National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for outlook commercial demand

  1. Residential Demand Sector Data, Commercial Demand Sector Data, Industrial Demand Sector Data - Annual Energy Outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing consumption and prices by sector and census division for 2006 - includes residential demand, commercial demand, and industrial demand

  2. SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK DRAFTSTAFFREPORT May ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B assessment of the capability of the physical electricity system to provide power to meet electricity demand

  3. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    2006. “Japan Long-Term Energy Outlook -A Projection up todescribes the residential energy outlook in Japan to 2030.s Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering

  4. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    ABORATORY Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030o r n i a Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030outlook of Japan’s residential energy demand, developed by a

  5. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    N ATIONAL L ABORATORY India Energy Outlook: End Use DemandTables Figures Figure 1. India Primary Energy Supply by fuel33 Table 15. India Industry Energy Intensities (GJ/

  6. Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Gasoline and distillate demand impact of the Energy Independance and Security Act of 2007...

  7. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Past Trend and Future Outlook",LBNL forthcoming. de la Rue2006. “Building up India: Outlook for India’s real estate”,2006a. “World Energy Outlook”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.

  8. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Crises & Climate Challenges - 30 Years of Energy Use in IEACountries”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France. International Energy2006a. “World Energy Outlook”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.

  9. Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing Products Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing Products Better Buildings...

  10. Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Financing and Commercial Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing Products, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, February 2, 2012....

  11. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Residential Demand Module

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (BillionTechnical InformationDecade Year-0 2Market ModuleOil and GasDemand

  12. Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table272/S The National Interim714 CreatedDemand and

  13. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table272/S The National Interim714 CreatedDemand

  14. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  15. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Commercial Demand Module

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (BillionTechnical InformationDecade Year-0 2

  16. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

    2008-05-15

    As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

  17. EnerNOC Inc. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © EnerNOC Inc. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response: An Overview of the Utility/Aggregator Business Model Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project April 28, 2011 #12;22 Agenda Introduction Ener #12;77 Whos EnerNOC? Market Leader in C&I Demand Response and Industrial Energy Efficiency More than

  18. Description of the global petroleum supply and demand outlook. Updated for the 1991 edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of the U. S. energy supply and demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreyfus, D.A.

    1990-12-01

    GRI developed a world oil projection for the 1991 Baseline Projection based on publicly available data. GRI's 1991 projection of the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil is described. The potential impact of the Middle East crisis is discussed along with two alternative world oil price tracks and their impacts on the global petroleum supply and demand outlook.

  19. Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2006-01-01

    Energy. “Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids Supply and Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The hydrocarbon gas liquids (ethane, propane, butanes, and natural gasoline) module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of U.S. production, consumption, refinery inputs, net imports, and inventories.

  1. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    Runs, Average Value) Electricity Demand Power/Electricitygrowth to 2030. Since electricity demand is projected toequipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit

  2. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    developed a residential energy demand forecast for 2030, theIn order to forecast energy service demand based on energy

  3. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, ElectricityEnergy Source Demand per Household Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat,ton of oil equivalent Considerable increases in demand for

  4. Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-01-01

    4 9 . Piette et at Automated Demand Response Strategies andDynamic Controls for Demand Response in New and ExistingFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities"

  5. Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-01-01

    efficiency, daily peak load management and demand response.Loads Efficiency, Daily Load Management and Demand ResponseOperations Peak Load Management (Daily) - TOU Savings - Peak

  6. CO2 MONITORING FOR DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David; Eliseeva, Ekaterina

    2010-03-17

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors are often deployed in commercial buildings to obtain CO{sub 2} data that are used, in a process called demand-controlled ventilation, to automatically modulate rates of outdoor air ventilation. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. Demand controlled ventilation is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. Reasonably accurate CO{sub 2} measurements are needed for successful demand controlled ventilation; however, prior research has suggested substantial measurement errors. Accordingly, this study evaluated: (a) the accuracy of 208 CO{sub 2} single-location sensors located in 34 commercial buildings, (b) the accuracy of four multi-location CO{sub 2} measurement systems that utilize tubing, valves, and pumps to measure at multiple locations with single CO{sub 2} sensors, and (c) the spatial variability of CO{sub 2} concentrations within meeting rooms. The field studies of the accuracy of single-location CO{sub 2} sensors included multi-concentration calibration checks of 90 sensors in which sensor accuracy was checked at multiple CO{sub 2} concentrations using primary standard calibration gases. From these evaluations, average errors were small, -26 ppm and -9 ppm at 760 and 1010 ppm, respectively; however, the averages of the absolute values of error were 118 ppm (16%) and 138 ppm (14%), at concentrations of 760 and 1010 ppm, respectively. The calibration data are generally well fit by a straight line as indicated by high values of R{sup 2}. The Title 24 standard specifies that sensor error must be certified as no greater than 75 ppm for a period of five years after sensor installation. At 1010 ppm, 40% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}75 ppm and 31% of sensors has errors greater than {+-}100 ppm. At 760 ppm, 47% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}75 ppm and 37% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}100 ppm. A significant fraction of sensors had errors substantially larger than 100 ppm. For example, at 1010 ppm, 19% of sensors had an error greater than 200 ppm and 13% of sensors had errors greater than 300 ppm. The field studies also included single-concentration calibration checks of 118 sensors at the concentrations encountered in the buildings, which were normally less than 500 ppm during the testing. For analyses, these data were combined with data from the calibration challenges at 510 ppm obtained during the multi-concentration calibration checks. For the resulting data set, the average error was 60 ppm and the average of the absolute value of error was 154 ppm. Statistical analyses indicated that there were statistically significant differences between the average accuracies of sensors from different manufacturers. Sensors with a 'single lamp single wavelength' design tended to have a statistically significantly smaller average error than sensors with other designs except for 'single lamp dual wavelength' sensors, which did not have a statistically significantly lower accuracy. Sensor age was not consistently a statistically significant predictor of error.

  7. Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global LNG Trade

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    This article is adapted from testimony by Jay Hakes, Administrator of the Energy Information Administration, before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on July 23, 1997. The hearing focused on the examination of certain aspects of natural gas into the next century with special emphasis on world natural gas supply and demand to 2015.

  8. Utility rebates for efficient motors -- The outlook for demand-side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nailen, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1987, many electric utilities throughout North America have been actively promoting demand-side management (DSM), the attempt to conserve fuels and postpone costly generating capacity increases by encouraging customers to use more efficient electrical equipment, including motors. One popular DSM program has been utility payment of cash rebates to purchasers of more efficient motors. Today, such payments face extinction in a rapidly changing utility economic climate based on deregulation. How rebates originated, the basis for such payments, how successful rebate programs have been, and what the future holds for them are the subjects of this paper.

  9. Utility rebates for efficient motors -- The outlook for demand-side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nailen, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    Since 1987, many electric utilities throughout North America have been actively promoting DSM--demand-side management, the attempt to conserve fuels and postpone costly generating capacity increases by encouraging customers to use more efficient electrical equipment, including motors. One popular DSM program has been utility payment of cash rebates to purchasers of more efficient motors. Today, such payments face extinction in a rapidly changing utility economic climate based on deregulation. How rebates originated, the basis for such payments, how successful rebate programs have been, and what the future holds for them--these are the subjects of this paper.

  10. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table272/S The National Interim714 CreatedDemand and

  11. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14

    This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

  12. Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

  13. Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies andStrategies in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2006-09-01

    Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak electric demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial buildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. The main objectives of the study were: (1) To evaluate the size of contributions of peak demand commercial buildings in the U.S.; (2) To understand how commercial building control systems support energy efficiency and DR; and (3) To disseminate the results to the building owners, facility managers and building controls industry. In order to estimate the commercial buildings contribution to peak demand, two sources of data are used: (1) Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). These two sources indicate that commercial buildings noncoincidental peak demand is about 330GW. The project then focused on technologies and strategies that deliver energy efficiency and also target 5-10% of this peak. Based on a building operations perspective, a demand-side management framework with three main features: (1) daily energy efficiency, (2) daily peak load management and (3) dynamic, event-driven DR are outlined. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide DR potential in commercial buildings are presented. Case studies involving these technologies and strategies are described. The findings of this project are shared with building owners, building controls industry, researchers and government entities through a webcast and their input is requested. Their input is presented in the appendix section of this report.

  14. Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Large California Commercial Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, S.; Piette, M. A.; Gu, L.; Haves, P.

    2001-01-01

    A great deal of research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy consumption in commercial buildings; however, the recent power crisis in California has given greater importance to peak demand. Several new loadshedding programs have been...

  15. Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

  16. Pilot Testing of Commercial Refrigeration-Based Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, Adam; Clark, Jordan; Deru, Michael; Trenbath, Kim; Doebber, Ian; Studer, Daniel

    2015-10-08

    Supermarkets potentially offer a substantial demand response (DR) resource because of their high energy intensity and use patterns. This report describes a pilot project conducted to better estimate supermarket DR potential. Previous work has analyzed supermarket DR using heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting, and anti-condensate heaters. This project was concerned with evaluating DR using the refrigeration system and quantifying the DR potential inherent in supermarket refrigeration systems. Ancillary aims of the project were to identify practical barriers to the implementation of DR programs in supermarkets and to determine which high-level control strategies were most appropriate for achieving certain DR objectives. The scope of this project does not include detailed control strategy development for DR or development of a strategy for regional implementation of DR in supermarkets.

  17. GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

  18. Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Levine. 2012. “China's Energy and Emissions Outlook to 2050:on China’s Future Energy and Emissions Outlook. LBNL-4032E.Energy Demand Outlook

  19. Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Mathieu, Johanna; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14

    California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15percent with an average of 13percent. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

  20. Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

    2011-07-01

    Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

  1. Demand relief and weather sensitivity in large California commercial office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann; Gu, Lixing; Haves, Philip

    2001-05-01

    A great deal of research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy consumption in commercial buildings; however, the recent power crisis in California has given greater importance to peak demand. Several new load-shedding programs have been implemented or are under consideration. Historically, the target customers have been large industrial users who can reduce the equivalent load of several large office buildings. While the individual load reduction from an individual office building may be less significant, there is ample opportunity for load reduction in this area. The load reduction programs and incentives for industrial customers may not be suitable for commercial building owners. In particular, industrial customers are likely to have little variation in load from day to day. Thus a robust baseline accounting for weather variability is required to provide building owners with realistic targets that will encourage them to participate in load shedding programs.

  2. Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

    2006-01-01

    buildings. A demand-side management framework from buildingthe integration of DR in demand-side management activitiesdevelopments. The demand-side management (DSM) framework

  3. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01

    2001. “Electricity Demand Side Management Study: Review ofEpping/North Ryde Demand Side Management Scoping Study:Energy Agency Demand Side Management (IEA DSM) Programme:

  4. Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2006-01-01

    perspective, a demand-side management framework with threethe integration of DR in demand-side management activitiesdevelopments. The demand-side management (DSM) framework

  5. Testing of peak demand limiting using thermal mass at a small commercial building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Braun, James E; Fredrickson, Steve; Konis, Kyle; Arens, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Submitted to the: Demand Response Research Center Preparedat Berkeley July 2007 Demand Response Research Center, Julywas coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  6. Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Janie

    2012-01-01

    2010 Assessment of Demand Response and  Advanced Metering:  Development for Demand Response  Calculation ? Findings and Energy  Efficiency and  Demand Response with Communicating 

  7. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01

    of Program Participation Rates on Demand Response MarketTable 3-1. Methods of Estimating Demand Response PenetrationDemand Response

  8. Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

    2006-01-01

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”NYSERDA) and the Demand Response Research Center (LLC “Working Group 2 Demand Response Program Evaluation –

  9. Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01

    Open Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project” LBNL-2009a). “Open Automated Demand Response Communications inand Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California. ”

  10. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng

    2010-01-01

    National Laboratory/Energy Commission PIER Demand Response ResearchNational Laboratory/Energy Commission PIER Demand Response Research

  11. Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

    2003-04-18

    Energy Information Systems (EIS) for buildings are becoming widespread in the U.S., with more companies offering EIS products every year. As a result, customers are often overwhelmed by the quickly expanding portfolio of EIS feature and application options, which have not been clearly identified for consumers. The object of this report is to provide a technical overview of currently available EIS products. In particular, this report focuses on web-based EIS products for large commercial buildings, which allow data access and control capabilities over the Internet. EIS products combine software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to collect, analyze and display building information to aid commercial building energy managers, facility managers, financial managers and electric utilities in reducing energy use and costs in buildings. Data types commonly processed by EIS include energy consumption data; building characteristics; building system data, such as heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and lighting data; weather data; energy price signals; and energy demand-response event information. This project involved an extensive review of research and trade literature to understand the motivation for EIS technology development. This study also gathered information on currently commercialized EIS. This review is not an exhaustive analysis of all EIS products; rather, it is a technical framework and review of current products on the market. This report summarizes key features available in today's EIS, along with a categorization framework to understand the relationship between EIS, Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCSs), and similar technologies. Four EIS types are described: Basic Energy Information Systems (Basic-EIS); Demand Response Systems (DRS); Enterprise Energy Management (EEM); and Web-based Energy Management and Control Systems (Web-EMCS). Within the context of these four categories, the following characteristics of EIS are discussed: Metering and Connectivity; Visualization and Analysis Features; Demand Response Features; and Remote Control Features. This report also describes the following technologies and the potential benefits of incorporating them into future EIS products: Benchmarking; Load Shape Analysis; Fault Detection and Diagnostics; and Savings Analysis.

  12. Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1)). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

  13. Machine to machine (M2M) technology in demand responsive commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, David S.; Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01

    Machine to Machine (M2M) is a term used to describe the technologies that enable computers, embedded processors, smart sensors, actuators and mobile devices to communicate with one another, take measurements and make decisions--often without human intervention. M2M technology was applied to five commercial buildings in a test. The goal was to reduce electric demand when a remote price signal rose above a predetermine price. In this system, a variable price signal was generated from a single source on the Internet and distributed using the meta-language, XML (Extensible Markup Language). Each of five commercial building sites monitored the common price signal and automatically shed site-specific electric loads when the price increased above predetermined thresholds. Other than price signal scheduling, which was set up in advance by the project researchers, the system was designed to operate without human intervention during the two-week test period. Although the buildings responded to the same price signal, the communication infrastructures used at each building were substantially different. This study provides an overview of the technologies used at each building site, the price generator/server, and each link in between. Network architecture, security, data visualization and site-specific system features are characterized. The results of the test are discussed, including: functionality at each site, measurement and verification techniques, and feedback from energy managers and building operators. Lessons learned from the test and potential implications for widespread rollout are provided.

