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1

Winter Fuels Outlook: 2002-2003 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... augmented by generally higher fuel prices, strongly suggests the likelihood that household energy expenses during the 2002-2003 heating season will be up ...

2

Ris Energy Report 5 Renewable energy outlook for selected regions 1 4 Renewable energy outlook for selected regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø Energy Report 5 Renewable energy outlook for selected regions 1 4 Renewable energy outlookTITUTE FOR sysTEMs AND INNOVATION REsEARCH, gERMANy Introduction Renewable resources, once almost insignificant, are now gradually expanding their role in global energy supply. In 2004, renewable energy from all sources

3

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: September 16, 4: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on

4

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: December 10, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Custom Table Builder Frequency: Annual Monthly Quarterly Select a Year Range: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 to 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

5

Wheeler County Riparian Buffers; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems Encountered During Contract Year--Wheeler County residents are mostly non participants when it comes to Farm Services programs. Results of the counties non participation is the rental rates are the lowest in the state. There is a government fear factor as well as an obvious distance limitation. The FSA office is nearly 150 mile roundtrip from two of the counties urban areas. I find myself not only selling the CREP-Riparian Buffer but also selling Farm Services in general. Training has been very limited. NRCS is obviously not designed around training and certification. They are an on-the-job training organization. It has caused a hesitation in my outreach program and a great deal of frustration. I feel my confidence will strengthen with the follow through of the current projects. The most evident problem has come to light as of late. The program is too expensive to implement. The planting is too intensive for a 12''-18'' rainfall area. I provide the potential landowner a spread sheet with the bonuses, the costs, and the final outcome. No matter the situation, CREP or CCRP, the landowner always balks at the cost. The program assumes the landowner has the capital to make the initial investment. For example, project No.2 is going to be a minimum width buffer. It is approximately 3,000 ft long and 5.5 acres. The buffer for tree planting and fencing alone will result in a cost of nearly $13,000. With the water developments it nears $23,000. That is nearly 10% of a 250 mother-cow operating budget. Project No.1, the tree planting estimate is $45,000. This alone is nearly 25% of the same type of budget. I would greatly appreciate any help in finding a third party willing to put money to work covering the initial costs of the program, expecting reimbursement from Farm Services Agency. I believe this could create a powerful tool in buffering streams in Wheeler County. Outlook for Contract Year 2--I have been in this position now for 6 months. I am beginning to feel a much more confident in the buffer program. As my confidence improves I will move forward rapidly in contacting. With increased contacting I will find participating landowners. I am positive the landowner involved in my first project will be doing another after the first is complete.

Potter, Judy; Homer, Will (Wheeler County Soil and Water Conservation District, John Day, OR)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

2002-2003 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002-2003 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 A winter rapeseed and canola variety trial with 17 canola (Brassica napus) cultivars or advanced breeding of this new production has been with cultivars that produce canola quality oil and meal. Many new cultivars

Brown, Jack

7

Outlook for cellulase improvement: Screening and selection strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulose is the most abundant renewable natural biological resource, and the production of biobased products and bioenergy from less costly renewable lignocellulosic materials is important for the sustainable development of human beings. A reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. Here, we review quantitative cellulase activity assays using soluble and insoluble substrates, and focus on their advantages and limitations. Because there are no clear relationships between cellulase activities on soluble substrates and those on insoluble substrates, soluble substrates should not be used to screen or select improved cellulases for processing relevant solid substrates, such as plant cell walls. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on soluble substrates have been only moderately successful, and have primarily targeted improvement in thermal tolerance. Heterogeneity of insoluble cellulose, unclear dynamic interactions between insoluble substrate and cellulase components, and the complex competitive and/or synergic relationship among cellulase components limit rational design and/or strategies, depending on activity screening approaches. Herein, we hypothesize that continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates could be a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library displayed on the cell surface.

Zhang, Yiheng P [ORNL; Himmel, Michael [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Current velocity in rearing vessels had little if any effect on reproductive behavior of captively reared steelhead. However, males and females reared in high velocity vessels participated a greater number of spawning events than siblings reared in low velocity tanks. Observations of nesting females and associated males in a natural stream (Hamma Hamma River) were consistent with those observed in a controlled spawning channel. DNA pedigree analyses did not reveal significant differences in the numbers of fry produced by steelhead reared in high and low velocity vessels. To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon are being exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Subsequently they will be tested for development of long-term memories of these odorants. In 2002-2003, the efficacy of EOG analysis for assessing imprinting was demonstrated and will be applied in these and other behavioral and molecular tools in the current work plan. Results of these experiments will be important to determine the critical periods for imprinting for the offspring of captively-reared fish destined for release into natal rivers or lakes. By early August, the oocytes of all of Rapid River Hatchery chinook salmon females returning from the ocean had advanced to the tertiary yolk globule stage; whereas, only some of the captively reared Lemhi River females sampled had advanced to this stage, and the degree of advancement was not dependent on rearing temperature. The mean spawning time of captive Lemhi River females was 3-4 weeks after that of the Rapid River fish. Captive Lemhi River females produced smaller and fewer eggs than the Rapid River females; however, relative fecundity was higher than that of the Rapid River fish. Female coho salmon that ceased or slowed oocyte development in the spring had lower body growth from the previous August onward compared with females that continued oocyte growth. This indicates that growth during the late summer and fall, one year prior to spawning, can determine the decision to mature the following spring. Therefore it is important to maintain the growth of broodstock during the summer/fall period to ensure the continuation of ovary development in the subsequent spring. A combined whole cell vaccine of Renogen with killed R. salmoninarum strain MT239 may be effective in reducing the occurrence of BKD during the period immediately after seawater transfer, but not in yearling seawater-adapted chinook salmon. Control of BKD is likely to require an integrated disease management plan, utilizing three components, namely broodstock segregation, antibiotics, and vaccination. Vaccine results incorporated with antibiotic treatment will be used to work toward an integrated disease management plan to help to reduce the cycle of BKD transmission in the captive stocks to increase survival safely. Patterns of estimated survival in one chinook salmon stock (Grovers Creek)were generally consistent with inbreeding depression: progeny of fish that were full siblings (approximate increment in F of 0.25) survived to return at much lower rates than did progeny of fish that were half siblings (F {approx} 0.125) or unrelated individuals (F {approx} 0). Growth at sea of Grovers Creek Hatchery stock study fish was lower than that of UWH stock fish. Among the inbreeding groups alone, no clear differences in growth were detectable. However, preliminary results suggest the general pattern of growth was opposite that expected if inbreeding depression reduced growth: the highest growth was in progeny of related parents.

Berejikian, Barry A. (National Marine Fisheries Service)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Outlook For NY Energy Forum October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Agenda * Winter Fuels Outlook * Drilling Productivity Report * Geopolitical...

11

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have decreased in 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. These results indicate that the surface waters in Arrow Lakes Reservoir were approaching nitrogen limitation. Results from the 2003 discrete profile series indicate nitrate concentrations decreased significantly below 25 {micro}g/L (which is the concentration where nitrate is considered limiting to phytoplankton) between June and July at stations in Upper Arrow and Lower Arrow. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (weight:weight) were also low during these months indicating that the surface waters were nitrogen deficient. These results indicated that the nitrogen to phosphorus blends of fertilizer added to the reservoir need to be fine tuned and closely monitored on a weekly basis in future years of nutrient addition. Phytoplankton results shifted during 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. During 2002, there was a co-dominance of potentially 'inedible' diatoms (Fragilaria spp. and Diatoma) and 'greens' (Ulothrix). Large diatom populations occurred in 2003 and these results indicate it may be necessary to alter the frequency and amounts of weekly loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in future years to prevent the growth of inedible diatoms. Zooplankton density in 2002 and 2003, as in previous years, indicated higher densities in Lower Arrow than in Upper Arrow. Copepods and other Cladocera (mainly tiny specimens such as Bosmina sp.) had distinct peaks, higher than in previous years, while Daphnia was not present in higher numbers particularly in Upper Arrow. This density shift in favor to smaller cladocerans was mirrored in a weak biomass increase. In Upper Arrow, total zooplankton biomass decreased from 1999 to 2002, and in 2003 increased slightly, while in Lower Arrow the biomass decreased from 2000-2002. In Lower Arrow the majority of biomass was comprised of Daphnia throughout the study period except in 2002, while in Upper Arrow the total biomass was comprised of copepods from 2000-2003.

Schindler, E.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

Myra, D.; Ready, C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas, 2002-2003 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall Chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period (mid- to late-summer) when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River Chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations (e.g., summer flow augmentation) to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile Chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall Chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. This was a pilot-scale study to evaluate these relationships under existing operations of Hells Canyon Dam (i.e., without any prescribed manipulations of river discharge) during the 2002-2003 water year. The project was initiated in the context of examining the potential for improving juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon survival by modifying the discharge operations of Hells Canyon Dam. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project at index sites throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The HCR extends from Hells Canyon Dam (river kilometer [rkm] 399) downstream to the upper end of Lower Granite Reservoir near rkm 240. We randomly selected 14 fall Chinook salmon spawning locations as study sites, which represents 25% of the most used spawning areas throughout the HCR. Interactions between river water and pore water within the riverbed (i.e., hyporheic zone) at each site were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. Surrounding the piezometer cluster at each site were 3 artificial egg pockets. In mid-November 2002, early-eyed stage fall Chinook salmon eggs were placed inside of perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, along with a temperature data logger, and buried within the egg pockets. Fall Chinook salmon eggs were also incubated in the laboratory for the purpose of developing growth curves that could be used as indicators of emergence timing. The effects of discharge on vertical hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed were inferred from measured temperature gradients between the river and riverbed, and the application of a numerical model. The hydrologic regime during the 2002-2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only 2 of 14 sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude

Hanrahan, T.; Geist, D.; Arntzen, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An Outlook on Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief outlook on low-energy nuclear physics is presented. Selected recent developments in nuclear structure theory are highlighted and a few open questions are discussed.

A. B. Balantekin

2013-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

An Outlook on Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief outlook on low-energy nuclear physics is presented. Selected recent developments in nuclear structure theory are highlighted and a few open questions are discussed.

Balantekin, A B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon; Assessment of Captive Broodstock Technologies, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Current velocity in rearing vessels had little if any effect on reproductive behavior of captively reared steelhead. However, males and females reared in high velocity vessels participated a greater number of spawning events than siblings reared in low velocity tanks. Observations of nesting females and associated males in a natural stream (Hamma Hamma River) were consistent with those observed in a controlled spawning channel. DNA pedigree analyses did not reveal significant differences in the numbers of fry produced by steelhead reared in high and low velocity vessels. To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon are being exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Subsequently they will be tested for development of long-term memories of these odorants. In 2002-2003, the efficacy of EOG analysis for assessing imprinting was demonstrated and will be applied in these and other behavioral and molecular tools in the current work plan. Results of these experiments will be important to determine the critical periods for imprinting for the offspring of captively-reared fish destined for release into natal rivers or lakes. By early August, the oocytes of all of Rapid River Hatchery chinook salmon females returning from the ocean had advanced to the tertiary yolk globule stage; whereas, only some of the captively reared Lemhi River females sampled had advanced to this stage, and the degree of advancement was not dependent on rearing temperature. The mean spawning time of captive Lemhi River females was 3-4 weeks after that of the Rapid River fish. Captive Lemhi River females produced smaller and fewer eggs than the Rapid River females; however, relative fecundity was higher than that of the Rapid River fish. Female coho salmon that ceased or slowed oocyte development in the spring had lower body growth from the previous August onward compared with females that continued oocyte growth. This indicates that growth during the late summer and fall, one year prior to spawning, can determine the decision to mature the following spring. Therefore it is important to maintain the growth of broodstock during the summer/fall period to ensure the continuation of ovary development in the subsequent spring. A combined whole cell vaccine of Renogen with killed R. salmoninarum strain MT239 may be effective in reducing the occurrence of BKD during the period immediately after seawater transfer, but not in yearling seawater-adapted chinook salmon. Control of BKD is likely to require an integrated disease management plan, utilizing three components, namely broodstock segregation, antibiotics, and vaccination. Vaccine results incorporated with antibiotic treatment will be used to work toward an integrated disease management plan to help to reduce the cycle of BKD transmission in the captive stocks to increase survival safely. Patterns of estimated survival in one chinook salmon stock (Grovers Creek) were generally consistent with inbreeding depression: progeny of fish that were full siblings (approximate increment in F of 0.25) survived to return at much lower rates than did progeny of fish that were half siblings (F {approx} 0.125) or unrelated individuals (F {approx} 0). Growth at sea of Grovers Creek Hatchery stock study fish was lower than that of UWH stock fish. Among the inbreeding groups alone, no clear differences in growth were detectable. However, preliminary results suggest the general pattern of growth was opposite that expected if inbreeding depression reduced growth: the highest growth was in progeny of related parents.

Berejikian, Barry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to 1992, decisions on dam operations and use of stored water relied on recoveries of branded hatchery fish, index counts at traps and dams, and flow patterns at the dams. The advent of PIT-tag technology provided the opportunity to precisely track the smolt migrations of many wild stocks as they pass through the hydroelectric complex and other monitoring sites on their way to the ocean. With the availability of the PIT tag, a more complete approach to these decisions was undertaken starting in 1992 with the addition of PIT-tag detections of several wild spring and summer chinook salmon stocks at Lower Granite Dam. Using data from these detections, we initiated development of a database on wild fish, addressing several goals of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning Council and Conservation Act (NPPC 1980). Section 304(d) of the program states, ''The monitoring program will provide information on the migrational characteristics of the various stocks of salmon and steelhead within the Columbia Basin.'' Further, Section 201(b) urges conservation of genetic diversity, which will be possible only if wild stocks are preserved. Section 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program states that field monitoring of smolt movement will be used to determine the best timing for water storage releases and Section 5.8A.8 states that continued research is needed on survival of juvenile wild fish before they reach the first dam with special attention to water quantity, quality, and several other factors. The goals of this ongoing study are as follows (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence these patterns. (4) Characterize the migrational behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. This report provides information on PIT tagging of wild chinook salmon parr in 2002 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish. Fish were monitored as they migrated through two in-stream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek and at juvenile migrant traps in 2002 and 2003 as well as through interrogation systems at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during 2003. Fish were also monitored by the PIT-tag trawl in the mouth of the Columbia River in 2003. In 2002-2003, we also continued to collect environmental data for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program, which was developed from 1993 to 1997. The project was designed to collect data for use in conjunction with data on parr and smolt movements to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between these movements and environmental factors. Water quality data collected consist of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH measured at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho.

Achord, Stephen; McNatt, Regan A.; Hockersmith, Eric E. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

One: California Economic Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: AN IMPROVED POWER SITUATIONwas sluggish. An improved outlook for consumer spending inforecast compared with the outlook of UCLA's Anderson

Lieser, Tom K

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

2008 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 ... Retail Price Regular-Grade Gasoline Motor Gas Consumption ... * Retail price minus crude oil cost ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(83/3Q) (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

22

Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project; Factors Affecting the Recreational Fishery in Moses Lake Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is a precursor to the final technical report we will be writing the next contract period. Consequently, this report, covering the period between September 27, 2002, and September 26, 2003, represents a progress report towards the final technical report we anticipate completing by September 26, 2004. Sample analysis and field work have progressed well and we anticipate no further delays. There are 4 objectives: (1) To quantify secondary production Moses Lake; (2) To quantify the influence of predation on target fishes in Moses Lake; (3) To quantify mortality of selected fished in Moses Lake; and (4) To assess effects of habitat changes from shoreline development and carp on the fish community in Moses Lake.

Burgess, Dave

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook Figure 12. World marketed energy consumption, 1990-2035 Figure 13. World marketed energy consumption:OECD and Non-OECD, 1990-2035 Figure 14. Shares of world energy consumption in the United States, China, and India, 1990-2035 Figure 15. Marketed energy use in the Non-OECD economies by region, 1990-2035 Figure 16. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 17. Coal consumption in selected world regions, 1990-2035 Figure 18. World electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 19. Renewable electricity generation in China by energy source, 2007-2035 Figure 20. World nuclear generating capacity by region, 2007 and 2035

24

Outlook [Caring About Places...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Donlyn Lyndon editor Outlook James F. Fulton publisher T o dn w h i c h they join outlook or lookout carries subtlydesign assistant watchman. Outlook becomes a point of view,

Lyndon, Donlyn

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; Underwood Conservation District, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project addresses existing habitat conditions, fish population status, and restoration priority sites within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed, a sub-basin of the White Salmon River. Our partners in this project are the United States Geological Service (USGS), and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN). Underwood Conservation District (UCD) is involved in the project via accomplishment of water quality monitoring, sampling for stable isotopes, and characterization of the watershed geomorphology. These work items are part of an effort to characterize the stream and riparian habitat conditions in Rattlesnake Creek, to help guide habitat and fish restoration work. Water chemistry and temperature information is being collected both on Rattlesnake Creek, and on other tributaries and the main stem of the White Salmon River. Information on the entire system enables us to compare results obtained from Rattlesnake Creek with the rest of the White Salmon system. Water chemistry and temperature data have been collected in a manner that is comparable with data gathered in previous years. The results from data gathered in the 2001-2002 performance period are reported in appendix A at the end of this 2002-2003 report. Additional work being conducted as part of this study includes; an estimate of salmonid population abundance (YIN and USGS); a determination of fish species composition, distribution, and life history (YIN and USGS), and a determination of existing kinds, distribution, and severity of fish diseases (YIN and USGS). The overall objective is to utilize the above information to prioritize restoration efforts in Rattlesnake Creek.

White, Jim

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - DRAFT - June 12, 2012 1 Table B1. Total energy...

28

Annual Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4) January 2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 With Projections to 2025 January 2004 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) was prepared by the Energy...

29

School of Mines 2002 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodiesel Sprays in the Low-Temperature Combustion Regime Casey M. Allen, Elisa Toulson, David L. S. Hung is to investigate the spray ignition characteristics of diesel and canola-derived biodiesel in a rapid compression, whereby a given temperature is attained prior to the fuel spray by altering the charge cooling time after

30

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook For NASEO Winter Fuels Outlook Conference November 1, 2013| Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA works closely...

31

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

One: The California Economic Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Christopher Thornberg,signs of having peaked. The outlook for 2006 is dominated by

Thornberg, Christopher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ShortShort--Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis ShortShort--Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook Chart Gallery for Chart Gallery for ...

34

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Short Short- -Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook Chart Gallery for Chart Gallery for November...

