CPP. The

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Outlook Release Date: September 7, 2016 | Next Release Date: October 12, 2016 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Petroleum and Other Liquids U.S. Petroleum and Other Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and Carbon Dioxide Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Real Prices Viewer Real

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: September 7, 2016 | Next Release Date: October 12, 2016 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Petroleum and Other Liquids U.S. Petroleum and Other Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and Carbon Dioxide Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special

  14. Short-term energy outlook, October 1998. Quarterly projections, 1998 4. quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from October 1998 through December 1999. Values for third quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the October 1998 version of the Short-term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

  15. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gasoline in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining industry.

  16. Subcooling margin system for cooling fluid in a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, R. M.; Womack, E. A. Jr.

    1984-11-13

    A monitoring system for providing a display of the margin between actual and saturation pressure as well as a display between actual and saturation temperature for the cooling fluid of a nuclear reactor. The system also has an alarm which is set off whenever the pressure margin to saturation pressure reaches a predetermined limit as well as a temperature margin alarm which sets off an alarm whenever the temperature margin to saturation temperature reaches a predetermined limit.

  17. The Outlook for U.S. Oil Dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The US economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the US economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the US economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the US and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  18. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang; Post, Wilfred M; Wang, Dali; Nichols, Dr Jeff A; Bandaru, Vara Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  19. Polarized Neutron in Structural Biology Present and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Crabb, Don [University of Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen has a strong polarization-dependent neutron scattering cross section. This property has been exploited in the study of soft matters, especially biological macromolecules. When a polarized neutron beam is scattered off a polarized hydrogenous sample, the otherwise large hydrogen incoherent cross section is drastically reduced while the coherent signal is significantly increased. Past experiments have demonstrated the potentials and benefits of polarized neutron scattering from soft materials. The main technical challenge of polarized neutron scattering from biological matters lies at sample polarization. Dynamic nuclear polarization is a proven yet rather sophisticated technique. Its complexity is one of the main reasons for the technique's slow adoption. The future of polarized neutron scattering in biology may rest largely in neutron protein crystallography. Polarization of protein crystals is much easier to accomplish, since protein crystals are typically rather small (<<1 mm) and only require small and easy- to-operate polarization apparatuses. In addition, the high resolution nature of neutron protein crystallography means that we will be able to study individual atoms using the polarized neutron scattering technique.

  20. Outlook for cellulase improvement: Screening and selection strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yiheng P; Himmel, Michael; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2006-03-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable natural biological resource, and the production of biobased products and bioenergy from less costly renewable lignocellulosic materials is important for the sustainable development of human beings. A reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. Here, we review quantitative cellulase activity assays using soluble and insoluble substrates, and focus on their advantages and limitations. Because there are no clear relationships between cellulase activities on soluble substrates and those on insoluble substrates, soluble substrates should not be used to screen or select improved cellulases for processing relevant solid substrates, such as plant cell walls. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on soluble substrates have been only moderately successful, and have primarily targeted improvement in thermal tolerance. Heterogeneity of insoluble cellulose, unclear dynamic interactions between insoluble substrate and cellulase components, and the complex competitive and/or synergic relationship among cellulase components limit rational design and/or strategies, depending on activity screening approaches. Herein, we hypothesize that continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates could be a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library displayed on the cell surface.

  1. Hanford and the tri-cities economy: Review and outlook, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; March, S.J.; Beck, D.M.; Schultz, R.W.; Harkreader, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    The economy of the Tri-Cities, Washington area (primarily, Benton and Franklin Counties) is in transition due to major changes in two Department of Energy programs at Hanford---the abrupt ending of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) in December 1987 and the placing of the N Reactor in ''cold standby'' status in February 1988. This report reviews the economic situation in the Tri-Cities during 1988 and presents forecasts for key economic indicators for 1989. This report will be updated about every six months to review the changes in the area economy and forecast the near-term outlook. 6 figs., 33 tabs.

  2. International Energy Outlook 2016-Energy-related CO2 emissions - Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration 9. Energy-related CO2 emissions print version Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, energy consumption is at the center of the climate change debate. In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world energy-related CO2 emissions [331] increase from 32.3 billion metric tons in 2012 to 35.6 billion metric tons in 2020 and to 43.2 billion metric tons in 2040. The

  3. QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    >OE/EIA-0202(92/3Q) 1992 3 QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION August 1992 This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Farragut Bookstore 151 OH Street N.W. Washington, DC 20005 (202)653-2050 FAX (202) 376-5055 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., eastern time,

  4. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  5. Regnar -- Development of a marginal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalund, K.M.; Brodersen, F.P.; Roigaard-Petersen, B.

    1994-12-31

    Regnar is a small marginal field located some 13 km from the main Dan F complex and is the first subsea completion in Danish waters, operated by Maersk Olie og Gas AS. A short lifetime has been predicted for the field which therefore has been developed as a low cost project, using a combination of subsea technology and minimum topside facilities. Regnar consists of a subsea x-mas tree producing through a 6 inch pipeline with a 2 1/2 inch chemical piggyback line to Dan F. The x-mas tree and the subsea choke valve are controlled from a buoy moored nearby the well. The buoy is radio linked to Dan F. The Regnar field was brought on stream on September 26, 1993.

  6. Energy consumption and expenditure projections by population group on the basis of the annual energy outlook 1999 forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, D.A.; Balsley, J.H.

    2000-01-07

    This report presents an analysis of the relative impact of the base-case scenario used in Annual Energy Outlook 1999 on different population groups. Projections of energy consumption and expenditures, as well as energy expenditure as a share of income, from 1996 to 2020 are given. The projected consumption of electricty, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas during this period is also reported for each population group. In addition, this report compares the findings of the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 report with the 1998 report. Changes in certain indicators and information affect energy use forecasts, and these effects are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Price Report - July 1999 Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 Estimated Consumer Marginal Energy Prices for the Commercial and Residental Sectors for use in the Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for four of the High-Priority Appliance Rulemakings marg_eprice_0799.pdf (379.48 KB) More Documents & Publications Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update Standby Rates for Customer-Sited Resources - Issues, Considerations, and the Elements of Model Tariffs, 2009 Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is Real-Time

  8. Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An updated estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual house level using the 1997 RECS survey data margepricerecs97.pdf (18.15 KB) More Documents & ...

  9. Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rim Margins Lithologically Controlled Fractures caused by igneous activity creates permeability, allowing water to circulate deep beneath the surface thus becoming heated in the...

  10. Marginal pricing of transmission services: An analysis of cost recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Arriaga, I.J.; Rubio, F.J.; Puerta, J.F.; Arceluz, J.; Marin, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents an in-depth analysis of network revenues computed with marginal pricing, and in particular it investigates the reasons why marginal prices fail to recover the total incurred network costs in actual power systems. The basic theoretical results are presented and the major causes of the mismatch between network costs and marginal revenues are identified and illustrated with numerical examples, some tutorial and others of realistic size. The regulatory implications of marginal network pricing in the context of competitive electricity markets are analyzed, and suggestions are provided for the meaningful allocation of the costs of the network among its users.

  11. Integrating Safety Assessment Methods using the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-03-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of nuclear power plants (NPPs). As the current light water reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of systems, structures, and components (SSC) degradations or failures that initiate safety significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated primarily based on engineering judgment backed by a set of conservative engineering calculations. The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development (R&D) in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the RISMC Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as margins management strategies. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Macro Bridge Procedure to Update Regional Macroeconomic Forecasts with National Macroeconomic Forecasts

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) uses macroeconomic variables such as income, employment, industrial production and consumer prices at both the national and regional1 levels as explanatory variables in the generation of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). This documentation explains how national macroeconomic forecasts are used to update regional macroeconomic forecasts through the RSTEM Macro Bridge procedure.

  13. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  14. A risk-informed approach to safety margins analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-07-01

    The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway is a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The model has been tested on the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

    2010-09-01

    The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential

  16. Radiotherapy margin design with particular consideration of high curvature CTVs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herschtal, Alan; Kron, Tomas; Fox, Chris [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, St. Andrews Place, E. Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia)

    2009-03-15

    In applying 3D conformal radiation therapy to a tumor clinical target volume (CTV), a margin is added around the CTV to account for any sources of error in the application of treatment which may result in misalignment between the CTV and the dose distribution actually delivered. The volume enclosed within the CTV plus the margin is known as the PTV, or planning target volume. The larger the errors are anticipated to be, the wider the margin will need to be to accommodate those errors. Based on the approach of van Herk et al. [''The probability of correct target dosage: Dose-population histograms for deriving treatment margins in radiotherapy,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol., Phys. 47(4), 1121-1135 (2000)] this paper develops the mathematical theory behind the calculation of the margin width required to ensure that the entire CTV receives sufficiently high dose with sufficiently high probability. The margin recipe developed not only considers the magnitude of the errors but also includes a term to adjust for curved CTV surfaces. In doing so, the accuracy of the margin recipe is enhanced yet remains mathematically concise enough to be readily implemented in the clinical setting. The results are particularly relevant for clinical situations in which the uncertainties in treatment are large relative to the size of the CTV.

  17. Marginal erg facies: A trial approach toward a descriptive classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caputo, M.V. ); Langford, R.P. )

    1991-03-01

    During the late 1970s and early 1980s, sedimentologists began recognizing the margins of eolian sand seas as separate, components which differed from interior sand seas in geometry, extent, and facies. Stratigraphers have now observed these differences in eolian rocks. Erg margins may be grouped in five ways: (1) by associations with extradunal environments-coastal plain, lacustrine, periglacial, marine (tidal flat, coastal sabkha, beach, and lagoon), and arid alluvial (alluvial fan, fluvial, playa, inland sabkha); (2) by allocyclic controls-eustasy, plate tectonism, and climate; (3) by autocyclic controls-local tectonism, topography, vegetation, hydrology, structure, sediment source and supply, and wind regime; (4) by geographic position-upwind, downwind, and along-wind margins; and (5) by sedimentary facies-texture and architecture. In contrast with erg interiors, erg margins are characterized by smaller, less complex dune-forms related to thinner sand accumulation; elementary dune architecture; more vegetation and bioturbation; high occurrence of sand sheet, zibar, and serir facies; expansive, low-relief interdunes with widely distributed dunes; and a greater proportion of interbedded extradunal deposits. Some of the published studies on ancient eolian systems have identified erg margin facies that have been influences by marine and arid alluvial processes. Few reports have described lacustrine-eolian and periglacial-eolian interactions. This study is an attempt to organize known features of modern and ancient erg margins into a scheme based on erg margin controls.

  18. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Wilson Center on the “2015 U.S. Energy Policy Outlook: Opportunities and Challenges”-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, on the “2015 U.S. Energy Policy Outlook: Opportunities and Challenges” at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC on January 7, 2015.

  19. ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The objective of this study is to generate a marginal opportunity curve for the ITP steel subprogram showing the location of the current portfolio compared against all opportunities for steel manufacturing.

  20. Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

  1. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration Case Study | Department of Energy (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A

  2. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification | Department of Energy Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Reference 1 discussed key elements of the process for developing a margins-based "safety case" to support safe and efficient operation for an extended period. The

  3. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  4. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

    2008-05-15

    As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

  5. Iran`s petroleum policy: Current trends and the future outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pezeshki, S.; Fesharaki, F.

    1994-12-01

    The Iranian economy and political situation have undergone radical changes since the 1979 Islamic revolution. The excesses of the early years of the revolution have gradually given way to moderation and a more pragmatic economic policy--based on the principles of the free market. The petroleum policy, as a subset of the economic policies, has been somewhat affected by the political and economic developments in Iran. The petroleum policy has changed from a position of no foreign participation to a position that includes a desire for foreign participation, the text of a model contract, and an attempt to introduce new technologies in the upstream sector. This report provides an overview of the key issues facing the Iranian oil industry and the economic context in which the oil industry is operating in Iran. It describes the evolution of policies meant to move the oil industry toward the free market; it discusses Iran`s oil trading partners, the outlook for refining and project investments, and current and likely future developments in the natural gas and petrochemical sectors. In short, the report provides an up-to-date assessment of the Iranian petroleum sector and its likely evolution in the future.