  14. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01

    3–6 percent of non-residential peak demand, can be viewed as3–6 percent of non-residential peak demand, can be viewed asto large, non-residential customers with peak demand greater

  15. Demand relief and weather sensitivity in large California commercial office buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann; Gu, Lixing; Haves, Philip

    2001-01-01

    TX Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Large California76SF00098. Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Largeof research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy

  16. Short-term energy outlook, Annual supplement 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-25

    This supplement is published once a year as a complement to the Short- Term Energy Outlook, Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts. Chap. 2 analyzes the response of the US petroleum industry to the recent four Federal environmental rules on motor gasoline. Chap. 3 compares the EIA base or mid case energy projections for 1995 and 1996 (as published in the first quarter 1995 Outlook) with recent projections made by four other major forecasting groups. Chap. 4 evaluates the overall accuracy. Chap. 5 presents the methology used in the Short- Term Integrated Forecasting Model for oxygenate supply/demand balances. Chap. 6 reports theoretical and empirical results from a study of non-transportation energy demand by sector. The empirical analysis involves the short-run energy demand in the residential, commercial, industrial, and electrical utility sectors in US.

  17. Diversity Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    abroad to accomplish. For more information on this study see this link. DIVERSIT Y OUTLOOK • THE NEWSLETTER OF CAMPUS DIVERSITY JANUARY 2012VOL. 3 • ISSUE 5 LANGSTON HUGHES VISITING PROFESSORSHIP Tammy Kernodle, Associate Professor from Miami...

  18. Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    response, automation, commercial, industrial buildings, peakautomation system design. Auto-DR for commercial and industrialautomation server renamed as the DRAS. This server was operated at a secure industrial

  19. Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motegi, N.; Piette, M.A.; Watson, D.S.; Kiliccote, S.; Xu, P.

    2007-05-01

    There are 3 appendices listed: (A) DR strategies for HVAC systems; (B) Summary of DR strategies; and (C) Case study of advanced demand response.

  20. Diversity Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-02-01

    continues; a special issue of Diversity Outlook will provide details. The Emily Taylor Women’s Resource Center and the Office of Multicultural Affairs, who now report to the Office of Diversity & Equity, are busy working on updating mission statements...:15, Sabatini MRC Feb. 13, 1:00, Centennial Rm, KS Union Feb. 16, 1:00, English Room, KS Union Read the KU ADA review here. DIVERSITY OUTLOOK • THE NEWSLETTER OF CAMPUS DIVERSITY FEBRUARY 2012VOL. 3 • ISSUE 6 THE SCHOLARSHIP OF DIVERSITY: A SYNOPSIS Students...

  1. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  2. Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    such as CEC, EPRI, Building Automation Control Network (is the lack of automation of building systems. Most DRresponse, automation, commercial, industrial buildings, peak

  3. Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2006-01-01

    Study in Energy Efficiency in Buildings August Nationalelectric loads in buildings: energy efficiency (for steady-and Energy Efficiency Options Using Commercial Building

  4. Guidelines for Marketing Demand-Side Management in the Commercial Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    For the past decade, electric and gas utilities throughout the nation, not just in hot and humid climates, have promoted energy efficiency through a variety of demand-side management (DSM) programs. In 1984, the Electric Power Research Institute...

  5. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01

    43 Appendices: Table D-1. Churn Rates for ISO-NE and NYISOyears, along with “churn rates”—the percentage of customersprograms. Table D-1. Churn Rates for ISO-NE and NYISO Demand

  6. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01

    Komiyama, "Japan's Energy Outlook for 2050 with Stochastic2008 (10) EIA/DOE, "Annual Energy Outlook 2008," 2008 (11)its long-term energy supply/demand outlook (Reference No.

  7. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  8. International energy outlook 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

  9. Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Watson, David; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

  10. Final Scientific Technical Report: INTEGRATED PREDICTIVE DEMAND RESPONSE CONTROLLER FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, Mike

    2013-10-14

    This project provides algorithms to perform demand response using the thermal mass of a building. Using the thermal mass of the building is an attractive method for performing demand response because there is no need for capital expenditure. The algorithms rely on the thermal capacitance inherent in the building?s construction materials. A near-optimal ?day ahead? predictive approach is developed that is meant to keep the building?s electrical demand constant during the high cost periods. This type of approach is appropriate for both time-of-use and critical peak pricing utility rate structures. The approach uses the past days data in order to determine the best temperature setpoints for the building during the high price periods on the next day. A second ?model predictive approach? (MPC) uses a thermal model of the building to determine the best temperature for the next sample period. The approach uses constant feedback from the building and is capable of appropriately handling real time pricing. Both approaches are capable of using weather forecasts to improve performance.

  11. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

  12. Utilisation de MSUtilisation de MS OUTLOOK 2003OUTLOOK 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    Utilisation de MSUtilisation de MS OUTLOOK 2003OUTLOOK 2003 GGéérer ses courriels adrer sesQuoi de neuf dans Microsoft Outlook 2003Microsoft Outlook 2003 Panneau de support et dPanneau de supportQuoi de neuf dans Microsoft Outlook 2003Microsoft Outlook 2003 Par dPar dééfaut, le panneau de

  13. Outlook 2010 Tips 'n Tricks General Outlook Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Outlook 2010 Tips 'n Tricks General Outlook Tips 1. Display Outlook Today Mail | Click on the top-level email account address to display a customizable "Day at a Glance" view of Outlook 2. Change Outlook's default starting location File | Options | Advanced | "Start Outlook in this folder:" | Browse

  14. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

  15. Electricity Demand of PHEVs Operated by Private Households and Commercial Fleets: Effects of Driving and Charging Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Matthew Shirk; Ken Kurani; Casey Quinn; Jamie Davies

    2010-11-01

    Automotive and energy researchers have made considerable efforts to predict the impact of plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) charging on the electrical grid. This work has been done primarily through computer modeling and simulation. The US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), in partnership with the University of California at Davis’s Institute for Transportation Stuides, have been collecting data from a diverse fleet of PHEVs. The AVTA is conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory for DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. This work provides the opportunity to quantify the petroleum displacement potential of early PHEV models, and also observe, rather than simulate, the charging behavior of vehicle users. This paper presents actual charging behavior and the resulting electricity demand from these PHEVs operating in undirected, real-world conditions. Charging patterns are examined for both commercial-use and personal-use vehicles. Underlying reasons for charging behavior in both groups are also presented.

  16. One: The California Economic Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Christopher Thornberg,signs of having peaked. The outlook for 2006 is dominated by

  17. International energy outlook 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

  18. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    fraction of residential and commercial demands, leading16 Residential electricity demand endspecific residential electricity demands into electricity

  19. Policy Paper 36: Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

    1998-01-01

    Kazuya, 1996. "Long-Term Energy Supply/Demand Outlook for19 Energy Supply Security and Infrastructure Issues inseek to project future energy supply and demand for Japan,

  20. The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presents an outlook on the future supply and demand for energy until the year 2030, with a major focus on oil, natural gas, coal, and renewable sources of energy.

  1. Key Milestones/Outlook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Key Milestones/Outlook per the Department of Energy 2015 Congressional Budget Request, Environmental Management, March 2014

  2. Commercial Sector Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep3,118,592 3,102,59399 2006-20105)

  3. TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK THE STATE'S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK SPRING 2015 #12;Matthew N Knoxville, Tennessee TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK THE STATE'S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK SPRING 2015 #12;ii | SPRING 2015 TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK The preparation of this report was financed in part

  4. International energy outlook 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

  5. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01

    drive commercial and residential demand for energy servicesOutlook and Analysis Residential energy demand is drivenOutlook Basis for Residential Energy Demand Outlook With

  6. Energy Demand Staff Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    #12;Sources: China National Bureau of Statistics; U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook. Overview:Overview: Energy Use in China and the U.S.Energy Use in China and the U.S. 5 0Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused

  7. Microsoft Outlook 2010 The Essentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    Microsoft Outlook 2010 The Essentials Training User Guide Sue Pejic Training Coordinator Information Technology Services Email : spejic@swin.edu.au Mobile : 0419 891 113 #12;Microsoft Outlook What is Outlook

  8. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, second quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates, are available on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The paper discusses outlook assumptions; US energy prices; world oil supply and the oil production cutback agreement of March 1998; international oil demand and supply; world oil stocks, capacity, and net trade; US oil demand and supply; US natural gas demand and supply; US coal demand and supply; US electricity demand and supply; US renewable energy demand; and US energy demand and supply sensitivities. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. SUMMER 2006 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Average Forced and Planned)............................................ 15 Line 11: Zonal Transmission ............................................................................. 16 Line 14: High Zonal Transmission Limitation ................................................... 16, contractors, and subcontractors make no warrant, express or implied, and assume no legal liability

  10. Outlook for Biomass Ethanol Production and Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a midterm forecast for biomass ethanol production under three different technology cases for the period 2000 to 2020, based on projections developed from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. An overview of cellulose conversion technology and various feedstock options and a brief history of ethanol usage in the United States are also presented.

  11. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    demands. Residential and commercial demand has a significantDemand by Sector Residential Peak Demand (MW) Commercialwe convert residential electricity demand based upon climate

  12. OUTLOOK COMPARE OUTLOOK -MAC / WINDOWS 1 COMPARE OUTLOOK -MAC / WINDOWS | Swinburne University of Technology Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    OUTLOOK COMPARE OUTLOOK - MAC / WINDOWS 1 COMPARE OUTLOOK - MAC / WINDOWS | Swinburne University of Technology Version 1.0 Compare Outlook for Mac 2011 with Outlook 2010 for Windows Outlook for Mac 2011 and Outlook 2010 for Windows differ in some key respects. The following table summarizes these differences

  13. Outlook export contacts and groups Migrate Outlook Contacts to gmail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Outlook export contacts and groups Migrate Outlook Contacts to gmail 1. In Outlook 2007 on the File menu, click Import and Export. 1a. For Outlook 2010 on the File menu, click Open, then Import 2. Click Export to a file, and then click Next. #12;3. Click Comma Separated Values (Windows), and then click Next

  14. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

  15. Prepared for Outlook 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Northern British Columbia: A Vision for Prosperity Prepared for Outlook 2020: Shaping BC Trust #12;2 Northern British Columbia's Vision for Prosperity Outlook 2020: Shaping BC's Economic and the emerging bio-energy industry..................................... 15 2.2 Mining, oil and gas

  16. Microsoft Office for Mac 2011 tutorial: Outlook basics 1 Outlook basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsoft Office for Mac 2011 tutorial: Outlook basics 1 Outlook basics Outlook is a powerful...................................................................................................................... 2 2. Explore the Outlook user interface. · Create a calendar event. Requirements · Outlook for Mac 2011 · E-mail account information (for example

  17. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

  18. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01

    LBNL Commercial and Residential Demand Response Overview ofmarket [5]. Residential demand reduction programs have beenin the domain of residential demand response. There are a

  19. Energy Market Outlook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Energy Market Outlook: Helping Customers Meet Their Diverse Energy Goals, held on May 22-23, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

  20. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    2001, International Energy Outlook 2001 , Report No. DOE/The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) , WashingtonEnergy Outlook .

  2. CosPA2013: Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Halzen

    2014-02-28

    Outlook talk presented at the 10th International Symposium on Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (CosPA2013)

  3. Microsoft Outlook 2011 The Essentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    Microsoft Outlook 2011 The Essentials Training User Guide Sue Pejic Training Coordinator Information Technology Services Email : spejic@swin.edu.au Mobile : 0419 891 113 #12;MAC - Outlook THE ESSENTIALS 2 MAC Outlook The Essentials | Swinburne University of Technology Version 1.0 Table of Contents

  4. OUTLOOK BYLAWS Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OUTLOOK BYLAWS Table of Contents Article I - Legal Authority to Operate Article II - Scope-in-Chief and Responsible Director Article VIII - Funding of Outlook Article IX - Unused Funds Article X - Composition The publication of Outlook is authorized under a license granted to AUB by decision No. 113 issued by the Lebanese

  5. Diversity Outlook, August 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-08-01

    stream_size 9099 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name OfficeOfDiversity&Equity_DiversityOutlook_Newsletter_August2012.pdf.txt stream_source_info OfficeOfDiversity&Equity_DiversityOutlook_Newsletter_August2012.pdf.txt Content... renewed excitement and energy as the campus comes alive with the spirit that makes KU a special place to be. I truly hope everyone at KU has an experience that is personally and professionally rewarding. In this issue, we highlight the new office...

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.

  7. Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-17

    The Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993 is a companion document to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 1993 (AEO). Supplement tables provide the regional projections underlying the national data and projections in the AEO. The domestic coal, electric power, commercial nuclear power, end-use consumption, and end-use price tables present AEO forecasts at the 10 Federal Region level. World coal tables provide data and projections on international flows of steam coal and metallurgical coal, and the oil and gas tables provide the AEO oil and gas supply forecasts by Oil and Gas Supply Regions and by source of supply. All tables refer to cases presented in the AEO, which provides a range of projections for energy markets through 2010.

  8. Diversity Outlook, Summer, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-07-01

    -American and Hispanic ball players who, in the years 1947-59, transitioned to Major League teams and later became All-Stars. DIVERSITY OUTLOOK • THE NEWSLETTER OF CAMPUS DIVERSITY SUMMER 2012VOL. 3 • ISSUE 9 THE SCHOLARSHIP OF DIVERSITY: A SYNOPSIS Over the past...

  9. Diversity Outlook, March 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-03-01

    AT SYMPOSIUM. COMPLETE SCHEDULE: PAGE 2 Sylvia Hurtado SPECIAL EDITION 2nd Annual Spring Symposium on the Scholarship of Diversity March 29, 2012 8:30–1:30 DIVERSITY OUTLOOK • THE NEWSLETTER OF CAMPUS DIVERSITY MARCH 2012VOL. 3 • ISSUE 7...

  10. Diversity Outlook, April 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-01

    .” Elsewhere in this issue is a draft definition and the DEAC welcomes any feedback on that to fredrod@ku.edu. As always, thank you for your continued support. DIVERSITY OUTLOOK • THE NEWSLETTER OF CAMPUS DIVERSITY APRIL 2012VOL. 3 • ISSUE 8 THE SCHOLARSHIP...