35

2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Key factors driving the short-term outlook. 2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook. 2 Disruption of crude oil and liquefied natural gas supply from

36

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2009-2040...

37

Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Outlook National Association of State Energy Officials State Heating Oil and Propane Conference August 30, 2004 William Trapmann Energy Information ...

38

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Non-OECD Statistics" (2012), www.iea.org (subscription site). Projections: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013, DOEEIA-0383(2013) (Washington, DC: April 2013); AEO2013 National...

39

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Table G1. Heat rates Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton...

40

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

36 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 6 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2010 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 234 Regional maps Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information...

42

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 22 Table A10....

43

Baryons 2002: Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary and outlook presented at the 9th International Conference on the Structure of Baryons (BARYONS 2002), Jefferson Lab, March 3-8, 2002

Wolfram Weise

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F17. Delivered energy...

45

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections: EIA, AEO2012 National Energy Modeling System run REF2012.D020112C. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 160 Reference case Table...

46

Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook ... State gasoline taxes ... that occurred between spring 1999 and fall 2001, ...

47

The California Economy: The Long Term Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1996. First, we cover the outlook for the main macroeconomicin the two economies. The outlook calls for moderate growthunderlies the macroeconomic outlook. Good jobs offer high

Kimbell, Larry J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Now that the heating season has ended, natural gas wellhead prices have fallen from the exceptionally high levels seen in February and early March. Nevertheless, they still remain historically and unseasonably high, hovering around $5.00 per MMBtu. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will remain above $5.00 per MMBtu in April and then decrease to $4.36 in May and $4.26 in June (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2003). Wellhead prices for the 2002-2003 heating season (November through March) averaged $4.44 per MMBtu, or $2.08 more than last winter's price. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.53 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $4.40 per MMBtu. This projection is based on the expectation of lower volumes of natural gas in underground storage compared with last year and continued increases in demand over 2002 levels. Cold temperatures this past winter led to a record drawdown of storage stocks. By the end of March, estimated working gas stocks were 676 Bcf (prior estimates were 696 Bcf), which is the lowest end-of-March level in EIA records and 44 percent below the previous 5-year average. In 2004, continued tightness of domestic natural gas supply and high demand levels are expected to keep the average wellhead price near the 2003 level.

49

Key Drivers Affecting the Outlook for Renewables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release, International Energy Outlook 2011 . ... AECO Germany - BEB Hub Netherlands - TTF Belgium - Zeebrugge

50

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand and Economic Outlook Demand and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 Figure 9 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 Figure 10 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 11 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 12. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type,1990-2030 Figure 12 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 13. Coal Consumption in Selected World Regions,1980-2030 Figure 13 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

51

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 143 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 8.82 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEER for central air conditioner and heat pumps, increasing to 12 SEER in 2006. Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, c. Water Heaters Electric: Current standard .86 EF, incr easing to .90 EF in 2004. Gas: Curren

52

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in IEO99 are consistent with those published in AEO99. IEO99 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private

53

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

235 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions...

54

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Brazil July 24, ... Germany Non-OECD OECD 108.00 86.00 69.00 44.00 35.00

55

Learning from Multiple Outlooks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider semi-supervised learning from multiple outlooks of the same learning task, that is, learning from different representations of the same type of data. As opposed to learning from multiple views where it is assumed that the exact same instances have multiple representations, we only assume the availability of samples of the same learning task in different domains. We develop an algorithmic framework that is based on mapping the (unlabeled) data followed by adjusting the mapping using the scarcer labeled data. The mapped data from all the outlooks can then be used for a generic classification algorithm. We further provide sample complexity results under the assumption that the different outlooks are inherently low dimension Gaussian mixtures. Experiments with real-world data indicate the performance boost from using multiple outlooks.

Gal-on, Maayan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F11. Delivered energy consumption in Russia by end-use sector and fuel,...

57

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F7. Delivered energy consumption in Japan by end-use sector and fuel,...

58

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013 1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights The U.S. Energy Information ...

59

Annual Energy Outlook 1998 Forecasts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA Administrator's Press Briefing on the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) Annual Energy Outlook 1998 - Errata as of 3698 Data from the AEO98 Assumptions to the AEO98 (Nat'Gas...

60

Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A presentation to the National Association of State Energy Officials 2005 Energy Outlook Conference, in Washington, DC, on February 17, 2005, giving EIA's outlook for petroleum and natural gas supply, demand, and prices.

Information Center

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Winter Distillate .and Propane Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Distillate .and Propane Outlook. Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration State Heating Oil and Propane Program August 2000

62

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2010 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions Download the Report Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Report Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

63

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2009 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions

64

International Energy Outlook - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2004 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2004 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2004 projections are based on U.S. and foreign government laws in effect on October 1, 2003.

65

Prfungsstatistik fr das Studienjahr 2002/2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anzahl der Abschlüsse FS MW Biologie 4 12,7 Chemie 5 12,6 Deutsch 6 12,6 Englisch 7 12,7 Geographie 6 12 deutsche Philologie Am. Amerikanistik Angl. Anglistik Boh. Bohemistik Dt.Sp. Deutsche Sprache ELW Englische Komm.wiss. Kommunikationswissenschaft MNG Mittlere und Neuere Geschichte NDL Neuere Deutsche Literatur

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

66

Conjuntos y Numeros Curso 2002-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´ia del primer nivel del ´atomo de hidr´ogeno: -21, 8 ? 10-19 julios. · Carga del electr´on: e = 1, 6 ? 10

Fernández Gallardo, Pablo

67

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

68

Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Outlook 2010 Restrospective Review July 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Depa rtment of Energy W ashington, DC 20585 This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review While the integrated nature of NEMS may result in some feedback that slightly modifies the initial assumptions about world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment, these feedbacks tend to be relatively small, so that the initial assumptions for world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment largely determine the overall projection environ- ment. To the extent that this general environment deviates from the initial assumptions, the NEMS projection results will also deviate. Table 2 provides a summary of the percentage of years in

69

Summer_Gas_Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) 1 Summer 2001 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary April 2001 For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to once again exhibit a very tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.49 per gallon, slightly lower than last summer's average of $1.53 per gallon, but still above the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of $1.35 recorded in 1981. Nominal prices are expected to reach a peak of $1.52 per gallon in June but then decline gradually to about $1.43 by December. These projections presume no

70

Conoco details energy outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the U.S., government should adopt policies that encourage U.S. petroleum companies to diversify crude oil sources around the world, says Conoco Inc. That's the key them underlying Conoco's latest world energy outlook through 2000. In its 1989 outlook, Conoco called on the U.S. government to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain to exploration and development and provide a tax credit of $5/bbl of oil equivalent (BOE) for production from U.S. frontier areas as keys to reducing U.S. oil import dependence. Although Conoco included opening the ANWR Coastal Plain and more of the U.S. offshore among U.S. policy recommendations in its current outlook, the company placed the greatest emphasis on incentives for worldwide exploration.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

NASEO Energy Outlook Conference  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NASEO Energy Outlook Conference NASEO Energy Outlook Conference 2/26/01 Click here to start Table of Contents NASEO Energy Outlook Conference Retail Product Prices Are Driven By Crude Oil WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 Annual World Oil Demand Growth by Region, 1991-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* Fundamentals Explain High Crude Oil Prices Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand Balance U.S. Distillate Inventories Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter Heating Oil Imports Strong in 2001 Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs Propane prices Influenced by Crude Oil and Natural Gas

72

International energy outlook 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Forecasts & Analysis > Annual Energy Outlook 2011 : Annual Energy Outlook 2011 with Projections to 2035

74

Kaons: Review and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a review of recent results and an outlook of kaon physics. After enjoying a renaissance, the discipline is now becoming and endangered species. Action will be needed to keep kaon physics at the heart of future FPCP meetings.

Augusto Ceccucci

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hadronic Physics: an Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief outlook, in two senses, is presented for hadronic physics. The likely near term future for experiment and lattice effort is sketched and I speculate on future directions in theory. I also look out at other fields, presenting a short review of QCD ideas in ''Beyond the Standard Model'' physics.

Swanson, Eric S. [Dept of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA 15260 (United States)

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) ... 930.90 540.30 1982.00 2836.01 1193.30 1092.45 550.26 1983.00 3033.53

77

Natural Gas Winter Outlook 2000-2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is based on the Winter Fuels Outlook published in the 4th Quarter Short-Term Energy Outlook and discusses the supply and demand outlook from October 2000 through March 2001.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sorting in Patrick Geddes' Outlook Tower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n g in P a t r i c k Outlook Tower Geddes' J Joyce Barleythree months at the Outlook 'lower in Edinburgh, sorting theand services. The Outlook Tower was a disused observatory

Earley, Joyce

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

One: The California Long-Term Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA LONG-TERM OUTLOOK Tom K. Lieser, ExecutiveThe California Long-Term Outlook: Projections to 2020," TheThe California Long-Term Outlook: Projections to 2020," The

Lieser, Tom K

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte In this paper, the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluates the projections published in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), (1) by comparing the projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1982 through the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 with actual historical values. A set of major consumption, production, net import, price, economic, and carbon dioxide emissions variables are included in the evaluation, updating similar papers from previous years. These evaluations also present the reasons and rationales for significant differences. The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Winter Distillate and Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Winter Distillate and Natural Gas Outlook. Distillate Prices Increasing With Crude Oil. Distillate Outlook. When Will Crude Oil Prices Fall?

82

EIA Short -Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2008 NASEO 2008/09 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 7, 2008 Washington, DC Howard Gruenspecht Acting ...

83

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those...

84

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook Briefing for the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference Orlando, Florida Mike Burdette

85

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2/9/2005: Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook. This presentation contains content that your browser may not be able to show properly.

86

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

87

2013 Propane Market Outlook  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

3 3 Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats, and Opportunities Facing the Propane Industry Through 2020 P R E S E N T E D B Y : Prepared for the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) by: ICF International, Inc. 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 Tel (703) 218-2758 www.icfi.com Principal Authors: Mr. Michael Sloan msloan@icfi.com Mr. Warren Wilczewski wwilczewski@icfi.com Propane Market Outlook at a Glance ¡ Total consumer propane sales declined by more than 17 percent between 2009 and 2012, including 3.3 percent in 2011 and 10 to 12 percent in 2012. The declines in 2011 and 2012 were due primarily to much warmer than normal weather, as well as the impact of higher propane prices and continuing efficiency trends. Sales are expected to rebound in 2013 with a return to more

88

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012

89

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Admin- istration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). Projections in IEO2007 are divided according to Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and non-members (non-OECD). There are

90

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), and the U.S. projections that appear in the IEO are consistent with those published in the AEO. World energy consumption in this year's IEO2000 is projected to

91

International Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1997 April 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

92

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 with projections to 2020 March 16, 2000 Jay E. Hakes Energy Information Administration Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO),

93

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administra- tion (EIA) of the outlook for international energy mar- kets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). IEO2006 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Non- marketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included

94

International Energy Outlook 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1995 May 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

95

Annual Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) Annual Energy Outlook 1999 With Projections to 2020 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222).

96

Annual Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1998 With Projections to 2020 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administra- tion and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other or- ganization. The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Informa- tion Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling

97

International Energy Outlook - Electicity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2004 Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2004 projections. Developing nations in Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 60. World Net Electricity Consumptin, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 61. World Net Electricity Consumptin by Region, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World net electricity consumption is expected nearly double to over the next two decades, according to the International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) reference case forecast. Total demand for electricity is projected to increase on average by 2.3 percent per year, from 13,290

98

Annual Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2) 2) December 2001 Annual Energy Outlook 2002 With Projections to 2020 December 2001 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@ eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@ eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director, Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director, Oil and Gas Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA's National

99

Electric Industry Outlook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Challenges and Opportunities that Impact EEI Members and Their Federal Customers Steve Kiesner Director National Customer Markets Federal Utility Partnership Working Group May 22, 2013 San Francisco, CA Agenda  Necessary infrastructure investments to address:  Reliability  Environmental and other policy requirements  And continue the development of a grid for the 21 st Century  Our move to natural gas and what it means to customers  How technology is changing our world and those of our customers  Potential Federal-Utility Partnerships with Electrification as a transportation fuel 2 Infrastructure Investments Richard McMahon Vice President, Finance and Energy Supply Commission lays out U.S. energy efficiency roadmap through 2030

100

Annual Energy Outlook 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96) 96) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1996 With Projections to 2015 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/ 586-1130),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Annual Energy Outlook 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Annual Energy Outlook 2001 With Projections to 2020 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2001 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses the macroeconomic projections, world oil and natural gas markets, oxygenates in gasoline, distributed electricity generation, electricity industry restructuring, and carbon dioxide emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

102

Annual Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1997 With Projections to 2015 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441),

103

International energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

World Energy Outlook 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OECD/IEA - OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 To Cover... To Cover To Cover ... ... Transport Energy and CO 2 Where are we going? What are the dangers? How do we change direction? Primarily reporting on: IEA WEO 2008 IEA ETP 2008 On-going work with IEA's Mobility Model One or two detours to talk about modelling © OECD/IEA - 2008 0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 14 000 16 000 18 000 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Mtoe Other renewables Hydro Nuclear Biomass Gas Coal Oil World energy demand expands by 45% between now and 2030 - an average rate of increase of 1.6% per year - with coal accounting for more than a third of the overall rise Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook 2008 Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook

106

Supplement Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2005  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) New England 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014...

107

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2006 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

108

Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Provides instructions for remote Outlook access using...

109

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook Nan Zhou, Michael A.2001, International Energy Outlook 2001 , Report No. DOE/The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) , Washington

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Global and U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook, 2008. No.Mexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyPatterns, Issues, and Outlook Philip Martin Professor of

Martin, Philip

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy...

112

FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outlook) for the City of San Diego which presented a comprehensive examination of the Citys long range fiscal condition. The Financial Outlook has proven to be an important planning tool for the City of San Diego. The Outlook guided the City in establishing the fiscal year 2008 annual budget and has served throughout the year as the basis for longer term fiscal decisionmaking. The Outlook has communicated the Citys fiscal priorities along with the Citys strengths and the challenges that remain in achieving a balanced General Fund budget and fiscal health. The updated Five-Year Financial Outlook (2009-2013 Outlook) includes revised revenue and expenditure projections for fiscal years 2009 through 2013 as well as additional fiscal commitments that have emerged since the 2008-2012 Outlook was issued. Similar to the 2008-2012 Outlook, the revised revenue and expenditure estimates in the 2009-2013 Outlook are based on a variety of assumptions in the context of current and projected economic conditions. The updated Outlook not only identifies revenue and expenditure trends but also discusses risks and opportunities that affect fiscal decisions and the Citys ability to accomplish its strategic goals over the next five-year period. Those goals include: Preservation of City services to the fullest extent possible. Fund the operations of new public facilities. Meet contractual obligations and fund mandated programs. Contribute the full payment of the Annual Required Contribution (ARC) for the Citys pension system. Establish and maintain adequate General Fund reserves according to City Charter Section 91 and the City Reserve Policy recently approved by the City Council. Address other significant financial obligations with a longer-term strategy.

Jerry Sanders; Jay M. Goldstone

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

International Energy Outlook - Table of Contents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook International Energy Outlook EIA Glossary International Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0484(2004) Release date: April 2004 Next release date: July 2005 The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S.projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Table of Contents Appendixes Highlights World Energy and Economic Outlook Outlook for Primary Energy Consumption Energy End Use Outlook for Carbon Dioxide Emissions World Economic Outlook Alternative Growth Case Trends in Energy Intensity

114

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections November 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .lort lort lort lort <.ort ort Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Nrm ,iergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short-

115

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2QH 2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Tern Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

116

DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short

117

DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short Short

118

DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term' Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

119

DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

120

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B B World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal-computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product [GDP]) and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H13. World net liquids-fired electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 93 74 68 66 64 62 60 -1.5 United States a 37 20 17 18 18 18 18 -2.3 Canada 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 -1.0 Mexico/Chile 49 47 45 42 40 38 36 -1.0 OECD Europe 77 73 70 66 63 60 57 -1.0 OECD Asia 112 157 102 97 92 87 83 -1.0 Japan 92 137 83 79 75 71 68 -1.0 South Korea 18 17 16 15 15 14 13 -1.0 Australia/New Zealand 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 -1.0 Total OECD 282 303 239 229 219 209 200 -1.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

122

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 894 899 932 978 1,032 1,054 1,030 1,066 0.6 United States a 799 807 820 885 912 908 875 903 0.4 Canada 86 86 99 81 99 117 118 118 1.0 Mexico/Chile 10 6 12 12 21 29 37 46 7.3 OECD Europe 840 867 892 929 1,045 1,065 1,077 1,073 0.7 OECD Asia 406 415 301 447 490 551 557 576 1.1 Japan 266 274 103 192 200 206 209 209 -0.9 South Korea 140 141 198 255 291 346 348 367 3.2 Australia/NewZealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 2,140 2,181 2,124 2,354 2,567 2,670 2,664 2,715 0.7 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 272 274 344 414 475 533 592 630 2.8 Russia

123

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,511 1,563 1,686 1,793 1,888 1,987 2,114 2,233 1.2 United States a 1,222 1,266 1,357 1,404 1,431 1,468 1,528 1,570 0.7 Canada 170 162 171 199 223 240 255 271 1.7 Mexico/Chile 119 135 158 190 234 279 331 392 3.6 OECD Europe 1,024 1,082 1,086 1,123 1,144 1,215 1,277 1,348 0.7 OECD Asia 347 377 408 438 478 505 539 561 1.3 Japan 205 215 242 257 276 288 293 293 1.0 South Korea 72 90 91 98 110 117 136 148 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 70 71 75 83 91 101 110 119 1.7 Total OECD 2,882 3,022 3,180 3,353 3,510

124

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

125

International energy outlook 1998  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

International energy outlook 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home heating oil retail price includes taxes. 16 Source: EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2012 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 10, 2012.

128

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 1 - World Energy and Economic Outlook In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use; OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the NON-OECD Economies by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

129

International Energy Outlook - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2004 World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2004 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, including large increases for the developing economies of Asia. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2025. Figure 12. World Primary Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 Figure Data Figure 13. World Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 14. World Primary Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data

130

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2001.

131

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2000.

132

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2000

133

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2000.