  6. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  7. Tectonic evolution of Brazilian equatorial continental margin basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azevedo, R.P. )

    1993-02-01

    The structural style and stratigraphic relationships of sedimentary basins along the Brazilian Equatorial Atlantic Continental Margin were used to construct an empirical tectonic model for the development of ancient transform margins. The model is constrained by detailed structural and subsidence analyses of several basins along the margin. The structural framework of the basins was defined at shallow and deep levels by the integration of many geophysical and geological data sets. The Barreirinhas and Para-Maranhao Basins were divided in three tectonic domains: the Tutoia, Caete, and Tromai subbasins. The Caete area is characterized by northwest-southeast striking and northeast-dipping normal faults. A pure shear mechanism of basin formation is suggested for its development. The structure of the Tutoia and Tromai subbasins are more complex and indicative of a major strike-slip component with dextral sense of displacement, during early stages of basin evolution. These two later subbasins were developed on a lithosphere characterized by an abrupt transition (<50 km wide) from an unstretched continent to an oceanic lithosphere. The subsidence history of these basins do not comply with the classical models developed for passive margins or continental rifting. The thermo-mechanical model proposed for the Brazilian equatorial margin includes heterogeneous stretching combined with shearing at the plate margin. The tectonic history comprises: (1) Triassic-Jurassic limited extension associated with the Central Atlantic evolution; (2) Neocomian intraplate deformation consisting of strike-slip reactivation of preexisting shear zones; (3) Aptian-Cenomanian two-phase period of dextral shearing; and (4) Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic sea-floor spreading.

  8. Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2013-01-24

    Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

  9. ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study Energetics, Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Industrial Technologies Program September 2005 1 Table of Contents Introduction.....................................................................................................................- 1 - Ore-Based Steelmaking: Bandwidth and Opportunities................................................- 3 - EAF Steelmaking: Bandwidth and

  10. The Growth of U.S. Natural Gas: An Uncertain Outlook for U.S. and World Supply

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The Growth of U.S. Natural Gas: An Uncertain Outlook for U.S. and World Supply For 2015 EIA Energy Conference June 15, 2015 | Washington, D.C. By John Staub, Team Lead, Exploration and Production Analysis Outline * Changes in U.S. natural gas - Why resource estimates change * Why resource estimates produced with different methods should be different and are valuable * What we need to know about a play to get a fairly accurate estimate - Intersection of geology, technology & above-ground

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the

  12. Magmatic-tectonic evolution of a volcanic rifted margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldholm, O. )

    1990-05-01

    Many North Atlantic margins are underlain by huge volcanic edifices near the continent-ocean boundary. A crustal hole drilled at the outer Voering Plateau during ODP (Ocean Drilling Project) Leg 104 has provided important constraints on the breakup history and the subsequent margin evolution by penetrating more than 900 m of igneous rocks and interbedded sediment below a post-early Eocene cover. The recovered basement rocks constitute two different volcanic series. The Upper Series, comprising a seaward-dipping reflector wedge, consists of transitional mid-oceanic tholeiitic lava flows and thin volcaniclastic sediments. Dacitic flows, some dikes and thicker sediments constitute the Lower Series. The margin evolved by Paleocene crustal extension, uplift and pervasive intrusion in the rift zone. Just prior to breakup, magma from shallow crustal melts produced the Lower Series. The Upper Series was constructed during an intense, rapidly waning subaerial surge following breakup in the earliest Eocene. The Upper Series covers both new oceanic crust and large areas of continental crust. The dipping wedge was formed by subsidence due to loading and thermal contraction probably amplified by a tectonic force. When the surge had abated, the injection center subsided and a normal oceanic crust was formed. A direct temporal and compositional relationship exists between the onshore North Atlantic Volcanic Province and the volcanic margins. Whereas the central transverse part of the province, near the Iceland hotspot has been active for 60 m.y., the volcanic margins reflect a 2,000-km-long transient phenomenon lasting only 3 m.y. The breakup volcanism and lack of initial subsidence are related to a regional, about 50C{degree}, increased temperature at the base of the lithosphere (hot carpet) combined with opening in previously extended crust.

  13. Structural framework, stratigraphy, and evolution of Brazilian marginal basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, H.A.O.

    1982-06-01

    The structural framework of the Brazilian continental margin is basically composed of eight structural types: antithetic tilted step-fault blocks, synthetic untilted step-fault blocks, structural inversion axes, hinges with compensation grabens, homoclinal structures, growth faults with rollovers, diapirs, and igneous structures. The antithetic tilted and synthetic untilted step-fault blocks are considered as synchronous, complementary structural systems, separated by an inversion axis. Two evaporitic cycles (Paripueira and Ibura) were differentiated in the Sergipe-Alagoas type basin and tentatively correlated to the evaporitic section of other Brazilian marginal basis. Four phases are considered in the evolution of the Brazilian marginal basins: pre-rift, rift, transitional, and drift. During the pre-rift phase (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous), continental sediments were deposited in peripheral intracratonic basins. In the rift phase (Early Cretaceous), the breakup of the continental crust of the Gondwana continent gave rise to a central graben and rift valleys where lacustrine sediments were deposited. The transitional phase (Aptian) developed under relative tectonic stability, when evaporitic and clastic lacustrine sequences were being deposited. In the drift phase (Albian to Holocene), a regionl homoclinal structure developed, consisting of two distinct sedimentary sequences, a lower clastic-carbonate and an upper clastic. From the Albian to the Holocene Epoch, structures associated to plastic displacement of salt or shale developed in many Brazilian marginal basins. Two phases of major igneous activity occurred: one in the Early Cretaceous associated with the rift phase of the Gondwana continent, and the other in the Tertiary during the migration phase of the South American and African plates.

  14. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level IIIII Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level IIIII ...

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly over-design portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as safety margin. Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on engineering judgment.

  16. Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

    1997-04-01

    Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep.

  17. U.S., non-U.S. outlays to rise in `98, but oil price plunge clouds spending outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1998-03-23

    Capital spending by oil and gas companies in and outside the US will rise in 1998, but that forecast may be jeopardized by the continuing plunge in oil prices. For operations in the US, oil and gas company capital spending is expected to move up in 1998 for the fourth year in a row. If the money is spent, it will be the highest industry investment level since 1985. Strong oil and gas prices and increased volumes have boosted company cash flow and profits the last few years, fueling increased spending. However, the near-term outlook has now been clouded by economic turmoil in a number of Asian countries and the recent collapse of oil prices. The paper discusses oil and gas prices, US upstream spending, US non-exploration and production spending, capital spending in Canada, and spending outside US and Canada.

  18. Overview of the petroleum potential of active margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, D.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Active convergent margins are of two types. Type A, characterized by Ampherer or Alpino-type subduction, is represented by thick- and thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belts and the dynamically associated foreland basins that are developed in continental settings. Type B, characterized by Benioff-type subduction, is characterized by the trench, accretionary prism, forearc association developed on present-day active continental margins, notably around the Pacific and northeast Indian Ocean. Prolific hydrocarbon reserves are associated with A-type subduction settings, notably the Zagros fold belt and Persian Gulf, the Rockies and the Alberta basin. By contrast, only minor reserves have been proven in B-type subduction settings despite ample evidence of active seepage and large structures. Key contributing factors to the lack of exploration success are a combination of low geothermal gradients, lack of effective reservoir, and imaging of complex traps whose integrity may be impacted by the active deformation. Notable exceptions are Cook Inlet, Alaska, and the Progresso basin, Ecuador, where thick successor basins have been charged with hydrocarbons generated in the underlying accretionary prism.

  19. Depositional patterns of kerogen, Atlantic Margin, North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armentrout, J.M.

    1985-02-01

    Geochemical and biostratigraphic data from offshore wells along the Atlantic margin of North America define a depositional history dominated by coastal-plain and shallow-shelf facies containing degraded and residual continent-derived kerogen. Exceptions to this generalization are 4 depositional facies containing hydrogen-rich amorphous kerogen assemblages. The rocks containing hydrogen-rich amorphous kerogen assemblages are: (1) Upper Jurassic inner-shelf facies probably deposited in algal-rich lagoonlike environments, (2) Lower Cretaceous nonmarine coaly facies, probably deposited in algal-rich swamplike environments, (3) middle Cretaceous abyssal-plain facies probably deposited by turbidity currents that originated on an algal-rich slope, and (4) Miocene outer-shelf to upper-slope facies probably deposited under algal-rich upwelling systems. Correlations of these facies to seismic packages allows for extrapolation of probable organic facies distribution throughout the continental margin. Such modeling of organic facies distributions in conjunction with plate-tectonic and ocean-circulation models permits refinement of strategies for hydrocarbon exploration.

  20. SU-E-J-30: Benchmark Image-Based TCP Calculation for Evaluation of PTV Margins for Lung SBRT Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, M; Chetty, I; Zhong, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor control probability (TCP) calculated with accumulated radiation doses may help design appropriate treatment margins. Image registration errors, however, may compromise the calculated TCP. The purpose of this study is to develop benchmark CT images to quantify registration-induced errors in the accumulated doses and their corresponding TCP. Methods: 4DCT images were registered from end-inhale (EI) to end-exhale (EE) using a demons algorithm. The demons DVFs were corrected by an FEM model to get realistic deformation fields. The FEM DVFs were used to warp the EI images to create the FEM-simulated images. The two images combined with the FEM DVF formed a benchmark model. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images, created from the EI and simulated images, were used to develop IMRT plans. Two plans with 3 and 5 mm margins were developed for each patient. With these plans, radiation doses were recalculated on the simulated images and warped back to the EI images using the FEM DVFs to get the accumulated doses. The Elastix software was used to register the FEM-simulated images to the EI images. TCPs calculated with the Elastix-accumulated doses were compared with those generated by the FEM to get the TCP error of the Elastix registrations. Results: For six lung patients, the mean Elastix registration error ranged from 0.93 to 1.98 mm. Their relative dose errors in PTV were between 0.28% and 6.8% for 3mm margin plans, and between 0.29% and 6.3% for 5mm-margin plans. As the PTV margin reduced from 5 to 3 mm, the mean TCP error of the Elastix-reconstructed doses increased from 2.0% to 2.9%, and the mean NTCP errors decreased from 1.2% to 1.1%. Conclusion: Patient-specific benchmark images can be used to evaluate the impact of registration errors on the computed TCPs, and may help select appropriate PTV margins for lung SBRT patients.

  1. SU-E-T-573: The Robustness of a Combined Margin Recipe for Uncertainties During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroom, J; Vieira, S; Greco, C [Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variability of a safety margin recipe that combines CTV and PTV margins quadratically, with several tumor, treatment, and user related factors. Methods: Margin recipes were calculated by monte-carlo simulations in 5 steps. 1. A spherical tumor with or without isotropic microscopic was irradiated with a 5 field dose plan2. PTV: Geometric uncertainties were introduced using systematic (Sgeo) and random (sgeo) standard deviations. CTV: Microscopic disease distribution was modelled by semi-gaussian (Smicro) with varying number of islets (Ni)3. For a specific uncertainty set (Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)), margins were varied until pre-defined decrease in TCP or dose coverage was fulfilled. 4. First, margin recipes were calculated for each of the three uncertainties separately. CTV and PTV recipes were then combined quadratically to yield a final recipe M(Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)).5. The final M was verified by simultaneous simulations of the uncertainties.Now, M has been calculated for various changing parameters like margin criteria, penumbra steepness, islet radio-sensitivity, dose conformity, and number of fractions. We subsequently investigated A: whether the combined recipe still holds in all these situations, and B: what the margin variation was in all these cases. Results: We found that the accuracy of the combined margin recipes remains on average within 1mm for all situations, confirming the correctness of the quadratic addition. Depending on the specific parameter, margin factors could change such that margins change over 50%. Especially margin recipes based on TCP-criteria are more sensitive to more parameters than those based on purely geometric Dmin-criteria. Interestingly, measures taken to minimize treatment field sizes (by e.g. optimizing dose conformity) are counteracted by the requirement of larger margins to get the same tumor coverage. Conclusion: Margin recipes combining geometric and microscopic uncertainties quadratically are

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE-National-Cleanup-Workshop-Outlook-and-Challenges-John-Hale-III.pptx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 3 Here is what the PBER equation looks like. The only input variables are CFM and pressure - the two variables that engineers start with when they select a fan. It calculates a required minimum efficiency by multiplying three factors: - One, a Target efficiency, determined by a regulatory body - Two, a CFM factor, which reduces the efficiency required by smaller fans, exactly the way that FEG does with the banana shaped curves - and Three - a Pressure factor, which reduces the efficiency

  3. Study to Determine Adequate Margins in Radiotherapy Planning for Esophageal Carcinoma by Detailing Patterns of Recurrence After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Button, Michael R. Morgan, Carys A.; Croydon, Elizabeth S.; Roberts, S. Ashley; Crosby, Thomas D.L.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the adequacy of radiotherapy (RT) margins by studying the relapse patterns after definitive chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study assessing the first site of disease relapse after definitive chemoradiotherapy that included four 3-weekly cycles of cisplatin and continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, with conformal RT (50 Gy in 25 fractions) concurrent with Cycles 3 and 4. The RT planning target volume was the endoscopic ultrasonography/computed tomography-defined gross tumor volume with 1.5-cm lateral and 3-cm superoinferior margins. Results: A total of 145 patients were included. Their average age was 65.4 years, 45% had adenocarcinoma, 61% had lower third esophageal tumors, and 75% had Stage III-IVA disease. After RT, of 142 patients, 85 (60%) had evidence of relapse at a median follow-up of 18 months. The relapse was local (within the RT field) in 55; distant (metastatic) in 13, and a combination of local and distant in 14. The local relapse rates were not influenced by tumor stage, lymph node status, or disease length. Three patients developed a relapse in regions adjacent to the RT fields; however, it is unlikely that larger field margins would have been clinically acceptable or effective in these cases. The median overall survival was 15 months. Conclusion: The gross tumor volume-planning target volume margins in this study appeared adequate. Future efforts to improve outcomes using definitive chemoradiotherapy should be directed toward reducing the high rates of in-field and distant relapses.