  11. Diversity Outlook, September, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-01

    , but may also bring you new information on topics and issues prevalent on our campus today. Thank you for your continued support. As always, I welcome all feedback at fredrod@ku.edu. DIVERSITY OUTLOOK • THE NEWSLETTER OF CAMPUS DIVERSITY SEPTEMBER 2012...

  12. Kaons: Review and Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augusto Ceccucci

    2006-05-30

    This article presents a review of recent results and an outlook of kaon physics. After enjoying a renaissance, the discipline is now becoming and endangered species. Action will be needed to keep kaon physics at the heart of future FPCP meetings.

  13. Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    1992. Global warming and electricity demand: A study ofValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of SolarCEC). 2002. 2002-2012 Electricity Outlook Report, P700- 01-

  14. Short-term energy outlook, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  15. An Outlook on Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balantekin, A B

    2013-01-01

    A brief outlook on low-energy nuclear physics is presented. Selected recent developments in nuclear structure theory are highlighted and a few open questions are discussed.

  16. An Outlook on Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin

    2013-01-05

    A brief outlook on low-energy nuclear physics is presented. Selected recent developments in nuclear structure theory are highlighted and a few open questions are discussed.

  17. International energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

  18. International energy outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-15

    This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

  19. Intelligent Building Energy Information and Control Systems for Low-Energy Operations and Optimal Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Open  Automated  Demand  Response  Communications from  7 Years of Automated Demand Response in Commercial Management and Demand Response in Commercial  Buildings. , 

  20. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the first quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  1. Short-term energy outlook, Quarterly projections. Third quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-08-04

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the second quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

  2. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments response NAESB Business Practice

  3. Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Peirson. 1998. Residential energy demand and the interactionresponse of residential cooling energy demand to climaterise in residential and commercial electricity demand can be

  4. Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

  5. Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

    2004-01-01

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities"Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L Band Commissioning Issues from an Automated Demand Response.

  6. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review provides a yearly comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO) beginning with 1982. This edition of the report adds the AEO 2012 projections and updates the historical data to incorporate the latest data revisions.

  7. Outlook Mailbox Setup Once your Outlook Mailbox has been set up by Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    Outlook Mailbox Setup Once your Outlook Mailbox has been set up by Computing Services, it will be necessary to properly configure the Outlook client to begin receiving your mail. Just follow this process to configure your Outlook 2000, 2002 or 2003 client. 1. Right-click on the Outlook icon that is on your desktop

  8. OUTLOOK -MOBILE DEVICE ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    th OUTLOOK - MOBILE DEVICE ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE Quick Reference Guide is designed to step you through the initial set up of your Outlook email account on your Mac. Note: If you're opening Microsoft Outlook 2011 for the first time, you will see the Welcome to Microsoft Outlook for Mac window

  9. Hunter Outlook Web App Program Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Hunter ­ Outlook Web App #12;Program Basics · To Log In to Outlook Web App (OWA): o Open up your accessing your Outlook account: o OWA will typically default to the light version when it detects a mobile, click the Use the light version of Outlook Web App check box. o Enter your e-mail address and password

  10. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook Nan Zhou, Michael A.2001, International Energy Outlook 2001 , Report No. DOE/The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) , Washington

  11. Global and U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Philip

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook, 2008. No.Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyPatterns, Issues, and Outlook Philip Martin Professor of

  12. Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Provides instructions for remote Outlook...

  13. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Agency (IEA). 2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECDThis study presents a China Energy Outlook through 2050 thatto develop a China Energy Outlook through 2050 with 2020 and

  14. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

    2011-02-15

    As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic expansion and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both a short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as a long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study presents a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. Over the past few years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced its China End-Use Energy Model which is based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. In addition, this analysis also evaluated China's long-term domestic energy supply in order to gauge the potential challenge China may face in meeting long-term demand for energy. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not necessarily be the case because saturation in ownership of appliances, construction of residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that China's 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

  15. Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2006 - Supplemental Tables - All Tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing regional energy consumption and prices by sector; residential, commercial, and industrial demand sector data; transportation demand sector; electricity and renewable fuel; and petroleum, natural gas, and coal data.

  16. Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D.V. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook: Quarterly projections. Fourth quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-05

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the third quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications.

  18. Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-01

    This report is a companion document to the Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94), (DOE/EIA-0383(94)), released in Jan. 1994. Part I of the Supplement presents the key quantitative assumptions underlying the AEO94 projections, responding to requests by energy analysts for additional information on the forecasts. In Part II, the Supplement provides regional projections and other underlying details of the reference case projections in the AEO94. The AEO94 presents national forecasts of energy production, demand and prices through 2010 for five scenarios, including a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. These forecasts are used by Federal, State, and local governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers in the public and private sectors.

  19. 8-14 Day Outlook 30-Day and 90-Day Seasonal Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8-14 Day Outlook 30-Day and 90-Day Seasonal Outlook ENSO Advisory Climate Diagnostics and Prediction Workshop Monthly Climate Bulletin Drought Advisory Drought Outlook Ozone Winter Summary UV Index Forecast Seasonal Hurricane Outlook CDAS Reanalysis NATIONAL CENTERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PREDICTION

  20. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  1. Demand Reduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  2. Conversation View Outlook Web App User Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Conversation View Outlook Web App User Guide Email conversations that include multiple replies and sent messages can be viewed simultaneously using Conversation View. In Exchange 2010 Outlook Web App

  3. Changing Your Outlook Address Book Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    Changing Your Outlook Address Book Information Changes in Customer Services now allow users to update portions of their own Outlook Address Book information. To update your entry, fol- low

  4. LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    December 2014 LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy LD+A Magazine

  5. La Cl informatique Formation Outlook 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    La Clé informatique Formation Outlook 2000 Aide-mémoire Novembre 2003 #12;Table des matières Écrire directement dans votre Outlook. Voici la méthode pour le faire. Dans le menu Outils, choisir Comptes de Hotmail apparaîtra dans la liste des comptes de Outlook. 11 #12;Mettre un arrière plan dans votre message

  6. OUTLOOK -MOBILE DEVICE ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    th OUTLOOK - MOBILE DEVICE ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE This Quick Reference Guide is designed to step you through the setup of your Outlook email account on your mobile device. When to use this Guide is Outlook. NOTE: After you have set up your account you must remove your old GWSync account ITS

  7. Automatic Replies Outlook Web App User Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Automatic Replies Outlook Web App User Guide Automatic Replies (Out of Office) allows you to create or on vacation. Use the following steps to use the Automatic Replies option in Outlook Web App (OWA). Turn On Automatic Reply 1. Log On to Outlook Web App http://mail.ucalgary.ca 2. Click Options in the top right

  8. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01

    Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs V. Residential Discussion... Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off-peak period or from high-price periods...

  9. Outlook for Charged Higgs Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2009-01-15

    Almost all extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged Higgs bosons. This talk focuses on the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM), which is relatively predictive. The outlook for detecting supersymmetric particles and Higgs bosons at the LHC are discussed, as are the prospects for finding indirect effects of supersymmetric Higgs bosons at low energies, e.g., in K decays. The outlook for discovering observable effects of CP-violating supersymmetric phases at high energies or in B decays is also mentioned.

  10. Consideration of the environmental impact of aircraft has become critical in commercial aviation. The continued growth of air traffic has caused increasing demands to reduce aircraft emissions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    aviation. The continued growth of air traffic has caused increasing demands to reduce aircraft emissions airframe, engine and mission. The environmental metrics considered in this investigation are CO2 emissions -- which are proportional to fuel burn -- and landing- takeoff NOx emissions. The results are compared

  11. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Industrial Demand Module

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (BillionTechnical InformationDecade Year-0 2Market Module This pageIndustrial

  12. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Transportation Demand Module

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (BillionTechnical InformationDecade Year-0 2Market ModuleOil and

  13. Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    -2007 .............................................................................. 9 6 Alberta conventional crude oil production and price........................................................ 10 7 Alberta mined bitumen production and synthetic crude oil production and price............ 10 8 ............................................................................................................. 4 3 Alberta supply of crude oil and equivalent

  14. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    2006. “All India Electricity Statistics, General Review2005, “Industrial Statistics of India: Status and Issues”,is reported in India’s national statistics for this sector,

  15. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    rural, k=Kerosene m=rural, k=biogas m =urban, k=LPG m=urban,k=LPG k=wood k=kerosene k=biogas k=electricity k=electricity

  16. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    of oil use for the need of LPG and kerosene for cooking andSector PJ Fuel Oil Diesel Oil LPG Electricity Source: CEA,PJ) PJ fuel oil diesel LPG electricity Energy consumption is

  17. California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be 750 megawatts (MW) lower because of ongoing repairs to the Pacific Northwest DC transmission line, 2, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulation

  18. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Tables Figures Figure 1. India Primary Energy Supply by fuel7 Figure 2. Final and Primary Energy (including biomass) by19 Figure 10. Final and Primary Energy Consumption in the

  19. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Efficiency in Electricity Consumption", HWWA Discussionelectricity includes electricity consumption plus thedistribution. Total electricity consumption represents 1,654

  20. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Technology for Indian Pulp and Paper Industry” Newsletter ofwith 13% and the pulp and paper industry with 9%. Similarly,and Paper The Indian pulp and paper industry is the sixth

  1. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    for cooking and lighting. Biomass energy consumption willused in an economy, biomass energy consumption is certainlyby a large share of biomass energy use representing 50% of

  2. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    7 Figure 3. Energy Consumption in the Agriculture Sector (13 Figure 6. Energy Consumption in the ServiceFinal and Primary Energy Consumption in the Industry Sector,

  3. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Statistics and Programme Implementation published a condensed version of statics related to energy production and consumption (

  4. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    2002, “TEDDY: TERI’s energy data directory and yearbook2006. “TEDDY: TERI’s energy data directory and yearbookU.S. DOE, 2006, “Buildings Energy Data Book 2006”, September

  5. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum pricing in India: balancing efficiency andand Tables Figures Figure 1. India Primary Energy Supply by28 Table 13. India, US and France Farm Machinery

  6. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    same activities that require energy today will continue toaccounting of how energy is consumed today. For each sector,

  7. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    2005a. “Statistics of the Indian Paper Industry: Directoryof Indian Paper Industry”. Volume II. Saharanpur, India. de2005. “The Indian Paper Industry: Towards Sustainability”,

  8. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    and 6 million diesel irrigation pump sets in operation (rural areas, pump sets are installed to provide irrigation

  9. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  10. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    5% of its reserve is coking coal used by the steel industry.imports around 70% of coking coal annually. More recently,

  11. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Diesel, 18% Primary Electricity Diesel, 49% Electricty,51% Electricty Data Adjustment Electricity consumption from

  12. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    gas oil nuclear hydro Energy output Own Uses Transmissiongas oil nuclear hydro Energy output Own Uses Transmissionenergy equivalence of electricity generated from hydro or

  13. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    photovoltaic water pumping systems since 1993- 94. About 7,000 pump set were installed with a capacity

  14. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    of 43% of total oil consumption. The residential sectorrepresenting 63% and oil consumption representing the rest.the diesel and fuel oil consumption are included, the total

  15. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    pumps in India”, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews,Renewable Energy (MNES), 2008. “Annual Report 2007-08”. Government of India.

  16. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    first electricity distribution and transmission (T&D)Own Uses Transmission and distribution losses ElectricityOwn Uses Transmission and distribution loses Electricity

  17. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. Pan Kexi. (2005) “TheIEA 2008, various years. World Energy Outlook. Paris: OECD/2006). International Energy Outlook 2006. Washington DC:

  18. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

  19. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    pdf. ———. 2011b. Residential Demand Module of the Nationaland the Commercial and Residential Demand Modules (DOE EIAcommercial and residential electricity demand projections

  20. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    to  Automated  Demand   Response  and  the  OpenADR  ®  Automated  Demand  Response  Program.   https://Data  for  Automated  Demand  Response  in  Commercial  

  1. Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2008-01-01

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities. CEC-Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Management and Demand Response in Commercial Building. ,

  2. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01

    for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” In2010. “Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  3. Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    Development for Demand Response Calculation - Findings and2003. “Dividends with Demand Response. ” ASHRAE Journal,Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ”

  4. Annual energy outlook 1995, with projections to 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents projections and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1995 and 1996 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1995). Forecast tables for the five cases examined in the AEO95 are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendix A gives historical data and forecasts for selected years from 1992 through 2010 for the reference case. Appendix B presents two additional cases, which assume higher and lower economic growth than the reference case. Appendix C presents two cases that assume higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix D presents a summary of the forecasts in units of oil equivalence. Appendix E presents a summary of household energy expenditures. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO95 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO95 forecast assumptions. Appendix H presents a stand-alone high electricity demand case. Appendix 1 provides a table of energy conversion factors and a table of metric conversion factors. 89 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, third quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the second quarter of 1996, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the third quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  6. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, fourth quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-14

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for printed publication in January, April, July, and October in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates on or about the 6th of each interim month, are available on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the fourth quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. 19 tabs.

  7. Changes in Natural Gas Monthly Consumption Data Collection and the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Beginning with the December 2010 issue of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) will present natural gas consumption forecasts for the residential and commercial sectors that are consistent with recent changes to the Form EIA-857 monthly natural gas survey.

  8. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Agency (IEA). 2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECDlines in the 2009 World Energy Outlook 450 ppm scenario.Agency (IEA)’s 2009 World Energy Outlook 450 ppm scenario.

  9. Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-19

    Jun 19, 2013 ... efficient linear programming formulation for the demand response of such a consumer who could be a price taker, industrial or commercial user ...

  10. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, first quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the fourth quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the first quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook.

  11. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

  12. International energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1997 (IE097) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2015.

  13. Savannah River Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Safely Reach Milestone Savannah River Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Safely Reach Milestone January 1, 2012 -...

  14. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Financing and Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing and Commercial Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing Products Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call...

  15. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  16. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  17. Demand Control Utilizing Energy Management Systems - Report of Field Tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, B. D.; Heller, R. P.; Perry, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Energy Management systems and particularly demand controllers are becoming more popular as commercial and light industrial operations attempt to reduce their electrical usage and demand. Numerous techniques are used to control energy use and demand...