134

Pharmaceutical crops have a mixed outlook in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crops have a mixed outlook in California by Michelle Marvieras environmental harm. The outlook for the production of

Marvier, Michelle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Evaluation, 2005 1 Outlook Evaluation, 2005 1 Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005 * Then Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose or advocate future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes,

136

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0202(98/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use

137

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

& Analysis > AEO 2009 & Analysis > AEO 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Service Report, April 2009 The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009) reference case was updated to reflect the provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) that were enacted in mid-February 2009. The reference case in the recently published AEO2009, which reflected laws and regulations in effect as of November 2008, does not include ARRA. The need to develop an updated reference case following the passage of ARRA also provided the Energy Information Administration (EIA) with an opportunity to update the

138

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of the EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in the IEO2001 are consistent with those published in the AEO2001. IEO2001 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in

139

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference 2010  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation at the 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference in Washington, DC, outlined EIA's current forecast for U.S. crude oil, distillate, natural gas, propane and gasoline supply, demand, and markets over the coming winter season.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A presentation to the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference, in Orlando, Florida, on February 3, 2005, giving EIAs outlook for petroleum supply and prices, with particular attention to jet fuel.

Information Center

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

International Energy Outlook - Download Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

PDF Highlights PDF World Energy and Economic Outlook PDF World Oil Markets PDF Natural Gas PDF Coal PDF Electricity PDF Environmental Issues and World Energy Use PDF Index PDF...

142

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John Conti, Director, International, Economic and Greenhouse Gases Division (202/586-4430). Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041 or linda.doman@eia.doe.gov) or the following analysts: Macroeconomic Assumptions Nasir Khilji (nasir.khilji@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1294) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Natural Gas Phyllis Martin (phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9592) Justine Bardin (justine.baren@eia.doe.gov 202/586-3508) Coal Michael Mellish (michael.mellish@eia.doe.gov,

143

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred toLinda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Arthur Andersen (art.andersen@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441) Linda E. Doman (linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Perry Lindstrom (perry.lindstrom@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-0934) Reformulated Gasoline

144

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Growth in energy use is projected worldwide through 2020. The demand for electricity in homes, business, and industry is growing in all regions, as is the demand for petroleum-powered personal transportation. The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) reference case forecast indicates that by 2020, the world will consume three times the energy it consumed 28 years ago in 1970 (Figure 2). Much of the projected growth in energy consumption is attributed to expectations of rapid increases in energy use in the developing world—especially in Asia. Although the economic downturn in Asia that began in mid-1997 and continues into 1998 has lowered expectations for near-term growth in the region, the forecast still suggests that almost half the world’s projected increase in energy

145

International Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 3 May 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director,

146

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

147

International Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 8 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office

148

Annual Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2000 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses current energy issues—appliance standards, gasoline and diesel fuel standards, natural gas industry expansion, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

149

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption is projected to grow by 57 percent over the 2004 to 2030 period. Total world energy use rises from 447 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 qua- drillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). Global energy demand grows despite the relatively high world oil and natural gas prices that are projected to persist into the mid-term outlook. The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2004 to 2030 is projected for nations outside

150

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data Graphic Data International Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2003-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Use by Energy Type, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. Fuel Shares of World Marketed Energy Use, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

151

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

152

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is projected to continue. Although total world consumption of coal in 2001, at 5.26 billion short tons,12 was more than 27 percent higher than the total in 1980, it was 1 percent below the 1989 peak of 5.31 billion short tons (Figure 56). The International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 2001 and 2025, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent (on a tonnage basis), but with considerable variation among regions.

153

International Energy Outlook 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 4 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222),

154

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 7 May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office of

155

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Preface Highlights World Energy Consumption The World Oil Market (Errata as of May 13, 1998) Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Power Hydroelectric and Other Renewable Energy Electricity Appendix A-World Energy Consumption, Oil Production, and Carbon Emissions Tables (PDF) Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A1-A13 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A14-A26 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A27-A39 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A40-A50 Appendix B-World Energy Projection System Appendix C-A Status Report on Developing Transportation for Caspian Basin Oil and Gas Production Preface The Energy Information Administration’s outlook for world energy trends is presented in this report. Model projections now extending to the year 2020 are reported, and regional trends are discussed.

156

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Oil Markets World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million bar- rels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last year's outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period. To meet the projected increase in world oil demand in the IEO2006 reference case, total petroleum supply in 2030 will need to increase

157

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparisons With Other Forecasts, and Performance of Past IEO Forecasts for 1990, 1995, and 2000 Forecast Comparisons Energy Consumption by Region Three organizations provide forecasts comparable with the projections in IEO2006, which extend to 2030 for the first time. The International Energy Agency (IEA) pro- vides "business as usual" projections to 2030 in its World Energy Outlook 2004; Petroleum Economics, Ltd. (PEL) publishes world energy projections to 2025; and Petro- leum Industry Research Associates (PIRA) provides projections to 2020. For comparison, 2002 is used as the base year for all the projections. Comparisons between IEO2006 and IEO2005 extend only to 2025, the last year of the IEO2005 projections. Regional breakouts vary among the different projec- tions, complicating the comparisons. For example, IEO2006, PIRA, and IEA

158

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contacts.gif (2957 bytes) contacts.gif (2957 bytes) The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen, Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: Report Contact World Energy Consumption Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041 linda.doman@eia.doe.gov World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler - 202/586-9503 gbutler@eia.doe.gov Stacy MacIntyre - 202/586-9795- (Consumption) stacy.macintyre@eia.doe.gov Natural Gas Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041

159

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 6 June 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov,

160

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2003 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected to nearly double between 2001 and 2025, with the most robust growth in demand expected among the developing nations. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption in the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case. Consumption of natural gas worldwide is projected to increase by an average of 2.8 percent annually from 2001 to 2025, compared with projected annual growth rates of 1.8 percent for oil consumption and 1.5 percent for coal. Natural gas consumption in 2025, at 176 trillion cubic feet, is projected to be nearly double the 2001 total of 90 trillion cubic feet (Figure 40). The natural gas share of total energy consumption is projected to increase from 23 percent in 2001 to 28 percent in 2025.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

162

EIA - 2009 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2009 The International Energy Outlook 2009 (IEO2009) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2009 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), (March 2009). A revised, updated AEO2009 reference case projection was released on April 17, 2009. It reflects the impact of provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA2009), enacted in mid-February 2009, on U.S. energy markets. The revised AEO2009 reference case includes updates for the U.S. macroeconomic outlook, which has been changing at an unusually rapid rate in recent months. Throughout IEO2009, significant changes to the U.S. outlook relative to the published AEO2009 reference case are noted for the reader's reference. The complete revised AEO2009 reference case results for the United States can be viewed on the EIA web site: http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo.

163

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

164

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy intensity (Energy consumption/real $ GDP) About the Annual Energy Outlook. Contact Information and Staff; ... Updated capital cost for ...

165

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas Unconventional Total Conventional Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2011

166

Cluster Expansion Methods - Progress and Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Presentation Title, Cluster Expansion Methods - Progress and Outlook. Author(s), Axel van de Walle .

167

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8 2.7 3.8 5.0 6.3 7.8 9.2 5.7 Total 6.9 8.3 10.3 12.5 15.0 17.7 20.0 3.6 Commercial Liquids 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 -0.8 Natural gas 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.8 7.1 Coal 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.1 Electricity 0.7 1.0 1.4 1.9 2.6 3.5 4.4 6.5 Total 2.5 2.8 3.5 4.3 5.3 6.4 7.6 3.8 Industrial Liquids 8.4 10.2 11.4 12.2 12.7 13.0 13.0 1.5 Natural gas 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.8 4.2 4.5

168

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 121.3 126.1 129.7 132.9 137.2 143.6 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.3 100.5 101.8 102.3 103.9 107.2 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.8 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.9 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.2 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.5 88.6 90.9 92.8 94.6 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.6 43.0 44.3 45.4 46.1 46.4 0.5 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.7 22.5 23.0 23.0 22.9 22.2 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 13.0 13.8 14.7 15.3 15.9 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.5 7.7 8.0 8.2 0.7 Total OECD 234.7 242.3 244.1 254.6 262.7

169

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8 16.5 18.6 21.3 24.3 27.5 31.1 2.5 Total 28.9 30.8 33.6 37.1 40.9 44.8 49.0 1.8 Industrial Liquids 57.2 61.6 66.4 70.1 74.2 78.2 82.1 1.2 Natural gas 45.5 48.8 54.3 59.0 63.4

170

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.0 Total 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1.1 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 1.6 Total 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 1.2 Industrial Liquids 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.4 Natural gas 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.4 Coal 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Electricity

171

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D4. World liquids consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 23.4 23.5 23.2 22.9 22.9 23.5 0.0 United States a 18.6 18.9 18.7 18.8 18.4 17.7 17.4 17.5 -0.3 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.4 0.2 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 1.4 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 13.2 13.1 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 -0.3 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.0 7.7 7.6 7.6 7.6 7.4 -0.1 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.2 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.6 -0.7 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 0.5 Australia/NewZealand 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.3 Total OECD 45.8 46.0 44.6 44.3 43.8 43.6 43.8 44.3 -0.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

172

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6 Electricity 4.9 4.7 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 0.7 Total 11.4 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.2 11.4 11.6 0.1 Commercial Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 -0.3 Natural gas 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 0.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.7 Electricity 4.5 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 0.8 Total 8.6 8.8 8.9 9.2 9.5 9.9 10.2 0.6 Industrial Liquids 8.4 8.2 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.7 0.1 Natural gas 8.0 8.7 9.6 9.8 9.9 10.1 10.4 0.9 Coal 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6

173

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2 Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Total 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 2.4 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 5.5 Total 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Industrial Liquids 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 Natural gas 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.2 2.6 3.0 2.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 3.1 Electricity

174

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A6. World natural gas consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.2 29.2 31.3 33.4 35.1 37.0 39.4 41.6 1.2 United States a 22.9 23.8 25.3 26.3 26.9 27.6 28.7 29.5 0.7 Canada 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.6 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 1.7 Mexico/Chile 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.5 4.3 5.1 6.1 7.2 3.6 OECD Europe 18.8 19.8 19.7 20.4 20.8 22.1 23.2 24.5 0.7 OECD Asia 6.1 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.5 9.0 9.5 9.9 1.3 Japan 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.1 5.2 5.2 1.0 South Korea 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.3 2.5 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 1.7 Total OECD 53.2 55.6 58.2 61.5 64.4 68.0 72.1 76.0 1.0 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 19.8 21.8

175

GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

176

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999-Summer Gasoline Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook This year's base case outlook for summer (April-September) motor gasoline markets may be summarized as follows: * Pump Prices: (average regular) projected to average about $1.13 per gallon this summer, up 9-10 cents from last year. The increase, while substantial, still leaves average prices low compared to pre-1998 history, especially in inflation-adjusted terms. * Supplies: expected to be adequate, overall. Beginning-of-season inventories were even with the 1998 level, which was at the high end of the normal range. However, some refinery problems on the West Coast have tightened things up, at least temporarily. * Demand: up 2.0 percent from last summer due to solid economic growth and low (albeit rising) fuel prices; highway travel may reach 1.4 trillion miles for the

177

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Economic Outlook and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 8 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 Figure 9 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 10 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 Figure 11 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 12. World Coal Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 12 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

178

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: World Energy and Economic Outlook 1: World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year’s outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. Figure 7. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Country Grouping, 2003-2030 (Quadrillion Btu) Printer friendly version Region 2003 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Average Annual Percent Change, 2003-2030

179

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H3. World installed natural-gas-fired generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 402 435 461 505 568 631 697 1.9 United States a 350 379 390 420 472 519 566 1.6 Canada 20 19 26 28 29 32 35 1.9 Mexico/Chile 31 36 45 56 68 80 95 3.8 OECD Europe 217 219 213 204 218 234 252 0.5 OECD Asia 128 134 140 144 148 157 163 0.8 Japan 83 90 96 97 100 101 101 0.7 South Korea 27 26 26 28 29 35 38 1.1 Australia/New Zealand 18 18 18 19 20 22 23 1.0 Total OECD 746 787 814

180

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J3. World gross domestic product (GDP) per capita by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2009-2040 (2005 dollars per person) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 32,959 33,559 36,264 39,848 43,145 46,824 51,175 56,306 1.7 United States a 41,478 42,130 45,224 49,521 53,259 57,343 62,044 67,452 1.6 Canada 34,582 35,285 37,485 40,040 41,910 43,909 46,715 50,028 1.2 Mexico/Chile 12,215 12,750 14,862 16,996 19,460 22,324 25,830 30,192 2.9 OECD Europe 25,770 26,269 27,363 29,924 32,694 35,369 38,368 41,753 1.6 OECD Asia 28,623 29,875 32,912 36,117 39,347 42,264 45,505 48,961 1.7 Japan 29,469 30,827 33,255

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181

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A14. World population by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (millions) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 470 475 499 523 547 569 591 612 0.8 United States a 308 310 325 340 356 372 388 404 0.9 Canada 34 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 1.0 Mexico/Chile 129 131 138 144 150 155 159 162 0.7 OECD Europe 553 556 570 580 588 594 598 601 0.3 OECD Asia 202 203 204 205 204 203 201 199 -0.1 Japan 128 128 127 125 122 119 117 114 -0.4 South Korea 48 48 49 50 50 50 50 49 0.1 Australia/NewZealand 26 27 28 30 32 33 34 35 0.9 Total OECD 1,226 1,234 1,273 1,307 1,339 1,366 1,390 1,411 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 338 338 342 342 342 340 337 334 0.0 Russia 141 140 142 141 139 136 134 131 -0.2 Other 197

182

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

O F = = | = = g u n e = O M N O O F = = | = = g u n e = O M N O w i t h P r o j e c t i o n s t o 2 0 3 5 A n n u a l E n e r g y Ou t l o o k 2 0 1 2 For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202/586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia. gov, 202/586-1284), Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis; Joseph A. Beamon (joseph.beamon@eia.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis; Sam A. Napolitano (sam.napolitano@eia.gov, 202/586-0687), Director, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis; A. Michael

183

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H5. World installed nuclear generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 115 119 123 130 133 130 135 0.5 United States a 101 104 111 114 114 109 113 0.4 Canada 13 13 11 13 16 16 16 0.7 Mexico/Chile 1 2 2 3 4 5 6 5.1 OECD Europe 132 124 128 142 143 143 142 0.3 OECD Asia 67 45 65 71 79 80 82 0.7 Japan 49 20 34 35 36 37 37 -0.9 South Korea 18 25 32 36 43 43 45 3.2 Australia/New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 314 288 316 343 355 352 359 0.5 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 42 49 58 65 73 80 85 2.4 Russia 24 28 35 40 45 50 55 2.8 Other 17 20 23 25 27 29 29 1.8 Non-OECD Asia 21

184

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H21. World net solar electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 4 33 38 42 48 63 101 11.1 United States a 4 32 37 40 46 62 99 11.2 Canada 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 -- Mexico/Chile 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 -- OECD Europe 23 78 85 89 94 98 102 5.1 OECD Asia 5 12 22 33 39 50 50 8.1 Japan 4 7 14 23 29 39 39 8.1 South Korea 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3.6 Australia/New Zealand 0 4 6 8 8 9 9 -- Total OECD 32 123 145 165 181 211 253 7.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Russia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Other 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Non-OECD Asia 1 31 76 94 107 120 129 17.2 China 1 26 67 79 90 100 105 17.0 India 0 3 7 13 14 17

185

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H11. World installed other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 38 40 41 42 43 45 47 0.7 United States a 35 38 39 39 40 41 43 0.7 Canada 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.6 Mexico/Chile 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1.3 OECD Europe 73 75 76 77 78 79 80 0.3 OECD Asia 33 36 36 36 36 36 37 0.3 Japan 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 0.1 South Korea 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 1.2 Australia/New Zealand 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 1.4 Total OECD 144 151 153 155 158 160 163 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 0.2 Russia 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.3 Other 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0.2 Non-OECD Asia 26 36 45 54 63 69 73 3.4 China 20 27 36 45 53 59 61 3.9 India 3 4 4 4

186

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H7. World installed hydroelectric generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 170 177 181 190 201 214 228 1.0 United States a 78 78 79 79 79 80 81 0.1 Canada 75 78 80 85 93 101 109 1.3 Mexico/Chile 17 20 22 25 29 33 38 2.8 OECD Europe 151 155 169 176 183 189 195 0.9 OECD Asia 37 39 40 40 40 40 41 0.3 Japan 22 24 24 24 24 25 25 0.3 South Korea 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.3 Australia/New Zealand 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 0.3 Total OECD 358 371 389 405 424 443 464 0.9 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 87 91 99 103 110 118 125 1.2 Russia 47 49 54 58 62 66 69 1.3 Other 41 42 45 45 48 52 56 1.1 Non-OECD Asia

187

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections for Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel This page inTenTionally lefT blank 259 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H1. World total installed generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,248 1,316 1,324 1,379 1,456 1,546 1,669 1.0 United States a 1,033 1,080 1,068 1,098 1,147 1,206 1,293 0.8 Canada 137 144 152 163 174 185 198 1.2 Mexico/Chile 78 93 104 118 135 155 177 2.8 OECD Europe 946 1,028 1,096 1,133 1,159 1,185 1,211 0.8 OECD Asia 441 444 473 489 501 516 524 0.6 Japan 287 275 293 300 304 309 306 0.2 South Korea 85 93 100 107 114

188

International energy outlook 1996  

SciTech Connect

This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Title of Paper Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Title of Paper Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte OIAF has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: Natural gas has generally been the fuel with the least accurate forecasts of consumption, production, and prices. Natural gas was the last fossil fuel to be deregulated following the strong regulation of energy markets in the 1970s and early 1980s. Even after deregulation, the behavior

190

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

191

Petroleum Outlook:.More Volatility?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook: More Volatility? Outlook: More Volatility? 3/19/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Petroleum Outlook: More Volatility? Product Price Volatility-This Year and in the Future WTI Crude Oil Price: Potential for Volatility Around Base Case OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 Annual World Oil Demand Growth by Region, 1991-2001 Low Total OECD Oil Stocks* Keep Market Balance Tight Fundamentals Explain High Crude Oil Prices Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Reflect Product Market-Based Volatility U.S. Distillate Inventories Distillate Winter Demand Stronger Than Temperatures Would Imply High Production Offset Lack of Inventory High Production Came From High Yields & High Inputs High Margins Bring High Imports Gasoline Price Volatility Is a Concern This Summer Gasoline Volatility

192

IEA World Energy Outlook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IEA World Energy Outlook IEA World Energy Outlook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IEA World Energy Outlook Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations References: World Energy Outlook[1] The 2010 "edition of the World Energy Outlook - the International Energy Agency's flagship publication and leading source of analysis of global energy trends - presents updated projections of energy demand, production, trade and investment, fuel by fuel and region by region to 2035. WEO-2010 includes, for the first time, the result of a new scenario that takes account of the recent commitments that governments have made to

193

Outlook for Charged Higgs Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost all extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged Higgs bosons. This talk focuses on the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM), which is relatively predictive. The outlook for detecting supersymmetric particles and Higgs bosons at the LHC are discussed, as are the prospects for finding indirect effects of supersymmetric Higgs bosons at low energies, e.g., in K decays. The outlook for discovering observable effects of CP-violating supersymmetric phases at high energies or in B decays is also mentioned.