  4. RECONSTRUCTING PALEO-SMT POSITIONS ON THE CASCADIA MARGIN USING MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Joel; Phillips, Stephen

    2014-09-30

    Magnetic susceptibility (κ) is a mixed signal in marine sediments, representing primary depositional and secondary diagenetic processes. Production of hydrogen sulfide via anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) and organoclastic sulfate reduction above the SMT can result in the dissolution of iron oxides, altering κ in sediments in methane gas and gas hydrate bearing regions. We investigated records of κ on the Cascadia margin (ODP Sites 1249 and 1252; IODP Site 1325) using a Zr/Rb heavy mineral proxy from XRF core scanning to identify intervals of primary detrital magnetic susceptibility and intervals and predict intervals affected by magnetite dissolutions. We also measured total sulfur content, grain size distributions, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and magnetic mineral assemblage. The upper 100 m of Site 1252 contains a short interval of κ driven by primary magnetite, with multiple intervals (> 90 m total) of decreased κ correlated with elevated sulfur content, consistent with dissolution of magnetite and re-precipitation of pyrite. In the upper 90 m of Site 1249, κ is almost entirely altered by diagenetic processes, with much of the low κ explained by a high degree of pyritization, and some intervals affected by the precipitation of magnetic iron sulfides. At Site 1325, κ between 0-20 and 51-73 mbsf represents primary mineralogy, and in the interval 24-51 mbsf, κ may be reduced due to pyritization. This integrated approach allows for a prediction of primary κ and the amount of κ loss at each site when compared to actual κ measurements. In the case of magnetite dissolution and full pyritization, these drawdowns in κ are supported by sulfur measurements, and the exposure times of magnetite to hydrogen sulfide can be modeled. The presence of methane and methane hydrates at these sites, as well as large variations in TOC content, suggest that the past migration rates of the SMT and variation in sulfate

  5. Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Fragility analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindra, M. K.; Hardy, G. S.; Hashimoto, P. S.; Griffin, M. J.

    1987-03-01

    This Fragility Analysis is the third of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 1 is the Summary Report of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 2, Systems Analysis, documents the results of the systems screening for the review. The three volumes are part of the Seismic Margins Program initiated in 1984 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to quantify seismic margins at nuclear power plants. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

  6. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  7. Chemical, mechanical treatment options reduce hydroprocessor fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groce, B.C.

    1996-01-29

    The processing of opportunity crudes and the need to meet stricter environmental regulations in the production of distillates and finished fuels have increased the benefit of the hydroprocessing unit to the refiner. With this potential for increased margins and more environmentally friendly fuel products comes increased risk of fouling in hydroprocessing units. Increased fouling can reduce unit reliability and increase maintenance and operating costs. The refiner has several options available to help minimize the fouling and maximize the unit`s profitability and flexibility. One of the two commonly selected options is to allocate capital for a mechanical solution to address a specific cause of fouling. The other option is the use of a chemical treatment program. This paper reviews the efficiency and implementation procedures for these two processes.

  8. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  9. Produce through coiled tubing to keep marginal wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The use of coiled tubing as an alternate production tubing string has been attempted or considered by numerous operators in the past. However, its use has been tempered due to several problems known to be inherent with coiled tubing recompletions. Some of the problems encountered are: Killing the well to allow for tubing installation always carries the risk of formation damage; Candidate wells normally are marginal producers and may not produce sufficient revenue to justify the cost of a major workover; Procedures followed to install surface equipment may be hazardous; Previous installation designs required running the coiled tubing to the top of the tree, affecting the functional loss of all existing wellhead equipment; Often substandard modifications were required to reconnect into existing production facilities. However, a prototype spool and tubing hanger that incorporated modifications designed to solve these problems has been developed jointly by Reeled Tubing, Inc., and Well-head Control Systems. The solution is a new concept in the coiled tubing hanger. The design incorporates a floating element, which is a combination slip bowl, seal element and retaining sub. The entire assembly is installed and activated in the bore of a specially designed spool installed between the primary and secondary master valves of the existing wellhead.

  10. Dark halos and elliptical galaxies as marginally stable dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Zant, A. A.

    2013-12-10

    The origin of equilibrium gravitational configurations is sought in terms of the stability of their trajectories, as described by the curvature of their Lagrangian configuration manifold of particle positionsa context in which subtle spurious effects originating from the singularity in the two-body potential become particularly clear. We focus on the case of spherical systems, which support only regular orbits in the collisionless limit, despite the persistence of local exponential instability of N-body trajectories in the anomalous case of discrete point particle representation even as N ? ?. When the singularity in the potential is removed, this apparent contradiction disappears. In the absence of fluctuations, equilibrium configurations generally correspond to positive scalar curvature and thus support stable trajectories. A null scalar curvature is associated with an effective, averaged equation of state describing dynamically relaxed equilibria with marginally stable trajectories. The associated configurations are quite similar to those of observed elliptical galaxies and simulated cosmological halos and are necessarily different from the systems dominated by isothermal cores, expected from entropy maximization in the context of the standard theory of violent relaxation. It is suggested that this is the case because a system starting far from equilibrium does not reach a 'most probable state' via violent relaxation, but that this process comes to an end as the system finds and (settles in) a configuration where it can most efficiently wash out perturbations. We explicitly test this interpretation by means of direct simulations.

  11. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Sanford, Robert A.; Boop, Frederick A.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treated with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently investigating

  12. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  13. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low power factor is expensive and inefficient. Many utility companies charge an additional fee if your power factor is less than 0.95. Low power factor also reduces your electrical system’s distribution capacity by increasing current flow and causing voltage drops. This fact sheet describes power factor and explains how you can improve your power factor to reduce electric bills and enhance your electrical system’s capacity.

  14. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Tom Riley; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

  15. Petroleum possibilities in continental margin off central Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, E.

    1986-07-01

    The continental margin off central Chile, from Valparaiso to Valdivia, encompassing an area of 100,000 km/sup 2/, has been the target of exploratory activity by Empresa Nacional del Petroleo since 1970. Exploratory drilling began in 1972. By August 1984, total exploratory efforts had resulted in drilling 14 offshore wells and acquiring 12,130 km of seismic reflection lines. A biogenic gas accumulation was discovered in the F well. Because these attempts to find oil were unsuccessful and because drilling costs have escalated, exploratory activities have been curtailed. Forearc basins off central Chile are characterized by low geothermal gradient and a sedimentary filling of Cretaceous and Tertiary strata. Tertiary sequences are characterized by low organic carbon content, immature humic-type organic matter, and a biogenic gas potential. Cretaceous sequences are characterized by higher organic carbon content, good reservoir rocks, and fair to good source rocks. The organic matter is sapropelic, with vitrinite and liptinites, and is favorable for oil and gas generation. Seismic and well data suggest that Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rock sequences filling the basins (more than 4000 m thick at the shelf edge) extend 40-70 km beyond the present shelf edge. Mesozoic rocks deposited on the slope may generate petroleum and gas that could migrate upslope and accumulate in traps associated with the faulted basement highs and graben-type depressions existing at the shelf edge. This geologic setting favors the development of large petroleum accumulations along the shelf edge and graben on the sedimentary basins off central Chile.

  16. ORBITAL MIGRATION OF PROTOPLANETS IN A MARGINALLY GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2013-02-20

    Core accretion and disk instability require giant protoplanets to form in the presence of disk gas. Protoplanet migration models generally assume disk masses low enough that the disk's self-gravity can be neglected. However, disk instability requires a disk massive enough to be marginally gravitationally unstable (MGU). Even for core accretion, an FU Orionis outburst may require a brief MGU disk phase. We present a new set of three-dimensional, gravitational radiation hydrodynamics models of MGU disks with multiple protoplanets, which interact gravitationally with the disk and with each other, including disk gas mass accretion. Initial protoplanet masses are 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} for core accretion models, and 0.1 to 3 M {sub Jup} for Nice scenario models, starting on circular orbits with radii of 6, 8, 10, or 12 AU, inside a 0.091 M {sub Sun} disk extending from 4 to 20 AU around a 1 M {sub Sun} protostar. Evolutions are followed for up to {approx}4000 yr and involve phases of relative stability (e {approx} 0.1) interspersed with chaotic phases (e {approx} 0.4) of orbital interchanges. The 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} cores can orbit stably for {approx}1000 yr: monotonic inward or outward orbital migration of the type seen in low mass disks does not occur. A system with giant planet masses similar to our solar system (1.0, 0.33, 0.1, 0.1 M {sub Jup}) was stable for over 1000 yr, and a Jupiter-Saturn-like system was stable for over 3800 yr, implying that our giant planets might well survive an MGU disk phase.

  17. Reducing Configuration Complexity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ams AG 2015 Reducing Configuration Complexity The contribution of chipscale integrated solutions Tom Griffiths Sr. Marketing Manager ams AG November 2015 © ams AG 2015 Agenda Architecture of IoT smart lighting Importance of the sensors The puzzle pieces Focus on adoption (turn... key...) A quick case study Industry's to-do list (an opinion) © ams AG 2015 Page 3 The Opportunity of Smart Lighting "Sufficient" light 24x7 Worker Productivity Decorative Use Utilitarian Lights Following in

  18. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Howard L.

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  19. Stratigraphic analysis of 3-D and 2-D seismic data to delineate porous carbonate debris flow in permian strata along the northwestern margin of the Midlan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacht, J.A.; Brooks, L.; Messa, F.

    1995-12-31

    Carbonate debris flow are very important plays in Leonard strata along the northwestern margin of the Midland Basin. Delineation of these strata, however, is difficult and detailed stratigraphic analysis of both 2D and 3D seismic data is important in reducing risk. Porous debris flows are best developed during lowstand time. When sea-level falls to a point at or below the shelf margin, sand to boulder-sized clasts created by reef-front erosion are funneled through slope gullies onto the base of the slope. Large debris flows exhibit well-defined mounds which downlap onto the sequence boundary. Many of these flows, however, are too thin to exhibit discrete reflections. 3D seismic data are used to define subtle changes in amplitude and frequency which suggest presence of porous strata. Along the northwest shelf, porous debris flows exhibit lower amplitude (dim spots) and lower frequency than surrounding strata. They are commonly developed immediately downdip of major slump scars.

  20. Experimental validation of the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecclestone, Gillian; Heath, Emily; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To validate the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy using realistic dose calculation algorithms and respiratory motion modeling. The robustness of the margin formula against variations in lesion size, peak-to-peak motion amplitude, tissue density, treatment technique, and plan conformity was assessed, along with the margin formula assumption of a homogeneous dose distribution with perfect plan conformity.Methods: 3DCRT and IMRT lung treatment plans were generated within the ORBIT treatment planning platform (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) on 4DCT datasets of virtual phantoms. Random and systematic respiratory motion induced errors were simulated using deformable registration and dose accumulation tools available within ORBIT for simulated cases of varying lesion sizes, peak-to-peak motion amplitudes, tissue densities, and plan conformities. A detailed comparison between the margin formula dose profile model, the planned dose profiles, and penumbra widths was also conducted to test the assumptions of the margin formula. Finally, a correction to account for imperfect plan conformity was tested as well as a novel application of the margin formula that accounts for the patient-specific motion trajectory.Results: The van Herk margin formula ensured full clinical target volume coverage for all 3DCRT and IMRT plans of all conformities with the exception of small lesions in soft tissue. No dosimetric trends with respect to plan technique or lesion size were observed for the systematic and random error simulations. However, accumulated plans showed that plan conformity decreased with increasing tumor motion amplitude. When comparing dose profiles assumed in the margin formula model to the treatment plans, discrepancies in the low dose regions were observed for the random and systematic error simulations. However, the margin formula respected, in all experiments, the 95% dose coverage required for planning target volume (PTV) margin derivation, as

  1. Estimation of Inherent Safety Margins in Loaded Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Casks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Robb, Kevin R.; Radulescu, Georgeta; Scaglione, John M.