  18. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01

    In the residential and commercial sectors, oil demand willthe residential and commercial sectors, electricity demandwater heating demand in the residential sector. At present,

  19. Annual energy outlook 1994: With projections to 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents projects and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based for the first time on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is the latest in a series of computer-based energy modeling systems used over the past 2 decades by EIA and its predecessor organization, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze and forecast energy consumption and supply in the midterm period (about 20 years). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1994 and 1995 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1994). Forecast tables for 2000, 2005, and 2010 for each of the five scenarios examined in the AEO94 are provided in Appendices A through E. The five scenarios include a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO94 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly described the NEMS and the major AEO94 forecast assumptions. Appendix H summarizes the key results for the five scenarios.

  20. Outlook 2011 For the Macintosh Self Help Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outlook 2011 For the Macintosh Self Help Guide Overview Outlook 2011 is a program that includes Menu Bar List Pane MENU BAR At the top of the screen are menus that you are used to seeing. · Outlook - preferences and other Outlook commands. · File - new, open, close, save, importing, exporting and printing

  1. LHCb Computing Resources: 2016 request and 2017 outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozzi, Concezio

    2015-01-01

    Computing resources requested for LHCb in 2016, and an outlook for the following year, are presented.

  2. Short-term energy outlook, annual supplement 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (Supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  3. Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-06

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2010-01-01

    and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050. Lawrence Berkeley2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECD Publishing.Future Energy and Emissions Outlook Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou and

  5. Outlook of the Officers: Military Thought in Chile, 1960-1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bawden, John Richard

    2009-01-01

    national ideology. ECONOMIC OUTLOOK ‘Whether you like it orOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Outlook of the Officers: MilitaryOF THE DISSERTATION Outlook of the Officers: Military

  6. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01

    industrial sector, oil demand will decrease due particularlyand commercial sectors, oil demand will decline on a shifttransportation sector, oil demand will shrink on a fall in

  7. Annual outlook for US electric power, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-24

    This document includes summary information on the ownership structure of the US electric utility industry, a description of electric utility regulation, and identification of selected factors likely to affect US electricity markets from 1985 through 1995. This Outlook expands upon projections first presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1985, offering additional discussion of projected US electricity markets and regional detail. It should be recognized that work on the Annual Energy Outlook 1985 had been completed prior to the sharp reductions in world oil prices experienced early in 1986.

  8. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retired, but still being a nuisance and open to contracts Ex CEGB and National Grid UK GB Electricity Operations - Generation, Demand, Fuel and Market modelling Contributor to EU...

  9. Status of Potential New Commercial Nuclear Reactors in the United Release Date: December 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    and policies is provided in the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO), which projects a net increase. There is no assurance that any of these plants will ultimately be built or operate commercially. The Energy Information

  10. Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Method for Heat and Electricity Demand for the Purpose ofstatistical models of electricity demand from Commercial andbuilt with historical electricity demand data. A facility

  11. Conclusions and outlook 10.1 Conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Sterck, Hans

    Chapter 10 Conclusions and outlook 10.1 Conclusions In this dissertation new results have been- sults were applied to space physics ows in the solar corona and in the earth's magnetic environment

  12. 2015 NASEO Energy Policy Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BETO Director Jonathan Male will be speaking at the National Association of State Energy Organization Energy Policy Outlook Conference, which will be taking place from February 3–6 at the Washington, D.C.

  13. OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browne, Greg T

    2013-01-01

    finding alternatives to Outlook Specialty crops and methylNumber 3 Steve Fennimore Outlook Non-fumigant approaches to

  14. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  15. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    when called to do so. Daily Peak Load Management: Dailypeak load management is done in many buildings to minimizeimplement daily peak load management. Decisions about when

  16. DEEP WP 005 Commercial and Industrial Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    in the opportunity for fringe producers to exploit market power. Estimates place the magnitude of the deadweight loss, and is the most common way for time-varying incentives to be transmitted to retail electricity customers. We: (530) 752-5368; Email: dsrapson@ucdavis.edu #12;1 1 Introduction In the electricity market, marginal

  17. InDemandInDemandInDemand Energize Your Career

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    InDemandInDemandInDemand Energize Your Career You can join the next generation of workers who in Energy #12;#12;In Demand | 1 No, this isn't a quiz...but if you answered yes to any or all and Training Administration wants you to have this publication, In Demand: Careers in Energy. It will let you

  18. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    Press. IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. Pan Kexi. (IEA 2008, various years. World Energy Outlook. Paris: OECD/s total IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. World Energy

  19. VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand Video on Demand Testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleftheriadis, Alexandros

    VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand Columbia's Video on Demand Testbed and Interoperability Experiment Columbia's Video on Demand Testbed and Interoperability Experiment S.-F. Chang and A Columbia UniversityColumbia University www.www.ctrctr..columbiacolumbia..eduedu/advent/advent #12;VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand

  20. VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand Video on Demand Testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleftheriadis, Alexandros

    #12;VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand Columbia's Video on Demand Testbed and Interoperability Experiment Columbia's Video on Demand Testbed and Interoperability Experiment H.H. KalvaKalva, A.www.eeee..columbiacolumbia..eduedu/advent/advent #12;VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand VoD Testbed ArchitectureVoD Testbed Architecture Video

  1. The Space-Weather Awareness Dialogue: Findings and Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    The Space-Weather Awareness Dialogue: Findings and Outlook An event hosted by the European-WEATHER AWARENESS DIALOGUE: FINDINGS AND OUTLOOK An event hosted by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre

  2. 42 Ornamental OUTLOOK March 2008 By Cliff Sadof, Tamara Benjamin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    42 Ornamental OUTLOOK · March 2008 By Cliff Sadof, Tamara Benjamin, and Eduardo Hidalgo FF loridaEduardoHidalgoPhotocourtesyofCliffSadof #12;44 Ornamental OUTLOOK · March 2008 Plant Quality group at the Port of Miami took his team

  3. OUTLOOK 2007 -Configuration POP 1. Slectionnez le menu Outils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    OUTLOOK 2007 - Configuration POP 1. Sélectionnez le menu Outils 2. Sélectionnez le menu Paramètres. Cliquez sur le bouton Suivant 20. Cliquez sur le bouton Terminer. #12;OUTLOOK 2007 - Configuration IMAP 1

  4. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  5. Commercial and Industrial DSM Program Overview | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial and Industrial DSM Program Overview Commercial and Industrial DSM Program Overview Presentation provides an overview of PEPCO and Delmarva Power's demand side management...

  6. The Role of Demand Response Policy Forum Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Role of Demand Response Policy Forum Series Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Future and Demand Response #12;Historic focus on Seasonal Grid Stress PG&E Demand Bid Test Day 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 Communication Latency #12;Bottom Up Review of End-Use Loads for Demand Response 5 Commercial Residential

  7. Outlook Student Email Setup updated 1/3/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outlook Student Email Setup updated 1/3/2013 Summary: this document will describe how to setup your ODU account to use Outlook 2010. To do so, first you must setup a Gmail service password in MIDAS minutes for the initial password sync to occur, then you can proceed with the Outlook setup. #12;1. Open

  8. An Outlook on Semantic Business Process Mining and Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    An Outlook on Semantic Business Process Mining and Monitoring A.K. Alves de Medeiros1 , C-of-the-art in analysis techniques. In this paper we present an outlook on the opportunities and challenges on semantic Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007 #12;An Outlook on Semantic Business Process Mining and Monitoring

  9. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, 2nd quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1994 through the fourth quarter of 1995. Values for the first quarter of 1994, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available. The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1994 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the STIFS. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. The EIA model is available on computer tape from the National Technical Information Service.

  10. Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, J.

    2008-01-01

    Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assets—at no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary...

  11. Introduction Delegate Access is an Outlook feature that allows one person to act on behalf of another Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    Introduction Delegate Access is an Outlook feature that allows one person to act on behalf of another Outlook user. This is useful for people (e.g. personal assistants) who need to manage another user's Outlook items. When providing delegate access, the owner can decide what items the delegate can see

  12. Outlook Web App User Guide Use the following steps to create a web version of your signature for the Outlook Web App.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Signatures Outlook Web App User Guide Use the following steps to create a web version of your signature for the Outlook Web App. Create a Signature 1. Log On to Outlook Web App http://mail.ucalgary.ca 2

  13. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  14. China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2014-01-01

    China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook. Berkeley, CA:Energy Agency), 2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECDAgency (IEA)’s World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2009, which set

  15. DDI Specification: Current Status and Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Wendy; Gregory, Arofan

    2013-04-03

    DDI Specification: Current Status and Outlook Wendy Thomas Arofan Gregory NADDI 2013 3.2 Public Review 3.2 schema complete and in subversion site branches/proposed3.2/schema Field level documentation has been revised throughout and is available...DDI Specification: Current Status and Outlook Wendy Thomas Arofan Gregory NADDI 2013 3.2 Public Review • 3.2 schema complete and in subversion site branches/proposed3.2/schema • Field level documentation has been revised throughout...

  16. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  17. Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    signal · Reinforces conservation program efforts in areas such as insulation and heat pumps Voluntary DR Commercial & Industrial DR Pilot ­ Internet communication/control of imbedded load control devices on up storage Commercial & Industrial DR Pilot (8 customers)* · Open Automated Demand Response Communication

  18. Annual energy outlook 1999, with projections to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an Overview summarizing the AEO99 reference case. The next section, Legislation and Regulations, describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. Issues in Focus discusses current energy issues--the economic decline in East Asia, growth in demand for natural gas, vehicle emissions standards, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO99 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present a summary of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. The AEO99 projections are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1998. Pending legislation and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the forecasts. Historical data used for the AEOI99 projections were the most current available as of July 31, 1998, when most 1997 data but only partial 1998 data were available.

  19. Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2007-10-26

    I summarize the status of three-flavour neutrino oscillations with date of Oct. 2007, and provide an outlook for the developments to be expected in the near future. Furthermore, I discuss the status of sterile neutrino oscillation interpretations of the LSND anomaly in the light of recent MiniBooNE results, and comment on implications for the future neutrino oscillation program.

  20. Diversity Outlook Special Edition,March 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-01

    .S. Supreme Court in 2003. REGISTRATION REQUIRED, ONLINE AT SYMPOSIUM; more on pg. 2 DIVERSITY OUTLOOK • THE NEWSLETTER OF CAMPUS DIVERSITY MARCH 2013VOL. 4 • ISSUE 8 REGISTER FOR MARCH 28 SYMPOSIUM ONLINE AT WWW.DIVERSITY.KU.EDU Thursday, March 28 8-8:30 a...

  1. Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the AEO using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO projections.

  2. Short-term energy outlook, October 1998. Quarterly projections, 1998 4. quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from October 1998 through December 1999. Values for third quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the October 1998 version of the Short-term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

  3. ARE Update Volume 13, Number 6; The World of Wine: Economic Issues and Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumner, Dan; ANDERSON, KYM; Montaigne, Etienne; Lapsley, James T.

    2010-01-01

    of Wine: Economic Issues and Outlook Notes from the Guesta one-day symposium on “Outlook and Issues for the Worldof the situ- ation and outlook for wine that affect all

  4. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University shows women in the program that they can succeed and also prevents manipulation www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/Outlook

  5. Calendrier de Polytechnique Guide sur la synchronisation automatique des vnements avec Outlook et

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meunier, Michel

    Calendrier de Polytechnique Guide sur la synchronisation automatique des événements avec Outlook et..............................................................................................................4 Ajouter le calendrier dans Outlook calendrier Outlook. Afin de vous assurer que votre calendrier se mettra automatiquement à jour lors de l

  6. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University to distributional cues that support lexical acquisition. www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook_2015_3.pdf

  7. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook”. January 2007. LBNL-India: Past Trend and Future Outlook Stephane de la Rue duSectoral Trends and Future Outlook (Zhou et al. , 2007)

  8. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Agency (IEA). 2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECDsection of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the sameEnergy Agency (IEA)’s World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2009, which

  9. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2010-01-01

    2010. China’s Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050.Agency (IEA). 2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECDsection of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same

  10. USING MICROSOFT OUTLOOK 2010 FOR RSS UPDATES. Please note that this setup will only apply to the local machine that outlook is currently installed on.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING MICROSOFT OUTLOOK 2010 FOR RSS UPDATES. Please note that this setup will only apply to the local machine that outlook is currently installed on. 1. In Outlook 2010, by default a folder called should produce a screen like the one below if there are no RSS feeds being captured by Outlook. #12

  11. Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030 The Drive for Energy Diversity and Sustainability: The Impact on Transportation Fuels and Propulsion System Portfolios Algae Biofuels Technology...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 03 Wyss Economic Outlook [Compatibility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Wyss Economic Outlook Compatibility Mode More Documents & Publications Decoupling: Mechanics and Issues, Presentation to the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission Energy...

  13. SEP Special Projects Report: Future Outlook and Appendix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-07-01

    The Sharing Success appendix provides the future outlook for SEP as well as charts and graphs for grants and Special Projects.

  14. Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This section of the Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 present the major assumptions of the modeling system used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in Appendix B. A synopsis of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented. The NEMS is developed and maintained by the office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projection of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by various government agencies and the private sector.

  15. INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletterGuidingUpdateofMarchOffshore Wind Outlook INFOGRAPHIC:

  16. Agricultural Outlook Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslie PezzulloAgenda Agenda AgendaAgricultural Outlook

  17. Short-term energy outlook, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. International energy outlook 1995, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1995 (IEO95) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the international energy market outlook through 2010. The report is an extension of the EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). US projections appearing in the IEO95 are consistent with those published in the AEO95. IEO95 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projects are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 295(c). The IEO95 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1994. IEO95 displays projections according to six basic country groupings. The regionalization has changed since last year`s report. Mexico has been added to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and a more detailed regionalization has been incorporated for the remainder of the world, including the following subgroups: non-OECD Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China is included in non-OECD Asia. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are combined in the EE/FSU subgroup.

  19. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

  20. Annual energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2015 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). These projections are based on results of EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report begins with a summary of the reference case, followed by a discussion of the legislative assumptions and evolving legislative and regulatory issues. ``Issues in Focus`` discusses emerging energy issues and other topics of particular interest. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO97 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present summaries of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. Twenty-three other cases explore the impacts of varying key assumptions in NEMS--generally, technology penetration, with the major results shown in Appendix F. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO97 assumptions, with a summary table. 114 figs., 22 tabs.