John Ellis

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

194

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9 0.3 South Korea 10.1 10.8 12.1 13.6 14.7 15.7 16.5 17.4 1.6 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.5 7.6 7.9 8.1 8.4 0.8 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

195

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G5. World petroleum production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.8 35.0 33.9 34.2 36.5 39.3 42.8 45.3 0.9 Middle East 23.8 25.3 23.0 23.6 25.4 27.9 30.8 33.0 1.1 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.7 -0.1 West Africa 4.4 4.3 4.7 4.7 5.0 5.1 5.3 5.3 0.6 South America 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.3 0.4 Non-OPEC 50.1 50.0 54.1 55.9 56.8 59.5 62.2 65.7 0.9 OECD 20.4 20.3 23.1 23.6 23.4 23.4 24.2 25.2 0.7 OECD Americas 15.2

196

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A10. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6,448 6,657 6,480 6,627 6,762 6,880 7,070 7,283 0.3 United States a 5,418 5,608 5,381 5,454 5,501 5,523 5,607 5,691 0.0 Canada 548 546 551 574 593 609 628 654 0.6 Mexico/Chile 482 503 548 599 668 748 835 937 2.1 OECD Europe 4,147 4,223 4,054 4,097 4,097 4,151 4,202 4,257 0.0 OECD Asia 2,085 2,200 2,287 2,296 2,329 2,341 2,365 2,358 0.2 Japan 1,105 1,176 1,243 1,220 1,223 1,215 1,194 1,150 -0.1 South Korea 531 581 600 627 653 666 703 730 0.8 Australia/NewZealand 449 443 444 449 452 460 468 478 0.3 Total OECD 12,680

197

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections Reference case projections for natural gas production This page inTenTionally lefT blank 283 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.4 30.4 33.5 36.1 38.2 41.1 44.4 1.5 United States a 21.2 23.9 26.5 28.4 29.7 31.3 33.1 1.5 Canada 5.4 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 1.1 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.1 2.8 3.5 2.3 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.7 OECD Europe 10.4 9.0 8.1 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.9 -0.2 North Europe 10.1 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 -0.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.7 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel

198

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0 -0.2 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.5 12.5 13.3 14.2 14.9 15.7 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.8 0.5 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

199

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E E Low Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 217 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9

200

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9 22.3 22.5 22.6 22.4 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.8 14.8 15.6 16.6 1.4 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.3 7.4 7.6 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD

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201

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth case projections Low Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 203 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6

202

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6 22.2 21.4 -0.1 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.1 15.8 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD 234.7

203

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G7. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.9 35.1 37.6 43.9 47.5 50.7 56.3 61.5 1.9 Middle East 23.8 25.4 25.5 30.7 33.6 36.1 40.5 44.7 2.1 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.7 3.7 3.9 4.0 4.4 4.6 0.7 West Africa 4.4 4.3 5.2 5.8 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.1 1.6 South America 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.6 5.1 2.0 Non-OPEC 51.6 51.6 55.5 56.8 57.8 59.2 58.9 59.6 0.5 OECD 21.2 21.2 23.5 23.2 22.5 22.0 21.6 22.0 0.1

204

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G1. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.9 35.1 36.1 38.4 40.0 42.5 45.7 48.9 1.1 Middle East 23.8 25.4 24.5 26.7 28.2 30.4 33.1 35.8 1.4 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.5 3.3 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 0.2 West Africa 4.4 4.3 5.1 5.3 5.5 5.6 5.8 5.9 0.9 South America 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.3 0.4 Non-OPEC 51.8 51.7 55.8 58.2 60.3 61.9 63.7 66.0 0.8 OECD 21.4 21.4 23.9 23.9 23.4 23.0 23.8 24.8 0.5 OECD Americas

205

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G3.World nonpetroleum liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 12.5 Biofuels b 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Gas-to-liquids 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 12.5 Non-OPEC 1.6 1.6 1.9 2.3 2.8 3.3 3.8 4.3 3.5 OECD 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.4 Biofuels b 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.8 Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 15.0 Gas-to-liquids

206

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

D D High Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 209 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0

207

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan 52.7 53.2 57.2 54.1 53.3 52.8 52.2 51.8 -0.1 South Korea 52.8 53.7 50.7 48.1 47.2 45.4 46.0 45.8 -0.5 Australia/NewZealand 67.1 66.3 63.1 60.9 60.1 59.5 58.7 58.0 -0.4

208

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth case projections High Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 197 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9

209

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kaya Identity factor projections Kaya Identity factor projections * Carbon dioxide intensity * Energy intensity * GDP per capita * Population This page inTenTionally lefT blank 289 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan

210

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F F Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping This page inTenTionally lefT blank 225 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8

211

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

SciTech Connect

I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the big questions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

Hitoshi Murayama

2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E4. World liquids consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 24.2 25.1 25.2 25.2 25.7 26.7 0.4 United States a 18.6 18.9 19.4 20.0 19.8 19.6 19.7 20.2 0.2 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.5 0.4 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.6 4.0 1.7 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 13.7 14.5 14.7 15.1 15.4 15.8 0.2 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.3 8.7 8.9 8.9 9.0 9.1 0.5 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.7 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.5 0.1 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.2 1.2 Australia/NewZealand 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 0.8 Total OECD 45.8 46.0 46.2 48.3 48.8 49.2 50.2 51.5 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

214

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I3. World other natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 13.0 11.3 10.7 10.4 10.0 10.1 9.8 -1.0 United States a 8.3 7.5 7.3 7.4 7.1 7.2 6.9 -0.6 Canada 2.9 2.2 1.8 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.2 -2.9 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 -0.4 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 OECD Europe 10.4 8.9 7.6 6.6 6.1 5.7 5.6 -2.0 North Europe 10.0 8.3 6.9 6.0 5.5 5.1 5.0 -2.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1.0 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 -- OECD Asia 1.9 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 1.8 Japan 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.0

215

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.4 30.4 33.5 36.1 38.2 41.1 44.4 1.5 United States a 21.2 23.9 26.5 28.4 29.7 31.3 33.1 1.5 Canada 5.4 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 1.1 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.1 2.8 3.5 2.3 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.7 OECD Europe 10.4 9.0 8.1 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.9 -0.2 North Europe 10.1 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 -0.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.7 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 4.5 OECD Asia 2.1 2.8 4.0 5.0 5.7 6.3 6.9 4.0 Japan 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

216

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F15. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Asia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.7 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Electricity 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.8 3.2 Total 2.1 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.6 2.7 Commercial Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.7 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 -- Electricity 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.9 Total 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.3 Industrial Liquids 4.8 4.7 5.5 6.2 7.1 8.2 9.6 2.4 Natural gas 3.3 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.6 5.2

217

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F19. Delivered energy consumption in Other Central and South America by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 3.2 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.9 Total 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.0 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.5 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 2.4 Total 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 2.2 Industrial Liquids 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 0.5 Natural gas 2.6 2.7

218

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. Motorization Levels in Selected Countries, 1970, and 2020 (Vehicles per Thousand Persons). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202)...

219

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11. Carbon Intensity in Selected Countries and Regions, 1999 and 2020 . For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. horizonal...

220

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook ... for all fossil f elsMarch 31) for all fossil fuels Percent changg()e in fuel bills from last winter (forecast) Fuel bill ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECD Publishing.Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050 Nan Zhou, David37 Figure 39 Carbon Emissions Outlook for Two Scenarios by

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past Trend and Future Outlook",LBNL forthcoming. de la Rue2006. Building up India: Outlook for Indias real estate,2006a. World Energy Outlook, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A presentation to the National Association of State Energy Officials 2005 Energy Outlook Conference, in Washington, DC, on February 17, 2005, giving EIAs outlook ...

224

Changes in release cycles for EIA's International Energy Outlook ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Changes in release cycles for EIA's International Energy Outlook and Annual Energy Outlook. To focus more resources on rapidly changing energy markets and how they ...

225

International energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1997 (IE097) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2015.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Washington, DC, October 12, 2011 Source: EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2011 History : Heating Oil Howard Gruenspecht, Winter Fuels Outlook 14

227

NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 Washington, DC Richard Newell, Administrator

228

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation-Table 1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation > Table 1 Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for AEO Forecast Evaluation, 1996 to...

229

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Table 41  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

> Forecasts >Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook> Download Report Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF...

230

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case Author: USCX Last modified by: CH4 Created Date: 4/11/2011 8:46:50 PM Document presentation format

231

Natural Gas Market Outlook: Through 2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Market Outlook: Through 2020. Continued optimism about market growth (32 Tcf in 2020) Increasing wellhead prices to $2.81 Mcf ($98) in 2020

232

Annual Energy Outlook Report | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Outlook Report Jump to: navigation, search Topics in AEO 2011 Energy Sources OilLiquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity RenewableAlternative Nuclear Sectors Residential...

233

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 August 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

234

WEB RESOURCE: Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 9, 2007 ... The Occupational Outlook Handbook gives information on the training and education needed to go into engineering, earnings, job prospects,...

235

Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Motor Gasoline Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement April 2008 1 ... Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, National Transportation Data Book.

236

Alternative Energy Technologies in Asia: Achievements & Outlook...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Energy Technologies in Asia: Achievements & Outlook for the World Bank's Asia Alternative Energy Program Speaker(s): Grayson Heffner Date: March 21, 2003 - 12:00pm...

237

Fire Weather Outlooks | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Fire Weather Outlook areas - a Critical Fire Weather Area for Wind and Relative Humidity, an Extremely Critical Fire Weather Area for Extreme Conditions of Wind and Relative...

238

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Highlights. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040.

239

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics.

240

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

However, fossil fuels continue to supply almost 80 percent of world energy use through 2040. Natural gas is the fastest-growing fossil fuel in the outlook. Global ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy OutlookFebruary 2008 2 Global Petroleum OPEC left production targets unchanged at its February 1st ...

242

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy OutlookMarch 2008 2 Diesel prices are projected to show larger gains in 2008, averaging $3.45 per

243

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy OutlookJanuary 2009 2 Global Petroleum Overview. The downward trend in oil prices continued in ...

244

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy OutlookDecember 2008 2 Global Petroleum Overview The increasing likelihood of a prolonged global ...

245

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas Total Other Russia Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2011 DOE/EIA-0484(2011)

246

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas Total Russia Europe Central Asia Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2011

247

U.S. Energy Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Market Outlook for United States Association for ...

248

Short-Term Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: CBI Gas Outlook 2004 ConferenceHouston, TexasDecember 5, 2003

Information Center

2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Highlights picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent from 1999 to 2020. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2001 reference case forecast. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001), world energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent over a 21-year forecast horizon, from 1999 to 2020. Worldwide energy use grows from 382 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1999 to 607 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 2000 influenced this year’s outlook, including persistently high world oil prices, stronger than anticipated economic recovery in southeast Asia, and

250

Annual Energy Outlook 2005-Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AD AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 AEO2005 Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Altos Altos Partners AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Btu British thermal unit CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule CARB California Air Resources Board CBECS Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (EIA) CBO Congressional Budget Office CCCC Climate Change Credit Corporation CH 4 Methane CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide CTL Coal-to-liquids DB Deutsche Bank, A.G. E85 Fuel containing a blend of 70 to 85 percent ethanol and 30 to 15 percent gasoline by volume EEA Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. EIA Energy Information Administration EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EVA Energy Ventures Analysis, Incorporated FERC

251

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO 2008 AEO 2008 Annual Energy Outlook 2008 The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008) presents projections and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2008 includes the reference case, additional cases examining energy markets, and complete documentation. Analytical Overview: Energy Trends to 2030 In preparing projections for AEO2008, we evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets between today and 2030. The overview focuses on one case, the reference case. ...see full Overview Section You are encouraged to review the full range of alternative cases included in the analysis of other sections of AEO2008 -

252

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2006 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) reference case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a

253

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 Conference  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of Last Year's Conference Summary of Last Year's Conference The Energy Information Administration (EIA) will host its eighth annual National Energy Modeling System/Annual Energy Outlook Conference on March 21, 2000, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott, 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA, near the Crystal City Metro station. The conference includes speakers and attendees from Federal and State governments, private industry, and trade associations, discussing energy issues particularly related to EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2000, which was released in November 1999, and the National Energy Modeling System. Conference Registration Conference registration is free, but space is limited. You can register on-line or fax this form to: Peggy Wells Energy Information Administration, EI-84

254

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage HIGHLIGHTS World energy consumption is projected to increase by 60 percent from 1997 to 2020. Recent price developments in world oil markets and economic recovery in Southeast Asia have altered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000), world energy consumption increases by 60 percent over a 23-year forecast period, from 1997 to 2020. Energy use worldwide increases from 380 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1997 to 608 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 1999 are reflected in this year’s outlook. Shifting short-term world oil markets, the beginnings

255

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Crude oil prices fell sharply at the onset of war in Iraq, but the initial declines probably overshot levels that we consider to be generally consistent with fundamental factors in the world oil market. Thus, while near-term price averages are likely to be below our previous projections, the baseline outlook for crude oil prices (while generally lower) is not drastically different and includes an average for spot West Texas Intermediate (WTI) that is close to $30 per barrel in 2003 (Figure 1). The mix of uncertainties related to key oil production areas has changed since last month, as Venezuelan production has accelerated beyond previous estimates while Nigerian output has been reduced due to internal conflict.

256

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

acronyms.gif (3491 bytes) acronyms.gif (3491 bytes) AD - Associated/dissolved natural gas AEO98 - Annual Energy Outlook 1998 AEO99 - Annual Energy Outlook 1999 AFVs - Alternative-fuel vehicles AGA - American Gas Association API - American Petroleum Institute BTAB - BT Alex Brown CAAA90 - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CCAP - Climate Change Action Plan CDM - Clean Development Mechanism CFCs - Chlorofluorocarbons CNG - Compressed natural gas CO - Carbon monoxide CO2 - Carbon dioxide DOE - U.S. Department of Energy DRI - DRI/McGraw-Hill EIA - Energy Information Administration EOR - Enhanced oil recovery EPA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT - Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE - Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EU - European Union FERC - Federal Energy Regulatory Commission GDP - Gross domestic product

257

Annual Energy Outlook 96 Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in the Appendix. 1 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview. The National Energy Modeling System The projections

258

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Release Date: February 2005 Next Release Date: February 2006 Printer-friendly version Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation* Table 1.Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations Printer Friendly Version Average Absolute Percent Error Variable AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 AEO82 to AEO2004 Consumption Total Energy Consumption 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.1 7.1 6.7 6.4 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Total Electricity Sales 1.9 2.0 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.4 Production Crude Oil Production 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.6 4.7

259

International Energy Outlook - Chapter References  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chapter References Chapter References International Energy Outlook 2004 Chapter References World Energy and Economic Outlook 1. D.F. Barnes et al., “Tackling the Rural Energy Problem in Developing Countries,” Finance & Development, Vol. 34, No. 2 (June 1997), pp. 11-15. 2. A. Kirby, “Russia’s Climate Tussle Spins On,” BBC News Online (December 4, 2003). 3. A.C. Revkin, “Into Thin Air: Kyoto Accord May Not Die (or Matter),” The New York Times (December 4, 2003), p. A6. 4. The White House, Office of the Press Secretary, “President Announces Clear Skies & Global Climate Change Initiatives” (Press Release, February 14, 2002), web site www.whitehouse.gov/news/ releases/2002/02/20020214-5.html. 5. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2004, DOE/EIA-0383(2004) (Washington, DC, January 2004); and Global Insight, Inc., World Overview (Lexington, MA, September 2003). India’s GDP growth rates were adjusted downward, based on the judgment of EIA analysts.

260

Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement - June 2010 Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement - June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2010 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 27, 2010, predicted that the Atlantic basin will likely experience above-normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 14 to 23 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin over the next 6 months, including 8 to 14 hurricanes of which 3 to 7 will be intense. 2  Based on the results of a Monte Carlo hurricane outage simulation using the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2007 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2007 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

262

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2008 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2008 (IEO2008) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2008 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

263

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Outlook 2007 The International Energy Outlook 2007 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report is also released in print. Projection Tables Appendix A. Reference Case Appendix B. High Economic Growth Case Appendix C. Low Economic Growth Case Appendix D. High World Oil Price Case Appendix E. Low World Oil Price Case Appendix F. Reference Case Projections by End Use Appendix G. Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Productions in Three Cases

264

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook EIA Glossary Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0554(2004) Release date: February 2004 Next release date:February 2005 The Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook. Table of Contents Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Household Expenditures Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module Appendix A Adobe Acrobat Logo

265

Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

NONE

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

266

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation Wang Wenyuan, Department of Energy Conservation and...