    2016-06-15

    We completed a novel assessment to determine the unquantified and uncredited safety margins (i.e., the difference between the licensing basis and as-loaded calculations) available in as-loaded spent nuclear fuel (SNF) casks. This assessment was performed as part of a broader effort to assess issues and uncertainties related to the continued safety of casks during extended storage and transportability following extended storage periods. Detailed analyses crediting the actual as-loaded cask inventory were performed for each of the casks at three decommissioned pressurized water reactor (PWR) sites to determine their characteristics relative to regulatory safety criteria for criticality, thermal, and shielding performance.more » These detailed analyses were performed in an automated fashion by employing a comprehensive and integrated data and analysis tool—Used Nuclear Fuel-Storage, Transportation & Disposal Analysis Resource and Data System (UNF-ST&DARDS). Calculated uncredited criticality margins from 0.07 to almost 0.30 Δkeff were observed; calculated decay heat margins ranged from 4 to almost 22 kW (as of 2014); and significant uncredited transportation dose rate margins were also observed. The results demonstrate that, at least for the casks analyzed here, significant uncredited safety margins are available that could potentially be used to compensate for SNF assembly and canister structural performance related uncertainties associated with long-term storage and subsequent transportation. The results also suggest that these inherent margins associated with how casks are loaded could support future changes in cask licensing to directly or indirectly credit the margins. Work continues to quantify the uncredited safety margins in the SNF casks loaded at other nuclear reactor sites.« less

  2. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  3. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  4. Developing a marginal field using new techniques-South Monagas Unit, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skirvin, T.M.; Sven Hagen, E.; McGee, R.A.; Hinrichs, P.D.; Medina, P.A.

    1996-12-31

    In 1992 the Venezuelan national oil company, PDVSA, awarded operating service agreements to foreign oil companies for reactivation of marginal oil fields. The South Monagas Unit contains three oil and gas fields, Uracoa, Bombal, and Tucupita, that were not producing prior to the award of the contract As of October 1995, production from Uraroa had exceeded 20 MBbls/day of heavy oil from 26 vertical and 11 horizontal wells. Initial uncertainties about heavy oil treatment capability, water and gas production, oil flow rates, and ultimate recoverable reserves led to a phased development plan that has incrementally reduced the risk of financial exposure over time. The first phase of development utilized conventional geologic techniques and vertical wells to test treatment facilities, mud and gravel-pack technologies, and flow rates. Positive results led to the next phase of development which focused on reservoir performance and well optimization. A horizontal well drilling program was implemented in December 1993. A milestone in this program was the first gravel-pack horizontal well in Venezuela, completed in February, 1995. A pilot 2-D seismic program in late 1994 confined that high-quality seismic could be acquired to significantly enhance the development of Uracoa. A 175 W 3-D survey was shot and processed in mid-1995. Concurrently, borehole imaging logs were acquired in vertical wells to determine internal reservoir heterogeneity and sand depositional models. The sequence stratigraphic model that evolved, based on outcrop field analogs, 3-D seismic stratigraphy, and regional well control, is being used to optimize field development. In addition, new exploration concepts are being tested without risk using strategically located water injection wells as test wells.

  5. Developing a marginal field using new techniques-South Monagas Unit, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skirvin, T.M.; Sven Hagen, E.; McGee, R.A.; Hinrichs, P.D. ); Medina, P.A. )

    1996-01-01

    In 1992 the Venezuelan national oil company, PDVSA, awarded operating service agreements to foreign oil companies for reactivation of marginal oil fields. The South Monagas Unit contains three oil and gas fields, Uracoa, Bombal, and Tucupita, that were not producing prior to the award of the contract As of October 1995, production from Uraroa had exceeded 20 MBbls/day of heavy oil from 26 vertical and 11 horizontal wells. Initial uncertainties about heavy oil treatment capability, water and gas production, oil flow rates, and ultimate recoverable reserves led to a phased development plan that has incrementally reduced the risk of financial exposure over time. The first phase of development utilized conventional geologic techniques and vertical wells to test treatment facilities, mud and gravel-pack technologies, and flow rates. Positive results led to the next phase of development which focused on reservoir performance and well optimization. A horizontal well drilling program was implemented in December 1993. A milestone in this program was the first gravel-pack horizontal well in Venezuela, completed in February, 1995. A pilot 2-D seismic program in late 1994 confined that high-quality seismic could be acquired to significantly enhance the development of Uracoa. A 175 W 3-D survey was shot and processed in mid-1995. Concurrently, borehole imaging logs were acquired in vertical wells to determine internal reservoir heterogeneity and sand depositional models. The sequence stratigraphic model that evolved, based on outcrop field analogs, 3-D seismic stratigraphy, and regional well control, is being used to optimize field development. In addition, new exploration concepts are being tested without risk using strategically located water injection wells as test wells.

  6. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Blanchard; R. Youngblood

    2012-04-01

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  7. Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

    2008-04-18

    The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

  8. Interim Data Changes in the Short-term Energy Outlook Data Systems Related to Electric Power Sector and Natural Gas Demand Data Revisions (Released in the STEO December 2002)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Beginning with the December 2002 issue of the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), electricity generation and related fuel consumption totals will be presented on a basis that is consistent with the definitions and aggregates used in the 2001 edition of EIA's Annual Energy Review (AER). Particularly affected by these changes are the demand and balancing item totals for natural

  9. TU-F-17A-07: Real-Time Personalized Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To maximize normal tissue sparing for treatments requiring motion encompassing margins. Motion mitigation techniques including DMLC or couch tracking can freeze tumor motion within the treatment aperture potentially allowing for smaller treatment margins and thus better sparing of normal tissue. To enable for a safe application of this concept in the clinic we propose adapting margins dynamically in real-time during radiotherapy delivery based on personalized tumor localization confidence. To demonstrate technical feasibility we present a phantom study. Methods: We utilize a realistic anthropomorphic dynamic thorax phantom with a lung tumor model embedded close to the spine. The tumor, a 3D-printout of a patient's GTV, is moved 15mm peak-to-peak by diaphragm compression and monitored by continuous EPID imaging in real-time. Two treatment apertures are created for each beam, one representing ITV -based and the other GTV-based margin expansion. A soft tissue localization (STiL) algorithm utilizing the continuous EPID images is employed to freeze tumor motion within the treatment aperture by means of DMLC tracking. Depending on a tracking confidence measure (TCM), the treatment aperture is adjusted between the ITV and the GTV leaf. Results: We successfully demonstrate real-time personalized margin adjustment in a phantom study. We measured a system latency of about 250 ms which we compensated by utilizing a respiratory motion prediction algorithm (ridge regression). With prediction in place we observe tracking accuracies better than 1mm. For TCM=0 (as during startup) an ITV-based treatment aperture is chosen, for TCM=1 a GTV-based aperture and for 0margins during radiotherapy and adapt to tracking confidence in real-time. Normal tissue sparing is maximized. The worst case scenario results in delivering a plan

  10. Sedimentary basins on the connugate margins of South America and Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, G.T. )

    1990-05-01

    An Early Cretaceous spreading system formed the South Atlantic by separating South America from Africa along two subparallel major transform fault systems. The distribution of major sedimentary depocenters is controlled by the complex interplay of two factors: the late Mesozoic-Cenozoic cycle of sea-floor spreading and the legacy of a Precambrian collage of ancient cores that comprised western Gondwana. Three spreading modes created this configuration: rift, transform, and subduction. Each produces a different geometry and tectonic framework for the accumulation of sediment. Rifted margins (60%) contain basins that are elongate, form with their depocenter axes inboard of the ocean-continent transition, and rest on a tectonically complex, foundered basement. Transform margins have abrupt ocean-continent transitions. Such margins (30%) may be sediment starved or contain a thick sedimentary section controlled by the volcanic ridges of transform faults. Off Tierra del Fuego, Burdwood Bank is bounded on the north by a fossil (aseismic) subduction zone. The associated basin is an elongate, deformed accretionary prism of sediments on a gently dipping, faulted oceanic plate. The South Atlantic margins are divisible into 68 basins or segments that collectively contain over 33 {times} 106 km{sup 3} of syn- and postbreakup sediments. The South American margin contains 22 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 3} in 46 basins, and the African margin, 11 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 3} in 22 basins. Over 65% of the basins have a sediment column greater than 5 km with some depocenters that locally exceed 10 km. The source rock quality and character vary along both margins. The top of the oil generation window averages about 3.3 km; however, due to differing thermal histories, individual basins can depart significantly from this average.

  11. Tectonic significance of Synrift sediment packages across the Congo continental margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, J.P.; Karner, G.D.; Driscoll, N.W. ); Brumbaugh, W.D. ); Cameron, N. )

    1993-09-01

    The tectonic and stratigraphic development of the Congo continental margin reflects the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension responsible for its formation. Details of the lithospheric extension process are recorded in the stratigraphic successions preserved along and across the margin. By using the stratal relationships (e.g., onlap, downlap, and truncation) and lithofacies determined from seismic reflection and exploratory well data as input into our basin-modeling strategy, we have developed an integrated approach to determine the relationship between the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension across the margin. Two hinge zones, an eastern and Atlantic hinge formed along the Congo margin in response to discrete extensional events occurring from the Berriasian to the Aptian. The eastern hinge zone demarcates the eastern limit of the broadly distributed Berriasian extension. This extension resulted in the formation of deep anoxic, lacustrine systems. In contrast, the Atlantic hinge, located [approximately]90 km west of the eastern hinge, marks the eastern limit of a second phase of extension, which began in the Hauterivian. Consequent footwall uplift and rotation exposed the earlier synrift and prerift stratigraphy to at least wave base causing varying amounts of erosional truncation across the Atlantic hinge zone along much of the Gabon, Congo, and Angola margins. The absence of the Melania Formation across the Congo margin implies that uplift of the Atlantic hinge was relatively minor compared to that across the Angola and Gabon margins. In addition, material eroded from the adjacent and topographically higher hinge zones may in part account for the thick wedge of sediment deposited seaward of the Congo Atlantic hinge. A third phase of extension reactivated both the eastern and Atlantic hinge zones and was responsible for creating the accommodation space for Marnes Noires source rock deposition.

  12. Growth rates of upper Permian carbonate platform, Capitan margin of northern Delaware basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, P.M.; Grover, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Subsurface and outcrop studies of the Capitan margin (late Guadalupian, Capitanian) in the northern Delaware basin have revealed that over 80% of the total progradation of the margin, over half the total aggradation of the platform (150 of 290 m), and over two-thirds of the basin fill (190 of 280 m) occurred during an early phase of development equating with Seven Rivers beds on the platform. The amount of progradation varied from 6 km from outcrop data in the Guadalupe Mountains to 19 km along trend to the east from subsurface information. The later phase of Capitan margin development was coincident with Yates and Tansill deposition on the platform and was dominated by aggradation and steepening of the margin. Corresponding to this two-phase model, two third-order cycles of relative sea level occur within the Capitanian on the eustasy curve of Ross and Ross: a Seven Rivers cycle lasting 1.5 m.y. and a Yates-Tansill cycle of 1.0 m.y. Progradation rates for the Capitan range from 2.6 to 8.3 m/1000 years. Similar rates are calculated from high-resolution seismic lines across the Cenozoic margin of northwestern great Bahama Bank. Accumulation rates for the Capitan, uncorrected for compaction, average 125 ..mu..m/year and 335 ..mu..m/year for the early phase shelf and shelf margin, respectively, and 160 ..mu..m/year and 430..mu..m/year for the later phase shelf and shelf margin. These accumulation rates are similar to those of other ancient, prograding platforms.

  13. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  14. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    price per barrel (real 2010 dollars) Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Thomson Reuters 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 1970 1974 1978 1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002...

  15. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    all administrative staff 2) 4 DARE OfficersSRO's 3) 3 Assistant Sheriff's 4) 1 person specifically assigned to training, however an accurate count is hard to determine as...

  16. Wind power outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2006-04-15

    This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

  17. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - PEH-1 Cc: 'asha@mckinstry.com'; Doug Francis (dfrancis@tecmechanical.com); England, Perry; Janet Stephenson; John Morris; Jordan Lerner; Marcus Wilcox; Phil Welker; Roger...

  18. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This includes LLW, MLLW, TRU waste, haz waste, etc. But there are also other fish to fry, such as the West Valley job, and the definition of No Action seems to be still...

  19. China's energy outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, D.

    1991-03-01

    Economic reform in China has given a major boost to the development of China's energy industries. Demand for energy has risen steadily in response to the rapid expansion of the economy over the past ten years, while economic liberalization and deregulation have stimulated energy output as the energy industries found new sources of capital, labor, and investment opportunities. In the first half of 1980s, the coal, oil, and electric power industries all experienced accelerating rates of growth. After mid-decade, however, an overheating economy, rising inflation, and lower international oil prices had a serious impact on the vitality of the energy industries. At a time when energy demand was soaring, the state-owned energy industries faced a decline in the real value of their output, excessive debt, falling productivity, and sharply higher costs of production. These trends have continued into 1990 despite the economic slowdown engineered in late 1988 and, if left unmanaged, will constrain the ability of the domestic energy industries to meet the energy needs of China's modernization program. This in turn could lead to progressively higher imports of energy, particularly oil, and could limit the speed and scope of economic expansion in the 1990s and beyond. 2 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. 2013 Propane Market Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domestic propane prices will not fully delink from oil prices, and competition against electricity and natural gas in traditional propane markets will remain very challenging....