  1. Annual energy outlook 2009 with projections to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-15

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO009), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an 'early release' version of the AEO009 reference case in December 2008. The report begins with an 'Executive Summary' that highlights key aspects of the projections. It is followed by a 'Legislation and Regulations' section that discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including a summary of recently enacted legislation, such as the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (EIEA2008). The next section, 'Issues in Focus,' contains discussions of selected topics, including: the impacts of limitations on access to oil and natural gas resources on the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS); the implications of uncertainty about capital costs for new electricity generating plants; and the result of extending the Federal renewable production tax credit (PTC). It also discusses the relationship between natural gas and oil prices and the basis of the world oil price and production trends in AEO2009.

  2. Annual energy outlook 2005 with projections to 2025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-02-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modelling System (NEMS). The report begins with an 'Overview' summarizing the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, 'Legislation and Regulations', discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues in the USA. Issues in Focus includes discussions on key energy market issues and examines their potential impacts. In particular, it includes a discussion of the world oil price assumptions used in the reference case and four alternative world oil price cases examined in AEO2005. 'Issues in Focus' is followed by 'Market Trends', which provides a summary of energy market trends in the AEO2005 forecast. The analysis in AEO2005 focuses primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and four alternative oil price cases, a low world oil price case, an October oil futures case, and two high world oil price cases. Forecast tables for those cases are provided in Appendixes A through D. The major results for the alterative cases, which explore the impacts of varying key assumption in NEMS (such as rates of technology penetration), are summarized in Appendix E. Appendix F briefly describes NEMS and the alternative cases. 115 figs., 38 tabs., 8 apps.

  3. Commercial Weatherization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial buildings consume 19 percent of the energy used in the U.S. Learn how the Energy Department is supporting research and deployment on commercial weatherization.

  4. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  5. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01

    benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

  6. Comparison of the 1984 DOE/EIA annual energy outlook and the 1984 GRI baseline projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashby, A.; Holtberg, P.; Woods, T.

    1985-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the Gas Research Institute (GRI) Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand with the DOE/EIA 1984 Annual Energy Outlook shows many similar assumptions, but many cases of widening differences between the projections of primary energy consumption and sector-specific energy consumption. The DOE/EIA expects a faster and more significant decline in the electricity to natural gas price ratio, lower sector-specific end-use prices of refined petroleum products, and a faster growth in industrial raw material energy demand. In contrast to the GRI report, it also omits an estimate of industrial cogeneration and does not retire any exisiting generating capacity. The report examines the basic assumptions and results of both projections using five scenarios. 17 tables.

  7. Energy for 500 million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sourcesLBNL-2417E Energy for 500 million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*, Michael A. McNeil, Mark Levine Keywords

  8. CAREER OUTLOOK FOR ACTUARIES in Property/Casualty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, David B.

    CAREER OUTLOOK FOR ACTUARIES in Property/Casualty insurance in 20106 in number of actuaries. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Dermot and Sommer, Martin. "Vehicle Ownership and Income Growth, Worldwide: 1960-2030," Energy Journal

  9. Long-term outlook for engineered wood products in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-term outlook for engineered wood products in Europe Heikki Manninen Technical Report 91, 2014 #12;Long-term outlook for engineered wood products in Europe Heikki Manninen Publisher: European for future oriented market research of engineered wood products (EWP) in Europe. For example, the need for CO

  10. Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesOutlook and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesPresident, Emerging Markets Online http://www.emerginghttp://www.emerging--markets.commarkets.com Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market SurveyAuthor, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey Columnist

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 with Projections to 2035

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-04-01

    The projections in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. Under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain unchanged throughout the projections, the AEO2011 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy production, consumption, technology, and market trends and the direction they may take in the future. It also serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in energy policies. But AEO2011 is not limited to the Reference case. It also includes 57 sensitivity cases (see Appendix E, Table E1), which explore important areas of uncertainty for markets, technologies, and policies in the U.S. energy economy. Key results highlighted in AEO2011 include strong growth in shale gas production, growing use of natural gas and renewables in electric power generation, declining reliance on imported liquid fuels, and projected slow growth in energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions even in the absence of new policies designed to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. AEO2011 also includes in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect the energy outlook. They include: impacts of the continuing renewal and updating of Federal and State laws and regulations; discussion of world oil supply and price trends shaped by changes in demand from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development or in supply available from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries; an examination of the potential impacts of proposed revisions to Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for light-duty vehicles and proposed new standards for heavy-duty vehicles; the impact of a series of updates to appliance standard alone or in combination with revised building codes; the potential impact on natural gas and crude oil production of an expanded offshore resource base; prospects for shale gas; the impact of cost uncertainty on construction of new electric power plants; the economics of carbon capture and storage; and the possible impact of regulations on the electric power sector under consideration by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some of the highlights from those discussions are mentioned in this Executive Summary. Readers interested in more detailed analyses and discussions should refer to the 'Issues in focus' section of this report.

  12. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University/III study of 475 extremely preterm babies at 15 medical centers across the country. www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human

  13. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University with FXS and ASD, which, in turn, can help families and practitioners who work with these children. www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University

  14. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University, and several studies have shown the positive effects of PFR on at-risk populations. www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University of Washington, Box 357920

  15. Using Outlook's Spam Filter Last Updated: April 29, 2010 Page 1 of 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Using Outlook's Spam Filter Last Updated: April 29, 2010 Page 1 of 6 Microsoft Outlook has several the sender's email address to the list will bypass Outlook's spam filter. 3. Add Sender's Domain (@example Outlook's spam filter. 4. Add Recipient to Safe Recipients List ­ An example for this is that your email

  16. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University to MS, and our hypothesis is that a small number of people www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center

  17. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University ages. www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook_2012_7.pdf 2012 Issue #7 Colin Studholme is leading Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University of Washington, Box 357920

  18. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University matter. As a consequence, drugs that proved useful in rodent models failed in clinical trials. www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/Outlook and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center

  19. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University finds its target, in this case the muscle www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook_2015_2.pdf 2015 and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University

  20. Using Outlook Web Access Last Updated: September 2, 2010 Page 1 of 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Using Outlook Web Access Last Updated: September 2, 2010 Page 1 of 4 Outlook Web Access is another additional software. Most of what could be accessed from an installation of Microsoft Outlook could will lengthen the period of activity before the session is logged off. Selecting Outlook Web Access Light if you

  1. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University, in particular N-acetylaspartate, (NAA), measured at very low levels in the children with autism, as www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University of Washington, Box 357920

  2. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University or duplications www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook_2012_3.pdf 2012 Issue #3 Fuki Hisama, the medical and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University

  3. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University disabilities." www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/Outlook_2012-Issue1.html 2012 Issue #1 LEND director Beth Ellen and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University

  4. Outlook 2007 Junk Email Safe Senders Option Page 1 of 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Outlook 2007 Junk Email Safe Senders Option Page 1 of 4 Title Please note: This document is written for Outlook 2007. Often, you will find emails misclassified as spam and end up in the Outlook Junk Email Email Filters. Whitelists in Outlook 2007 is called Safe Senders List. To add email addresses or email

  5. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University." www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/Outlook_2010-Issue5.html 2010 Issue #6 #12;CHDD Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University of Washington, Box 357920

  6. OUTLOOK MAIL MERGE QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Copyright Swinburne University of Technology Updated 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    OUTLOOK ­ MAIL MERGE QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Copyright ©Swinburne University of Technology Updated 4 th September 2012 Mail merge is a feature of Outlook and Word that allows you to send: From Outlook using your Outlook contacts 1. In the Contacts view, select the names of the Contacts you

  7. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University during cerebellar development. We are finding more and more types of cerebellar www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center

  8. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University opportunities into play. Some of the families will be taught using experimental teaching methods aimed www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University

  9. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University used by high-performing athletes for a different purpose in what is called "blood-doping." www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University of Washington, Box 357920

  10. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University for mutations in genes that might be linked to human disease. Then, by knocking things out in a neuron www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University

  11. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University embryos, the fish developed larger heads and wide-set eyes. The www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human Development and Disability, University

  12. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University, is charged with serving the poorest preschool-age children in the country www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/Outlook Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center on Human

  13. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University's interdisciplinary team approach is well-suited for seeing children with significant www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. CHDD Outlook Center

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

  15. Commercial Vehicle Parking In California: Exploratory Evaluation of the Problem and Possible Technology-Based Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Dealing with Truck Parking Demands. National CooperativeAdequacy of Commercial Truck Parking Facilities – TechnicalAdequacy of Commercial Truck Parking Facilities – Technical

  16. Asian Development Outlook 2010 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A SOpenAshley, Ohio: Energy- Transport Jump to:Outlook 2010

  17. Global EV Outlook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlant <SilverChange AssociatesOutlook Jump to:

  18. IEA World Energy Outlook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei | Open Energy2010) |Outlook Jump to: navigation,

  19. Fujifilm_NERSC_StorageOutlook.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming UpgradesArea: PADD 1 toCellsA Storage Outlook

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003Summer 2013 Outlook forSupplement:3 1

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecade Year-0dAnnual Energy Outlook

  2. LPG export growth will exceed demand by 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1994-08-08

    LPG supplies for international trade will increase sharply through 2000 and begin to outstrip demand by 1997 or 1998. This outlook depends on several production projects proceeding as planned. Leading the way to increased volumes are projects in Algeria, Nigeria, and Australia, among others. Purvin and Gertz, Dallas, projected this trend earlier this year at an international LPG seminar near Houston. Representatives from LPG-supplying countries also presented information to support this view and subsequently supplied more specifics to OGJ in response to questions. This paper discusses this information. Trends in Africa, Australia, North America, and South America are forecast.

  3. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    2011).pdf. ———. 2012a. “Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2012. ”2013. “Annual Energy Outlook - Model Documentation. ”forecast, the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (DOE EIA 2012a).

  4. Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Freight transportation demand is projected to grow to 27.5 billion tons in 2040, and by extrapolation, to nearly 30.2 billion tons in 2050, requiring ever-greater amounts of energy. This report describes the current and future demand for freight transportation in terms of tons and ton-miles of commodities moved by truck, rail, water, pipeline, and air freight carriers. It outlines the economic, logistics, transportation, and policy and regulatory factors that shape freight demand; the possible trends and 2050 outlook for these factors, and their anticipated effect on freight demand and related energy use.After describing federal policy actions that could influence freight demand, the report then summarizes the available analytical models for forecasting freight demand, and identifies possible areas for future action.

  5. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Residential Energy Demand .Variables Drivers of Residential Energy Demand Key Drivers2050. In AIS, residential energy demand plateaus by 2020,

  6. MS Outlook 2003 Secure IMAP Configuration Settings for Windows-based PC for HMS Local and Remote Usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi

    MS Outlook 2003 Secure IMAP Configuration Settings for Windows-based PC for HMS Local and Remote. Technical support is available only for the web-based email client, Outlook Web Access (OWA). · *Pre/install the updates for Outlook. (This document has been tested using MS Outlook 2003.) Step 1: Launch MS Outlook 2003

  7. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01

    This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

  8. DEMAND INTERPROCEDURAL PROGRAM ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reps, Thomas W.

    1 DEMAND INTERPROCEDURAL PROGRAM ANALYSIS USING LOGIC DATABASES Thomas W. Reps Computer Sciences@cs.wisc.edu ABSTRACT This paper describes how algorithms for demand versions of inerprocedural program­ analysis for all elements of the program. This paper concerns the solution of demand versions of interprocedural

  9. Capacity Demand Power (GW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Capacity Demand Power (GW) Hour of the Day The "Dip" Electricity Demand in Electricity Demand Every weekday, Japan's electricity use dips about 6 GW at 12 but it also shows that: · Behavior affects naHonal electricity use in unexpected ways

  10. Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

  11. Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

  12. Outlook Web App User Guide Frequently contacted individuals can be saved in an address book in Outlook known as a Contact Card. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Contacts Outlook Web App User Guide Frequently contacted individuals can be saved in an address book in Outlook known as a Contact Card. The following instructions will aid you in creating

  13. Steamboat-Springs:Internet:Internet Applications:Outlook Express 4.5 Folder:Outlook Express Temp:final-masanori.doc 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    Steamboat-Springs:Internet:Internet Applications:Outlook Express 4.5 Folder:Outlook Express Temp for Collaborative, Evolutionary Design____________11 #12;Steamboat-Springs:Internet:Internet Applications

  14. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Retrofitting Existing Buildings for Demand Response & Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Retrofitting Existing Buildings for Demand Response & Energy Efficiency www rate periods to avoid high charges. · Assembly Bill 1103 ­ Building Energy Efficiency Disclosure - Starting January 1, 2010, all commercial building lease transactions must disclose the energy efficiency

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 with Projections to 2040

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013), prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2040, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System. The report begins with an “Executive summary” that highlights key aspects of the projections. It is followed by a “Legislation and regulations” section that discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues, including a summary of recently enacted legislation and regulations, such as: Updated handling of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for industrial boilers and process heaters; New light-duty vehicle (LDV) greenhouse gas (GHG) and corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards for model years 2017 to 2025; Reinstatement of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) after the court’s announcement of intent to vacate the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR); and Modeling of California’s Assembly Bill 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32), which allows for representation of a cap-and-trade program developed as part of California’s GHG reduction goals for 2020. The “Issues in focus” section contains discussions of selected energy topics, including a discussion of the results in two cases that adopt different assumptions about the future course of existing policies, with one case assuming the elimination of sunset provisions in existing policies and the other case assuming the elimination of the sunset provisions and the extension of a selected group of existing public policies—CAFE standards, appliance standards, and production tax credits. Other discussions include: oil price and production trends in AEO2013; U.S. reliance on imported liquids under a range of cases; competition between coal and natural gas in electric power generation; high and low nuclear scenarios through 2040; and the impact of growth in natural gas liquids production. The “Market trends” section summarizes the projections for energy markets. The analysis in AEO2013 focuses primarily on a Reference case, Low and High Economic Growth cases, and Low and High Oil Price cases. Results from a number of other alternative cases also are presented, illustrating uncertainties associated with the Reference case projections for energy demand, supply, and prices. Complete tables for the five primary cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Major results from many of the alternative cases are provided in Appendix D. Complete tables for all the alternative cases are available on EIA’s website in a table browser at http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo/tablebrowser. AEO2013 projections are based generally on federal, state, and local laws and regulations in effect as of the end of September 2012. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards (and sections of existing legislation that require implementing regulations or funds that have not been appropriated) are not reflected in the projections. In certain situations, however, where it is clear that a law or regulation will take effect shortly after the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is completed, it may be considered in the projection.