267

Short-term energy outlook, annual supplement 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (Supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Identification of Larval Pacific Lampreys (Lampetra tridentata), River Lampreys (L. ayresi), and Western Brook Lampreys (L. richardsoni) and Thermal Requirements of Early Life History Stages of Lampreys, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two fundamental aspects of lamprey biology were examined to provide tools for population assessment and determination of critical habitat needs of Columbia River Basin (CRB) lampreys (the Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata, and the western brook lamprey, L. richardsoni). We evaluated the usefulness of current diagnostic characteristics for identification of larval lampreys (i.e., pigment patterns) and collected material for development of meristic and morphometric descriptions of early life stage CRB lampreys, and we determined the effects of temperature on survival and development of early life stage CRB lampreys. Thirty-one larval lampreys were collected from locations throughout the CRB and transported to the Columbia River Research Laboratory. Lampreys were sampled at six-week intervals at which time they were identified to the species level based on current diagnostic characteristics. Sampling was repeated until lampreys metamorphosed, at which time species identification was validated based on dentition, or until they died, at which time they were preserved for genetic examination. These lampreys were sampled 30 times with two individuals metamorphosing, both of which were consistently identified, and subsequently validated, as Pacific lampreys. Of the remaining lampreys, only one was inconsistently identified (Pacific lamprey in 83% of the sampling events and western brook lamprey in 17% of the sampling events). These data suggest that pigmentation patterns do not change appreciably through time. In 2001 and 2002 we artificially spawned Pacific and western brook lampreys in the laboratory to provide material for meristic and morphometric descriptions. We collected, digitized, preserved, and measured the mean chorion diameter of Pacific and western brook lamprey embryos. Embryos ranged in development from 1 d post fertilization to just prior to hatch, and were incubated at 14 C. Mean chorion diameter was greater and more variable for Pacific lampreys (mean {+-} SD; 1.468 {+-} 0.107 mm, N = 320) than for western brook lampreys (1.237 {+-} 0.064 mm, N = 280). An unpaired t-test showed that the difference in mean chorion diameter between species was highly significant (t = 32.788, df = 528.62, P < 0.0001). For larvae, we collected, digitized, and preserved 156 individuals from each species. Eight homologous landmarks defining a two-cell truss network with two appended triangles were selected for morphometric analyses and species discrimination. A full model discriminant analysis correctly classified 92% of the Pacific lampreys and 93% of the western brook lampreys in a classification data set. When applied to a test data set, the classification functions correctly classified 91% of the Pacific lampreys and 85% of the western brook lampreys. A backward elimination discriminant analysis removed four variables from the full model, and the reduced model correctly classified 91% of the Pacific lampreys and 93% of the western brook lampreys in a classification data set. The reduced model classification functions correctly classified 91% of the Pacific lampreys and 85% of the western brook lampreys in a test data set. In 2001 and 2002 Pacific and western brook lampreys were artificially spawned and resulting progeny were reared in the laboratory at 10 C, 14 C, 18 C, and 22 C. The estimated temperature for zero development was 4.85 C for Pacific and 4.97 C for western brook lampreys. Survival was greatest at 18 C followed by 14 C, 10 C, and 22 C, with significant differences observed between 22 C and other temperatures. Overall survival was significantly greater for western brook than for Pacific lampreys, although the difference in proportion of individuals surviving was only 0.02. Survival to hatch was significantly greater than survival to the larval stage with a difference of only 0.03. The proportion of individuals exhibiting abnormalities at the larval stage was greatest at 22 C followed by 18 C, 10 C, and 14 C, with significant differences observed between 22 C and other temperatures.

Meeuwig, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030 under EnvironmentalEnergy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy EfficiencyEnergy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050. Lawrence Berkeley2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECD Publishing.Future Energy and Emissions Outlook Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou and

Zheng, Nina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japan Long-Term Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering EnergyResidential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Outlook of the Officers: Military Thought in Chile, 1960-1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national ideology. ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Whether you like it orOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Outlook of the Officers: MilitaryOF THE DISSERTATION Outlook of the Officers: Military

Bawden, John Richard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

One: Californias Economic Outlook: Looking Beyond the State Budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIAS ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: LOOKING BEYOND THE STATEForecast Californias economic outlook depends in largepart on the national outlook. But it also depends,

Lieser, Tom

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energymillion Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energyconsumption, future outlook, end-use, bottom-up analysis

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook, 2008. No.Mexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyMexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Atlantic Forest of South America: Biodiversity Status, Threats, and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Status, Threats, and Outlook By Carlos Galindo-Leal andStatus, Threats, and Outlook. (Center for Appliedstatus, threats, and outlook. The book begins with a

Sayre, Don

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier: Outlook for 2010, 2030, and 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025,as an Energy Carrier: Outlook for 2010, 2030 and 2050 Joanas an Energy Carrier: Outlook for 2010, 2030 and 2050 Joan

Ogden, Joan M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an "Overview" summarizing the AEO2007 reference case. The next section, "Legislation and Regulations," discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for light-duty trucks finalized by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in March 2006. It also provides an update on the handling of key provisions in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT2005) that could not be incorporated in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) because of the absence of implementing regulations or funding appropriations. Finally, it provides a summary of how sunset provisions in selected Federal fuel taxes and tax credits are handled in AEO2007.

279

Solar Program Overview: Fiscal Years 2002& 2003 (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the research activities and accomplishments of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program for fiscal years 2002 and 2003. It includes detailed accounts, charts, and photos of R&D activities in the areas of photovoltaics, concentrating solar power, and solar heating and lighting

Not Available

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fifteenmile Creek Riparian Buffers Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteenmile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. During this second year of the project, 11 buffer contracts were implemented on 10.9 miles of stream. Buffer widths averaged 132 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.6 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $666,121 compared with $71,115 in Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer projects. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. In addition, specific outreach efforts targeting the orchard areas of the county began to bear fruit with orchardists sign-ups as the project year ended. Progress this second year of project includes only work accomplished in the Fifteenmile subbasin. A similar but separate effort to implement buffers in the Columbia Plateau Province was initiated during the year under project number 2002-019-00. This project supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion.

Graves, Ron

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During August 2002 we conducted a hydroacoustic survey to enumerate pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. The purpose of this survey was to determine a collective lakewide biomass estimate of pelagic bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and lake trout S. namaycush and compare it to pelagic prey (kokanee salmon O. nerka) biomass. By developing hydroacoustic techniques to determine the pelagic predator to prey ratio, we can annually monitor their balance. Hydroacoustic surveys were also performed during December 2002 and February 2003 to investigate the effectiveness of autumn and winter surveys for pelagic predators. The inherent problem associated with hydroacoustic sampling is the inability to directly identify fish species. Therefore, we utilized sonic tracking techniques to describe rainbow trout and lake trout habitat use during our winter hydroacoustic survey to help identify fish targets from the hydroacoustic echograms. During August 2002 we estimated there were 39,044 pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille (1.84 f/ha). Based on temperature and depth utilization, two distinct groups of pelagic fish >406 mm were located during August; one group was located between 10 and 35 m and the other between 40 and 70 m. The biomass for pelagic fish >406 mm during August 2002 was 73 t (metric ton). This would account for a ratio of 1 kg of pelagic predator for every 2.63 kg of kokanee prey, assuming all pelagic fish >406 mm are predators. During our late fall and winter hydroacoustic surveys, pelagic fish >406 mm were observed at lake depths between 20 and 90 m. During late fall and winter, we tracked three rainbow trout (168 habitat observations) and found that they mostly occupied pelagic areas and predominantly stayed within the top 10 m of the water column. During late fall (one lake trout) and winter (four lake trout), we found that lake trout (184 habitat observations) utilized benthic-nearshore areas 65% of the time and were found in the pelagic area only 35% of the time. Lake trout were found at depths between 10 and 90 m (average was approximately 30 m). Based on hydroacoustic surveys of pelagic fish >406 mm and habitat use of sonic tagged rainbow trout and lake trout during late fall and winter, we conclude that hydroacoustic sampling during those times would be ineffective at acquiring an accurate pelagic predator population estimate and recommend conducting abundance estimates for pelagic predators when Lake Pend Oreille is thermally stratified (i.e. August).

Bassista, Thomas

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Analise Matematica III 1 o semestre de 2002/2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?atica da semana de 18/11/2002) 1. Num reactor nuclear a temperatura t da ?agua de refrigera?c?ao, a press?ao p nas paredes do reactor, e a quantidade de ur?anio u no interior do reactor, satisfazem as seguintes rela?c?oes # # # t 2 + 8ue p = 5, ut 3 + p 8u = -1. No estado actual do reactor estas vari

Godinho, Leonor

283

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Gilliam County Riparian Buffers; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are only two problems that have been encountered during the contract year. The first problem has to do with eligibility. To be eligible for CREP you must own land adjacent to stream that has been delineated an anadromous fish stream. The problem is there are areas in Gilliam County that are designated anadromous fish streams that probably don't deserve that delineation and then there are streams that are not listed that probably do deserve that delineation. This has affected a few proposed projects. For instance, there is a project area on a stream that is delineated on the eligibility map, but the particular reach we are working with does not show up on the map. ODFW then receives an eligibility sheet from FSA or the SWCD technician. On this particular area it says steelhead distribution is downstream .5 miles. FSA won't consider this area eligible for CREP, thus the landowner must enroll in CCRP, which doesn't quite have the incentives as CREP. We are working to improve the maps. A meeting has been scheduled to discuss some particular areas and possibly re-draw the eligibility map. The other problem has to do with the amount of cost share for off-stream watering facilities. Many landowners who wish to install spring developments and other off-stream watering facilities run into a problem with cost-share limits within the CREP guidelines. When a landowner wants to enroll all of his/her stream and exclude livestock from the creek entirely they are having to pay some out of pocket expenses to get enough water to sufficiently support their livestock without using the creek. There has been one landowner who decided not to enroll because of this technicality. The problems encountered are problems that occur within the parameters of the program. These problems may or may not be changed. Otherwise, interest in the programs has been excellent and will only get better. The number of contracts that were estimated to be negotiated in the three-year term may be a bit excessive. In counties such as Gilliam, most tracts of land are large parcels. If multiple project areas occur in the same tract then you have one contract per tract. This reduces your total number in a lot of cases. In year 1 there were 6 contracts negotiated and approved in the CREP program. Prior to the contract there were a total of 9. The program started in 1998. The numbers will only increase in year 2. Year two should be a drastic improvement over year one. There has already been several projects proposed that may or may not be approved during year 2. There are 367.4 acres of land that has been proposed in either CREP or CCRP, which would include 30.94 miles of stream buffered on both sides.

Coiner, Josh (Gilliam Soil and Water Conservation District, Condon, OR)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in earth and atmospheric sciences is becoming increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than hydrocarbons and the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane) are critical to the future energy needs and environmental safety of this planet. In addition, the cleanup of many contaminated sites in the U.S., along with the preservation and management of our water supply, remain key challenges for us as well as future generations. Addressing these energy, climate change, and environmental issues requires the timely integration of earth sciences' disciplines (such as geology, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics, ecology, and environmental sciences). This integration will involve focusing on fundamental crosscutting concerns that are common to many of these issues. A primary focus will be the characterization, imaging, and manipulation of fluids in the earth. Such capabilities are critical to many DOE applications, from environmental restoration to energy extraction and optimization. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is currently addressing many of the key technical issues described above. In this document, we present summaries of many of our current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, it is representative of the nature and breadth of our research effort. We are proud of our scientific efforts, and we hope that you will find our research useful and exciting. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally. This report is divided into five sections that correspond to the major research programs in the Earth Sciences Division: (1) Fundamental and Exploratory Research; (2) Nuclear Waste; (3) Energy Resources; (4) Environmental Remediation Technology; and (5) Climate Variability and Carbon Management. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Microbial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Geophysics and Geomechanics, Geochemistry, and Hydrogeology and Reservoir Dynamics. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. A list of publications for the period from January 2002 to June 2003, along with a listing of our personnel, are appended to the end of this report.

Bodvarsson, G.S.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Annual Report for the Year 2002-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

online in March ????, making the database for ????-???? available alongside the printed and CD-ROM editions. Crowds awaiting the arrival of the royal party in Amritsar during the visit of Prince George and Princess Mary to India in 1905-6. (Royal... Figures representing each of the Four Winds of Heaven, on the corners of the tower. (From the exhibition Speaking volumes: 600 years of Cambridge University Library.) M ar k Sc ud de r 19 Yet another reorganisation within the National Health Service...

Cambridge University Library

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Kursplan fr lsret 2002/2003 RISKHANTERING 2 VBR105  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire Marshal (SFM) Title 159 regulations and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) design, excepted, or deferred from Title 159 regulations, such as but not limited to: USTs with a capacity of 110 requirements, installation permits may also reference applicable NFPA codes and/or standards. Desired design

288

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: 2002/2003 Toyota Prius Fleet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact sheets and maintenance logs for these vehicles give detailed information such as miles driven, fuel economy, operations and maintenance requirements, operating costs,...

289

Compilation of COG Packing Reports 2002-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under a technical exchange agreement, EPRI has obtained several reports documenting research conducted by the Candu Owners Group (COG). This report presents a compilation of COG reports documenting research conducted in 20022003 to investigate the frictional performance characteristics of several valve packing materials that contain Teflon (PTFE). The testing conducted by the COG includes the effects of previous ionizing radiation exposure on the frictional performance of these packing materials

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Vanderbilt University Undergraduate Catalog Calendar 2002/2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community College Blackfeet Community College Salish Kootenai College Stone Child College Fort Belknap

292

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

logo Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division Questions & Comments | Privacy & Security Notice You are using IE6. Older browsers present a security risk to...

293

Potlatch River Watershed Restoration, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project's goal is to improve instream fish habitat in the Potlatch River and the lower Clearwater River through comprehensive watershed planning, implementation of best management practices and expanded water quality and fish habitat monitoring. This proposal has two primary objectives: (1) complete the Potlatch River watershed implementation plan; and, (2) augment existing monitoring efforts in the Potlatch River to broaden the water quality and fish resource data baseline.

Stinson, Kenneth

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Forrest Ranch Management and Implementation, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

Smith, Brent

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hangman Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress has been made in defining the level of work that needs to be accomplished in the Hangman Watershed in order to restore a viable riparian system and hydrology. The end goal is to use wildlife habitat to protect streams and provide water for instream fish habitats. In order to define the most expedient means of attaining that goal an Instream Flow/Watershed Hydrology Study was initiated. The study is intended to be comprehensive in order to determine the potential of increasing base flow with Hangman Watershed Streams and predict available fish habitats for the range of flow level possibilities. The Study Plan and work for the first field season was contracted and the Plan and end of field season reports are included with this Annual Report. The initial draft of the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan was completed and presented to the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Committee. The Committee felt that the Basin Hydrology Study needed to be closer to completion before the bulk of wildlife monitoring should be implemented. The extent of the landscape that must be restored in order to facilitate the needed stream flows may not be large enough to affect the population levels of the Plan's target species. The main result of the Committee review of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan however, was that since the Hangman Restoration Project is not a HU driven wildlife mitigation project than the Wildlife Committee does not have a role to play since their focus is wildlife HU crediting projects. Further work on the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan is suspended until the crediting issues surrounding the Hangman Restoration Project are settled. Certain aspects of the Plan, such as the land bird, amphibian, reptile and beaver monitoring can be implemented in the spring of the coming year because monitoring these species and groups needs to be accomplished regardless of crediting status and baseline data is needed for these. Data from the Hangman Creek Watershed from portions upstream and east of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation were included in the Second Iteration of the Habitat Prioritization Plan. These data were gathered both by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Idaho's Department of Environmental Quality. The addition of this portion of the Watershed in the Prioritization Plan fills a gap that the lack of data left in the first draft of the Plan. The streams in these upper headwaters support remnant salmonid populations and are close enough to be integrated with the streams and trout populations on the Reservation. The addition of this area strengthens the base from which the Hangman Restoration Project can work to secure and expand resident fish populations. An extensive 2-year search for historic photos of the upper portion of the Hangman Watershed was completed during this annual funding cycle. The disappointing result is that few photographs were acquired. One excellent panoramic view of the Upper Hangman Watershed from Tekoa Mountain was recovered and photos of this view were taken for comparison. The task of finding historic photos has been removed from future Scopes of Work, however search for photos will continue as part of the Project's public outreach. The notable exception to the lack of historic photos is the purchase, digitizing and GIS registry of 1947 aerial photo coverage of the entire Hangman Creek Watershed east of the Washington/Idaho State Boarder. In addition, 1933 aerial photo coverage of most of this same area is being registered to our GIS system. These 1933 photos were available to the Tribe prior to the initiation of this Project; however these photos are being registered partly as a result of requests made from this Project. The process of developing a map of potential vegetation types for the Hangman Watershed has benefited from establishment of an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Geologic Survey to hire a Scientific Advisor. The Scientific Advisor has assisted with the design of a scheme to sample remnant native vegetation within an

Coeur d'Alene Tribe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Evaluation Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Esmeralda Sanchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: Over the last two decades, there have been many significant changes in laws, policies, and regulations that could not have been anticipated and were not assumed in the projections prior to their implementation. Many of these actions have had significant impacts on energy supply, demand, and prices; however, the impacts were not incorporated in the AEO projections until their enactment or effective dates in accordance with EIA's requirement to remain policy neutral and include only current laws and regulations in the AEO reference case projections.

297

International Energy Outlook - Special Topics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A A Energy Information Administration Forecast Channel. If having trouble viewing this page, contact the National Energy Informaiton Center at (202) 586-8800. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Environment> International Energy Outlook> Special Topics International Energy Outlook 2004 Converting Gross Domestic Product for Different Countries to U.S. Dollars: Market Exchange Rates and Purchasing Power Parity Rates The world energy forecasts in IEO2004 are based primarily on projections of GDP for different countries and regions, which for purposes of comparison are expressed in 1997 U.S. dollars. First, GDP projections are prepared for the individual countries in terms of their own national currencies and 1997 prices of goods and services. Then, the projections are converted to 1997 U.S. dollars by applying average 1997 foreign exchange rates between the various national currencies and the dollar. The resulting projections of real GDP are thus based on national 1997 prices in each country and the 1997 market exchange rate (MER) for each currency against the U.S. dollar.

298

18-Month Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of the security and adequacy of the Ontario Electricity System for the 18-month period from April 2002 through September 2003. This assessment is based on forecasts of electricity demand and available supply combined with current information on the configuration and capability of the transmission system. Outage plans of generators and transmitters are based on information available as of February 2002. During the Outlook period, the IMO forecasts show that Ontarios available generation exceeds projected demands. Over this period, approximately 3,000 MW of additional generation resources are expected to either return to service or be placed in service for the first time thereby enhancing the reliability of the Ontario electricity system. During the first half of the Outlook there are periods when Ontarios available reserves are forecast to be between 2,000 and 2,500 MW. These reserves are below the IMOs required planning reserve levels, but do not account for additional resources from outside Ontario that are expected to be available. Reserves are planning buffers identified to address circumstances that cannot be accurately predicted such as weather variations and unscheduled maintenance. The IMO anticipates that the Ontario market will be effective in attracting additional resources to provide adequate reliability. However, there

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Outlook and Related Information Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This procedure provides the steps required for market participants to submit the information required for the 18-Month Outlook, and specifies the information to be contained in the Outlook. Public Disclaimer The posting of documents on this Web site is done for the convenience of market participants and other interested visitors to the IESO Web site. Please be advised that, while the IESO attempts to have all posted documents conform to the original, changes can result from the original, including changes resulting from the programs used to format the documents for posting on the Web site as well as from the programs used by the viewer to download and read the documents. The IESO makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, that the documents on this Web site are exact reproductions of the original documents listed. In addition, the documents and information posted on this Web site are subject to change. The IESO may revise, withdraw or make final these materials at any time at its sole discretion without further notice. It is solely your responsibility to ensure that you are using up-to-date documents and information.