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels Analysis Administrator Briefing October 2nd, 2012 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AEO2013P uses ref2013.d100312b AEO2012 uses ref2012.d020112c Changes for AEO2013 Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis Working Group Natural Gas Presentation for Discussion Purposes Washington, DC, October 4, 2012 DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE as results are subject to

  2. Winter Weather Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With the chill of colder temperatures in the air, we can rest assured that the icy grips ... ANLERNL-00-11 2 Regionally, the Northeast will have a greater chance for snow, and ...

  3. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 28, 2012 Open House Attendees Gain Insight on NNSS Low-Level Waste Disposal Dozens of community members recently gathered in Pahrump to learn more about the low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste disposal program at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). On June 19, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NSO) hosted a Waste Management Open House to provide information on the NSO waste management program as well as talk

  4. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 28, 2013 On Your Mark, Get Set....TORTOISE! The sun is out and the weather is warm. The plants are blooming and the birds are chirping - Spring has sprung at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)! And that can only mean one thing... It's time for the Great Tortoise Derby! Fresh from their winter siestas, Scurry and his desert tortoise friends at the NNSS have been spotted basking outside of their winter burrows. It's been a long winter and everyone is anxious to see what the tortoises

  5. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 22, 2012 Scurry Makes it to the Finish Line! It's official! Our fast running tortoise has a name...Scurry. From the more than 100 suggested names, Scurry is the winner with 30 votes posted on Facebook. Second place goes to Rock Steady with 20 votes, and the bronze goes to Taco with 11. Now it's up to winner, Patricia Guy Cooper, to scurry and claim her prize, which is a gift basket provided by the Nevada Site Office. Nice work Patricia! The name Scurry certainly fits this young yet

  6. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 24, 2014 Surface Cleanup Concludes at Tonopah Test Range Following several months of intensive field work, environmental cleanup crews have wrapped up a campaign to address contaminated equipment and debris at two historical nuclear testing locations on the Tonopah Test Range in Nevada. Field crews worked throughout the summer at Tonopah's Clean Slates II and III sites, removing contaminated drums, shipping containers, debris piles, and machinery, before packaging the waste for

  7. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the transportation accident impacts for shipping JASPER TRU waste to INL, we need to know the isotopic composition of the waste (isotope name and number of curies for each). ...

  8. Annual Energy Outlook 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels Analysis Administrator Briefing ... AEO2013 Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis Working Group Natural Gas ...

  9. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 0 40 80 120 160 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 World crude oil price projection is lower in the AEO2015 Reference case than in AEO2014, particularly...

  10. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    And enjoy the holidays. G.W. Roles| SAIC Nuclear Engineer | ILPSG phone: 301-353-8354 | ... G.W. Roles| SAIC Nuclear Engineer | ILPSG phone: 301-353-8354 | fax 301-428-3713 3 mobile: ...

  11. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration (EIA) James Zeni, Chief of Economic Analysis & Statistical Information Rafael Alexandri Rionda, General Director for Planning and Energy Information Shirley Neff,...

  12. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Monday, July 04, 2011 11:06 AM To: Deborah Shinkle Subject: FW: REQUEST FOR INFO ON WASTE VOLUMES Importance: High Debbie - here is a reference for Chapter 6, "Denton 2011"....

  13. International Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    September 9, 2014" "Figure 1. North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices in three cases, 1990-2040 (2012 dollars per barrel)" 1990,,,37.26967935 1991,,,30.36263812 1992,,,28.59310566 ...

  14. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data and analysis to help stakeholders understand the rapidly changing energy landscape across all fuels and all sectors EIA information is used by a range of stakeholders...

  15. US energy outlook: 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines new perceptions of the US energy picture through the year 2000. US energy consumption has been relatively stable since the 1973 oil embargo in terms of demand by both fuel type and sector. Total consumption has temporarily flattened out in the 75 to 80 quads range, because of high price elasticity of demand operating during a period of rapidly escalating real costs for most energy commodities, compounded by structural changes in the US economy. Only coal use shows a consistent upward trend among major primary energy sources. The share of primary energy consumption used for electric power generation shows the only clear upward trend in the sectoral demands. The consensus opinion is that primary energy consumption in the US by the year 2000 will be in the range of 90 to 100 quads. Estimates of fossil fuel supplies to meet this level of demand are presented.

  16. World Energy Outlook 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 To Cover... To Cover To Cover ... ... Transport Energy and CO 2 Where are we going? What are the dangers? How do we change direction? Primarily reporting on: IEA WEO 2008 IEA ETP 2008 On-going work with IEA's Mobility Model One or two detours to talk about modelling © OECD/IEA - 2008 0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 14 000 16 000 18 000 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Mtoe Other renewables Hydro Nuclear

  17. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household heating bills expected to be lower this winter U.S. consumers are expected to pay less this winter on their home heating bills because of lower oil and natural gas prices and projected milder temperatures than last winter. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said households that rely on heating oil which are mainly located in the Northeast will pay the lowest heating expenditures in 9 years down 25% from last winter as consumers are expected to save about

  18. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    P. E.; Ryan Serote; Leslie James; Bill Drummond; Anita J. Decker; Scott Corwin; George M. Caan; Daniel T. Payton; David A. Fitzgerald; David P. Slick; Bob Johnson; Jayne ...

  19. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  20. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Appendix F Table F10. Total Non-OECD delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 5.1 5.4 5.2 5.1 5.1 5.0 4.9 -0.2 Natural gas 7.9 8.9 10.4 12.3 14.3 16.2 17.9 2.8 Coal 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 -0.1 Electricity 7.0 9.0 11.4 14.0 16.9 20.0 23.3 4.1 Total 23.9 27.0 30.8 35.1 40.0 45.0 49.8 2.5 Commercial Liquids 1.9 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 1.8

  1. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Appendix F Table F12. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.1 Natural gas 1.7 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.4 1.2 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.4 Electricity 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 2.4 Total 2.4 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.6 1.3 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

  2. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Appendix F Table F14. Delivered energy consumption in India by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.9 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 -0.1 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 2.4 Electricity 0.6 1.0 1.3 1.8 2.4 3.0 3.8 6.4 Total 1.7 2.2 2.6 3.0 3.6 4.2 5.0 3.7 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.0

  3. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Appendix F Table F16. Delivered energy consumption in the Middle East by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.7 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.0 Natural gas 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.2 2.2 2.1 1.1 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.9 2.0 1.8 Total 3.4 3.9 4.2 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.8 1.2 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.2 Natural

  4. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix F Table F18. Delivered energy consumption in Brazil by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.1 Total 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.4 2.2 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.0

  5. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Appendix F Table F2. Total OECD delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 4.3 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.5 3.4 -0.8 Natural gas 12.0 11.9 12.2 12.5 12.8 12.9 12.9 0.3 Coal 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 -1.4 Electricity 10.6 11.1 11.7 12.5 13.2 13.9 14.6 1.1 Total 28.2 28.1 29.0 29.9 30.8 31.3 32.0 0.4 Commercial Liquids 2.6 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.2

  6. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    28 Appendix F Table F4. Delivered energy consumption in Canada by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.4 Natural gas 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.5 Electricity 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.4 Total 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 0.8 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.3 Natural gas

  7. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Appendix F Table F6. Delivered energy consumption in OECD Europe by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 2.1 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.6 -0.8 Natural gas 5.6 5.6 5.9 6.3 6.5 6.6 6.8 0.7 Coal 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.5 -1.3 Electricity 3.3 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 1.4 Total 11.7 11.9 12.5 13.1 13.5 13.7 13.9 0.6 Commercial Liquids 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 -1.0

  8. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix F Table F8. Delivered energy consumption in South Korea by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.9 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 2.3 Total 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.2 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.6 Natural gas

  9. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Appendix D Table D2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 45.0 44.8 44.1 43.6 43.8 45.0 -0.1 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 31.9 34.0 36.2 38.4 40.7 43.0 1.2 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.3 20.2 21.1 21.7 22.2 22.6 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 11.1 12.4 0.9 Other 11.9 11.9 13.6 15.0 15.9 17.0 18.9

  10. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix D Table D3. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (billion 2005 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 15,498 15,929 17,914 20,777 23,647 26,726 30,368 34,751 2.6 United States a 12,758 13,063 14,519 16,803 19,017 21,301 23,998 27,270 2.5 Canada 1,165 1,202 1,351 1,524 1,701 1,897 2,148 2,445 2.4 Mexico/Chile 1,575

  11. Oil and gas outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 non-OECD consumption growth non-OECD GDP growth* Prices and economic growth are important, but policy, preferences, and technology may have a bigger...

  12. Winter Weather Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. Use of a human face as the modeled target. 3. Incorporation of modern heat transfer theory to model heat loss from the body and its surroundings on cold, windy days. 4. A...

  13. EIA Winter Fuels Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7, 2014 2 EIA actions to improve winter fuels information * More Detailed Weekly Propane Stock Data - In addition to weekly PADD- level propane stocks, EIA will publish...

  14. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 1, 2015 | Palo Alto, CA by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Improvements in energy intensity largely offset impact of growth in GDP leading to slow growth in energy...

  15. Question 3: Industry outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigg, J.A.; Crespo, J.R.; Croom, J.H.; Davis, E.B. Jr.; Green, R.C. Jr.; Hale, R.W.; Howard, J.J.; McCormick, W.T. Jr.; Page, T.A.; Ryan, W.F.; Schrader, T.F.; Schuchart, J.A.; Smith, J.F.; Stys, R.D.

    1990-10-25

    This article is a collection of responses from natural gas distribution company representatives to questions on what they believe is the most important problem facing local distribution companies today and how are they positioning their companies to respond to the problem. Topics include remaining competitive in a changing market and business environment, proper pricing of services, procurement and marketing of natural gas, avoiding gas shortages from deliverability problems, coordination with state regulators on relevant issues such as cost recovery and rate structures, diversification of natural gas sources, regulation, service to customers, bypassing of local utilities, unbundling of rates and services at the pipeline level, and nonutility electric generators.

  16. EMSL Outlook Review 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2005-04-01

    The William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is a national user facility that contains state-of-the-art instrumentation and expert resources available for use by researchers from academia, industry, and the national laboratory system. The facility is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Biological and Environmental Research Program, but the research conducted within the facility benefits many funding agencies, including other branches of DOE, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Defense. EMSL requires the continued funding and support of its stakeholders and clients to continue to grow its mission, build its reputation as a sought-after national user facility with cutting-edge capabilities, and attract high-profile users who will work to solve the most critical scientific challenges that affect DOE and the nation. In this vein, this document has been compiled to provide these stakeholders and clients with a review document that provides an abundance of information on EMSL’s history, current research activities, and proposed future direction.

  17. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 6:31 PM To: Cobb,Carrie L (BPA) - PEH-1; Lewis,Margaret L (BPA) - PEJB-1 Cc: Bicker, Stephen; Stafford, Jeff Subject: Comments on...

  18. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    still like to comment on the removal of nuclear waste from the San Onofre Nuclear Station. ... I am in support of using the nuclear waste facility at Yucca Mountain. The federal ...

  19. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico Brazil Kazakhstan...

  20. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2015 Most significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico...

  1. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  2. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Patrick Morris, Division Manager Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities National Security Technologies (NSTec), LLC Ph: (702) 295-5397 Cell: (702) 630-0500 From: Michael ...

  3. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    WIPP Approved Yes Overpack No Internal Volume (m3) 1.89 Payload Volume (m3) 1.89 Steel Density (kgm3) 153.5 Plastic Density (kgm3) 1.2 Lead Density (kgm3) 0 Cellulosics Density...

  4. Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... GDP Gross domestic product. Btu British thermal unit. - - Not applicable. Sources: 2012 and 2013: IHS Economics, Industry and Employment models, November 2014. Projections: ...

  5. Optimization of leaf margins for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a flattening filter-free beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakai, Nobuhide; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to determine the optimal collimator leaf margins which minimize normal tissue dose while achieving high conformity and to evaluate differences between the use of a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and a flattening-filtered (FF) beam. Methods: Sixteen lung cancer patients scheduled for stereotactic body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to the planning target volume (PTV) with a range of leaf margins (?3 to 3 mm). Forty grays per four fractions were prescribed as a PTV D95. For PTV, the heterogeneity index (HI), conformity index, modified gradient index (GI), defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by target volume, maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) were calculated. Mean lung dose (MLD), V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for the lung (defined as the volumes of lung receiving at least 20 and 5 Gy), mean heart dose, and Dmax to the spinal cord were measured as doses to organs at risk (OARs). Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: HI was inversely related to changes in leaf margin. Conformity index and modified GI initially decreased as leaf margin width increased. After reaching a minimum, the two values then increased as leaf margin increased (V shape). The optimal leaf margins for conformity index and modified GI were ?1.1 0.3 mm (mean 1 SD) and ?0.2 0.9 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?1.0 0.4 and ?0.3 0.9 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. Dmax and Dmean for 7 MV FFF were higher than those for 6 MV FF by 3.6% and 1.7%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the ratios of HI, Dmax, and Dmean for 7 MV FFF to those for 6 MV FF and PTV size (R = 0.767, 0.809, and 0.643, respectively). The differences in MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung between FFF and FF beams were negligible. The optimal leaf margins for MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung were ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.1 1.2 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0

  6. Tectonic denudation of upper mantle along passive margins: a model based on drilling (ODP Leg 103) and diving (Galinaute cruise) results, western Galicia Margin, Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boillot, G.; Winterer, E.L.; Recq, M.; Girardeau, J.; Kornprobst, J.; Loreau, J.P.; Malod, J.; Mougenot, D.

    1987-05-01

    During ODP Leg 103 (April-June 1985) and the Galinaute cruise (June-July 1986), serpentinized peridotite (clinopyroxene-spinel harzburgite) was recovered within the basement approximately at the boundary between the North Atlantic ocean crust to the west and the thinned continental crust of the Galicia passive margin (Spain) to the east. The exposure of mantle-derived peridotite on the sea floor occurred at the end of the period of rifting, roughly 110 Ma. Ductile shear zones observed in the peridotite are consistent with movements along a deep, low-angle normal fault rooted within the upper mantle and dipping eastward beneath the Galicia margin. To explain the tectonic denudation of the mantle at the ocean-continent boundary, they use a nonuniform stretching model for the lithosphere, set up from Wernicke's model.

  7. Evaluation of the marginal outage costs in interconnected and composite power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghajar, R.; Billinton, R.

    1995-05-01

    The structure of electric utilities is undergoing dramatic changes as new and expanded service options are added. The concepts of unbundling the electric service and offering customers a range of new services that more closely track actual costs are expanding the options open to customers. Spot pricing provides the economic structure for many of these new service options. An important component of spot prices is the marginal outage cost incurred by customers due to an incremental change in load. This paper presents a formalized approach of calculating the marginal outage cost in interconnected generating systems and composite generation and transmission systems using quantitative reliability techniques. The effects of selected pertinent factors on the marginal outage cost in composite systems are also presented. The proposed methods are illustrated by application to the IEEE-Reliability Test System (IEEE-RTS).

  8. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  9. Geologic evolution of the Late Permian Capitan shelf margin, northern Delaware basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, G.A. )

    1991-03-01

    A two-phase model, based on outcrop and subsurface data rimming the northern half of the Delaware basin, characterizes the evolution of the late Guadalupian Capitan shelf margin, a margin that prograded up to 19 km basinward while an interval of over 700 m accumulated. Phase 1, during Seven Rivers shelf (early Capitan) deposition, accounts for 70-80% of the total progradation, over 50% of the total aggradation, and corresponds with shelf facies devoid of siliciclastics, emplacement of abundant carbonate debris on the slope and basin margin, and deposition of 50-70% of the Bell Canyon siliciclastic interval in the basin. The clastics bypassed the growing Capitan margin and were equally important to that of the allochthonous carbonate debris in filling accommodation space to facilitate progradation of the margin. The second phase, during Yates-Tansill (middle-upper Capitan) time, was dominated by aggradation, steepening of the shelf margin, deepening of the basin, and deposition of abundant siliciclastics on the shelf. This model differs from previous reconstructions that show uniform growth of the Capitan reef, and it contradicts the long-standing dogma of reciprocal sedimentation. This two-phase growth model adds insight into deposition of the two principle Guadalupian reservoir facies that account for nearly 50% of the Permian basin in-place oil reserves. Offlapping sheets of inner shelf carbonates (e.g., San Andres Formation, McElroy field) relate to periods of shelf progradation whereas widespread sheets of shelf clastics (e.g., Yates Formation, N. Ward Estes field) reflect periods of shelf aggradation. The model should be useful in evaluating the evolution of other shelves, particularly mixed shelves.

  10. Quantification of the Variability of Diaphragm Motion and Implications for Treatment Margin Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rit, Simon; Herk, Marcel van; Zijp, Lambert [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the variability of diaphragm motion during free-breathing radiotherapy of lung patients and its effect on treatment margins to account for geometric uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three lung cancer patients were analyzed. Each patient had 5-19 cone-beam scans acquired during different treatment fractions. The craniocaudal position of the diaphragm dome on the same side as the tumor was tracked over 2 min in the projection images, because it is both easily visible and a suitable surrogate to study the variability of the tumor motion and its impact on treatment margins. Intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability of the respiratory cycles were quantified separately, as were the probability density functions (PDFs) of the diaphragm position over each cycle, each acquisition, and each patient. Asymmetric margins were simulated using each patient PDF and compared to symmetric margins computed from a margin recipe. Results: The peak-to-peak amplitude variability (1 SD) was 3.3 mm, 2.4 mm, and 6.1 mm for the intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability, respectively. The average PDF of each cycle was similar to the sin{sup 4} function but the PDF of each acquisition was closer to a skew-normal distribution because of the motion variability. Despite large interfraction baseline variability, the PDF of each patient was generally asymmetric with a longer end-inhale tail because the end-exhale position was more stable than the end-inhale position. The asymmetry of the PDF required asymmetric margins around the time-averaged position to account for the position uncertainty but the average difference was 1.0 mm (range, 0.0-4.4 mm) for a sharp penumbra and an idealized online setup correction protocol. Conclusion: The respiratory motion is more irregular during the fractions than between the fractions. The PDF of the respiratory motion is asymmetrically distributed. Both the intra

  11. Impact of Millimeter-Level Margins on Peripheral Normal Brain Sparing for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Larson, David A.; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Fogh, Shannon; Barani, Igor; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate how millimeter-level margins beyond the gross tumor volume (GTV) impact peripheral normal brain tissue sparing for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A mathematical formula was derived to predict the peripheral isodose volume, such as the 12-Gy isodose volume, with increasing margins by millimeters. The empirical parameters of the formula were derived from a cohort of brain tumor and surgical tumor resection cavity cases (n=15) treated with the Gamma Knife Perfexion. This was done by first adding margins from 0.5 to 3.0 mm to each individual target and then creating for each expanded target a series of treatment plans of nearly identical quality as the original plan. Finally, the formula was integrated with a published logistic regression model to estimate the treatment-induced complication rate for stereotactic radiosurgery when millimeter-level margins are added. Results: Confirmatory correlation between the nominal target radius (ie, R{sub T}) and commonly used maximum target size was found for the studied cases, except for a few outliers. The peripheral isodose volume such as the 12-Gy volume was found to increase exponentially with increasing Δ/R{sub T}, where Δ is the margin size. Such a curve fitted the data (logarithmic regression, R{sup 2} >0.99), and the 12-Gy isodose volume was shown to increase steeply with a 0.5- to 3.0-mm margin applied to a target. For example, a 2-mm margin on average resulted in an increase of 55% ± 16% in the 12-Gy volume; this corresponded to an increase in the symptomatic necrosis rate of 6% to 25%, depending on the Δ/R{sub T} values for the target. Conclusions: Millimeter-level margins beyond the GTV significantly impact peripheral normal brain sparing and should be applied with caution. Our model provides a rapid estimate of such an effect, particularly for large and/or irregularly shaped targets.

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  13. Geologic hazards on the Atlantic continental margin of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although 46 exploratory holes have failed to reveal commercial hydrocarbon accumulations on the US Atlantic margin, about twice that number were drilled on the contiguous Canadian margin before large reserves were discovered. Thus, despite the initial results, exploration on the US margin will probably continue and additional information will be needed to augment the extensive environmental data base acquired over the past 10 years. The extent, timing, causes, and importance of sediment instability of the Continental Slopes of Georges Bank, Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough--where future exploration will take place--remain controversial. Many question remain to be answered regarding such phenomena as creep on the upper slope, mass wasting in canyons and gullies, and slumping associated with faults and salt diapirs. Along the southeastern margin, the distribution of cavernous porosity below the shelf is only broadly known. Caverns pose a potential threat to drilling operations ranging from collapse of rigs to circulation loss and sheared drill strings. In deeper waters of the Continental Slope (700-2000 m), clathrates or frozen gas hydrates are common. The potential hazard of blow-outs from gas trapped beneath this layer are unknown. Additional information is needed to assess the bottom stresses imposed by tidal, storm, and geostrophically-driven currents on offshore rigs and structures, particularly in such areas as Georges Bank, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau.

  14. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  15. Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request for information on reducing regulatory burden Reducing Regulatory Burden (177.64 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden Reducing Regulatory Burden

  16. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-30

    The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  17. On the marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-07-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. Here, an analytical marginal instability condition is derived for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions. The derived marginal instability condition as a function of the temperature anisotropy and plasma beta agrees remarkably well with the numerically determined instability condition. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed with the leading A??{sub ?}{sup ?1}-dependence, if the counter-stream parameter P{sub e} exceeds a critical value. At small plasma beta values at large enough counter-stream parameter, the O-mode also operates for temperature anisotropies A?=?T{sub ?}/T{sub ?}?>?1 even larger than unity, as the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

  18. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, M.; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M.

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

  19. Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies relationships in a passive margin basin, western North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prather, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    Correlation of facies from hydrocarbon-bearing continent and transitional marine sandstones to time-equivalent high-energy shelf-margin carbonates provide insight into hydrocarbon habitats of the Baltimore Canyon basin. These facies occur within a thick (>10,000 ft) prograded wedge of shelf sediments in this passive margin basin. Wells drilled to test structural closures in shallow-water (<600 ft) areas of Baltimore Canyon penetrate clastic facies which are time-equivalent to the downdip carbonate facies tested in deep-water wells. Numerous hydrocarbon shows, including a noncommercial gas and gas-condensate accumulation, occur with sandstone units that were deposited in prograding continental/fluvial and transitional marine environments located updip of the Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian carbonate shelf edge. The continental and transitional facies are overlain by a fine-grained deltaic complex which forms a regionally extensive top seal unit. The deltaic complex was deposited during aggradation of the Kimmeridgian through Berriasian shelf-margin carbonates penetrated by the deep-water wells.

  20. Core design of long life-cycle fast reactors operating without reactivity margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aristova, E. N.; Baydin, D. F.; Gol'din, V. Y.; Pestryakova, G. A.; Stoynov, M. I.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we consider a possibility of designing a fast reactor core that operates without reactivity margin for a long time. This study is based on the physical principle of fast reactor operating in a self-adjustable neutron-nuclear regime (SANNR-1) introduced by L.P. Feoktistov (1988-1993) and improved by V. Ya. Gol'din SANNR-2 (1995). The mathematical modeling of active zones of fast reactors in SANNR modes is held by authors since 1992. The numerical simulation is based on solving the neutron transport equation coupled with quasi-diffusion equations. The calculations have been performed using standard 26 energy groups. We use a hierarchy of spatial models of 1D, 1.5D, 2D, and 3D geometries. The spatial models of higher dimensionality are used for verification of results. The calculations showed that operation of the reactor in this mode increases its efficiency, safety and simplifies management. It is possible to achieve continuous work of the reactor in SANNR-2 during 7-10 years without fuel overloads by means of further optimization of the mode. Small reactivity margin is used only for the reactor start up. After first 10-15 days the reactor in SANNR-2 operates without reactivity margin. (authors)

  1. Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-09-20

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

  2. Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Burden Reducing Regulatory Burden Request for information on reducing regulatory burden Reducing Regulatory Burden (289.74 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 SEVENTH RFI COMMENTS ON REDUCING REGULATORY BURDEN

  3. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonney, Matthew S.; Brake, Matthew R.W.

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  4. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  5. Reduced waste generation, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy is committed to the principles of minimizing the quantity and transuranic content of its transuranium (TRU) waste being generated at its nuclear facilities. The reasons are to reduce costs associated with waste handling and disposal, and also to reduce radiation exposure to workers and risk for radionuclide release to man and the environment. The purpose of this document is to provide the USDOE with a plan of research and development tasks for waste minimization, and is prepared so as to provide the maximum impact on volumes based on cost/benefit factors. The document is to be updated annually or as needed to reflect current and future tasks. The Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of activities with the principal goals of (1) preventing the generation of waste and (2) converting TRU waste into low-level wastes (LLW) by sorting or decontamination. Concepts for reducing the volume such as in incineration and compaction are considered within the discipline of Reduced Waste Generation, but are considered as somewhat developed technology with only a need for implementation. 33 refs.

  6. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, F.

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  7. Microbial methods of reducing technetium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wildung, Raymond E. [Richland, WA; Garland, Thomas R. [Greybull, WY; Gorby, Yuri A. [Richland, WA; Hess, Nancy J. [Benton City, WA; Li, Shu-Mei W. [Richland, WA; Plymale, Andrew E. [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a method for microbial reduction of a technetium compound to form other compounds of value in medical imaging. The technetium compound is combined in a mixture with non-growing microbial cells which contain a technetium-reducing enzyme system, a stabilizing agent and an electron donor in a saline solution under anaerobic conditions. The mixture is substantially free of an inorganic technetium reducing agent and its reduction products. The resulting product is Tc of lower oxidation states, the form of which can be partially controlled by the stabilizing agent. It has been discovered that the microorganisms Shewanella alga, strain Bry and Shewanelia putrifacians, strain CN-32 contain the necessary enzyme systems for technetium reduction and can form both mono nuclear and polynuclear reduced Tc species depending on the stabilizing agent.

  8. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  9. METHOD OF REDUCING PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johns, I.B.

    1958-06-01

    A method is described for reducing plutonium compounds in aqueous solution from a higher to a lower valence state. This reduction of valence is achieved by treating the aqueous solution of higher valence plutonium compounds with hydrogen in contact with an activated platinum catalyst.

  10. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  11. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using Hig Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-11-21

    The Yowlumne field is a giant field in the southern San Joaquin basin, Kern County, California. It is a deep (13,000 ft) waterflood operation that produces from the Miocene- aged Stevens Sand. The reservoir is interpreted as a layered, fan-shaped, prograding turbidite complex containing several lobe-shaped sand bodies that represent distinct flow units. A high ultimate recovery factor is expected, yet significant quantities of undrained oil remain at the fan margins. The fan margins are not economic to develop using vertical wells because of thinning pay, deteriorating rock quality, and depth. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the northeast distal fan margin through the use of a high- angle well completed with multiple hydraulic- fracture treatments. A high-angle well offers greater pay exposure than can be achieved with a vertical well. Hydraulic-fracture treatments will establish vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at a cost of approximately two vertical wells. The near-horizontal well penetrated the Yowlumne sand; a Stevens sand equivalent, in the distal fan margin in the northeast area of the field. The well was drilled in a predominately westerly direction towards the interior of the field, in the direction of improving rock quality. Drilling and completion operations proved to be very challenging, leading to a number of adjustments to original plans. Hole conditions resulted in obtaining less core material than desired and setting intermediate casing 1200 ft too high. The 7 in. production liner stuck 1000 ft off bottom, requiring a 5 in. liner to be run the rest of the way. The cement job on the 5 in. liner resulted in a very poor bond, which precluded one of three hydraulic fracture treatments originally planned for the well. Openhole logs confirmed most expectations going into the project about basic

  12. Tenvig offshore A/S solution to development of marginal oilfields in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickey, A.

    1980-06-12

    The Tenvig offshore A/S solution to development of marginal oilfields in the North Sea consists of a tanker about the size of a VLCC, a turret platform moored with anchors and equipped with processing equipment for oil and gas treatment, living quarters, and helicopter landing facilities. The platform is permanently moored at the field during depletion and is connected to a subsea completion. Offloading the oil from the tanker can be done via a subsea pipeline to a nearby loading buoy or directly to shuttle tankers.

  13. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

  14. Amphetamine margin in sports. [Effects on performance of highly trained athletes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1980-01-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seems clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both man and rat. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogues of such performance have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  15. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  16. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  17. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  18. On the effect of pulsating flow on surge margin of small centrifugal compressors for automotive engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galindo, J.; Climent, H.; Guardiola, C.; Tiseira, A.

    2009-11-15

    Surge is becoming a limiting factor in the design of boosting systems of downsized diesel engines. Although standard compressor flowcharts are used for the selection of those machines for a given application, on-engine conditions widely differ from steady flow conditions, thus affecting compressor behaviour and consequently surge phenomenon. In this paper the effect of pulsating flow is investigated by means of a steady gas-stand that has been modified to produce engine-like pulsating flow. The effect of pressure pulses' amplitude and frequency on the compressor surge line location has been checked. Results show that pulsating flow in the 40-67 Hz range (corresponding to characteristic pulsation when boosting an internal combustion engine) increases surge margin. This increased margin is similar for all the tested frequencies but depends on pulsation amplitude. In a further step, a non-steady compressor model is used for modelling the tests, thus allowing a deeper analysis of the involved phenomena. Model results widely agree with experimental results. (author)

  19. Tectonic controls on carbonate platform evolution in southern Papua New Guinea: Passive margin to foreland basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigram, C.J., Davies, P.J.; Feary, D.A.; Symonds, P.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The middle Oligocene collision of the northern margin of the Australian craton with a complex subduction system resulted in emplacement of a thrust mass and formation of a foreland basin that extended from the Coral Sea to the Indian Ocean. The distribution of carbonate-platform facies in southwestern Papua New Guinea reflects the transition from an Eocene passive margin setting to the early stages of foreland basin evolution. The initial basin configuration, with terrigenous sedimentation confined to the proximal foredeep, allowed carbonate deposition in the shallow environment adjacent to the peripheral forebulge. Subsequent southward migration of the basin resulted in a rapid increase in the area and thickness of carbonate-platform deposition. When the proximal foredeep became filled by detritus shed from the emerging orogen, clastic sediments buried the platform and terminated carbonate deposition. The history of the southern Papua New Guinea carbonate platform illustrates the paradox of carbonate deposition within the foreland basin, whereby basin configuration initially encourages thick and extensive carbonate deposition but inevitably leads to terrigenous inundation and the demise of the carbonate platform.

  20. Energy-conserving perennial agriculture for marginal land in southern Appalachia. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G.

    1982-01-30

    USDA economists predict the end of surplus farm production in the US within this decade. More and more marginal land will be cropped to provide feed for the growing world population and to produce energy. Much of this potential cropland in Southern Appalachia is poorly suited to annual crops, such as corn. Perennial crops are much better suited to steep, rocky, and wet sites. Research was undertaken on the theoretical potentials of perennial species with high predicted yields of protein, carbohydrates, or oils. Several candidate staple perennial crops for marginal land in Southern Appalachia were identified, and estimates were made of their yields, energy input requirements, and general suitabilities. Cropping systems incorporating honeylocust, persimmon, mulberry, jujube, and beech were compared with corn cropping systems. It appears that these candidate staple perennials show distinct advantages for energy conservation and environmental preservation. Detailed economic analyses must await actual demonstration trials, but preliminary indications for ethanol conversion systems with honeylocust are encouraging. It is suggested that short-term loans to farmers undertaking this new type of agriculture would be appropriate to solve cash-flow problems.

  1. Seismic stratigraphy of Long Island platform, United States Atlantic Continental Margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jowett, R.A.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1987-09-01

    Approximately 2000 km of single- and multichannel seismic reflection profiles collected over the Long Island platform on the US Atlantic continental margin show that the basement beneath the platform was rifted prior to the separation of Africa from North America and that it subsided after the separation. Postrift sediment thicknesses range from less than 1 km in the northwest part of the platform to several kilometers in the southeast, near the Atlantis and Nantucket rift basins. Flanking the platform are the Georges Bank basin to the east and Baltimore Canyon Trough to the south, where sedimentary rocks are 10-15 km thick. Nine major unconformities have been delineated in analysis of the seismic profiles. The most conspicuous unconformities are correlated with the end of rifting and the upper surfaces of the Bathonian, Tithonian, Albian, Turonian-Coniacian, Maestrichtian, upper Eocene, mid-Oligocene, and mid-Miocene sections. Ages are determined by tracing reflectors and unconformities to the COST (Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test), AMCOR (Atlantic Margin Coring Project), and coastal wells. Several of these unconformities coincide with pronounced fluctuations in the Vail curve of relative sea level.

  2. Fission track analysis, rift shoulder uplift, and tectonic modeling of the Norwegian Continental Margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andriessen, P.; Van Der Beek, P.; Cloetingh, S.; Rohrman, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Apatite fission track analysis from southern Norway and Sweden, across the Permian Carboniferous Oslo rift, are presented and discussed in relation to different rifting scenarios. Vertical and horizontal apatite fission tack profiles in middle and southern Norway unravel the post-Carboniferous history of the Fennoscandian shield. Fission track apatite ages range from 240 Ma in the south to 160 Ma in the north, and according to spontaneous fission track length measurements, they must be interpreted as mixed ages, indicating minor amounts of Paleozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary cover. Apatite fission track length and age modeling suggest rapid cooling and uplift in the Tertiary for the southernmost part of Norway, suggesting a differential uplift of the basement. the obtained data are important for the reconstruction of burial and thermal histories of Cenozoic sedimentary basins of the Norwegian continental margin in the northern North Sea, where diverse rifting events, intraplate stress regimes, and inversion tectonics are involved. Fission track analysis puts constraints on tectonic modeling of uplift of rift flanks and the Norwegian continental margin and yields information for these assessment of hydrocarbon potentials of the sedimentary basins.

  3. Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  4. MapReduce SVM Game

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; Aimone, James B.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently and recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.

  5. MapReduce SVM Game

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; Aimone, James B.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently andmore » recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.« less

  6. Improvement of the thermal margins in the Swedish Ringhals-3 PWR by introducing new fuel assemblies with thorium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, C. W.; Demaziere, C.; Nylen, H.; Sandberg, U.

    2012-07-01

    Thorium is a fertile material and most of the past research has focused on breeding thorium to fissile material. In this paper, the focus is on using thorium to improve the thermal margins by homogeneously distributing thorium in the fuel pellets. A proposed uranium-thorium-based fuel assembly is simulated for the Swedish Ringhals-3 PWR core in a realistic demonstration. All the key safety parameters, such as isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity, Doppler temperature of reactivity, boron worth, shutdown margins and fraction of delayed neutrons are studied in this paper, and are within safety limits for the new core design using the uranium-thorium-based fuel assemblies. The calculations were performed by the two-dimensional transport code CASMO-4E and the two group steady-state three dimensional nodal code SIMULATE-3 from Studsvik Scandpower. The results showed that the uranium-thorium-based fuel assembly improves the thermal margins, both in the pin peak power and the local power (Fq). The improved thermal margins would allow more flexible core designs with less neutron leakage or could be used in power uprates to offer efficient safety margins. (authors)

  7. System-area operating margin assessment and security enhancement against voltage collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berizzi, A.; Bresesti, P.; Marannino, P.; Granelli, G.P.; Montagna, M.

    1996-08-01

    The (very) short term reactive power scheduling function, to be adopted by ENEL Spa, takes into account the voltage stability requirements in a preventive application of the security function. In this environment the procedure determines the voltage collapse distance of the global system and of the areas controlled by the Secondary Voltage Regulation (SVR) both in short (24 hours ahead) and in a very short term (few hours or fractions of hour ahead). The procedure also schedules the control actions to be taken in emergency states in a preventive way. Area or system-wise indicators, based on nodal sensitivities and/or eigen (singular) value analysis, provide effective measures of the margins of the system with respect to the risk of voltage collapse and the related corrective actions. Applications of the procedure to the EHV network and to a subtransmission area of the ENEL system are presented in the paper.

  8. Front and Center: Bringing Marginalized Girls into Focus in STEM and CTE Education

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This week, as part of the President’s commitment to equal opportunity for all students, the White House Domestic Policy Council and the Council on Women and Girls, the Department of Education, and the Georgetown University Law Center on Poverty and Inequality highlighted programs that focus on developing the talent of girls of color and low-income girls in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and career technical education (CTE) careers. We heard from the educators, innovators, researchers, scientists, and marginalized girls themselves who are dedicated to increasing the participation of low-income girls and girls of color in post-secondary education and in-demand careers within high-growth industry sectors.

  9. Marginal cost of natural gas in developing countries: concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashayekhi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Many developing nations are facing complex questions regarding the best strategy for developing their domestic gas reserves. The World Bank has addressed these questions in studies on the cost and prices of gas and its optimal allocation among different markets. Based on the average incremental method, an estimate of the marginal cost of natural gas in 10 developing countries proved to be $0.61-1.79/1000 CF or $3.59-10.54/bbl of oil equivalent, far below the border prices of competing fuels in these nations. Moreover, the cost of gas is not expected to rise in these countries within the next 20 years while the reserves/production ratios remain high. The sample involves a variety of gas compositions and production conditions among the countries of Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Tunisia.

  10. Marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode in equal-mass plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions has recently received renewed attention due to its importance for the solar wind plasma. Here, the analytical marginal instability condition is derived for magnetized plasmas consisting of equal-mass charged particles, distributed in counter-streams with equal temperatures. The equal-mass composition assumption enormously facilitates the theoretical analysis due to the equality of the values of the electron and positron (positive and negative ion) plasma and gyrofrequencies. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed, when the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

  11. Handbook of nuclear power plant seismic fragilities, Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cover, L.E.; Bohn, M.P.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has a gola to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor were made. These calculations required a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most would be usable for other sites as well.

  12. Ideas underlying quantification of margins and uncertainties(QMU): a white paper.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2006-09-01

    This report describes key ideas underlying the application of Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) to nuclear weapons stockpile lifecycle decisions at Sandia National Laboratories. While QMU is a broad process and methodology for generating critical technical information to be used in stockpile management, this paper emphasizes one component, which is information produced by computational modeling and simulation. In particular, we discuss the key principles of developing QMU information in the form of Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty, the need to separate aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in QMU, and the risk-informed decision making that is best suited for decisive application of QMU. The paper is written at a high level, but provides a systematic bibliography of useful papers for the interested reader to deepen their understanding of these ideas.

  13. Geometry, lateral variability, and preservation of downlapped regressive shelf deposits, eastern Tyrrhenian Margin, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, M.E. ); Trincardi, F. )

    1990-05-01

    The shelf of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin changes substantially in width, shelf-break depth, and sea-floor steepness over relatively short distances, largely due to marked lateral changes in geologic structure. Remnants of late Pleistocene prograded coastal deposits are locally preserved on the middle and outer parts of this complex shelf. Through the authors studies of these prograded deposits they recognize two major controls on the distribution, lateral extent, thickness, and preservation potential. First, prograded (downlapped) deposits formed only where the physiographic shelf break was deeper than the lowstand shoreline, thus providing accommodation space for the lowstand deposits. Second, the proximity and relative size of sediment sources and the local coastal dispersal system influenced the geometry of the deposit. Mid-shelf and shelf-margin bodies composed of seaward-steepening downlapping reflectors were deposited as thin-to-thick continuous prograding sheets over an irregular eroded shelf surface and onto the shelf edge during the last fall and lowstand of sea level. A dearth of sediment at the end of lowstand conditions led to a switch from deposition to erosion. During sea level rise, shoreface erosion produced a major marine erosional (ravinement) surface landward of the 120-m isobath, and much, and in many places all, of the downlapping deposit was removed. Preservation of downlapping deposits is largely a function of their thickness. Thick continuous deposits are common on the shelf edge, whereas on the mid-shelf only thin remnants are preserved locally where depressions or morphologic steps were present in the shelf surface.

  14. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  15. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, Charles J.; Rhudy, Ralph G.; Bushman, Ralph E.

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  16. The Development of Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis Simulations for Inclusion in Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Diego Mandelli; Ronald L. Boring; Curtis L. Smith; Rachel B. Shirley

    2015-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program, which has the overall objective of supporting the near-term and the extended operation of commercial nuclear power plants. One key research and development (R&D) area in this program is the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization pathway, which combines probabilistic risk simulation with thermohydraulic simulation codes to define and manage safety margins. The R&D efforts to date, however, have not included robust simulations of human operators, and how the reliability of human performance or lack thereof (i.e., human errors) can affect risk-margins and plant performance. This paper describes current and planned research efforts to address the absence of robust human reliability simulations and thereby increase the fidelity of simulated accident scenarios.

  17. Lower Permian facies of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: depositional systems, shelf-margin evolution, paleogeography, and petroleum potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    A Palo geological study suggests that potential hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in shelf-margin carbonates, delta-front sandstones, and fan-delta arkoses. Zones of porous (greater than 10 percent) dolomite are concentrated near shelf margins and have configurations similar to productive Lower Permian shelf-margin trends in New Mexico. Delta-front sandstones (log-computed porosity of 18 to 25 percent) are similar to producing deltaic sandstones of Morris Buie-Blaco Fields in North-Central Texas. Porous (18 percent) fan-delta sandstones along the south flank of the Amarillo Uplift may form reservoirs similiar to that of the Mobeetie Field on the north side of the Amarillo Uplife in Wheeler County, Texas. Potential hydrocarbon source beds occur in slope and basinal environments. Total organic carbon generally ranges from 1 to 2.3 percent by weight and averages 0.589 percent by weight.

  18. Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases: Prospective Evaluation of Target Margin on Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Given the neurocognitive toxicity associated with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT), approaches to defer or avoid WBRT after surgical resection of brain metastases are desirable. Our initial experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the resection cavity showed promising results. We examined the outcomes of postoperative resection cavity SRS to determine the effect of adding a 2-mm margin around the resection cavity on local failure (LF) and toxicity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 120 cavities in 112 patients treated from 1998-2009. Factors associated with LF and distant brain failure (DF) were analyzed using competing risks analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival (OS) rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method; variables associated with OS were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards and log rank tests. Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF and DF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.5% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, expansion of the cavity with a 2-mm margin was associated with decreased LF; the 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF with and without margin were 3% and 16%, respectively (P=.042). The 12-month toxicity rates with and without margin were 3% and 8%, respectively (P=.27). On multivariate analysis, melanoma histology (P=.038) and number of brain metastases (P=.0097) were associated with higher DF. The median OS time was 17 months (range, 2-114 months), with a 12-month OS rate of 62%. Overall, WBRT was avoided in 72% of the patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity of brain metastases results in excellent local control and allows WBRT to be avoided in a majority of patients. A 2-mm margin around the resection cavity improved local control without increasing toxicity compared with our prior technique with no margin.

  19. Shelf margin bioherms and associated facies in the Lower Permian Hueco Group (Late Wolfcampian), Hueco Mountains, West Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlman, G.P.; Tasker, D.R.; St. John, J.W.; Werle, K.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Late Wolfcampian phylloid algal/Tubiphytes biohermal complexes are exposed in three erosional oilers lying about 3 miles west of and parallel to the main Hueco Mountains in far West Texas. The biohermal complexes are located paleogeographically along the shelf margin between the Diablo Platform and Orogrande Basin. Based on fusulinids the shelf margin buildups correlate with well-bedded shelf carbonates of the type Hueco Group in the main Hueco Mountains. The phylloid algal/Tubiphytes shelf margin bioherms contain an upward shallowing facies succession, which, in ascending order, consists of: (1) phylloid algal wackestone-bafflestone, (2) phylloid algal-fusulinid bafflestone-packstone, and (3) Tubiphytes boundstone and Tubiphytes-fusulinid-phylloid algal packstone-grainstone. The crest of the southernmost outlier has a different type of bioherm that consists of nodular boundstones composed of calcisponges, encrusting bryozoans and laminar red algae. The shelf margin complexes prograded over slope facies of dark-gray cherty limestones, which generally lack skeletal fossils, but contain common ichnofossils in upper slope beds. Overlapping tongues and channels of lithoclastic-skeletal packstones and grainstones extend seaward from the phylloid algal/Tubiphytes bioherms into the dark-gray slope facies. Proximal backreef facies consist of mainly skeletal-peloidal packstones and wackestones. The Hueco Mountains outlier exposures are important because: (1) they confirm a Late Wolfcampian shelf margin with distinct topographic relief in the southern Orogrande Basin, and (2) they provide an easily accessible field laboratory where Wolfcampian shelf-to-basin facies relationships and shelf margin bioherms can be studied. Wolfcampian bioherms represent a significant stage in the evolutionary history of Late Paleozoic reef communities and form important petroleum reservoirs in the adjacent Permian Basin.

  20. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel Appliances & Electronics Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save...

  1. PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module Material Costs While Increasing Durability PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module Material Costs ...

  2. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    By way of background illustration, I attach two of my documents on Future Power Systems which look at the Smart Enterprise and the Smart Customer. The papers look at the system ...

  3. NASEO Energy Policy Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) is hosting its annual conference in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 3-6, 2015.

  4. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    I'm interested in a several areas of potential impacts. 1. I'd like to be added to the public contact list for NEPA. 2. I'm interested in knowing the studies and findings of the ...

  5. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pell, Jerry From: Bill Helmer [Bill.Helmer@transmissiondevelopers.com] Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 1:40 PM To: Pell, Jerry Cc: Donald Jessome; Jay Ryan; Solomon, Patrick D; Murphy, Sean (Portland); Mills, Brian Subject: RE: CHPE Preferred Alternative Follow Up Flag: Follow up Flag Status: Flagged Dear Dr. Pell: Thank you for your email of 3/6/2012. The Applicants' new preferred alternative is the route as proposed in the Joint Proposal of Settlement, as filed with the New York State Public

  6. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stephen Browning Sent: Thursday, September 23, 2010 2:52 PM To: SmartGridPolicy Subject: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Dear Mr Li and the department. By way of background illustration, I attach two of my documents on Future Power Systems which look at the Smart Enterprise and the Smart Customer. The papers look at the system from the perspective of the Power system in Great Britain but I hope the principles outlined may be of some help to you. Another of my papers

  7. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    If you happen to have any of this information, please forward. Thanks, 2 Andrea Andrea M. Wilkes Environmental Engineer Potomac-Hudson Engineering, Inc. 7830 Old Georgetown Road, ...

  8. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Monday, December 07, 2009 8:03 PM To: Andrea Wilkes Cc: Enyeart, Sandra B.; Mike West Subject: Fwd: SWEIS DATA Attachments: image001.jpg Andrea, Here is the functional square...

  9. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Thursday, March 18, 2010 8:36 PM To: Andrea Wilkes Subject: Fwd: Wastewater Questions Andrea, Here's Dave's response on the question of utilization of the septic systems. Sounds...

  10. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: August 17, 2016 | Next Release Date: December 22, 2016 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. All quarterly data are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the fourth quarter 2015: Total

  11. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    William S. Helmer Senior Vice President & General Counsel Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc. Pieter Schuyler Building, 600 Broadway, Albany NY 12207 Tel: 518-465-0710 Cell: ...

  12. Oil market outlook and drivers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil inventories in industrialized countries to reach record high at end of 2015 The amount of year-end oil inventories held in industrialized countries is expected to be the highest on record in 2015. In its monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said it expects commercial oil inventories in the United States and other industrialized countries to total 2.83 billion barrels at the end of this year almost 90 million barrels more than at the end of 2014. Global oil production

  13. Outlook for alternative transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gushee, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation provides a brief review of regulatory issues and Federal programs regarding alternative fuel use in automobiles. A number of U.S. DOE initiatives and studies aimed at increasing alternative fuels are outlined, and tax incentives in effect at the state and Federal levels are discussed. Data on alternative fuel consumption and alternative fuel vehicle use are also presented. Despite mandates, tax incentives, and programs, it is concluded alternative fuels will have minimal market penetration. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights * Crude oil prices increased during the first three weeks of July 2013 as world oil markets tightened in the face of seasonal increases in world consumption, unexpected supply disruptions, and heightened uncertainty over the security of supply with the renewed unrest in Egypt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $108 per barrel over the first half of 2013, will average $104 per barrel over the second half

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $57/barrel (b) in July, a $5/b decrease from June. Brent crude oil spot prices fell further in early August, settling at $48/b on August 7. The recent price declines reflect concerns about lower economic growth in emerging markets, expectations of higher oil exports from Iran, and continuing actual and expected growth in global inventories.  EIA forecasts that Brent crude oil prices will average $54/b in 2015 and $59/b in 2016,

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  After falling by more than 40 cents per gallon from the beginning of September through mid-November, weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail prices increased by 8 cents per gallon to reach $3.27 per gallon on December 2, 2013, due in part to unplanned refinery maintenance and higher crude oil prices. The annual average regular gasoline retail price, which was $3.63 per gallon in 2012, is expected to average $3.50 per gallon in 2013 and $3.43 per gallon in 2014.  The

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights * North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $44/barrel (b) in November, a $4/b decrease from October. Global oil inventories are estimated to have increased by 1.3 million barrels per day (b/d) in November, putting downward pressure on Brent prices. * EIA forecasts that Brent crude oil prices will average $53/b in 2015 and $56/b in 2016. Forecast West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices average $4/b lower than the Brent price in 2015 and $5/b lower in 2016. The current

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  January was the seventh consecutive month in which monthly average North Sea Brent crude oil prices decreased, reaching $48/barrel (bbl), the lowest since March 2009. The price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production and strong global supply, amid weaker global oil demand growth, which contributed to rising global oil inventories. In January, estimated Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) total commercial oil inventories

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights * Unrest in Iraq put upward pressure on world oil prices last month, helping North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices reach their highest daily level of the year at just over $115/barrel (bbl) on June 19. North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices increased from a monthly average of $110/bbl in May to $112/bbl in June. This was the 12th consecutive month in which the average Brent crude oil spot price ranged between $107/bbl and $112/bbl. EIA projects Brent crude oil prices to average

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $61/barrel (b) in June, a $3/b decrease from May. Crude oil prices fell by about $4/b on July 6 in the aftermath of the "no" vote in Greece on the economic program, as well as lingering concerns about lower economic growth in China, higher oil exports from Iran, and continuing growth in global petroleum and other liquids inventories. A percent price change of this extent on a single day is unusual, but despite daily price