  17. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    DECC aggregator managed portfolio automated demand responseaggregator designs their own programs, and offers demand responseaggregator is responsible for designing and implementing their own demand response

  18. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 2: Final residential and commercial building prototypes and DOE-2.1E developed UECs and EUIs; Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    This section contains the detailed measured impact results and market segment data for each DSM case examined for this building type. A complete index of all base and measure cases defined for this building type is shown first. This index represents an expansion of the base and measure matrix presented in Table 1 (residential) or Table 2 (commercial) for the applicable sector. Following this index, a summary report sheet is provided for each DSM measure case in the order shown in the index. The summary report sheet contains a host of information and selected graphs which define and depict the measure impacts and outline the market segment data assumptions utilized for each case in the DBEDT DSM Forecasting models. The variables and figures included in the summary report sheet are described. Numerous tables and figures are included.

  19. Procdure de configuration d'Outlook 2010 pour Exchange 2010 Procdure de modification d'un compte d'Outlook 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    Procédure de configuration d'Outlook 2010 pour Exchange 2010 1 Procédure de modification d'un compte d'Outlook 2010 pour Exchange 2010 1. Cliquez sur l'onglet « Fichier » et sur le bouton compte », cliquez sur le bouton « Nouveau... ». #12;Procédure de configuration d'Outlook 2010 pour

  20. Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) offers the Demand and Energy Efficiency Program (DEEP) to eligible commercial, industrial, and municipal government customers served by OMPA. This...

  1. Electric power supply and demand for the contiguous United States, 1980-1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    A limited review is presented of the outlook for the electric power supply and demand during the period 1980 to 1989. Only the adequacy and reliability aspects of bulk electric power supply in the contiguous US are considered. The economic, financial and environmental aspects of electric power system planning and the distribution of electricity (below the transmission level) are topics of prime importance, but they are outside the scope of this report.

  2. IN-SPIRE: Creating a Visualization from Microsoft Outlook

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31

    IN-SPIRE can harvest text from Microsoft Outlook e-mail messages via a simple drag-and-drop mechanism. This is great for mailing lists or systems that send search results via e-mail.

  3. Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook was undertaken to characterize the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market and to examine recent trends and future prospects in the LNG market.

  4. Workshop to Examine Outlook for State and Federal Policies to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RENO, Nev. Experts from around the country will discuss the outlook for state and federal policies to help expand geothermal energy at an all-day workshop scheduled for Reno,...

  5. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13%...

  6. China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Energy Agency), 2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECDEnergy Agency (IEA)’s World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2009, whichresults are taken from World Energy Outlook 2009. As seen in

  7. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Agency. 2008. ?2008 World Energy Outlook. ? Japan Petroleumbelow the 2008 World Energy Outlook‘s projection (FigureSource: IEA, 2008 World Energy Outlook; LBNL CLU Model. 4.2

  8. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01

    Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

  9. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

  10. Demand Response Programs for Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

  11. The jamming scenario - an introduction and outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea J. Liu; Sidney R. Nagel; Wim van Saarloos; Matthieu Wyart

    2011-01-27

    The jamming scenario of disordered media, formulated about 10 years ago, has in recent years been advanced by analyzing model systems of granular media. This has led to various new concepts that are increasingly being explored in in a variety of systems. This chapter contains an introductory review of these recent developments and provides an outlook on their applicability to different physical systems and on future directions. The first part of the paper is devoted to an overview of the findings for model systems of frictionless spheres, focussing on the excess of low-frequency modes as the jamming point is approached. Particular attention is paid to a discussion of the cross-over frequency and length scales that govern this approach. We then discuss the effects of particle asphericity and static friction, the applicability to bubble models for wet foams in which the friction is dynamic, the dynamical arrest in colloids, and the implications for molecular glasses.

  12. A Demand-Side Management Experience in Existing Building Commissioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franconi, E.; Selch, M.; Bradford, J.; Gruen, B.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a suite of demand-side management (DSM) program offerings, Xcel Energy provides a recommissioning program to its Colorado commercial customers. The program has a summer peak-demand savings goal of 7.8 MW to be achieved by 2005. Commenced...

  13. Demand key factor in worldwide crude prices and drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1995-01-30

    The global demand surge that rescued world crude oil prices in 1994 will continue through 1995 and at least sustain, if not increase, worldwide drilling activity. Although average world crude oil prices at the end of 1994 were somewhat higher than a year earlier, the average price for all of last year was down from that of 1993. Production capacity remained sufficient to meet the growing need for crude, and the potential for return of Iraqi exports, embargoed by the United Nations since August 1990, lingered over the market. For several years the average world export crude oil price fluctuated seasonally within the range of $16--20/bbl. This band appears to have dropped to $13--17/bbl. The paper discusses economic growth rates; worldwide demand; worldwide supply; worldwide supply outlook; prices; and international drilling activity.

  14. Commercialization of germanium based nanocrystal memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seow, Kian Chiew

    2007-01-01

    This thesis explores the commercialization of germanium-based nanocrystal memories. Demand for smaller and faster electronics and embedded systems supports the development of high-density, low-power non-volatile electronic ...

  15. Exponential Demand Simulation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Derek D.

    2015-05-15

    Operant behavioral economics investigates the relation between environmental constraint and reinforcer consumption. The standard approach to quantifying this relation is through the use of behavioral economic demand curves. ...

  16. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you...

  17. China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook.Institute. IEA (International Energy Agency), 2009.World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECD Publishing. Li, J. ,

  18. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    water heater, Gas water heater, LPG water heater Hot WaterCooling Space Heating Coal LPG Kerosene Projection * “Mtoe”Renewable Gas Kerosene LPG Coal LPG Electricity Coal

  19. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    tackle the energy security and global warming problems.in order to tackle the energy security and global warming

  20. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    Vending Machines and Transformers Electric Rice Cookers, DVDn i a Machines, Computers, Magnetic Disk Units and Electric

  1. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01

    economy, demography and energy prices, which implies thatgrowth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the futuredemand is determined by energy price indicators, taking into

  2. Electrical Demand Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below...

  3. Configure Microsoft Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, Keith

    Configure Microsoft Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000: (617) 432-2000 2 · Select "Entourage information from an archive Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000 3 · Select

  4. Introduction and Motivation Structural Model for Laminated Glass Beams Conclusions and Outlook of Laminated Glass Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction and Motivation Structural Model for Laminated Glass Beams Conclusions and Outlook 1 #12;Introduction and Motivation Structural Model for Laminated Glass Beams Conclusions and Outlook Outline 1 Introduction and Motivation 2 Structural Model for Laminated Glass Beams 3 Conclusions

  5. Motivation Methods Model configuration Results Forecasting Summary & Outlook Retrieving direct and diffuse radiation with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Motivation Methods Model configuration Results Forecasting Summary & Outlook 1/ 14 Retrieving. 17, 2015 #12;Motivation Methods Model configuration Results Forecasting Summary & Outlook 2/ 14 Motivation Sky Imager based shortest-term solar irradiance forecasts for local solar energy applications

  6. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2010-01-01

    from 2015 to 2030 while the WEO 2009 AAGR of 6.1% from 2006IEA)’s World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2009, which set out anof the World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2009 published by the

  7. OUTLOOK ON EVOLUTION AND SOCIETY doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.00947.x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zürich, Universität

    OUTLOOK ON EVOLUTION AND SOCIETY doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.00947.x EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY. Evolution 64-5: 1517­1528 #12;OUTLOOK ON EVOLUTION AND SOCIETY Evolutionary biologists have long endeavored

  8. Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, David

    2008-01-01

    No. 8: David Shields, Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook:of California, Berkeley Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook:and the Environment in Mexico, 2005. No. 14: Kevin P.

  9. Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities Status and Outlook for the U.S....

  10. Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, David

    2008-01-01

    Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyMexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyA ccelerates Mexico’s crude oil production, which reached a

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential

  12. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    and Reserves Circular. Beijing: MLR, cited in IEA. 2009.Cleaner Coal in China. Paris: IEA. Ghee Peh, Wei Ouyang. (London: WEC Press. IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007.

  13. Flat Lining: Connecticut's Disappearing Economic Growth The Connecticut Economic Outlook: June 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    Flat Lining: Connecticut's Disappearing Economic Growth The Connecticut Economic Outlook: June 2015 William E. Waite, Managing Director, Semnia LLC Connecticut

  14. NWS Product Definition Document (PDD) for: Refinement of SPC Experimental Enhanced Resolution Thunderstorm Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thunderstorm Outlook Part 1 - Mission Connection The Storm Prediction Center is the National Weather Service such as tornadoes, large hail, damaging winds and heavy rainfall. Included within the existing convective outlooks experimental Enhanced Resolution Thunderstorm Outlook product based on customer and partner feedback

  15. Conclusions and outlook Akey question in astronomy is the interrelationship of mergers, starburst and AGN activ-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    8 Conclusions and outlook Akey question in astronomy is the interrelationship of mergers, starburst of such objects. The main conclusions are summarized here and an outlook for future research is presented. The mid;144 CHAPTER 8: Conclusions and outlook tureless mid-infrared continuum. The spectrum closely resembles

  16. OUTLOOK CONTACTS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Copyright Swinburne University of Technology Updated 20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    OUTLOOK CONTACTS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Copyright ©Swinburne University of Technology Updated 20 and are available in Outlook View Contacts Click on the Contacts icon: Got to the File Tab > Options if you wish details for, then select Add to Outlook Contacts : Add any additional information you wish to include

  17. OUTLOOK WEB APP (OWA) QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Copyright Swinburne University of Technology Updated 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    OUTLOOK WEB APP (OWA) QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Copyright ©Swinburne University of Technology Updated the Outlook Web App, also known as OWA After your email account is migrated, go to the Swinburne Staff Page : http://www.swinburne.edu.au/staff/ and select > Outlook Email The following screen will appear Type

  18. Gas energy supply outlook through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalisch, R.B.

    1986-03-01

    Late in 1984 the American Gas Association published a study by the Gas Supply Committee titled, ''The Outlook for Gas Energy Through 2010.'' This study was a joint effort by many people of the gas industry including GRI, IGT and AGA. The study observed that come 1646 Tcf of natural gas is judged to be ultimately recoverable in the US. Of this total, 665 Tcf were produced up to year-end 1984. At that time an additional 197 Tcf were categorized as proved reserves, i.e., known to exist with reasonable certainty and producible under current economic and operating conditions. An additional 784 Tcf were classified as potential supply. In short, about 60 % of the nation's ultimately recoverable resource still is available; only 40 % has been produced to data. This is a formidable gas resource for the lower-48; in 1984 the production level was about 17 Tcf; proved reserves were approximately 163 Tcf - more than nine times the 1984 production. 2 references, 2 tables.

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grenzeback, L. R.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Hutson, N.; Lamm, C. R.; Pei, Y. L.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Winebrake, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Freight transportation demand is projected to grow to 27.5 billion tons in 2040, and to nearly 30.2 billion tons in 2050. This report describes the current and future demand for freight transportation in terms of tons and ton-miles of commodities moved by truck, rail, water, pipeline, and air freight carriers. It outlines the economic, logistics, transportation, and policy and regulatory factors that shape freight demand, the trends and 2050 outlook for these factors, and their anticipated effect on freight demand. After describing federal policy actions that could influence future freight demand, the report then summarizes the capabilities of available analytical models for forecasting freight demand. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  20. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as wind, solar, and electric vehicles as well as dispatchable loads and microgrids. Many of these resources will be "behind-the-meter" (i.e., demand resources) and...

  1. Non-OPEC oil supply gains to outpace demand in 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1997-01-27

    Rising oil supplies in 1997 will relax some of the market tightness that drove up crude prices last year. Worldwide demand for petroleum products in 1996 rose faster than anticipated and faster than supply from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This increased demand for OPEC oil and pushed up prices for crude. At year end, the world export price of crude was up more than 25% from the same period a year earlier. Market conditions will change in 1997. While worldwide economic growth will continue to boost demand for energy and petroleum, non-OPEC petroleum supply will grow even more. Increases in North Sea and Latin American production will help boost non-OPEC output by 1.9 million b/d. And revenues from 1996 production gains will make additional investment possible in exploration and production. The paper discusses world economic growth, world oil demand, worldwide supply, supply outlook, prices and international drilling.

  2. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  3. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  4. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    H. , and James M. Gri¢ n. 1983. Gasoline demand in the OECDof dynamic demand for gasoline. Journal of Econometrics 77(An empirical analysis of gasoline demand in Denmark using

  5. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

  6. MS Outlook 2003 Secure POP Configuration Settings for Windows-based PC for HMS Local and Remote Usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi

    MS Outlook 2003 Secure POP Configuration Settings for Windows-based PC for HMS Local and Remote for the web-based email client, Outlook Web Access (OWA). · *Pre-doctoral students entering medical school/install any updates for Outlook. (This document has been tested using MS Outlook 2003.) Step 1: Launch MS

  7. How to setup MS Outlook 2003 for MS Exchange 2007 July 26, 2010 Page 1 of 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    How to setup MS Outlook 2003 for MS Exchange 2007 July 26, 2010 Page 1 of 8 Viterbi IT User Document 1. This document is intended for users setting up Outlook 2003 for the first time on a Windows PC Office Outlook) #12;How to setup MS Outlook 2003 for MS Exchange 2007 July 26, 2010 Page 2 of 8 2

  8. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Sterner. 1991. Analysing gasoline demand elasticities: A2011. Measuring global gasoline and diesel price and incomeMutairi. 1995. Demand for gasoline in Kuwait: An empirical

  9. Commercial Nuclear Power 1984: prospects for the United States and the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gielecki, M.; Diedrich, R.; Hewlett, J.; Murphy, T.

    1984-11-27

    This analysis report presents the current status and outlook for commercial nuclear power reactors for all countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 1995 that are presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1983. Additionally, US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2020 are presented for various nuclear power supply scenarios. These long-term projections are provided in support of the Department of Energy's activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The projections for foreign nuclear capacity through 1990 supplant the preliminary foreign WOCA projection presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1983 and are supplemented by WOCA country-specific projections through 2000.

  10. The North American Forest Sector Outlook Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to consumption patterns for wood products and bioenergy. Markets for wood products, which mainly are destined in the forest sector of North America 21 3.1 Forest inventory 21 3.2 Aggregate production, consumption, Canada, carbon sequestration, climate change, consumption, demand, econometric, EFSOS, export, fellings

  11. Autimated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, J. J.; Yin, R.; Kiliccote, S.

    2013-01-01

    Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject...