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 1 June 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2008 Outlook for Hurricane Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted above-normal hurricane activity in its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook released on May 22, 2008. 1 NOAA projects 12 to 16 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin, including 6 to 9 hurricanes, of which 2 to 5 will be intense, during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 2 * Above-normal hurricane activity in the Atlantic is likely to correspond to increased impacts on offshore crude oil and natural gas producers in the Gulf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Asian Development Outlook 2010 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asian Development Outlook 2010 Asian Development Outlook 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Asian Development Outlook 2010: Macroeconomic Management Beyond the Crisis Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.adb.org/Documents/Books/ADO/2010/ado2010.pdf Country: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia (country), Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, China, South Korea, Mongolia, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Laos, Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand, Philippines, Myanmar, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Timor-Leste UN Region: Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

302

EM's Budget Outlook by Terry Tyborowski  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM's Budget Outlook: EM's Budget Outlook: FY 2013, FY 2014 and Beyond Terry Tyborowski Acting, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Planning and Budget April 18, 2012 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 EM's Budget Outlook: FY 2013, FY 2014 and Beyond Congressional hearing room www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 3 Timeline for Congressional Action on FY 2013 Budget Jan. Feb. 13 th - DOE's FY 2013 budget request is publicly released April 15 - Congress passes resolution with overall budget targets June thru September - House and Senate consider budget bills

303

OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

finding alternatives to Outlook Specialty crops and methylNumber 3 Steve Fennimore Outlook Non-fumigant approaches to

Browne, Greg T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2013 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the full report. The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) focus on the factors that shape the

305

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 for Center for Strategic and International Studies July 25, 2013 | Washington, DC by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Key findings of the International Energy Outlook 2013 2 Adam Sieminski, IEO2013 July 25, 2013 * With world GDP rising by 3.6 percent per year, world energy use will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Half of the increase is attributed to China and India. * Renewable energy and nuclear power are the world's fastest-growing energy sources, each increasing by 2.5 percent per year; however, fossil fuels continue to supply almost 80 percent of world energy use through 2040. * Natural gas is the fastest growing fossil fuel in the outlook, supported by increasing supplies of shale gas, particularly in the United States.

306

Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chart Gallery for January 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 West Texas...

307

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Release Date: June 25, 2012 | Next Early Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2012) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2012 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete June 2012 published report. Executive summary The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) focus on the factors that shape the

308

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2013 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the full report. The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) focus on the factors that shape the

309

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2007 projections. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

310

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: September 19, 2011 | Next Scheduled Release Date: June 10, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2011) No International Energy Outlook will be released in 2012. The next edition of the report is scheduled for release in Spring 2013 Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for

311

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 25% 19% 42% 13% 1% Nuclear Oil and other liquids Natural gas Coal Renewables...

312

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2009 Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption:OECDand Non-OECD, 1980-2030 Figure 12....

313

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

When EIA's demand forecast is combined with its outlook for production and net imports, distillate stocks are projected to remain low for the rest of the year. - Distillate fuel...

314

Radiative QCD corrections a personal outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe several problems related to the studies of the effects of radiative QCD corrections in the phenomenological and theoretical considerations thus summarizing the work of the QCD part of the Symposium on "Radiative Corrections: Status and Outlook".

Kataev, A L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Radiative QCD Corrections: A Personal Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe several problems related to the studies of the effects of radiative QCD corrections in the phenomenological and theoretical considerations thus summarizing the work of the QCD part of the Symposium on "Radiative Corrections: Status and Outlook".

Andrei L. Kataev

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... in order to gain perspective on how variations in key assumptions can lead to different outlooks for ... U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov FedStats. Stay Connected

317

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

318

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is expected to continue. Although 1999 world consumption, at 4.7 billion short tons,9 was 15 percent higher than coal use in 1980, it was lower than in any year since 1984 (Figure 51). The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 1999 and 2020, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, but with considerable variation among regions.

319

International Energy Outlook 2002 - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Linda Doman linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041 World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler Aloulou Fawzi george.butler@eia.doe.gov aloulou.fawzi@eia.doe.gov 202/586-9503 202/586-7818 Natural Gas Phyllis Martin Bruce Bawks phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov bruce.bawks@eia.doe.gov 202/586-9592 202/586-6579 China’s West-to-East Pipeline Aloulou Fawzi aloulou.fawzi@eia.doe.gov 202/586-7818

320

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Key Energy Issues to 2020 Prices Consumption Energy Intensity Electricity Generation Production and Imports Carbon Dioxide Emissions Key Energy Issues to 2020 Currently, most attention in energy markets is focused on near-term issues of world oil supply and prices, U.S. natural gas prices, and the transition to restructured electricity markets in several regions of the country. The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) addresses the longer-term trends of electricity industry restructuring, fossil fuel supply and prices, and the impacts of economic growth on projected energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. AEO2001 does not project short-term events, such as supply disruptions or severe weather. The AEO2001 projections assume a transition to full competitive pricing of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

highlights.gif (3388 bytes) highlights.gif (3388 bytes) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 65 percent from 1996 to 2020. The current economic problems in Asia and Russia have lowered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for this International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), world energy consumption reaches 612 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) by 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1)—an increase of 65 percent over the 24-year projection period. The IEO99 projection for the world’s energy demand in 2020 is about 4 percent (almost 30 quadrillion Btu) lower than last year’s projection. The downward revision is based on events in two parts of the world: Asia and Russia. In Asia, the economic crisis that began in early 1997 persisted throughout 1998, as economic

322

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by by Esmeralda Sanchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: * Over the last two decades, there have been many significant changes in laws, policies, and regulations that could not have been anticipated and were not assumed in the projections prior to their implementation. Many of these actions have had significant impacts on energy supply, demand, and prices; however, the

323

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: Report Contact World Energy Consumption Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041 linda.doman@eia.doe.gov World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler - 202/586-9503 gbutler@eia.doe.gov Bruce Bawks - 202/586-6579 bruce.bawks@eia.doe.gov Natural Gas Phyllis Martin - 202/586-9592 phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov Gas-to-Liquids Technology William Trapmann - 202/586-6408 william.trapmann@eia.doe.gov Coal Michael Mellish - 202/586-2136

324

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Graphic data - Highlights > Graphic data - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic data - Highlights Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 2. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 3. World liquids production, 1990-2035 Figure 4. Net change in world natural gas production by region, 2007-2035 Figure 5. World coal consumption by region, 1990-2035 Figure 6. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 7. World renewable electricity generation by energy source excluding world and hydropower, 2007-2035 Figure 8. World delivered energy consumption in the industrial sector, 2007-2035 Figure 9. World delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector, 2005-2035 Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035

325

Annual Energy Outlook 2001-Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Acronyms AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AGA American Gas Association ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BEA Bureau of Economic Analysis (U.S. Department of Commerce) BRP Blue Ribbon Panel Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CARB California Air Resources Board CBECS EIA’s 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CCTI Climate Change Technology Initiative CDM Clean Development Mechanism CO Carbon monoxide DBAB Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown DOE U.S. Department of Energy DRI Standard & Poor’s DRI E85 Motor fuel containing 85 percent ethanol EIA Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced oil recovery EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992

326

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Natural Gas Figure 36. World natural gas consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 37. Change in world natural gas production by region, 2007 and 2035 Figure 38. Natural gas consumption in North America by country, 2007-2035 Figure 39. Natural gas consumption in OECD Europe by end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 40. Natural gas consumption in OECD Asia by country and end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 41. Natural gas consumption in Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia, 2007-2035 Figure 42. Natural gas consumption in Non-OECD by Asia by country, 2007-2035 Figure 43. OECD natural gas production by country, 1990-2035 Figure 44. OECD Europe natural gas production, 1990-2035 Figure 45. Middle East natural gas production, 1990-2035

327

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IEO > Order Information IEO > Order Information International Energy Outlook 2009 Ordering Information This EIA publications may be purchased from the U.S. Government Printing Office via the Internet, phone, fax, postal mail, or teletype. Payment must accompany all orders. Method Reference Internet U.S. Government Online Bookstore Phone DC Metro Area: (202) 512-1800 Toll-Free: (866) 512-1800 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m., Eastern time, M-F Fax (202) 512-2104 Mail Superintendent of Documents P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 For additional information see, U.S. Government Online Bookstore Support Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as public and academic libraries; Federal, State, local, and foreign governments; EIA survey respondents; and the

328

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Figure 91. World liquids consumption by end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 92. OECD and Non-OECD transportation sector liquids consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 93. OECD transportation energy use by region, 2007, 2025, and 2035 Figure 94. North America transportation energy use by country, 2007 and 2035 Figure 95. OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 96. OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 97. Non-OECD transportation energy use by region, 2007-2035 Figure 98. Non-OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 99. Transportation energy use per capita in China and South Korea, 2007-2035

329

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Sector Industrial Sector Energy Sector International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Industrial Sector Energy Sector Figure 82. Annual changes in world industrial and all other end-use energy consumption from previous year, 2006-2010 Figure 83. World delivered energy consumption in the industral and all other end-use sectors, 2005-2035 Figure 84. OECD and Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 85. World industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 86. World industrial sector energy consumption by major energy-intensive industry shares, 2007 Figure 87. OECD and Non-OECD major steel producers, 2008 Figure 88. OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 89. Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035

330

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Emissions Figure 103. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035 Figure 104. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 105. U.S.energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel in IEO2009 and IEO2010, 2007, 2015, and 2035 Figure 106. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 107. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the Non-OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 108. World carbon dioxide emissions from liquids combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 109. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 110. World carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion, 1990-2035

331

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Esmeralda Sánchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced an annual evaluation of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. The Forecast Evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute forecast errors for each of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2003. The average absolute forecast error, which for the purpose of this report will also be referred to simply as "average error" or "forecast error", is computed as the simple mean, or average, of all the absolute values of the percent errors,

332

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage ACEEE American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AGA American Gas Association ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge API American Petroleum Institute BRP Blue Ribbon Panel Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CARB California Air Resources Board CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CDM Clean Development Mechanism CECA Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act CIDI Compression ignition direct injection CO Carbon monoxide DBAB Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown DOE U.S. Department of Energy DRI Standard & Poor’s DRI EIA Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced oil recovery EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether

333

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

electricity.gif (3233 bytes) electricity.gif (3233 bytes) Electricity continues to be the most rapidly growing form of energy consumption in the IEO99 projections. The strongest long-term growth in electricity consumption is projected for the developing countries of Asia. Long-term growth in electricity consumption is expected to be strongest in the developing economies of Asia, followed by Central and South America (Figure 64). In the reference case for the International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), the projected growth rates for electricity consumption in the developing Asian nations average nearly 5 percent per year from 1996 to 2020 (Table 17). Electricity consumption growth in Central and South America is projected to exceed 4 percent between 1996 and 2020. The projected increases in electricity use are based on expectations of rapid

334

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 6: Electricity World electricity consumption doubles in the IEO2006 projections from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD countries account for 71 percent of the projected growth, and OECD countries account for 29 percent. Figure 55. World Net Electricity Consumption, 2003-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 56. World Net Electricity Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 57. Net Electricity Consumption in OECD Countries by End-Use Sector, 2003, 2015, and 2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

335

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contact.gif (4492 bytes) contact.gif (4492 bytes) The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441), Director of the International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gas Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; or Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Modeling Analyst. Detailed questions about the forecasts and related model components may be addressed to the following analysts:

336

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Printer Friendly Version (PDF) The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Linda Doman (linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Bruce Bawks (bruce.bawks@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-6579) Natural Gas Sara Banaszak Phyllis Martin (phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9592) Coal Sara Banaszak

337

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage For Further Information... The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Modeling Analyst. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA’s National Energy Information Center. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows:

338

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2001 projections. Developing nations in Asia and in Central and South America are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. In the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case, worldwide electricity consumption is projected to increase at an average annual rate of 2.7 percent from 1999 to 2020 (Table 20). The most rapid growth in electricity use is projected for developing Asia, at 4.5 percent per year, and by 2020 developing Asia is expected to consume more than twice as much electricity as it did in 1999. China’s electricity consumption is projected to triple, growing by an average of 5.5 percent per year from 1999 to 2020. The expected growth rate for electricity use in

339

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Electricity Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035 Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2035 Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030 Figure 72. Net electricity generation in North America, 1990-2035 Figure 73. Net electricity generation in North America by Fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 74. Net electricity generation in OECD Europe by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 75. Net electricity generation in OECD Asia, 2007-2035 Figure 76. Net electricity generation in Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia, 2007-2035

340

Table 5.23 All Sellers Sales Prices for Selected Petroleum ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Excluding Taxes) Product: ... 1996: 1997: 1998: 1999: 2000: 2001: 2002: 2003: 2004: 2005: 2006: 2007: 2008: 2009: 2010: Sales Prices ... ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microsoft Word - What's New in Outlook 2007.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's New in Outlook 2007? What's New in Outlook 2007? Help The Help option has additional topics in Outlook 2007. Some of the most useful ones are under the Microsoft Office Outlook Help menu item. "What's New" and "Training" are both helpful. What's New in Outlook 2007? What's New? One topic that we recommend is "Getting to know you; again: The Ribbon". It explains the use of the Ribbon that we will be discussing later in this document. What's New in Outlook 2007? Training The Training option provides numerous small training modules that you can read to learn about specific areas within Outlook 2007. It also has an "Outlook 2007 Training Courses" option that provides links to a variety of online training courses provided by Microsoft. A great training resource that you can link to

342

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook: EIA projects that natural gas prices will remain relatively high through the rest of 2003, with...

343

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural...

344

The Role of Technology in the Outlook for Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Role of Technology in the Outlook for Energy. Purpose: ExxonMobil is investing in technologies for improving energy ...

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook. Briefing for the 7 th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference

346

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Esmeralda Sanchez by Esmeralda Sanchez Errata -(7/14/04) The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced an annual evaluation of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. The Forecast Evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute forecast errors for each of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2003. The average absolute forecast error, which for the purpose of this report will also be referred to simply as "average error" or "forecast error", is computed as the simple mean, or average, of all the absolute values of the percent errors, expressed as the percentage difference between the Reference Case projection and actual historic value, shown for every AEO and for each year in the forecast horizon (for a given variable). The historical data are typically taken from the Annual Energy Review (AER). The last column of Table 1 provides a summary of the most recent average absolute forecast errors. The calculation of the forecast error is shown in more detail in Tables 2 through 18. Because data for coal prices to electric generating plants were not available from the AER, data from the Monthly Energy Review (MER), July 2003 were used.

347

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Key Issues Prices Consumption Energy Intensity Electricity Generation Production and Imports Carbon Emissions Key Issues Important energy issues addressed in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) include, among others, the ongoing restructuring of U.S. electricity markets, near-term prospects for world oil markets, and the impacts of energy use on carbon emissions. AEO2000 reflects the restructuring of U.S. electricity markets and the shift to increased competition by assuming changes in the financial structure of the industry. Ongoing efficiency and operating improvements are also assumed to continue. The projections assume a transition to full competitive pricing in States with specific deregulation plans—California, New York, New England, the Mid-Atlantic States, Illinois, Texas, Michigan, Ohio, Arizona, and New Mexico. Other States are assumed to continue cost-of-service electricity pricing. The provisions of the California legislation regarding stranded cost recovery and price caps are included. In other regions, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008.

348

Outlook positive over long term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trends established in 1987 will be very important in reestablishing some level of confidence in future price expectations. The authors expect prices to fluctuate widely in the coming year as OPEC makes and breaks various production quota agreements. Continued price instability will certainly all but negate short term marginally economic exploration and development prospects. Utilization rates will suffer accordingly. But on the positive side, the long term outlook is considerably more stable. Rock-bottom prices will increase the demand for cheap oil substantially. We're already seeing world demand figures rise. Increased demand will cause the world's (mainly OPEC's) excess production to be depleted over the next three to five years. Prices will rise slowly in parallel with the decline in excess production capacity over several years. Banking on upward price pressure, financially sound operators with solid cash flow will want to take advantage of low exploration and development costs. Utilization, then, can be expected to follow oil prices in a slow upward spiral over the next three to five years. Next year, the industry should begin to feel the effect of the beginning of that upward trend.