  12. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01

    No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

  13. Outlook and Challenges for Chinese Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina

    2008-06-20

    China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. The rapid growth of coal demand since 2001 has created deepening strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about supply security. Although China's coal is 'plentiful,' published academic and policy analyses indicate that peak production will likely occur between 2016 and 2029. Given the current economic growth trajectory, domestic production constraints will lead to a coal gap that is not likely to be filled with imports. Urbanization, heavy industry growth, and increasing per-capita consumption are the primary drivers of rising coal usage. In 2006, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement accounted for 71% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units could save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand. If China follows Japan, steel production would peak by 2015; cement is likely to follow a similar trajectory. A fourth wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. New demand from coal-to-liquids and coal-to-chemicals may add 450 million tonnes of coal demand by 2025. Efficient growth among these drivers indicates that China's annual coal demand will reach 4.2 to 4.7 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not been able to reduce China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Few substitution options exist: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth would require over 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas, 48 GW of nuclear, or 86 GW of hydropower capacity. While these alternatives will continue to grow, the scale of development using existing technologies will be insufficient to substitute significant coal demand before 2025. The central role of heavy industry in GDP growth and the difficulty of substituting other fuels suggest that coal consumption is inextricably entwined with China's economy in its current mode of growth. Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on its current growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Broadening awareness of the environmental costs of coal mining, transport, and combustion is raising the pressure on Chinese policy makers to find alternative energy sources. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China is short of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport. Transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transport oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 mt by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets. The looming coal gap threatens to derail China's growth path, possibly undermining political, economic, and social stability. High coal prices and domestic shortages will have regional and global effects. Regarding China's role as a global manufacturing center, a domestic coal gap will increase prices and constrain growth. Within the Asia-Pacific region, China's coal gap is likely to bring about increased competition with other coal-importing countries including Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and India. As with petroleum, China may respond with a government-supported 'going-out' strategy of resource acquisition and vertical integration. Given its population and growing resource constraints, China may favor energy security, competitiveness, and local environmental protection over global climate change mitigation. The possibility of a large coal gap suggests that Chinese and international policy makers should maximize institutional and financial support

  14. An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Reflecting Provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and Recent Changes in the Economic Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report updates the Reference Case presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 based on recently enacted legislation and the changing macroeconomic environment.

  15. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  16. ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................1-16 Energy Consumption Data...............................................1-15 Data Sources for Energy Demand Forecasting ModelsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report

  17. CO2 MONITORING FOR DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory-based evaluations of nine sensors with largespecified existing sensor for evaluation. In the prior fieldIn summary, these evaluations of faulty sensors did not

  18. CO2 MONITORING FOR DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2010-01-01

    evaluations of the performance of sensor electronics and measurements of the output of infrared sources within sensors

  19. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic response (DR) is a process of managing customer consumption of electricity in response to supply conditions to reduce electricity costs or improve electrical system reliability. Generally, DR refers to mechanisms

  20. Commercial Fleet Demand for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golob, Thomas F; Torous, Jane; Bradley, Mark; Brownstone, David; Crane, Soheila Soltani; Bunch, David S

    1996-01-01

    Operating cost (cents/mile) NGV operating cost Number offuel type on California roads NGV penetration Dual fueldummy: (0=NGV only; 1 =can also run on gasoline) NGV dual

  1. Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher iSlide 1 Moresteelmaking industry has significantlytextDepartment ofProducts |

  2. Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop, Inc JumpElko,Servizi EngineeringManagement (DSM) In

  3. Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey an almost ideal demand system for five types of meat using cross-sectional data from Mexico, where most households did not buy at least one type of meat during the survey week. The system of demands is shown

  4. Peer-Assisted On-Demand Streaming: Characterizing Demands and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Peer-Assisted On-Demand Streaming: Characterizing Demands and Optimizing Supplies Fangming Liu Abstract--Nowadays, there has been significant deployment of peer-assisted on-demand streaming services over the Internet. Two of the most unique and salient features in a peer-assisted on-demand streaming

  5. Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5129E Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities;Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR

  6. Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Wolfgang

    Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;Contents Our Breaking News 35 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse University of South Australia Mawson Lakes Campus Mawson Lakes SA 5095 Telephone: +61 (08) 8302 3338 Fax: +61 (08) 8302 3386 Web: unisa.edu.au/water

  7. Southwest Climate Outlook, March 2012 3 | Feature Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Southwest Climate Outlook, March 2012 3 | Feature Article http://climas half of Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma com- bined. When all was said and done, damages in the highest 1 percent blanketed almost all of Texas, western Oklahoma, and eastern New Mexico and covered

  8. DIFFRACTION SCATTERING AT HIGH ENERGIES (outlook from 1980s) 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    DIFFRACTION SCATTERING AT HIGH ENERGIES (outlook from 1980s) 1 A.A.Vorobyov 1. Introduction In 1960 of the most exciting tasks in the high energy physics. Several theorems have been formulated based on general cross sections in the asymptotic region at high energies. Among the general theorems of the axiomatic

  9. Update and Outlook for the Fusion Energy Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update and Outlook for the Fusion Energy Sciences Program E.J. Synakowski Associate Director, Office of Science Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting Washington, D.C. December Energy Sciences 3D topologies Samuel Barish, Lead,: Validation Platforms, Stellarators Steve Eckstrand

  10. NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell Lead Seasonal Forecaster Climate Prediction Center NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Collaboration With National Hurricane Center/ NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Hurricane Research Division/ NOAA/ OAR/ AOML/ HRD www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/hurricane #12;Outline 1. Features

  11. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21

    Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

  12. Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required in electricity demand is, of course, crucial to determining the need for new electricity resources and helping of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors

  13. The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-04-15

    In designing default service for competitive retail markets, demand response has been an afterthought at best. But that may be changing, as states that initiated customer choice in the past five to seven years reach an important juncture in retail market design and consider an RTP-type default service for large commercial and industrial customers. The authors describe the experience to date with RTP as a default service, focusing on its role as an instrument for cultivating price-responsive demand. (author)

  14. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    the increase in crude oil demand is driven by a burgeoningwith growing share of oil demand. While other sectors havewill reach 66% share of oil demand in 2050 in CIS. This is

  15. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    the rise of final electricity demand, more than offsettingfor nearly one-third of all electricity demand. Under AIS,has growing share of electricity demand because of more

  16. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    demand, bunker fuel (heavy oil) demand will continue to riseFigure 57Figure 58). Demand for heavy oil for ship bunkersElectricity Ethanol Gasoline Heavy Oil Jet Kerosene LPG

  17. Update and Outlook for theUpdate and Outlook for the Fusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update and Outlook for theUpdate and Outlook for the Fusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy Sciences E J SynakowskiE.J. Synakowski Associate Director, Office of Science F i E S iFusion Energy Sciences For the University Fusion Associates Town Hall Meeting APS DPP P id

  18. Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

  19. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gasto Development of Long-Term Energy Demand Scenarios forto Development of Long-Term Energy Demand Scenarios for

  20. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    effects. The forecast of energy demand underlying bothEnergy demand in residential buildings has been rising very fast in recent years. The forecast

  1. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

    2009-06-01

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

  2. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    retail regulatory authority prohibit such activity. Demand response integration into US wholesale power marketsretail or wholesale level. 17 While demand response began participating at scale in wholesale power markets

  3. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    US emission data are from the IEA World Energy Outlook,world conventional fossil fuel reserves were coal by energy content; 19% were oil, and 19% natural gas. Data

  4. The outlook for US oil dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

    1995-05-11

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  5. Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-09-30

    The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

  6. Alternative fuel information: Alternative fuel vehicle outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Major automobile manufacturers continue to examine a variety of alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) options in an effort to provide vehicles that meet the fleet requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) and the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT). The current generation of AFVs available to consumers is somewhat limited as the auto industry attempts to respond to the presently uncertain market. At the same time, however, the automobile industry must anticipate future demand and is therefore engaged in research, development, and production programs on a wide range of alternative fuels. The ultimate composition of the AFV fleet may be determined by state and local regulations which will have the effect of determining demand. Many state and regional groups may require vehicles to meet emission standards more stringent than those required by the federal government. Therefore, a significant impact on the market could occur if emission classifications begin serving as the benchmark for vehicles, rather than simply certifying a vehicle as capable of operating on an ``alternative`` to gasoline. Vehicles classified as Zero-Emissions, or even Inherently Low-Emissions, could most likely be met only by electricity or natural gas, thereby dictating that multi-fuel vehicles would be unable to participate in some clean air markets. In the near-term, the Clinton Administration desires to accelerate the use of alternative fuels as evidenced by an executive order directing the federal government to increase the rate of conversion of the federal fleet beyond that called for in EPACT. The Administration has expressed particular interest in using more compressed natural gas (CNG) as a motor fuel, which has resulted in the auto industry`s strong response of concentrating short-term efforts on CNG vehicles. For the 1994 model year, a number of CNG cars and trucks will be available from major automobile manufacturers.

  7. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2DepartmentDelta Dental Claim Form PDF iconDemand

  8. Revelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux 1 · Mehdi Benzine1,2 · Luc Bouganim1 · Philippe Pucheral1 "revelation on demand". Keywords: Confidentiality and privacy, Secure device, Data warehousing, Indexing model

  9. by popular demand: Addiction II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niv, Yael

    by popular demand: Addiction II PSY/NEU338:Animal learning and decision making: Psychological, size of other non-drug rewards, and cost (but ultimately the demand is inelastic, or at least

  10. Space Heaters, Computers, Cell Phone Chargers: How Plugged In Are Commercial Buildings?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie; Brown, Richard; Busch, John; Pinckard, Margaret; Roberson, Judy

    2007-01-01

    February. EIA. 2006. Annual Energy Outlook 2006. DepartmentEIA) publishes the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). In the AEO

  11. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2007-10-04

    This report provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis ofenergy consumption in China. It recalibrates official Chinese governmentstatistics by reallocating primary energy into categories more commonlyused in international comparisons. It also provides an analysis of trendsin sectoral energy consumption over the past decades. Finally, itassesses the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020,based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity,availability of energy services, and energy intensities. The followingare some highlights of the study's findings: * A reallocation of sectorenergy consumption from the 2000 official Chinese government statisticsfinds that: * Buildings account for 25 percent of primary energy, insteadof 19 percent * Industry accounts for 61 percent of energy instead of 69percent * Industrial energy made a large and unexpected leap between2000-2005, growing by an astonishing 50 percent in the 3 years between2002 and 2005. * Energy consumption in the iron and steel industry was 40percent higher than predicted * Energy consumption in the cement industrywas 54 percent higher than predicted * Overall energy intensity in theindustrial sector grew between 2000 and 2003. This is largely due tointernal shifts towards the most energy-intensive sub-sectors, an effectwhich more than counterbalances the impact of efficiency increases. *Industry accounted for 63 percent of total primary energy consumption in2005 - it is expected to continue to dominate energy consumption through2020, dropping only to 60 percent by that year. * Even assuming thatgrowth rates in 2005-2020 will return to the levels of 2000-2003,industrial energy will grow from 42 EJ in 2005 to 72 EJ in 2020. * Thepercentage of transport energy used to carry passengers (instead offreight) will double from 37 percent to 52 percent between 2000 to 2020,.Much of this increase is due to private car ownership, which willincrease by a factor of 15 from 5.1 million in 2000 to 77 million in2020. * Residential appliance ownership will show signs of saturation inurban households. The increase in residential energy consumption will belargely driven by urbanization, since rural homes will continue to havelow consumption levels. In urban households, the size of appliances willincrease, but its effect will be moderated by efficiency improvements,partially driven by government standards. * Commercial energy increaseswill be driven both by increases in floor space and by increases inpenetration of major end uses such as heating and cooling. Theseincreases will be moderated somewhat, however, by technology changes,such as increased use of heat pumps. * China's Medium- and Long-TermDevelopment plan drafted by the central government and published in 2004calls for a quadrupling of GDP in the period from 2000-2020 with only adoubling in energy consumption during the same period. A bottom-upanalysis with likely efficiency improvements finds that energyconsumption will likely exceed the goal by 26.12 EJ, or 28 percent.Achievements of these goals will there fore require a more aggressivepolicy of encouraging energy efficiency.

  12. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, first quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1998 through the fourth quarter of 1999. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the first quarter 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. Chord on Demand Alberto Montresor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelasity, Márk

    Chord on Demand Alberto Montresor University of Bologna, Italy montresor@cs.unibo.it M´ark Jelasity to solve a specific task on demand. We introduce T- CHORD, that can build a Chord network efficiently to solve a specific task on demand. Existing join protocols are not designed to handle the massive

  14. Supply Chain Supernetworks Random Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Supernetworks with Random Demands June Dong and Ding Zhang Department of Marketing of three tiers of decision-makers: the manufacturers, the distributors, and the retailers, with the demands equilibrium model with electronic commerce and with random demands for which modeling, qualitative analysis

  15. Chord on Demand Alberto Montresor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chord on Demand Alberto Montresor University of Bologna, Italy montresor@cs.unibo.it Mark Jelasity to solve a specific task on demand. We introduce T- CHORD, that can build a Chord network efficiently on demand. Existing join protocols are not designed to handle the massive concurrency involved in a jump

  16. ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre;Definitions of Demand Response · `The short-term adjustment of energy use by consumers in response to price to market or reliability conditions.' (NAESB) #12;Definitions of Demand Response · The common threads

  17. Assessment of Demand Response Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

  18. Energy: A global outlook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulhady, H.; Tahar, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents an authoritative analysis of the typical oil and energy related problems faced by various countries of the regions of the world, and the divergent viewpoints and interests of the developing and industrialised countries. The need for urgent international cooperation is identified and useful guidelines offered which could contribute to the solution of the world energy problems. Contents (partial): An Economic and Political Evaluation: Historical evolution of the international oil industry. Global energy supply and demand balance. A historical review of OPEC's creation and actions. The rationale for OPEC. Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Historical review and rationale of the IEA's creation policies and action. Impact of structural changes on the international energy industries. Petromin, Saudi Arabian oil policies and industrialization through joint ventures. North- South--an international energy dialogue. Structural changes and new strategies. Towards an international energy development programme. Global Primary Energy: Statistical and General Information: Global statistical review of primary energy. Energy scenarios for 1985 and 1990. Energy scenarios for the year 2000. The US energy situation. The West European energy situation. The Japanese energy situation. The OPEC developing countries' energy situation. The USSR energy situation. The East European energy situation. Energy situation of the People's Republic of China. Energy and the Third World. Price fluctuations in perspective. The impact of downstream Arab investment. Statistical Data and Appendices: Statistical tables. Appendices. Bibliography. Index.