Not Available

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The provincial government?s plan to phase out coal?fired generation in favour of cleaner forms of generation represents one of the most significant undertakings in the 100?year history of Ontario?s electricity sector. Aging generation facilities and the continued increase in demand for electricity add to the urgency of proceeding with new generating and transmission facilities over the next 10 years. Over the last 12 months 650 MW of new gas?fired generation has been put in place and 515 MW of nuclear generation and 370 MW of renewable generation is expected to be in service within the next 18 months. There are also a number of projects totalling more than 9,000 MW of additional capacity that are in various stages of discussion, development or negotiation. Timely progress to achieve this additional capacity must continue if Ontario is to ensure a reliable supply of electricity over the next decade and beyond. This 10?year Outlook from the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) provides an assessment of the demand?supply picture for the province over the next decade and provides a plan identifying the timing and requirements of system changes needed to meet the governments coal shutdown timeframe. Under the provisions of Bill 100, the Ontario Power

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Disagreement about the Inflation Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disagreement among economic forecasters about the future path of inflation has risen substantially since the start of the recession. The nature of this disagreement varies with the forecast time horizon, with some forecasters expecting much lower short-run inflation and others anticipating much higher long-run inflation. This variation may complicate the Federal Reserves monetary policy communications strategy. The recent recession has been exceptionally long and difficult with an unusual degree of financial turmoil. In order to stabilize the financial system and restore economic growth, fiscal and monetary policymakers have taken unprecedented actions. In this extraordinary environment, it is not surprising that forecasters views of the economic outlook have shown increasing disparity. In this Economic Letter, we focus on the increased dispersion of inflation forecasts that lately has emerged among the business economists who participate in the Survey of Professional Forecasters (SPF). Interestingly, the nature of this greater disagreement appears to depend on the forecast time horizon. For forecasts over the next year or so, increased dispersion largely reflects the expectations of some forecasters that inflation may move much lowerlikely because this group puts larger weight on the prospect that persistent excess productive capacity and high unemployment will restrain prices over

Sylvain Leduc; Glenn D. Rudebusch; Justin Weidner

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acronyms Acronyms List of Acronyms AEO Annual Energy Outlook LDV Light-duty vehicle AEO2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 LED Light emitting diode AEO20014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 LNG Liquefied natural gas ATRA American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 LPG Liquefied petroleum gases bbl Barrels LRG Liquefied refinery gases Btu British thermal units MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy MECS Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule MMbbl/d Million barrels per day CO2 Carbon dioxide MMBtu Million Btu CTL Coal-to-liquids MMst Million short tons DOE U.S. Department of Energy NEMS National Energy Modeling System E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol NGL Natural gas liquids

352

Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1 June 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2009 Outlook for Hurricane Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted in its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook released on May 21, 2009 that the Atlantic basin will most likely experience near-normal activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects 9 to 14 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin over the next 6 months, including 4 to 7 hurricanes, of which 1 to 3 will be intense. 2 * Based on the results of a Monte Carlo hurricane outage simulation using NOAA's most recent predictions for the level of hurricane activity, EIA expects

353

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: April 26, 2011 | Next Early Release Date: January 23, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2011) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Changes from Previous AEO Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2011 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete April 2011 published report. Changes from previous AEO2010 Significant update of the technically recoverable U.S. shale gas

354

Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June 2012 1 June 2012 1 June 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 24, 2012, predicts that the Atlantic basin likely will experience near- normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 9 to 15 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin over the next 6 months, including 4 to 8 hurricanes of which 1 to 3 will be intense. 2  Based on the results of a Monte Carlo hurricane outage simulation using the NOAA predictions

355

INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Offshore Wind Outlook Offshore Wind Outlook INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook December 12, 2012 - 2:15pm Addthis According to a new report commissioned by the Energy Department, a U.S. offshore wind industry that takes advantage of this abundant domestic resource could support up to 200,000 manufacturing, construction, operation and supply chain jobs across the country and drive over $70 billion in annual investments by 2030. Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. For more details, check out: New Reports Chart Offshore Wind’s Path Forward. According to a new report commissioned by the Energy Department, a U.S. offshore wind industry that takes advantage of this abundant domestic

356

International Energy Outlook 2001 - World Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Energy Consumption picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents the Energy Information Administration (EIA) outlook for world energy markets to 2020. Current trends in world energy markets are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of the IEO2001 projections for energy consumption by primary energy source and for carbon emissions by fossil fuel. Uncertainty in the forecast is highlighted by an examination of alternative assumptions about economic growth and their impacts on the

357

Annual Energy Outlook | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Energy Outlook Annual Energy Outlook Dataset Summary Description Supplemental Table 147 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Source EIA Date Released December 08th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Annual Energy Outlook barrel btu conversion EIA energy Energy Information Administration kWh TEF transportation Transportation Energy Futures Data text/csv icon Conversion_Factors.csv (csv, 153.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

358

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: April 26, 2011 | Next Early Release Date: January 23, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2011) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Changes from Previous AEO Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2011 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete April 2011 published report. Changes from previous AEO2010 Significant update of the technically recoverable U.S. shale gas

359

PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook 09/15/2000 Click here to start Table of Contents Winter Distillate Outlook Distillate Prices Increasing With Crude Oil Factors Driving Prices & Forecast First Factor Impacting Distillate Prices: Crude Oil Prices High Crude Prices Go With Low Inventories Second Price Component: Spread Impacted by Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Distillate Stocks are Low – Especially on the East Coast Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Winter Demand Impacted by Weather Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999 Dec 1999 & Jan 2000 Production Fell, But Rebounded with Price Higher Yields Can Be Achieved Unusual Net Imports May Only Be Available at a High Price

360

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Download Adobe Acrobat Reader Printer friendly version on our site are provided in Adobe Acrobat Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Actual vs. Forecasts Formats Table 2. Total Energy Consumption Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports Excel, PDF Table 12. World Oil Prices Excel, PDF Table 13. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Modeling and Analysis Papers> Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Actual vs. Forecasts Available formats Excel (.xls) for printable spreadsheet data (Microsoft Excel required) MS Excel Viewer PDF (Acrobat Reader required Download Acrobat Reader ) Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Table 2. Total Energy Consumption Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports Excel, PDF

362

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2012 April 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2012) Acronyms List of Acronyms AB 32 Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 LDVs Light-duty vehicles AEO Annual Energy Outlook LFMM Liquid Fuel Market Module AEO20011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 LNG Liquefied natural gas AEO2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 MACT Maximum achievable control technology bpd barrels per day MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Btu British thermal units mpg miles per gallon CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy NGL National gas liquids CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration CHP Combined heat and power NOx Nitrogen oxides CO2 Carbon dioxide OCS Outer Continental Shelf CTL Coal-to-liquids OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

363

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecast Evaluation 2005 Forecast Evaluation 2005 Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005 Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005 * Then Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose or advocate future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected.

364

Selected State Legislation and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 156 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories. Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 9.8 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking. b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEET for central air conditioners and heat

365

Selected State Legislation and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook U. S. Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 173 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Ba sis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories. Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 9.8 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking. b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEET for central air conditioners and heat

366

Annual energy outlook 1995, with projections to 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents projections and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1995 and 1996 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1995). Forecast tables for the five cases examined in the AEO95 are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendix A gives historical data and forecasts for selected years from 1992 through 2010 for the reference case. Appendix B presents two additional cases, which assume higher and lower economic growth than the reference case. Appendix C presents two cases that assume higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix D presents a summary of the forecasts in units of oil equivalence. Appendix E presents a summary of household energy expenditures. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO95 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO95 forecast assumptions. Appendix H presents a stand-alone high electricity demand case. Appendix 1 provides a table of energy conversion factors and a table of metric conversion factors. 89 figs., 23 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

overview.gif (2907 bytes) overview.gif (2907 bytes) Key Issues A major issue in energy markets today is carbon emissions. Because the Kyoto Protocol has not been ratified by the United States and no specific policies for carbon reduction have been enacted, such policies are not included in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), although the Protocol and EIA’s recent analysis of its potential impacts are discussed. Economic developments in Asia over the past 18 months have weakened worldwide oil demand and lowered world oil prices—a trend that is likely to continue for several years and, therefore, is included in the AEO99 analysis of oil markets and prices. As in AEO98, the projections in AEO99 reflect ongoing changes in the financial structure of the U.S. electricity industry and cost reductions that are becoming evident with increased competition. A transition to retail competitive pricing is assumed in five regions—California, New York, New England, the Mid-Atlantic Area Council (Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, and Maryland), and the Mid-America Interconnected Network (Illinois and parts of Wisconsin and Missouri). Provisions of the California legislation on stranded cost recovery and price caps are also included. In the other regions, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008. No national renewable portfolio standard has been passed, but State standards and other programs intended to encourage renewables are included as enacted. The new standards for control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by electricity generators are also incorporated.

368

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontarios electricity system faces significant challenges over the next 10 years. The uncertainty surrounding the return to service of Pickering A nuclear units, the lack of new generation investment and the commitment to shut down 7,500 MW of coal fired generation by December 31, 2007, all contribute to a potentially severe shortfall. New transmission, supply and demand side initiatives are urgently needed to address this gap and secure Ontarios energy future. The need is most pressing in the Toronto area, to deal with the immediate impact of the April 30, 2005 shutdown of the Lakeview Thermal Generating Station. Plans are being implemented to address this in the short term. In the longer term, additional generation is also required in the Toronto area to replace the Lakeview generating capacity and to meet load growth in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Each year the Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO) publishes an integrated assessment of the security and adequacy of the Ontario electricity system over the next 10 years. This report presents the IMO assessment for the 10-year period from 2005 to 2014. It is based on the IMOs forecast of electricity demand, information provided by Ontario generators on the supply that will be available and the latest information on the configuration and capability of the transmission system. Electricity Supply Outlook Additional Ontario electricity supply and demand-side measures are required to maintain supply adequacy into the future and to reduce Ontarios dependency on supply from other jurisdictions.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills 1

370

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating oil electricity South U.S. total wood kerosene/other/no heating 116 million homes 4 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 8, 2013

371

win0203SelUpdates0303.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

En En ergy Outlook -- October 2002 Updated Feb 2003) 1 Winter Fuels Outlook: 2002-2003 Selected Table and Figure Updates Based on the March 2003 Short-Term Energy Outlook Figure WF1. U.S. Winter Natural Gas Demand (Year-to-Year Percent Change) Table WF1. Illustrative Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 Actual Actual Actual Base Forecast Natural Gas (Midwest) Consumption (mcf) 81.7 99.1 81.3 92.1 Avg. Price ($/mcf) 6.69 9.54 7.33 8.43 Expenditures ($) 546 945 596 776 Heating Oil (Northeast) Consumption (gals) 644 731 584 751 Avg. Price ($/gal) 1.16 1.37 1.10 1.37 Expenditures ($) 751 999 643 1029 Propane (Midwest) Consumption (gals) 807 979 803 910 Avg. Price ($/gal)

372

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) quarterly forecasts of short-term energy supply, demand, and prices are revised in January, April, July, and October for publication in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes previous forecast errors, compares recent projections by other forecasters, and discusses current topics of the short-term energy markets (see Short- Term Energy Outlook: Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The principal users of the Outlook are managers and energy analysts in private industry and government. The projections in this volume extend through the fourth quarter of 1990. The forecasts are produced using the Short-term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model uses two principal driving variables: a macroeconomic forecast and world oil price assumptions. Macroeconomic forecasts produced by data Resources, Inc., (DRI), are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic forecast. EIA's Oil Market Simulation Model is used to project world oil prices. 20 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Tennessee Business and economic ouTlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Business and Economic Outlook -- 1 The U.S. Forecast introduction Economic conditions continue to deteriorate, raising concerns about a potentially deeper and more prolonged downturn. Throughout 2007 as oil business cycle. Even seemingly positive news loses its luster when one probes beneath the surface. Export

Tennessee, University of

374

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Appendix I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I - Comparisons With International Energy Agency and IEO2006 Projections I - Comparisons With International Energy Agency and IEO2006 Projections International Energy Outlook 2007 Appendix I - Comparisons With International Energy Agency and IEO2006 Projections Comparisons with IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Agency (IEA) provides projections comparable with those in IEO2007 in its World Energy Outlook 2006. Because IEA releases projections only for the years 2015 and 2030, two time periods are compared here—2004 to 2015 and 2015 to 2030. In the 2004 to 2015 projection period, both IEO2007 and IEA expect world energy demand to increase by an average of 2.1 percent per year (Table I1). Not surprisingly, both outlooks project much faster growth in energy demand among the non-OECD nations than in the OECD, with non-OECD energy use growing three times as rapidly. There are, however, some regional differences. IEA’s expectations for demand growth in OECD Asia, for instance, are much higher than those in IEO2007, and the projected 1.4-percent annual growth rate projected by IEA for the region exceeds the 1.3-percent rate in the IEO2007 high economic growth case.

375

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Overview Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Trends to 2030 In preparing projections for the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets between today and 2030. This overview focuses on one case, the reference case, which is presented and compared with the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) reference case (see Table 1). Readers are encouraged to review the full range of alternative cases included in other sections of AEO2008. As in previous editions of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), the reference case assumes that current policies affecting the energy sector remain unchanged throughout the projection period. The reference case provides a clear basis against which alternative cases and policies can be compared. Although current laws and regulations may change over the next 25 years, and new ones may be created, it is not possible to predict what they will be or how they will be implemented [1].

376

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Release date: June 2008 Next release date: March 2009 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Petroleum Market Module

377

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation section in the U.S. Department section in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;ppaappeerr ttoo bbeeLBNL-292E Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards

378

Short-term energy outlook, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO projections.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Neutrino oscillations present status and outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I summarize the status of three-flavour neutrino oscillations with date of Oct. 2007, and provide an outlook for the developments to be expected in the near future. Furthermore, I discuss the status of sterile neutrino oscillation interpretations of the LSND anomaly in the light of recent MiniBooNE results, and comment on implications for the future neutrino oscillation program.

Schwetz, Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I summarize the status of three-flavour neutrino oscillations with date of Oct. 2007, and provide an outlook for the developments to be expected in the near future. Furthermore, I discuss the status of sterile neutrino oscillation interpretations of the LSND anomaly in the light of recent MiniBooNE results, and comment on implications for the future neutrino oscillation program.

Thomas Schwetz

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

382

Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I summarize the status of three-flavour neutrino oscillations with date of Oct. 2007, and provide an outlook for the developments to be expected in the near future. Furthermore, I discuss the status of sterile neutrino oscillation interpretations of the LSND anomaly in the light of recent MiniBooNE results, and comment on implications for the future neutrino oscillation program.

Schwetz, Thomas [Physics Department, Theory Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

383

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook. January 2007. LBNL-India: Past Trend and Future Outlook Stephane de la Rue duSectoral Trends and Future Outlook (Zhou et al. , 2007)

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

New Estimates of the Budget Outlook: Plus Ca Change, Plus C'est la Meme Chose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Budget and Economic Outlook: Fiscal Years 2007- 2016."R. Orszag. 2002. The Budget Outlook and Options for FiscalBudget Blues: The Fiscal Outlook and Options for Reform, in

Auerbach, Alan J.; Gale, William G.; Orszag, Peter R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Californias Economic Outlook: Short-term Recovery But Longer-term Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Long-Term Demographic Outlook for California and LosCALIFORNIAS ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SHORT-TERM RECOVERY BUTCalifornias short-term outlook remains one of expansion,

Hurd, Joseph; Mitchell, Daniel J.B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

ARE Update Volume 13, Number 6; The World of Wine: Economic Issues and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Wine: Economic Issues and Outlook Notes from the Guesta one-day symposium on Outlook and Issues for the Worldof the situ- ation and outlook for wine that affect all

Sumner, Dan; ANDERSON, KYM; Montaigne, Etienne; Lapsley, James T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Reference case Table A21. International liquids supply and disposition summary (continued) (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A21. International liquids supply and disposition summary (continued) (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Supply and disposition Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Selected world liquids production subtotals: Petroleum 6 Crude oil and equivalents 7 .................................. 74.11 74.08 80.28 82.51 85.26 87.59 90.90 0.7% Tight oil ............................................................ 0.82 1.27 3.83 4.52 4.91 5.54 6.10 5.6% Bitumen 8 .......................................................... 1.65 1.74 3.00 3.52 3.95 4.21 4.26 3.1%

388

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO Graphic Data AEO Graphic Data Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Figure 1. Energy Prices, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data Figure 2. Delivered Energy Consumption by Sector Figure 2 Data Figure 3. Energy Consumption by Fuel, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data Figure 4. Energy Use Per Capita and Per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product, 1980-2030 Figure 4 Data Figure 5. Electricity Generation by Fuel, 1980-2030 Figure 5 Data Figure 6. Total Energy Production and Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 6 Data Figure 7. Energy Production by Fuel, 1980-2030 Figure 7 Data Figure 8. Projected U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Fuel, 1990-2030 Figure 8 Data Figure 9. Sulfur Dioxide Emissions in Selected States, 1980-2003 Figure 9 Data Figure 10. World Oil Prices in the AEO2005 and AEO 2006 Reference Cases Figure 10 Data

389

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

390

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2006 International Energy Outlook 2006 International Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Projection Tables Appendix A: Reference Case Appendix B: High Economic Growth Case Appendix C: Low Economic Growth Case Appendix D: Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Appendix E: Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases Appendix F: Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel

391

Summary Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook 1/12/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Summary Short-Term Petroleum. and Natural Gas Outlook WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Costs U.S. Total Gasoline Inventory Outlook Retail Motor Gasoline Prices* U.S. Propane Total Stocks Average Weekly Propane Spot Prices Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Working Gas in Storage (Percentage Difference fron Previous 5-Year Average)

392

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Previous STEO Forecasts: Changes in Forecast from Last Month; STEO Archives; Other EIA Forecasts: Annual Energy Outlook; International Energy Outlook; Thank ...

393

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook; International Energy Outlook; Thank You. We welcome your comments or suggestions (optional). EIA - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC ...

394

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

New Zealand Energy Outlook (2010): Electricity and Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to...

396

U.S. Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

E85 . Jet fuel . CNG/LNG . 11% . 13% . 4% . 29% . 47% . Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release . 2% . Pipeline fuel . 3% . 4% . Other . 4% . Diesel ...

397

EIA releases additional Annual Energy Outlook 2013 content ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) today released additional content of the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013), updating and expanding the early ...

398

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Asheville, NC Mike Burdette Petroleum Division, Energy ...

399

Propane Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Propane Outlook Conclusion. Lower residential prices possible this winter U.S. inventories likely to be ample prior to the heating season. However, Midwest ...

400

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Wilmington, DE by Douglas MacIntyre

402

EIA Outlook for U.S. Heating Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Outlook for U.S. Heating Fuels State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference North Falmouth, Massachusetts Laurie Falter Industry Economist

403

Heating Oil Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion. Distillate stocks are likely to be higher than last year, but still relatively low Prices likely to average a little lower than last ...

404

Summary Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Summary Short-Term Petroleum. and Natural Gas Outlook. WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval. Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices

405

2008-2009 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Ronald Reagan Building...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trade Center More Documents & Publications Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities 2008-2009 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Ronald Reagan...

406

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Annual outlook for US electric...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Annual outlook for US electric power, 1986 Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

407

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial production indices December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy...

408

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Uranium Supplies Are...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Uraninum Supplies Are Sufficient To Power Reactors Worldwide Through 2030 International Energy Outlook 2008 Uranium Supplies Are Sufficient To Power Reactors Worldwide Through 2030...

409

Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 presents a projection and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the ...

410

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Natural Gas Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas International Energy Outlook 2009 Figure 33. World Natural Gas Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 34. Natural Gas Consumption in North America by Country and Sector, 2006 and...

411

U.S. Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade

412

Microsoft PowerPoint - 03 Wyss Economic Outlook [Compatibility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyss Economic Outlook Compatibility Mode More Documents & Publications Decoupling: Mechanics and Issues, Presentation to the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission Energy...

413

NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10/13/2010: NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 Washington, DC Richard Newell, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration

414

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... 2013) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The ...

415

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2013 Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, ... Annual Energy Outlook 2013. Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 ...

416

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, ... International Energy Outlook 2013. Release Date: July 25, 2013 ...

417

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, ... Annual Energy Outlook 2013. Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 ...

418

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 ... This early release focuses on the AEO2013 Reference case, ... Topics Analysis & Projections Environment

419

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2013 Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... Annual Energy Outlook 2013. ... U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov FedStats. Stay Connected

420

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Outlook 2012 Release Date: June 25, 2012 | Next Release Date: June 2013 | Report Number: DOEEIA-0383(2012) Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Short-Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 2 Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region

422

Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Understanding the Decline in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement October 2009 2 Projected reductions in CO2 emissions associated with changes in the ...

423

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2012...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2012 and Prior Reference Case Projections March 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of...

424

Long-term Outlook for Oil and Other Liquid Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels, natural gas liquids, and crude oil production are key sources of increased domestic liquids supply. Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011. Gulf of Mexico.

425

Jet Fuel Supply/Price Outlook - Fueling the Recovery  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Jet Fuel Supply/Price Outlook: Fueling the Recovery Energy Information Administration Presentation to 4th International Jet Fuel Conference February ...

426

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summer Fuels Outlook U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Prices. EIA expects that regular-grade gasoline retail prices, which averaged $3.69 per gallon last ...

427

The outlook for transportation fuel markets this summer ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The price forecast for transportation fuels is highly uncertain, in large part due to the uncertainty in the outlook for crude oil prices.

428

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the...

429

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Fuels Outlook ... (October 1 March 31) for all fossil fuels Percent change in fuel bills from last winter (forecast) Fuel bill . Base case . forecast :

430

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook ... March 31) for fossil fuels but not electricity . Percent change in fuel bills from last winter (forecast) Fuel .

431

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Fuels Outlook for National Association of State Energy Officials . ... for all fossil fuels Percent change in fuel bills from last winter (forecast)

432

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Regional maps Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Figure F3. Petroleum...

433

Current Status and Outlook of Computational Materials ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007 ... Topic Title: Article: Current Status and Outlook of Computational Materials Science Education in the US Topic Summary: K. Thornton and M.

434

Article: Current Status and Outlook of Computational Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... Citation: Thornton, K. and Asta, M., Current status and outlook of computational materials science education in the US, Modelling Simul. Mater...

435

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA .gov. A-Z Index; A-Z ... Arizona's 250-megawatt Solana generation station became the first major solar ...

436

Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2002 Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Forecasting System database, and Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- September 2002 10

437

Short Term Energy Outlook Supplement - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement June 2007 4 Figure 2. Major Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, 1995?2006

438

Annual Energy Outlook-List of Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ABWR ABWR Advanced Boiling Water Reactor AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AECL Atomic Energy Canada Limited AEO2003 Annual Energy Outlook 2003 AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 ALAPCO Association of Local Air Pollution Control Officials AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge AP1000 Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor ARI Advanced Resources International AT-PZEV Advanced technology partial zero-emission vehicle BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics BNFL British Nuclear Fuels Limited plc Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CARB California Air Resources Board CBO Congressional Budget Office CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CGES Centre for Global Energy Studies CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide DB Deutsche Bank A.G. DES Department of Environmental Services (New Hampshire)

439

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For U.S. Senate Briefing August 12, 2013 | Washington, DC by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Key findings of the International Energy Outlook 2013 2 Adam Sieminski, IEO2013 August 12, 2013 * With world GDP rising by 3.6 percent per year, world energy use will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Half of the increase is attributed to China and India. * Renewable energy and nuclear power are the world's fastest-growing energy sources, each increasing by 2.5 percent per year; however, fossil fuels continue to supply almost 80 percent of world energy use through 2040. * Natural gas is the fastest growing fossil fuel in the outlook, supported by increasing supplies of shale gas, particularly in the United States. * Coal grows faster than petroleum consumption until after 2030, mostly due to

440

Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2002 October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $29.75 in September, about $3.50 per barrel above the year-ago level and about $10 per barrel above a low point seen last January. Home Heating Costs Outlook: While fuel supplies should remain sufficient under normal weather

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption

442

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Appendix H  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

H H International Energy Outlook 2006 Appendix H: Comparisons With Other Forecasts, and Performance of Past IEO Forecasts for 1990, 1995, and 2000 Forecast Comparisons Energy Consumption by Region Three organizations provide forecasts comparable with the projections in IEO2006, which extend to 2030 for the first time. The International Energy Agency (IEA) provides “business as usual” projections to 2030 in its World Energy Outlook 2004; Petroleum Economics, Ltd. (PEL) publishes world energy projections to 2025; and Petroleum Industry Research Associates (PIRA) provides projections to 2020. For comparison, 2002 is used as the base year for all the projections. Comparisons between IEO2006 and IEO2005 extend only to 2025, the last year of the IEO2005 projections.

443

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S.

444

Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary For the upcoming summer season (April to September 2003), high crude oil costs and other factors are expected to yield average retail motor gasoline prices higher than those of last year. Current crude oil prices reflect a substantial uncertainty premium due to concerns about the current conflict in the Persian Gulf, lingering questions about whether Venezuelan oil production will recover to near pre-strike levels in time for the peak driving season, and the impact of recent disruptions in Nigerian oil output. Moreover, unusually low crude oil and gasoline inventory levels at the outset of the driving season are expected to keep prices high throughout much of the

445

August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2012 1 August 2012 1 August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  EIA projects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average about $103 per barrel during the second half of 2012, about $3.50 per barrel higher than in last month's Outlook. The forecast Brent crude oil spot price falls to an average of $100 per barrel in 2013. The projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price discount to Brent crude oil narrows from about $14 in the third quarter of 2012 to $9 by late 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product (GDP), which increased by 3.0 percent in 2011, grows by 2.8 percent in 2012 and 2.9

446

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Correction/Update July 27th A stray "2010" was left in the middle of Figure 1. August 1st Figure title changes (PDF only): Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 2010-2040 (billion metric tons) This should actually be: Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2040 (billion metric tons) Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons carbon dioxide emitted per million 2010 dollars of gross domestic product) This should actually be: Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons

447

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2010 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a projection and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2035. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2010 includes Reference case, additional cases examining alternative energy markets. Executive Summary Issues in Focus includes: Market Trends in Economic Activity No Sunset and Extended Policies cases Energy Demand Projections World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 Electricity Projections Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Oil and Natural Gas Projections Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Coal Projections Factors affecting the relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices

448

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2008 reference case in December 2007; however, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), which was enacted later that month, will have a major impact on energy markets, and given the year-long life of AEO2008 and its use as a baseline for analyses of proposed policy changes, EIA decided to update the reference case to reflect the provisions of EISA2007.

449

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

450

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

natgas.jpg (4355 bytes) natgas.jpg (4355 bytes) Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO99 forecast. Because it is a cleaner fuel than oil or coal and not as controversial as nuclear power, gas is expected to be the fuel of choice for many countries in the future. Prospects for natural gas demand worldwide remain bright, despite the impact of the Asian economic recession on near-term development. Natural gas consumption in the International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) is somewhat increased from last year’s outlook, and the fuel remains the fastest growing primary energy source in the forecast period. Worldwide gas use more than doubles in the reference case projection, reaching 174 trillion cubic feet in 2020 from 82 trillion cubic feet in 1996 (Figure

451

Annual Energy Outlook 1998 Forecasts - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 With Projections to 2020 1998 With Projections to 2020 Annual Energy Outlook 1999 Report will be Available on December 9, 1998 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO98 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses three current energy issues—electricity restructuring, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis

452

Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Outlook Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans Tancred Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Supply and Demand 3. Ethanol Supply 4. Gasoline Supply 5. Gasoline Prices A. Long-Term Equilibrium Price Analysis B. Short-Term Price Volatility 6. Conclusion 7. Appendix A. Estimating MTBE Consumption by State 8. Appendix B. MTBE Imports and Exports 9. Appendix C. Glossary of Terms 10. End Notes 11. References 1. Summary The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories and higher prices than last year. Recovery from this tight gasoline market could be made more difficult by impending State bans on the blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into gasoline that are scheduled to begin later this year. Three impending State bans on MTBE blending could significantly affect gasoline

453

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Markets Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 3: World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million barrels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last year’s outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period.

454

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Actual vs. Forecasts Available formats Excel (.xls) for printable spreadsheet data (Microsoft Excel required) PDF (Acrobat Reader required) Table 2. Total Energy Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales HTML, Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 12. Net Coal Exports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 13. World Oil Prices HTML, Excel, PDF

455

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption

456

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2004 2004 * The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has produced annual evaluations of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and replacing the historical year of data with the most recent. The forecast evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute percent errors for several of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2004. (There is no report titled Annual Energy Outlook 1988 due to a change in the naming convention of the AEOs.) The average absolute percent error is the simple mean of the absolute values of the percentage difference between the Reference Case projection and the

457

Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993 is a companion document to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 1993 (AEO). Supplement tables provide the regional projections underlying the national data and projections in the AEO. The domestic coal, electric power, commercial nuclear power, end-use consumption, and end-use price tables present AEO forecasts at the 10 Federal Region level. World coal tables provide data and projections on international flows of steam coal and metallurgical coal, and the oil and gas tables provide the AEO oil and gas supply forecasts by Oil and Gas Supply Regions and by source of supply. All tables refer to cases presented in the AEO, which provides a range of projections for energy markets through 2010.

Not Available

1993-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 3 6 Table A18. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source (Million Metric Tons, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 80 73 68 64 61 58 -1.2% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 259 261 263 263 262 260 0.0% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 -1.1% Electricity 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 872 820 757 778 833 878 916 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1220 1160 1092 1110 1161 1202 1234 0.2% Commercial Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 43 39 38 38 37 37 -0.5% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 169 183 189 193 200 207 0.8% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

459

Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1995  

SciTech Connect

This section of the Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 present the major assumptions of the modeling system used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in Appendix B. A synopsis of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented. The NEMS is developed and maintained by the office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projection of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by various government agencies and the private sector.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth Issues In Focus. Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth The AEO2004 reference case economic forecast is a projection of possible economic growth, from the short term to the longer term, in a consistent framework that stresses demand factors in the short term and supply factors in the long term [33]. Productivity is perhaps the most important concept for the determination of employment, inflation, and supply of output in the long term. Productivity is a measure of economic efficiency that shows how effectively economic inputs are converted into output. Advances in productivity—that is, the ability to produce more with the same or less input—are a significant source of increased potential national income. The U.S. economy has been able to produce more goods and services over time, not only by requiring a proportional increase of labor time but also by making production more efficient. To illustrate the importance of productivity improvements, on the eve of the American Revolution, U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) per capita stood at approximately $765 (in 1992 dollars) [34]. Incomes rose dramatically over the next two centuries, propelled upward by the Industrial Revolution, and by 2002 GDP per capita had grown to $30,000 (1992 dollars). Productivity improvements played a major role in the increase in per capita GDP growth.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Short-term energy outlook, April 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Short-term energy outlook, July 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

International energy outlook 1995, May 1995  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1995 (IEO95) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the international energy market outlook through 2010. The report is an extension of the EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). US projections appearing in the IEO95 are consistent with those published in the AEO95. IEO95 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projects are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 295(c). The IEO95 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1994. IEO95 displays projections according to six basic country groupings. The regionalization has changed since last year`s report. Mexico has been added to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and a more detailed regionalization has been incorporated for the remainder of the world, including the following subgroups: non-OECD Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China is included in non-OECD Asia. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are combined in the EE/FSU subgroup.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Tau Physics 2006: Summary & Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large amount of new results have been presented at TAU2006. The highlights of the workshop, the present status of a few selected topics on lepton physics (universality, QCD tests, Vus determination from ? decay, g ? 2, ? oscillations, lepton-flavour violation) and the prospects for future improvements are briefly summarized. 1.

A. Pich A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Tau Physics 2006: Summary & Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large amount of new results have been presented at TAU2006. The highlights of the workshop, the present status of a few selected topics on lepton physics (universality, QCD tests, V_{us} determination from tau decay, g-2, neutrino oscillations, lepton-flavour violation) and the prospects for future improvements are briefly summarized.

Antonio Pich

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Webmail by Google Migration Checklist for Outlook users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Webmail by Google Migration Checklist for Outlook users During your transition to Webmail by Google you must use the Webmail by Google Web Interface located at: http://webmail.njit.edu 1. Configure your Outlook Client: Install and run Google Apps Sync from http://ist.njit.edu/google/sync/. Google Apps Sync

Hu, Jie

467

Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

Not Available

1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

United States Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: United States Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Focus Area: Other Renewable Electricity Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/er/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/united-states-annual-energy-outlook-2 Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Utility/Electricity Service Costs The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) reference case overview evaluates a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for

469

United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: geodata.grid.unep.ch/ United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Screenshot References: UNEP Data[1] Overview "The GEO Data Portal is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global

470

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

471

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

472

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Carbon Emission Outlook to 2050. Berkeley, CA:of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings2 Sectoral Outlook and

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis" Independent Statistics & Analysis" ,"U.S. Energy Information Administration" ,"Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures, December 2013" ,"U.S. Prices" ,,"West Texas Intermediate (WTI) Crude Oil Price" ,,"U.S. Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"U.S. Diesel Fuel and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Price" ,,"U.S. Natural Gas Prices" ,"World Liquid Fuels" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Production and Consumption Balance" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Outages Among OPEC Producers" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Disruptions Among non-OPEC Producers" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption Growth"

474

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to the Annual Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3

475

Fujifilm_NERSC_StorageOutlook.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Storage Outlook A Storage Outlook for Energy Sciences: Data Intensive, Throughput and Exascale Computing --- 1 --- October, 2 013 National Energy Research Scientific ! Computing Center (NERSC) * L ocated a t B erkeley L ab * User facility to support 6 DOE Offices of Science: * 5000 u sers, 7 00 r esearch p rojects * 48 s tates; 6 5% f rom u niversi=es * Hundreds o f u sers e ach d ay * ~1500 p ublica=ons p er y ear * With s ervices f or c onsul=ng, d ata analysis a nd m ore --- 2 --- Types of Computing at NERSC NERSC Petascale C ompu=ng, Petabyte S torage, a nd E xpert Scien=fic C onsul=ng Data I ntensive Experiments a nd Simula=ons Large S cale Capability S imula=ons High V olume Job T hroughput Data Explosion is Occurring Everywhere in DOE Genomics * Sequencer data volume increasing 12x over the next 3 years * Sequencer

476

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20041 (AEO2004), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every two years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2004 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the U.S. Congress, the Administration, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies.

477

Maritime Transportation System: Trends and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007-R-5 Water is an essential resource in the U.S. economy. It plays a crucial role in supporting many economic activities and ensuring the quality of human life and the health of ecological systems. Despite this, the value of water may not be widely appreciated because only some water resources and water uses are easily visible or noticed while others are not. Among the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) Future Directions program activities are the identification of emerging water challenges and opportunities and the tactical engagement of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) senior leaders on these issues. Such critical thinking is an essential prerequisite to strategy development and planning. IWR has developed this series of Water Resources Outlook papers, commissioned utilizing outside experts, to identify emerging issues and implications for the Nation. These issues and implications will be presented in the form of provocation sessions with external and internal subject matter experts and stakeholders and will inform the USACE strategic planning process. Maritime Transportation System: Trends and Outlook USACE major responsibilities for waterborne commerce include dredging, development and maintenance of the inland and coastal waterways and related maritime infrastructure, and

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook - Regional Enhancements Starting with this edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA is introducing regional projections (the scope of which will vary by fuel) of energy prices, consumption, and production. The addition of regional data and forecasts will allow us to examine regional fuel demands and prices, regional fuel inventory trends, the interaction between regional electricity demand shifts, and regional electric generating capacity. This edition of STEO includes regional projections for heating oil, propane, and gasoline prices and natural gas and electricity demand and prices. Over the next 2 months, we will include additional regional

479

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

NONE

1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

480

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2003 Annual Energy Outlook 2003 Assumptions to the AEO2003 Nattional Energy Modeling System/Annual Energy Outlook 2003 Conference E-Mail Subscription Lists Forecasts Home Page Supplement Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 AEO Supplement Reference Case Forecast (2000-2025) - (HTML) Table 1. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (New England) Table 2. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Middle Atlantic) Table 3. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East North Central) Table 4. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West North Central) Table 5. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (South Atlantic) Table 6. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East South Central) Table 7. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West South Central)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook 2002-2003 selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Subscribers to the NOAA Monthly and Seasonal Weather Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identity and characteristics of users of existing climate predictions (monthly and seasonal) as inputs to decision making am described. Subscribers to the NOAA Climate Analysis Center's Monthly and Seasonal Weather Outlook (MSWO) are surveyed ...

William E. Easterling

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

483

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 October 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook October 12, 2005 Release (Next Update: November 8, 2005) Overview Warnings from previous Outlooks about the potential adverse impacts of an active hurricane season on domestic energy supply and prices are unfortunately being reflected in the challenging realities brought about by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The impact of the hurricanes on oil and natural gas production, oil refining, natural gas processing, and pipeline systems have further strained already-tight natural gas and petroleum product markets on the eve of the 2005-2006 heating season (October through March). This combined Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook provides a current view of domestic energy supply and

484

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review 1 Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006) * The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations

485

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly higher than last winter, spending for gas heat will still be lower than the previous 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow).  Brent crude oil spot prices fell from a recent peak of $117 per barrel in early September to

486

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

487

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 October 7, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on November 1 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Originally scheduled for October 8, the conference has been rescheduled due to the shutdown of the Federal government. This supply and demand forecast event will address the effects of projected weather and market factors that may affect the supply, distribution and prices of petroleum, natural gas and electricity this winter. For more information and to register for the

488

California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook Ashuckian, Manager Electricity Analysis Office Terrence O'Brien, Deputy Director Systems Assessment

489

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42 Reference case Table A14. Oil and gas supply Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A14. Oil and gas supply Production and supply Reference case...

490

The Outlook for Energy - A View to 2030  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Outlook for Energy - A View to 2030 Speaker(s): David Reed Date: March 20, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Jayant Sathaye Galen Barbose This...

491

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Outlook 2009 Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure...

492

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Reference...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2003-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 To view or print in PDF format, Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0 MS Excel Viewer...

493

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Highlights Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2009 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 Figure 2. World Marketed Energy use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 Figure 3. World Oil Prices...

494

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

D Results from side cases Table D1. Key results for demand sector technology cases 187 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Results from side...

495

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Reference Case Projections...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables (2004-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data...

496

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas Author: Kondis, Paul Last modified by: ch4 Created Date: 5/9/2013 1:27:26 PM Document presentation format

497

EIA - Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO2010) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2007 to 2035....

498

Short-Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2013 2 Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels . The recent increase in crude oil and liquid fuels ...

499

Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Low Price Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price Case Tables (2006-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 XLS GIF Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Low Price Case Tables (2009-2030) Table Title Formats...

500

Annual Energy Outlook 2007 - High Price Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price Case Tables (2004-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in Excel High Price Case Tables (2004-2030) Table Title...