  19. Energy: A global outlook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulhady Hassen Tahea, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the typical oil and energy related problems faced by various countries and regions of the world, and the divergent viewpoints and interests of the developing and industrialised countries. The need for urgent international cooperation is identified and useful guidelines offered which could contribute to the solution of the world energy problems. Contents (partial): An Economic and Political Evaluation: Historical evolution of the international oil industry. Global energy supply and demand balance. A historical review of OPEC's creation and actions. The rationale for OPEC. Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Historical review and rationale of the IEA's creation policies and action. Impact of structural changes on the international energy industries. Petromin, Saudi Arabian oil policies and industrialization through joint ventures. North-South - an international energy dialogue. Structural changes and new strategies. Towards an international energy development programme. Global Primary Energy Statistical and General Information: Global statistical review of primary energy. Energy scenarios for 1985 and 1990. Energy scenarios for the year 2000. The US energy situation. The West European energy situation. The Japanese energy situation. The OPEC developing countries' energy situation. The non-OPEC developing countries' energy situation. The USSR energy situation. The East European energy situation. Energy situation of the People's Republic of China. Energy and the Third World. Oil price fluctuations in perspective. The impact of downstream Arab investment. Statistical Data and Appendices: Statistical tables. Appendices. Bibliography. Index.

  20. Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drazga, B.

    2006-08-15

    The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

  1. Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40% of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, the Energy Information Administration has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. The Annual Energy Outlook 2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

  2. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  3. Impacts of Temperature Variation on Energy Demand in Buildings (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    In the residential and commercial sectors, heating and cooling account for more than 40% of end-use energy demand. As a result, energy consumption in those sectors can vary significantly from year to year, depending on yearly average temperatures.

  4. The Window Market in Texas: Opportunities for Energy Savings and Demand Reduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarnikau, J.; Campbell, L.

    2002-01-01

    The use of high performance windows represents a promising opportunity to reduce energy consumption and summer electrical demand in homes and commercial buildings in Texas and neighboring states. While low-e glass coatings and other energy...

  5. OUTLOOK -OUT OF OFFICE QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Copyright Swinburne University of Technology Updated 31 October, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    OUTLOOK - OUT OF OFFICE QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Copyright ©Swinburne University of Technology message before you go on leave. In Outlook go into the Backstage area. File > Info > Automatic Replies you leave work you can also set it up using the Outlook Web App, also known as OWA Go to the Swinburne

  6. MAC -OUTLOOK QUICK TIP REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Quick Tip Reference Guide | Swinburne University of Technology Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    MAC - OUTLOOK QUICK TIP REFERENCE GUIDE 1 Quick Tip Reference Guide | Swinburne University of Technology Version 1.0 Managing Your Emails Conversation View in Outlook 2011 1. Click Organize tab 2. Click. On the Outlook menu, click Preferences. 2. Under E-mail, click Signatures . 3. Click Default Signatures. 4. Under

  7. MS Outlook 2010 Secure IMAP Configuration Settings for Windows-based PCs rriyo: 09/01/2011 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi

    MS Outlook 2010 Secure IMAP Configuration Settings for Windows-based PCs rriyo: 09/01/2011 Page 1 · This document was tested using MS Outlook 2010 using Windows 7 SP1 64-bit. Configuration settings may vary with other versions of Outlook and the Windows operating system. · When configuring your account settings

  8. Outlook 2002/2003 Secure POP Configuration Settings for PC For Harvard Medical School Local and Remote Usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi

    Outlook 2002/2003 Secure POP Configuration Settings for PC For Harvard Medical School Local and Remote Usage Updated April 19, 2007 Overview Harvard Medical School supports Microsoft Outlook as a POP: With Outlook installed and open, select the Tools > E-mail accounts menu option. Step 2: Choose the "Add a new

  9. Configure Microsoft Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, Keith

    Configure Microsoft Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000 2 · Create a new". #12;Configure Microsoft Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000

  10. Configure Microsoft Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, Keith

    Configure Microsoft Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000 2 · Create a new;Configure Microsoft Outlook 2011 for Mac HMS Help Desk: (617) 432-2000 3

  11. Aalborg Universitet HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current., ... Kjær, P. C. (2013). HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current Research Power into Power Systems as well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Power Plants

  12. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Washington Health Sciences Center CHDD | IDDRC | UCEDD Testing Adults for Genetic Causes of Autism by Sally of the University of Washington's Genetic Medicine Clinic based at the Center on Human Development and Disability for potential offspring. www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook_2013_4.pdf 2013 Issue #4 Chromosome

  13. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Washington Health Sciences Center CHDD | IDDRC | UCEDD Academic Performance and Cognitive Abilities.D., a University of Washington research assistant professor of speech and hearing sciences and CHDD research at both six and nine years by their teachers and parents. www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/Outlook_2011

  14. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Washington Health Sciences Center CHDD | IDDRC | UCEDD Intractable Epilepsy and Individuals with Intellectual and came from two centers: Fircrest Residential Habilitation Center (85 patients) in Shoreline, Washington, and Rainier www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook_2013_2.pdf 2013 Issue #2 Nicholas Poolos runs

  15. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Washington Health Sciences Center CHDD | IDDRC | UCEDD Mouse Model of Epileptic Syndrome Yields Discoveries of Washington discovered some surprising findings in research on mice bred to have genetic defects that cause there are inhibitory signals (red) and excitatory signals www.chdd.washington.edu/outlook/CHDD_Outlook_2013_1.pdf 2013

  16. 2007 Florida Hard Clam Aquaculture Outlook So what's in store for the new year? Expec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu. The current economic outlook for U.S. aquacultural producers for 2007 is clouded by wide swings in energy2007 Florida Hard Clam Aquaculture Outlook So what's in store for the new year? Expec- tations projects. Meeting details are on Page 5. Regarding market trends, the annual Buyer's Guide of Seafood

  17. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-15

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  18. Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Generating Demand for...

  19. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

  20. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

  1. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01

    3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

  2. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01

    their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

  3. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - deep

  4. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01

    2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  5. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

  6. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

  7. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  8. Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence 2009 Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool (January...

  9. Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Eto

    2014-01-01

    Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning Reserveand B. Kirby. 2012. The Demand Response Spinning Reserve

  10. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    duty fuel demand in alternate scenarios. ..for light-duty fuel demand in alternate scenarios. Minimum52 Heavy-duty vehicle fuel demand for each alternate

  11. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    2006-2016: Staff energy demand forecast (Revised SeptemberCEC (2005b) Energy demand forecast methods report.California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast. California

  12. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Demand response is increasingly recognized as an essentialingredient to well functioning electricity markets. This growingconsensus was formalized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), whichestablished demand response as an official policy of the U.S. government,and directed states (and their electric utilities) to considerimplementing demand response, with a particular focus on "price-based"mechanisms. The resulting deliberations, along with a variety of stateand regional demand response initiatives, are raising important policyquestions: for example, How much demand response is enough? How much isavailable? From what sources? At what cost? The purpose of this scopingstudy is to examine analytical techniques and data sources to supportdemand response market assessments that can, in turn, answer the secondand third of these questions. We focus on demand response for large(>350 kW), commercial and industrial (C&I) customers, althoughmany of the concepts could equally be applied to similar programs andtariffs for small commercial and residential customers.

  13. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    gasoline, jet kerosene and heavy oil (bunker fuel). LPG, fordemand, bunker fuel (heavy oil) demand will continue to riseFigure 57Figure 58). Demand for heavy oil for ship bunkers

  14. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    power generation and coal input to coking is not included inTransformation Coking Generation CIS Total Coal Demand (Coking Generation AIS Figure 44 CIS and AIS Coal Demand by

  15. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

  16. Demand Response Technology Roadmap A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meetings and workshops convened to develop content for the Demand Response Technology Roadmap. The project team has developed this companion document in the interest of providing...

  17. Procedure for Measuring and Reporting Commercial Building Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, D.; Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This procedure is intended to provide a standard method for measuring and characterizing the energy performance of commercial buildings. The procedure determines the energy consumption, electrical energy demand, and on-site energy production in existing commercial buildings of all types. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks to evaluate performance and verify that performance targets have been achieved.

  18. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003Summer 2013 Outlook forSupplement:3 13 1

  19. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2013 Data Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel pricesDieselAnnual Energy Outlook

  20. Supply Chain Supernetworks With Random Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Supernetworks With Random Demands June Dong Ding Zhang School of Business State Field Warehouses: stocking points Customers, demand centers sinks Production/ purchase costs Inventory Customer Demand Customer Demand Retailer OrdersRetailer Orders Distributor OrdersDistributor Orders

  1. Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Presentation slides from the Better...

  2. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

  3. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01

    Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

  4. Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Carlisle Smith Director, Hazardous Materials Programs Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Email:...

  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2014 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016November3April(STEO)4 Outlook

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2015 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016November3April(STEO)4 Outlook5

  8. Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-10-01

    Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day-ahead hourly pricing. We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication, prioritization of demand response signals, and control methods. Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management and demand response capabilities of two commercial buildings in New York City. Preliminary results reveal that providing machine-readable prices to commercial buildings can facilitate both demand response participation and continuous energy cost savings. Hence, efforts should be made to develop more sophisticated algorithms for building control systems to minimize customer's utility bill based on price and reliability information from the electricity grid.

  9. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  10. EPRI conference proceedings: solar and wind power - 1982 status and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.A.

    1983-02-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 18 papers in this proceedings. Not separately abstracted are speeches and presentations covering: past progress and future directions in solar and wind power research and development, new directions in Federal solar electric programs, Solar Energy Research Institute status and outlook, ARCO Solar Industries' involvement in the production of potential solar electric technologies, wind power status and outlook, utility requirements, roles and rewards, and a panel discussion on solar and wind power status and outlook as viewed from industrial, utility, financial, and government perspectives. (LEW)

  11. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

  12. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

  13. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    electricity. In this manner, demand side management is directly integrated into the wholesale capacity marketcapacity market U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Florida Reliability Coordinating Council incremental auctions independent electricity

  14. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

  15. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01

    and Sathaye, 2008. “India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand inand Sathaye, 2008. “India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand inand Sathaye, 2008. “India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in

  16. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and implement a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of demand response resources and to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to assess economic value of the realizable potential of demand response for ancillary services.

  17. Physically-based demand modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calloway, Terry Marshall

    1980-01-01

    nts on the demand. Of course the demand of a real a1r cond1t1oner has lower and upper bounds equal to 0 and 0 , respec- u tively. A constra1ned system can be simulated numerically, but there 1s no explicit system response formula s1m11ar... sect1on. It may now be instruct1ve to relate this model to that of Jones and Bri ce [5] . The average demand pred1 cted by their model is the expected value of the product of a load response factor 0 and a U sw1tching process H(t), which depends...

  18. Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    -Drive Systems - Industrial Efficient Lighting - Commercial/Residential Process Improvements- Industrial Solar Water Heaters ­ Residential/Commercial Efficient AC ­ Commercial/ Residential Cogeneration/Captive Power

  19. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Most of the increase in crude oil demand is driven by aaverage quality of crude oil for refining and increasinglyadjustment by comparing crude oil throughput to energy

  20. Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    event will address global oil supply uncertainty; the effects of projected winter weather on the demand for heating and key transportation fuels; and a range of market factors...

  1. FROZEN HEAT A GLOBAL OUTLOOK ON METHANE GAS HYDRATES EXECUTIVE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy demands, uncertainty about supplies, and the urgent need to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases mean that the world faces an uncertain energy future. Many countries have...

  2. Seasonality in air transportation demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichard Megwinoff, H?tor Nicolas

    1988-01-01

    This thesis investigates the seasonality of demand in air transportation. It presents three methods for computing seasonal indices. One of these methods, the Periodic Average Method, is selected as the most appropriate for ...

  3. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home, Proceedings of theConference on Smart Homes and Health Telematics, September,Smart Meter Motion sensors Figure 1: Schematic of the Demand Response Electrical Appliance Manager in a Home.

  4. Full Rank Rational Demand Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

    2006-01-01

    Dover Publications 1972. Barnett, W.A. and Y.W. Lee. “TheEconometrica 53 (1985): 1421- Barnett, W.A. , Lee, Y.W. ,Laurent demand systems (Barnett and Lee 1985; Barnett, Lee,

  5. Residential Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

  6. Marketing Demand-Side Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    Demand-Side Management is an organizational tool that has proven successful in various realms of the ever changing business world in the past few years. It combines the multi-faceted desires of the customers with the increasingly important...

  7. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  8. Impacts of Unconventional Gas Technology in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to represent unconventional gas technologies and their impacts on projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000).

  9. Modifications to incorporate competitive electricity prices in the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Market Module (EMM) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. It describes revisions necessary to derive competitive electricity prices and the corresponding reserve margins.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2010-01-01

    International Energy Agency (IEA). 2009. World EnergyChina-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009.while LBNL, McKinsey and IEA all employed bottom-up modeling

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Motor Gasoline Consumption Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The motor gasoline consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of total U.S. consumption of motor gasolien based on estimates of vehicle miles traveled and average vehicle fuel economy.

  13. Measuring Changes in Energy Efficiency for the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used to develop the National Energy Modeling System estimate of projected aggregate energy efficiency and to describe the results of applying it to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) reference case.

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Petroleum Product Prices Module

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The petroleum products price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. average wholesale and retail price forecasts for motor gasoline, diesel fuel, heating oil, and jet fuel.

  16. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01

    A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  17. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mares, K.C.

    2010-01-01

    Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

  18. Technology Commercialization Fund - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fund The Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) is designed to complement angel investment or early stage corporate product development. The fund totaled nearly 14.3 million in...

  19. Optimal Demand Response and Power Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willett, Rebecca

    Optimal Demand Response and Power Flow Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering #12;Outline Optimal demand response n With L. Chen, L. Jiang, N. Li Optimal power flow n With S. Bose;Optimal demand response Model Results n Uncorrelated demand: distributed alg n Correlated demand

  20. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relatively high economic/demographic growth, relatively low electricity and natural gas rates REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand Bill Junker Manager DEMAND ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS