Sample records for otter tail power

  1. Otter Tail Power Company- Dollar Smart Financing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company's Dollar Smart Financing Program offers loans of $150 - $40,000 to residential and business customers. Customers who have satisfactory 12-month payment histories with Otter...

  2. Otter Tail Power Company- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company offers incentives to all of its customers to install energy efficient equipment in their homes or facilities. Rebates are available for high-efficiency electric heating...

  3. Otter Tail Power Company- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company offers incentives to all residential customers in South Dakota to install energy efficient equipment in residences. Rebates are available for geothermal and air source heat...

  4. Otter Tail Power Company- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company offers incentives to all of its commercial customers in South Dakota to install energy efficient equipment in eligible facilities. Rebates are available for geothermal and...

  5. Otter Tail Power Company- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company Rebate Program offers rebates to qualifying residential customers for the installation of high-efficiency equipment upgrades. See the program web site for applicability and...

  6. Otter Tail Power Company- Dollar Smart Financing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company's Dollar Smart Financing Program offers $150 - $40,000 loans to its residential and business customers. Customers who have satisfactory 12-month payment histories with...

  7. Otter Tail Power Company- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company Grants for Conservation Program allows its commercial and industrial customers to submit energy-saving proposals and receive grants for their custom efficiency projects....

  8. Otter Tail Power Company- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company Rebate Program offers rebates to qualifying commercial, industrial, and agricultural customers for the installation of high-efficiency equipment upgrades. See the program...

  9. Otter Tail Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: Energy ResourcesOtsego,Wisconsin:Otter

  10. Otter Tail Power Co (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: Energy ResourcesOtsego,Wisconsin:Otter Tail

  11. Otter Tail Power Co (North Dakota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesource HistoryOsramOtherOtter Tail

  12. Langdon II - Otter Tail Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:Wind FarmLane-ScottOtter Tail

  13. Otter Tail Ag Enterprises LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesource HistoryOsramOtherOtter Tail Ag

  14. Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    customers for the installation of high-efficiency equipment upgrades. See the program web site for applicability and maximum amounts for certain technologies. Under Minnesota's...

  15. Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Grant

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverviewEfficiencyof EnergyOokieSolarWorld received

  16. Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverviewEfficiencyof EnergyOokieSolarWorld receivedProgram |

  17. Power-law tailed spectra from equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Biro; G. Purcsel; G. Gyorgyi; A. Jakovac; Zs. Schram

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that power-law tailed hadron spectra may be viewed as stemming from a matter in an unconventional equilibrium state typical for non-extensive thermodynamics. A non-extensive Boltzmann equation, which is able to form such spectra as a stationary solution, is utilized as a rough model of quark matter hadronization. Basic ideas about non-extensive simulation of the QCD equation of state on the lattice are presented.

  18. Otter Tail Power Company - DollarSmart Energy Efficiency Loan Program |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverviewEfficiencyof EnergyOokieSolarWorld receivedProgram

  19. OTTER3.3

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    000482UNIXW00 Automated deduction for first-order logic with equality  http://www.mcs.anl.gov/AR/otter/dist33 

  20. FORAGE FISH POPULATIONS AND GROWTH OF MUSKELLUNGE IN A SOUTH DAKOTA POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORAGE FISH POPULATIONS AND GROWTH OF MUSKELLUNGE IN A SOUTH DAKOTA POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR;ACKNOWLEBGEMENTS I would like to thank the following people for making this study possible: Dr. R. L. Applegate. Scaletfor reviewing the manuscript; R. G. Johnson and N. N. Thomas, Otter Tail Power Co., provided access

  1. A minimum hypothesis explanation for an IMF with a lognormal body and power law tail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu; C. E. Jones

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a minimum hypothesis model for an IMF that resembles a lognormal distribution at low masses but has a distinct power-law tail. Even if the central limit theorem ensures a lognormal distribution of condensation masses at birth, a power-law tail in the distribution arises due to accretion from the ambient cloud, coupled with a non-uniform (exponential) distribution of accretion times.

  2. On the Power-Law Tail in the Mass Function of Protostellar Condensations and Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu; C. E. Jones

    2003-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the idea that the power-law tail in the mass function of protostellar condensations and stars arises from the accretion of ambient cloud material on to a condensation, coupled with a nonuniform (exponential) distribution of accretion lifetimes. This model allows for the generation of power-law distributions in all star-forming regions, even if condensations start with a lognormal mass distribution, as may be expected from the central limit theorem, and supported by some recent numerical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds. For a condensation mass $m$ with growth rate $dm/dt \\propto m$, an analytic three-parameter probability density function is derived; it resembles a lognormal at low mass and has a pure power-law high-mass tail. An approximate power-law tail is also expected for other growth laws, and we calculate the distribution for the plausible case $dm/dt \\propto m^{2/3}$. Furthermore, any single time snapshot of the masses of condensations that are still accreting (and are of varying ages) also yields a distribution with a power-law tail similar to that of the IMF.

  3. Power-law tails in probability density functions of molecular cloud column density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunt, Chris

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-law tails are often seen in probability density functions (PDFs) of molecular cloud column densities, and have been attributed to the effect of gravity. We show that extinction PDFs of a sample of five molecular clouds obtained at a few tenths of a parsec resolution, probing extinctions up to A$_{{\\mathrm{V}}}$ $\\sim$ 10 magnitudes, are very well described by lognormal functions provided that the field selection is tightly constrained to the cold, molecular zone and that noise and foreground contamination are appropriately accounted for. In general, field selections that incorporate warm, diffuse material in addition to the cold, molecular material will display apparent core+tail PDFs. The apparent tail, however, is best understood as the high extinction part of a lognormal PDF arising from the cold, molecular part of the cloud. We also describe the effects of noise and foreground/background contamination on the PDF structure, and show that these can, if not appropriately accounted for, induce spurious ...

  4. Feeding Biomechanics & Craniodental Morphology in Otters (Lutrinae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Lori L

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials and Methods ........................................................................................ 21 Results????????????????????????????... 31 Discussion???????????????????????????. 45 CHAPTER III ESTIMATED BITE FORCE OF OTTERS... ................................................................................. 65 Materials and Methods ........................................................................................ 66 Results????. ................................................................................................ 73 Discussion...

  5. EA-1418: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector, Big Stone City, Grant County, South Dakota

  6. Feeding Biomechanics & Craniodental Morphology in Otters (Lutrinae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Lori L

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Historically, the diet of sea otters changes rapidly when they reoccupy an area (Ostfeld, 1982; Kvitek et al., 1992; Estes & Duggins, 1995; Watt et al., 2000; Lee et al., 2009). Sea otters are generalists and will first prey on the most calorically rich...

  7. Otter Tail County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: Energy ResourcesOtsego,Wisconsin:

  8. Ashtabula - Otter Tail Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformation Arizona'sinCalifornia:

  9. River otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    monitored otter latrines at two wetland types (a saltwater lake and freshwater treatment ponds), 5 times perRiver otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland Results DiscussionIntroduction River otters (Lontra canadensis) are the top predator in functioning wetland ecosystems. Kruuk (1995) proposed

  10. Peaks of Otter Soil and Water Conservation District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    leadership and education to sustain and utilize Bedford's natural resources in a manner that will enhancePeaks of Otter Soil and Water Conservation District Annual Report FY 2014 1071ATurnpikeRd.Bedford,VA24523 "The Peaks of Otter Soil and Water Con- servation District, with its partners, will provide

  11. Final Project Report - ARM CLASIC CIRPAS Twin Otter Aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. Ogren

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The NOAA/ESRL/GMD aerosol group made three types of contributions related to airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering and absorption for the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) in June 2007 on the Twin Otter research airplane operated by the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS). GMD scientists served as the instrument mentor for the integrating nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) on the Twin Otter during CLASIC, and were responsible for (1) instrument checks/comparisons; (2) instrument trouble shooting/repair; and (3) data quality control (QC) and submittal to the archive.

  12. Pesticide and heavy metal residues in Louisiana river otter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Debra Lynn

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Hg pollution, and hypothesized that Hg was an important cause of the species' decline in Sweden since 1950. There has been no comparable work in North America, but two studies have provided information on tissue levels of contaminants in otter...

  13. Human Impacts on Seals, Sea Lions, and Sea Otters: Integrating Archaeology and Ecology of the Northeast Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierotti, Raymond

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of Human Impacts on Seals, Sea Lions, and Sea Otters: Integrating Archaeology and Ecology of the Northeast Pacific.

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents the papers given at the Fifth Symposium on Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Advances made with regard to uranium mill tailings management, environmental effects, regulations, and reclamation are reviewed. Topics considered include tailings management and design (e.g., the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, environmental standards for uranium mill tailings disposal), surface stabilization (e.g., the long-term stability of tailings, long-term rock durability), radiological aspects (e.g. the radioactive composition of airborne particulates), contaminant migration (e.g., chemical transport beneath a uranium mill tailings pile, the interaction of acidic leachate with soils), radon control and covers (e.g., radon emanation characteristics, designing surface covers for inactive uranium mill tailings), and seepage and liners (e.g., hydrologic observations, liner requirements).

  15. Data:56c23a6f-a052-4dff-86b3-9b3bdb7c216e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 20111001 End date if known: Rate name: LARGE GENERAL SERVICE Transmission Sector: Commercial Description: RULES AND REGULATIONS: Terms and...

  16. Data:08f786ba-4b7f-4bdc-b495-901ef801544f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    name: Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 20111001 End date if known: Rate name: GENERAL SERVICE Primary Sector: Commercial Description: Facilities Charge per Month per...

  17. Data:B225df0b-05fd-4baf-9d0a-68c24a2a2607 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    name: Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 20111001 End date if known: Rate name: GENERAL SERVICE - TIME OF USE Declared-Peak Sector: Commercial Description: Facilities Charge...

  18. Data:4f5b3393-e6d7-4ec7-824c-efb0dd9748f4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 20111001 End date if known: Rate name: Large General Service - Time of Day Transmission On-Peak Sector: Commercial Description: RULES AND...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebate program eligibility and product and equipment requirements may be found on the web site listed above. Contact Otter Tail Power Company for more information on this ......

  20. Data:33e716f5-a537-4828-87a7-595595d5ba4a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    name: Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 20110213 End date if known: Rate name: COGENERATION PURCHASE RATE Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY: This schedule is...

  1. Data:65c87f52-3325-4d8d-ba4d-2b958cf0ccce | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 20111001 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Pumping Service - Secondary Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: https:...

  2. A Tale of a Tail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang-Siu, Evan Heng Seng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.2.2 Active Tail vs. Active Flywheel . . . . . . 2.3 Robotactive tail to an active flywheel. In section 2.3 we detailA. Active Tail vs. Active Flywheel Compared to the tail-like

  3. Otter Lake, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: Energy ResourcesOtsego,Wisconsin: EnergyOtter

  4. Habitat associations and photo-identification of sea otters in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilkinson, Andrea Karin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    waters. They are typically found within a few miles of shore and depths shallower that 40m (Kenyon 1975, Rotterman and Simon- Jackson 1988, Riedman and Estes 1990, Reeves et al. 2002). Canopy-forming kelp beds are an important component of sea otter... habitat throughout much of their range, used by 3 the otters for resting and foraging; they are not, however, a necessary component as many sea otter populations occur in areas without kelp beds (Miller 1974, Rotterman and Simon-Jackson 1988, Riedman...

  5. Soft gold and the Pacific frontier: geopolitics and environment in the sea otter trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravalli, Richard John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boston firms in the trade, Bryant and Sturgis, noted, ?Theprofits made in the N.W. Trade induced many adventurers toRather, the sea otter trade is presented as a ? bloody,?

  6. Effects Of Sea Otter Colonization On Soft-Sediment Intertidal Prey Assemblages In Glacier Bay, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weitzman, Benjamin Phillip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structuring in soft-sediment systems over a multi-decadalcaloric demands. In soft-substrate systems, recolonizing seainfluences of otters on soft-sediment systems in Glacier Bay

  7. Return of North American River Otters, Lontra canadensis, to Coastal Habitats of the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouley, Paola

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Otter monitoring by citizen science volunteers in northernyears. Utilizing a citizen-science network paired with fieldaquatic carnivore, citizen science, ecosystem restoration,

  8. Tail Emission of Prompt Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamazaki, R; Ioka, K; Nakamura, T; Yamazaki, Ryo; Toma, Kenji; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tail emission of the prompt gamma-ray burst is discussed using a multiple emitting sub-shell (inhomogeneous jet, sub-jets) model. The tail is a superposition of a number of smooth, long-duration, dim, and soft pulses emitted by segments located far from the line of sight. We find that the behavior of the tail is not so much affected by the local inhomogeneity but affected by the global sub-jet distribution. Some observed tails may disfavor the power-law jets.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ALGAL CANOPY INTERACTIONS IN A SEA OTTER-DOMINATED KELP COMMUNITY AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ALGAL CANOPY INTERACTIONS IN A SEA OTTER-DOMINATED KELP COMMUNITY three kelp canopy guilds were conducted in a community in which herbivorous invertebrates have been in the haptera of kelps all disappeared following the canopy removal, suggesting that the canopy itself offers

  10. PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN AGE AT FIRST REPRODUCTION OF FEMALE NORTHERN SEA OTTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN AGE AT FIRST REPRODUCTION OF FEMALE NORTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS phenotypic plasticity. When populations are near carrying capacity (K) or when they are declining due) populations in Alaska provides an opportunity to examine phenotypic plasticity. Using premolar teeth

  11. Return of North American River Otters, Lontra canadensis, to Coastal Habitats of the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouley, Paola

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use of this PDF, the BioOne Web site, and all posted andtandem with the launch of this web-based portal (see http://the public via the Otter Spotter web-based platform included

  12. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  13. Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is only available to customers of one of the state's investor-owned utilities (Alliant, Minnesota Power, Otter Tail Power Company, Xcel Energy). Customers of a municipal...

  14. Made in Minnesota Solar Energy Production Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is only available to customers of one of the state's investor-owned utilities (Alliant, Minnesota Power, Otter Tail Power Company, Xcel Energy). Customers of a municipal...

  15. Value of Solar Tariff (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is only available to customers of one of the state's investor-owned utilities (Alliant, Minnesota Power, Otter Tail Power Company, Xcel Energy). Customers of a municipal...

  16. Innervation Patterns of Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) Mystacial Follicle-Sinus Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Christopher D.; Rozas, Kelly; Kot, Brian; Gill, Verena A.

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    NEUROANATOMY ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 29 October 2014 doi: 10.3389/fnana.2014.00121 Innervation patterns of sea otter (Enhydra lutris ) mystacial follicle-sinus complexes Christopher D. Marshall1,2*, Kelly Rozas1, Brian Kot1 and Verena A...: Alfonso Fairén, University Miguel Hernandez, Spain Reviewed by: Paul Manger, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa George W. Huntley, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA *Correspondence: Christopher D. Marshall, Department of Marine...

  17. Aquatic Mammals 2014, 40(3), 243-251, DOI 10.1578/AM.40.3.2014.243 Hearing in Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris): Audible Frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichmuth, Colleen

    are relevant to improv- ing understanding of sea otter acoustic communi- cation, evolutionary biology to examine the acoustic detection capabilities of species for which little data are available and for which). Sea otters are particularly sensitive to anthropo- genic pollution and disturbance (U.S. Fish

  18. Understanding the Heavy Tailed Dynamics in Human Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Gordon J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent availability of electronic datasets containing large volumes of communication data has made it possible to study human behavior on a larger scale than ever before. From this, it has been discovered that across a diverse range of data sets, the inter-event times between consecutive communication events obey heavy tailed power law dynamics. Explaining this has proved controversial, and two distinct hypotheses have emerged. The first holds that these power laws are fundamental, and arise from the mechanisms such as priority queuing that humans use to schedule tasks. The second holds that they are a statistical artifact which only occur in aggregated data when features such as circadian rhythms and burstiness are ignored. We use a large social media data set to test these hypotheses, and find that although models that incorporate circadian rhythms and burstiness do explain part of the observed heavy tails, there is residual unexplained heavy tail behavior which suggests a more fundamental cause. Based ...

  19. Tail use in bioinspired quadrupedal locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, Randall (Randall Miller)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tails are seen in nature to be used in an amazing number of different applications. Many of these applications seen in nature may be of use to bioinspired roboticists in the future. I have provided a brief review of tail ...

  20. Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick requirements for operating uranium mill tailings (Subpart W) Status update on Subpart W activities Outreach/Communications #12;3 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Operating Uranium Mill Tailings (Clean Air Act) · 40 CFR 61

  1. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

  2. Empirical study of the tails of mutual fund size Yonathan Schwarzkopf1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    theory concerning the origin of the power law tails of the trading volume distribution. Based for the observed power law distribu- tion of trading volume 3,4 . Gabaix et al. have also asserted that the mutual-normal than a power law, indicating less concentration than, for example, personal income. The results

  3. Enhancing the safety of tailings management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meggyes, T.; Niederleithinger, E.; Witt, K.J.; Csovari, M.; Kreft-Burman, K.; Engels, J.; McDonald, C.; Roehl, K.E. [BAM, Berlin (Germany). Federal Institute for Material Research & Testing

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsafe tailings management facilities (TMFs) have caused serious accidents in Europe threatening human health/life and the environment. While advanced design, construction and management procedures are available, their implementation requires greater emphasis. An integrated research project funded by the European Union was carried out between 2002 and 2005 with the overall goal of improving the safety of TMFs (Sustainable Improvement in Safety of Tailings Facilities - TAILSAFE, http://www.tailsafe.com/). The objective of TAILSAFE was to develop and apply methods of parameter evaluation and measurement for the assessment and improvement of the safety state of tailings facilities, with particular attention to the stability of tailings dams and slurries, the special risks inherent when such materials include toxic or hazardous wastes, and authorization and management procedures for tailings facilities. Aspects of tailings facilities design, water management and slurry transport, non-destructive and minimally intrusive testing methods, monitoring and the application of sensors, intervention and remediation options were considered in TAILSAFE. A risk reduction framework (the TAILSAFE Parameter Framework) was established to contribute to the avoidance of catastrophic accidents and hazards from tailings facilities. Tailings from the mining and primary processing of metals, minerals and coal were included within the scope of TAILSAFE. The project focused on the avoidance of hazards by developing procedures and methods for investigating and improving the stability of tailings dams and tailings bodies.

  4. Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in the BPA Control Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Brothers, Alan J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigated the uncertainties with the operations of the power system and their contributions to tail events, especially under high penetration of wind. A Bayesian network model is established to quantify the impact of these uncertainties on system imbalance. The framework is presented for a decision support tool, which can help system operators better estimate the need for balancing reserves and prepare for tail events.

  5. White Tail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to:Westwood Renewables Jump to:meaningWillowTail Jump to:

  6. Photo Identification, Summer Activity Pattern, Estimated Field Metabolic Rate and Territory Quality of Adult Male Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris) in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finerty, Shannon E.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ) but are capable of traveling long distances across open water. Areas with canopy-forming kelp are often used by sea otters for resting and foraging, although it is not an essential habitat requirement, as several populations inhabit areas devoid of canopy...-forming kelp and rest in open water (Miller 1974, Riedman and Estes 1990). In their role as an upper trophic level predator, sea otters can have a strong top-down influence on populations of many species of benthic invertebrates. With a daily rate...

  7. An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with Coupled Engine and Aftertreatment System An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with Coupled...

  8. X Ray Precursors in SGRs: Precessing Gamma Jet Tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak isolated X-ray precursor events before the main Gamma Ray Burst, GRB, and also rare Soft Gamma Repeaters, SGR, events are in complete disagreement with any Fireball, or Magnetar, one-shoot explosive scenarios. Fireball model in last two years has been deeply modified into a fountain beamed Jet exploding and interacting on external shells to explain GRB fine time structure. On the contrary earlier we proposed a unified scenario for both GRBs-SGRs where a precessing Gamma Jet (of different intensity) and its geometrical beaming is the source of both GRB and SGRs wide morphology. GRBs are peaked SNs Jet spinning and precessing observed along the thin Jet axis. Their mysterious weak X precursors bursts, corresponding to non-negligible energy powers, up to million Supernova ones for GRB, are gamma Jet tails beamed off-axis, observed at X-Ray tails. They are rare, about (3-6)% of all GRBs, but not unique at all. Comparable brief X-ray precursor flashes occurred in rarest and most detailed SGRs events as the 27 and the 29 August 1998 event from SGR 1900+14. The same source has been in very power-full activity on recent 18 April 2001 once again preceded by X-Ray precursors. These events are inconsistent with any Fireball or Magnetar-Mini-Fireball models. We interpret them naturally as earlier marginal blazing of outlying X conical precessing Jet, an off-axis tails surrounding a narrower gamma precessing Jet. Only when the light-house Jet is in on-axis blazing mode toward the Earth we observe the harder power-full SGR event. We predict such a rich X-Ray precursor signals (more numerous then gamma ones) during Soft Gamma Repeater peak activities; they should be abundant and within detection threshold by a permanent monitoring SGRs by Beppo-Sax WFC or Chandra X ray satellites while at peak activity.

  9. TAIL ESTIMATES AND A RANDOM EMBEDDING OF n r , 0 < r < p < 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernués, Julio

    #12;2 J. BERNU´ES AND M. L´OPEZ-VALDES p ´IA L´OPEZ-VALDES Abstract. We compute tail estimates for certain sums of r-powers of truncated p] for an intro- duction to this theory). We say that an n-dimensional (r-)normed space X K-embeds into another m

  10. A Tale of Tails: Photon Rates and Flow in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLerran, Larry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility that quark and gluon distributions in the medium created in high energy heavy ion collisions may be modified by a power law tail at energies much higher than the temperature. We parametrize such a tail by Tsallis distributions with an exponent motivated by phenomenology. These distributions are characterized by an effective temperature scale that we assume to evolve in time like the temperature for thermal distributions. We find that including such a tail increases the rates for photon production and significantly delays the emission times for photons of a fixed energy. We argue that these effects are sufficiently large that they should be able to account for photon yields and flow patterns seen in LHC and RHIC experiments.

  11. Revisiting Directed Polymers with heavy-tailed disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Gueudré; Pierre Le Doussal; Jean-Philippe Bouchaud; Alberto Rosso

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this mostly numerical study, we revisit the statistical properties of the ground state of a directed polymer in a $d=1+1$ "hilly" disorder landscape, i.e. when the quenched disorder has power-law tails. When disorder is Gaussian, the polymer minimizes its total energy through a collective optimization, where the energy of each visited site only weakly contributes to the total. Conversely, a hilly landscape forces the polymer to distort and explore a larger portion of space to reach some particularly deep energy sites. As soon as the fifth moment of the disorder diverges, this mechanism radically changes the standard "KPZ" scaling behaviour of the directed polymer, and new exponents prevail. After confirming again that the Flory argument accurately predicts these exponent in the tail-dominated phase, we investigate several other statistical features of the ground state that shed light on this unusual transition and on the accuracy of the Flory argument. We underline the theoretical challenge posed by this situation, which paradoxically becomes even more acute above the upper critical dimension.

  12. Ra-226 radioassay of soil and tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, C.S.; Rayno, D.R.; Kretz, N.D.; Zelle, P.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of inactive uranium tailings piles have shown that tailings sands containing Ra-226 and other radionuclides may be dispersed by wind and water erosion, causing contamination of adjacent areas. To conduct an effective cleanup operation, it is necessary that boundaries of contamination be well defined. To accomplish this, data from surface gamma-ray surveys made under the Measurement Monitoring Program of the US DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) are first used to delineate a general outline of the contaminated area. Then, data from portable scintillometer surveys and from sealed-can gamma-ray analyses of soil samples are used to more precisely define the perimeter of Ra-226 contamination. These field measurements are supported by radiochemical analyses of randomly selected samples. Because of its adaptability to the widely varying chemical composition of the material in these samples, the complexing agent EDTA is used in a complexometric leaching procedure to analyze Ra-226. By this procedure, natural concentrations of Ra-226 in soil (approx. 1 pCi/g) can be measured routinely. The potential limit of detection is in the 0.1 to 0.5 pCi/g range. Details of the method, which includes leaching of radium followed by radon de-emanation, are described. Comparative data for various soil and tailings samples are presented.

  13. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success October 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is...

  14. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  15. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  16. Directed polymers in random environment with heavy tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Auffinger; Oren Louidor

    2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the model of Directed Polymers in Random Environment in 1+1 dimensions, where the distribution at a site has a tail which decays regularly polynomially with power \\alpha, where \\alpha \\in (0,2). After proper scaling of temperature \\beta^{-1}, we show strong localization of the polymer to a favorable region in the environment where energy and entropy are best balanced. We prove that this region has a weak limit under linear scaling and identify the limiting distribution as an (\\alpha, \\beta)-indexed family of measures on Lipschitz curves lying inside the 45-degrees-rotated square with unit diagonal. In particular, this shows order n transversal fluctuations of the polymer. If, and only if, \\alpha is small enough, we find that there exists a random critical temperature below which, but not above, the effect of the environment is macroscopic. The results carry over to d+1 dimensions for d>1 with minor modifications.

  17. DOE Awards Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    part of the Department's continued efforts to protect the Colorado River and downstream water users by removing uranium tailings at the former Atlas uranium-ore processing...

  18. active tails enhance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    products of independent random variables ABSTRACT Motivated Whitt, Ward 186 URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  19. Measurements of uranium mill tailings consolidation characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, M J

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments were conducted on uranium mill tailings from the tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado, to determine their consolidation characteristics. Three materials (sand, sand/slimes mix, slimes) were loaded under saturated conditions to determine their saturated consolidated behavior. During a separate experiment, samples of the slimes material were kept under a constant load while the pore pressure was increased to determine the partially saturated consolidation behavior. Results of the saturated tests compared well with published data. Sand consolidated the least, while slimes consolidated the most. As each material consolidated, the measured hydraulic conductivity decreased in a linear fashion with respect to the void ratio. Partially saturated experiments with the slimes indicated that there was little consolidation as the pore pressure was increased progressively above 7 kPa. The small amount of consolidation that did occur was only a fraction of the amount of saturated consolidation. Preliminary measurements between pore pressures of 0 and 7 kPa indicated that measurable consolidation could occur in this range of pore pressure, but only if there was no load. 13 references, 13 figures.

  20. Modulational instability of a Langmuir wave in plasmas with energetic tails of superthermal electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timofeev, I V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of superthermal electrons on dispersion properties of isotropic plasmas and on the modulational instability of a monochromatic Langmuir wave is studied for the case when the power-law tail of the electron distribution function extends to relativistic velocities and contains most of the plasma kinetic energy. Such an energetic tail of electrons is shown to increase the thermal correction to the Langmuir wave frequency, which is equivalent to the increase of the effective electron temperature in the fluid approach, and has almost no impact on the dispersion of ion-acoustic waves, in which the role of temperature is played by the thermal spread of low-energy core electrons. It is also found that the spectrum of modulational instability in the non-maxwellian plasma narrows significantly, as compared to the equilibrium case, without change of the maximum growth rate and the corresponding wavenumber.

  1. Tail universalities in rank distributions as an algebraic problem: the beta-like function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo G. Naumis; Germinal Cocho

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Although power laws of the Zipf type have been used by many workers to fit rank distributions in different fields like in economy, geophysics, genetics, soft-matter, networks etc., these fits usually fail at the tails. Some distributions have been proposed to solve the problem, but unfortunately they do not fit at the same time both ending tails. We show that many different data in rank laws, like in granular materials, codons, author impact in scientific journal, etc. are very well fitted by a beta-like function. Then we propose that such universality is due to the fact that a system made from many subsystems or choices, imply stretched exponential frequency-rank functions which qualitatively and quantitatively can be fitted with the proposed beta-like function distribution in the limit of many random variables. We prove this by transforming the problem into an algebraic one: finding the rank of successive products of a given set of numbers.

  2. Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in BPA Control Area: Task One Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report for task one of the tail event analysis project for BPA. Tail event refers to the situation in a power system when unfavorable forecast errors of load and wind are superposed onto fast load and wind ramps, or non-wind generators falling short of scheduled output, the imbalance between generation and load becomes very significant. This type of events occurs infrequently and appears on the tails of the distribution of system power imbalance; therefore, is referred to as tail events. This report analyzes what happened during the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) reliability event on February 26, 2008, which was widely reported because of the involvement of wind generation. The objective is to identify sources of the problem, solutions to it and potential improvements that can be made to the system. Lessons learned from the analysis include the following: (1) Large mismatch between generation and load can be caused by load forecast error, wind forecast error and generation scheduling control error on traditional generators, or a combination of all of the above; (2) The capability of system balancing resources should be evaluated both in capacity (MW) and in ramp rate (MW/min), and be procured accordingly to meet both requirements. The resources need to be able to cover a range corresponding to the variability of load and wind in the system, additional to other uncertainties; (3) Unexpected ramps caused by load and wind can both become the cause leading to serious issues; (4) A look-ahead tool evaluating system balancing requirement during real-time operations and comparing that with available system resources should be very helpful to system operators in predicting the forthcoming of similar events and planning ahead; and (5) Demand response (only load reduction in ERCOT event) can effectively reduce load-generation mismatch and terminate frequency deviation in an emergency situation.

  3. Functional Morphology of the Radialis Muscle in Shark Tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    of the caudal fin in most sharks. Caudal fin morphology (Affleck, 1950; Alexander, 1965; Lingham-Soliar, 2005 of the functional internal anatomy of the tail fin. The caudal fin of sharks is the most prominent control surface for locomotion, controlling the angle of attack of the fin by leading the tail beat with the dorsal tip

  4. Lifshitz tails for the Interband Light Absorption Coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kirsch; M. Krishna

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the Interband Light Absorption Coefficient for various models. We show that at the lower and upper edges of the spectrum the Lifshitz tails behaviour of the density of states implies similar behaviour for the ILAC at appropriate energies. The Lifshitz tails property is also exhibited at some points corresponding to the internal band edges of the density of states.

  5. Poly(A)-tail profiling reveals an embryonic switch in translational control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subtelny, Alexander Orest

    Poly(A) tails enhance the stability and translation of most eukaryotic messenger RNAs, but difficulties in globally measuring poly(A)-tail lengths have impeded greater understanding of poly(A)-tail function. Here we describe ...

  6. Predicting arsenic concentrations in porewaters of buried uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langmuir, D.; Mahoney, J.; MacDonald, A.; Rowson, J.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed JEB Tailings Management Facility (TMF) to be emplaced below the groundwater table in northern Saskatchewan, Canada, will contain uranium mill tailings from McClean Lake, Midwest and Cigar Lake ore bodies, which are high in arsenic (up to 10%) and nickel (up to 5%). A serious concern is the possibility that high arsenic and nickel concentrations may be released from the buried tailings, contaminating adjacent groundwaters and a nearby lake. Laboratory tests and geochemical modeling were performed to examine ways to reduce the arsenic and nickel concentrations in TMF porewaters so as to minimize such contamination from tailings buried for 50 years and longer. The tests were designed to mimic conditions in the mill neutralization circuit (3 hr tests at 25 C), and in the TMF after burial (5--49 day aging tests). The aging tests were run at 50, 25 and 4 C (the temperature in the TMF). In order to optimize the removal of arsenic by adsorption and precipitation, ferric sulfate was added to tailings raffinates having Fe/As ratios of less than 3--5. The acid raffinates were then neutralized by addition of slaked lime to nominal pH values of 7, 8, or 9. Analysis and modeling of the test results showed that with slaked lime addition to acid tailings raffinates, relatively amorphous scorodite (ferric arsenate) precipitates near pH 1, and is the dominant form of arsenate in slake limed tailings solids except those high in Ni and As and low in Fe, in which cabrerite-annabergite (Ni, Mg, Fe(II) arsenate) may also precipitate near pH 5--6. In addition to the arsenate precipitates, smaller amounts of arsenate are also adsorbed onto tailings solids. The aging tests showed that after burial of the tailings, arsenic concentrations may increase with time from the breakdown of the arsenate phases (chiefly scorodite). However, the tests indicate that the rate of change decreases and approaches zero after 72 hrs at 25 C, and may equal zero at all times in the TMF at 4 C. Consistent with a kinetic model that describes the rate of breakdown of scorodite to form hydrous ferric oxide, the rate of release of dissolved arsenate to tailings porewaters from slake limed tailings: (1) is proportional to pH above pH 6--7; (2) decreases exponentially as the total molar Fe/As ratio of tailings raffinates is increased from 1/1 to greater than 5/1; and (3) is proportional to temperature with an average Arrhenius activation energy of 13.4 {+-} 4.2 kcal/mol. Study results suggest that if ferric sulfate and slaked lime are added in the tailings neutralization circuit to give a raffinate Fe/As molar ratio of at least 3--5 and a nominal (initial) pH of 8 (final pH of 7--8), arsenic and nickel concentrations of 2 mg/L or less, are probable in porewaters of individual tailings in the TMF for 50 to 10,000 yrs after tailings disposal. However, the tailings will be mixed in the TMF, which will contain about 35% tailings with Fe/As = 3.0, and 65% tailings with Fe/As = 5.0--7.7. Thus, it seems likely that average arsenic pore water concentrations in the TMF may not exceed 1 mg/L.

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - mather_twpice_data_status_ny.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPA / SPRA /EstimatesMarch 2010Twin Otter

  8. Modelling of contaminant release from a uranium mine tailings site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahnt, Rene [G.E.O.S. Freiberg Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, P.O.Box 1162. D-09581 Freiberg (Germany); Metschies, Thomas [Wismut GmbH, Jagdschaenkenstrasse 29. D-09117 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Uranium mining and milling continuing from the early 1960's until 1990 close to the town of Seelingstaedt in Eastern Germany resulted in 4 tailings impoundments with a total tailings volume of about 105 Mio. m{sup 3}. Leakage from these tailings impoundments enters the underlying aquifers and is discharged into surface water streams. High concentration of salts, uranium and several heavy metals are released from the tailings. At present the tailings impoundments are reshaped and covered. For the identification of suitable remediation options predictions of the contaminant release for different remediation scenarios have to be made. A compartment model representing the tailings impoundments and the surrounding aquifers for the calculation of contaminant release and transport was set up using the software GOLDSIM. This compartment model describes the time dependent hydraulic conditions within the tailings and the surrounding aquifers taking into account hydraulic and geotechnical processes influencing the hydraulic properties of the tailings material. A simple geochemical approach taking into account sorption processes as well as retardation by applying a k{sub d}-approach was implemented to describe the contaminant release and transport within the hydraulic system. For uranium as the relevant contaminant the simple approach takes into account additional geochemical conditions influencing the mobility. Alternatively the model approach allows to include the results of detailed geochemical modelling of the individual tailings zones which is than used as source term for the modelling of the contaminant transport in the aquifer and to the receiving streams. (authors)

  9. Bump formation in the runaway electron tail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, J; Fülöp, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runaway electrons are generated in a magnetized plasma when the parallel electric field exceeds a critical value. For such electrons with energies typically reaching tens of MeV, the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac (ALD) radiation force, in reaction to the synchrotron emission, is significant and can be the dominant process limiting the electron acceleration. The effect of the ALD-force on runaway electron dynamics in a homogeneous plasma is investigated using the relativistic finite-difference Fokker-Planck codes LUKE [Decker & Peysson, Report EUR-CEA-FC-1736, Euratom-CEA, (2004)] and CODE [Landreman et al, Comp. Phys. Comm. 185, 847 (2014)]. Under the action of the ALD force, we find that a bump is formed in the tail of the electron distribution function if the electric field is sufficiently large. We also observe that the energy of runaway electrons in the bump increases with the electric field amplitude, while the population increases with the bulk electron temperature. The presence of the bump divides the elec...

  10. Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MOAB, Utah – The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter.

  11. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Plans to Resume Train Shipments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Contractor (RAC) to the U.S. Department of Energy will return to work on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project on March 4, following a 3-month planned furlough....

  12. A Note on Trans-Planckian Tail Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graef, L L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the proposal by Mersini et al. that the observed dark energy might be explained by the back-reaction of the set of tail modes in a theory with a dispersion relation in which the mode frequency decays exponentially in the trans-Planckian regime. The matter tail modes are frozen out, however they induce metric fluctuations. The energy-momentum tensor with which the tail modes effect the background geometry obtains contributions from both metric and matter fluctuations. We calculate the equation of state induced by the tail modes taking into account the gravitational contribution. We find that, in contrast to the case of frozen super-Hubble cosmological fluctuations, in this case the matter perturbations dominate, and they yield an equation of state which to leading order takes the form of a positive cosmological constant.

  13. Asymptotic Inference for AR Models with Heavy-tailed G-GARCH Noises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Shiqing

    Asymptotic Inference for AR Models with Heavy-tailed G-GARCH Noises Rongmao Zhang Department-tailed G-GARCH(1,1) noises. When the tail index of G-GARCH is within (0, 2), it is shown that the LSE and finance. Keywords: AR model, G-GARCH, heavy-tailed and stable processes 1 #12;1 Introduction Since

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action 1993 Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 Roadmap for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project office is a tool to assess and resolve issues. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office uses the nine-step roadmapping process as a basis for Surface and Groundwater Project planning. This is the second year the Roadmap document has been used to identify key issues and assumptions, develop logic diagrams, and outline milestones. This document is a key element of the DOE planning process. A multi-interest group used the nine-step process to focus on issues, root cause analysis and resolutions. This core group updated and incorporated comments on the basic assumptions, then used these assumptions to identify issues. The list of assumptions was categorized into the following areas: institutional, regulatory compliance, project management, human resource requirements, and other site-specific assumptions. The group identified 10 issues in the analysis phase. All of the issues are ranked according to importance. The number one issue from the 1992 Roadmap, ``Lack of sufficient human resources,`` remained the number one issue in 1993. The issues and their ranking are as follows: Lack of sufficient human resources; increasing regulatory requirements; unresolved groundwater issues; extension of UMTRCA through September 30, 1998; lack of post-UMTRA and post-cell closure policies; unpredictable amounts and timing of Federal funding; lack of regulatory compliance agreements; problem with states providing their share of remedial action costs; different interests and priorities among participants; and technology development/transfer. The issues are outlined and analyzed in detail in Section 8.0, with a schedule for resolution of these issues in Section 9.0.

  15. Simulations of the Nuclear Recoil Head-Tail Signature in Gases Relevant to Directional Dark Matter Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Majewski; D. Muna; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first detailed simulations of the head-tail effect relevant to directional Dark Matter searches. Investigations of the location of the majority of the ionization charge as being either at the beginning half (tail) or at the end half (head) of the nuclear recoil track were performed for carbon and sulphur recoils in 40 Torr negative ion carbon disulfide and for fluorine recoils in 100 Torr carbon tetrafluoride. The SRIM simulation program was used, together with a purpose-written Monte Carlo generator, to model production of ionizing pairs, diffusion and basic readout geometries relevant to potential real detector scenarios, such as under development for the DRIFT experiment. The results clearly indicate the existence of a head-tail track asymmetry but with a magnitude critically influenced by two competing factors: the nature of the stopping power and details of the range straggling. The former tends to result in the tail being greater than the head and the latter the reverse.

  16. Long-Term Performance of Uranium Tailings Disposal Cells - 13340

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary; Pill, Ken [Professional Project Services, Inc., 1100 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., 1100 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio; Noosai, Nantaporn; Villamizar, Viviana [Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100, Miami FL, 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100, Miami FL, 33174 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there has been interest in the performance and evolution of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell covers because some sites are not compliant with groundwater standards. Field observations of UMTRA disposal cells indicate that rock covers tend to become vegetated and that saturated conductivities in the upper portion of radon barriers may increase due to freeze/thaw cycles and biointrusion. This paper describes the results of modeling that addresses whether these potential changes and transient drainage of moisture in the tailings affect overall performance of the disposal cells. A numerical unsaturated/saturated 3-dimensional flow model was used to simulate whether increases in saturated conductivities in radon barriers with rock covers affect the overall performance of the disposal cells using field data from the Shiprock, NM, UMTRA site. A unique modeling approach allowed simulation with daily climatic conditions to determine changes in moisture and moisture flux from the disposal cell. Modeling results indicated that increases in the saturated conductivity at the top of radon barrier do not influence flux from the tailings with time because the tailings behave similar hydraulically to the radon barrier. The presence of a thin layer of low conductivity material anywhere in the cover or tailings restricts flux in the worst case to the saturated conductivity of that material. Where materials are unsaturated at depth within the radon barrier of tailings slimes, conductivities are typically less than 10{sup -8} centimeters per second. If the low conductivity layer is deep within the disposal cell, its saturated properties are less likely to change with time. The significance of this modeling is that operation and maintenance of the disposal cells can be minimized if they are allowed to progress to a natural condition with some vegetation and soil genesis. Because the covers and underlying tailings have a very low saturated hydraulic conductivity after transient drainage, eventually the amount of moisture leaving the tailings has a negligible effect on groundwater quality. Although some of the UMTRA sites are not in compliance with the groundwater standards, the explanation may be legacy contamination from mining, or earlier higher fluxes from the tailings or unlined processing ponds. Investigation of other legacy sources at the UMTRA sites may help explain persistent groundwater contamination. (authors)

  17. PSR J0357+3205: the tail of the turtle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marelli, Martino; Salvetti, David; Sartore, Nicola; Sartori, Angelica; Caraveo, Patrizia; Pizzolato, Fabio; Parkinson, Pablo M Saz; Belfiore, Andrea

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a new XMM-Newton observation, we have characterized the X-ray properties of the middle-aged radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar J0357+3205 (named Morla) and its tail. The X-ray emission from the pulsar is consistent with a magnetospheric non-thermal origin plus a thermal emission from a hot spot (or hot spots). The lack of a thermal component from the whole surface makes Morla the coldest neutron star in its age range. We found marginal evidence for a double-peaked modulation of the X-ray emission. The study of the 9'-long tail confirmed the lack of extended emission near the pulsar itself. The tail shows a very asymmetric brightness profile and its spectrum lacks any spatial variation. We found the nebular emission to be inconsistent with a classical bow-shock, ram-pressure dominated pulsar wind nebula. We propose thermal bremsstrahlung as an alternative mechanism for Morla's tail emission. In this scenario, the tail emission comes from the shocked interstellar medium (ISM) material heated up to X-ray tempera...

  18. Using Tidal Tails to Probe Dark Matter Halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Dubinski; J. Christopher Mihos; Lars Hernquist

    1995-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We use simulations of merging galaxies to explore the sensitivity of the morphology of tidal tails to variations of the halo mass distributions in the parent galaxies. Our goal is to constrain the mass of dark halos in well-known merging pairs. We concentrate on prograde encounters between equal mass galaxies which represent the best cases for creating tidal tails, but also look at systems with different relative orientations, orbital energies and mass ratios. As the mass and extent of the dark halo increase in the model galaxies, the resulting tidal tails become shorter and less massive, even under the most favorable conditions for producing these features. Our simulations imply that the observed merging galaxies with long tidal tails ($\\sim 50-100$ kpc) such as NGC 4038/39 (the Antennae) and NGC 7252 probably have halo:disk+bulge mass ratios less than 10:1. These results conflict with the favored values of the dark halo mass of the Milky Way derived from satellite kinematics and the timing argument which give a halo:disk+bulge mass ratio of $\\sim 30:1$. However, the lower bound of the estimated dark halo mass in the Milky Way (mass ratio $\\sim 10:1$) is still consistent with the inferred tidal tail galaxy masses. Our results also conflict with the expectations of $\\Omega=1$ cosmologies such as CDM which predict much more massive and extended dark halos.

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. [UMTRA project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereinafter referred to as the Act.'' Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at designated inactive uranium processing sites (Attachment 1 and 2) and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing site. The purpose of the remedial actions is to stabilize and control such uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a safe and environmentally sound manner to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. The principal health hazards and environmental concerns are: the inhalation of air particulates contaminated as a result of the emanation of radon from the tailings piles and the subsequent decay of radon daughters; and the contamination of surface and groundwaters with radionuclides or other chemically toxic materials. This UMTRA Project Plan identifies the mission and objectives of the project, outlines the technical and managerial approach for achieving them, and summarizes the performance, cost, and schedule baselines which have been established to guide operational activity. Estimated cost increases by 15 percent, or if the schedule slips by six months. 4 refs.

  20. ARM - Campaign Instrument - otter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to hear from you!jpl Comments? We would lovegovInstrumentsotter Comments? We

  1. Bent-Tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field-South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehghan, Siamak; Franzen, Thomas M O; Norris, Ray P; Miller, Neal A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS), supplemented with the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS). Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 bent-tailed sources, four diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (one relic, two halos, and one unclassified object), and a further seven complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range $10^{22} \\leq$ $\\textrm{P}_{1.4 \\textrm{ GHz}} \\leq 10^{26}$ W Hz$^{-1}$, redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kpc up to about one Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here one is the most distant bent-tailed source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be as...

  2. S. 2415: Title I may be cited as the Uranium Enrichment Act of 1990; Title II may be cited as the Uranium Security and Tailings Reclamation Act of 1989; and Title III may be cited as The Solar, Wind, Waste, and Geothermal Power Production Incentives Act of 1990, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, April 4, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. 2415 (which started out as a bill to encourage solar and geothermal power generation) now would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to redirect uranium enrichment enterprises to further the national interest, respond to competitive market forces, and to ensure the nation's common defense and security. It would establish a United States Enrichment Corporation for the following purposes: to acquire feed materials, enriched uranium, and enrichment facilities; to operate these facilities; to market enriched uranium for governmental purposes and qualified domestic and foreign persons; to conduct research into uranium enrichment; and to operate as a profitable, self-financing, reliable corporation and in a manner consistent with the health and safety of the public. The bill describes powers and duties of the corporation; the organization, finance, and management; decontamination and decommissioning. The second part of the bill would ensure an adequate supply of domestic uranium for defense and power production; provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry; and establish, facilitate, and expedite a comprehensive system for financing reclamation and remedial action at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The third part of the bill would remove the size limitations on power production facilities now part of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Solar, wind, waste, or geothermal power facilities would no longer have to be less than 80 MW to qualify as a small power production facility.

  3. Hybrid redox polyether melts based on polyether-tailed counterions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, E. V; Williams, M.E.; Hendrickson, S.M.; Masui, Hitoshi; Murray, R.W.

    1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Interesting ionic materials can be transformed into room temperature molten salts by combining them with polyether-tailed counterions such as polyether-tailed 2-sulfobenzoate (MePEG-BzSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and polyethertailed triethylammonium (MePEG-Et{sub 3}N{sup +}). Melts containing ruthenium hexamine, metal trisbipyridines, metal trisphenanthrolines, and ionic forms of aluminum quinolate, anthraquinone, phthalocyanine, and porphyrins are described. These melts exhibit ionic conductivities in the 7 x 10{sup {minus}5} to 7 x 10{sup {minus}10} {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1} range, which permit microelectrode voltammetry in the undiluted materials, examples of which are presented.

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term environmental effects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 address the public health hazards of radioactive wastes and recognize the significance of this issue to public acceptance of nuclear energy. Title I of the Act deals with stabilizing and controlling mill tailings at inactive sites and classifies the sites by priority. It represents a major Federal commitment. Title II changes and strengthens Nuclear Regulatory Commission authority, but it will have little overall impact. It is not possible to assess the Act's effect because there is no way to know if current technology will be adequate for the length of time required. 76 references. (DCK)

  5. Adrenal weight in a Texas white-tailed deer herd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Charles Warren

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADRENAL WEIGHT IN A TEXAS WHITE-TAILED DEER HERD A Thesis by CHARLES WARREN RAMSEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major... Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ADRENAL WEIGHT IN A TEXAS WHITE-TAILED DEER HERD A Thesis by CHARLES WARREN RAMSEY Approved as to style and content by: ( airman o Committ ) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1975 1. 1, 1...

  6. Hanford Site Black-tailed Jackrabbit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soil Hanford Traffic Safety10 Revision 0

  7. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems

  8. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  9. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  10. Role of C-Terminal Tails of G Protein Coupled Receptors on Beta-Arrestin 1/2 Dependent Signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Kasturi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated Receptor 2(PAR2) C-terminal tail direct ?-arrestinand threonine residues of PAR2 C-terminal tail in ? arrestinNK1R are directed by the C-terminal tails ABSTRACT Protease

  11. Particle acceleration from reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hesse, M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Schindler, K. [Ruhr-Univ., Bochum (Germany)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceleration of charged particles in the near geomagnetic tail, associated with a dynamic magnetic reconnection process, was investigated by a combined effort of data analysis, using Los Alamos data from geosynchronous orbit, MHD modeling of the dynamic evolution of the magnetotail, and test particle tracing in the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the MHD simulation.

  12. Right tail expansion of Tracy-Widom beta laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaëtan Borot; Céline Nadal

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using loop equations, we compute the large deviation function of the maximum eigenvalue to the right of the spectrum in the Gaussian beta matrix ensembles, to all orders in 1/N. We then give a physical derivation of the all order asymptotic expansion of the right tail Tracy-Widom beta laws, for all positive beta, by studying the double scaling limit.

  13. Tails of the endpoint distribution of directed polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Quastel; Daniel Remenik

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that the random variable $\\ct=\\argmax_{t\\in\\rr}\\{\\aip(t)-t^2\\}$ has tails which decay like $e^{-ct^3}$. The distribution of $\\ct$ is a universal distribution which governs the rescaled endpoint of directed polymers in 1+1 dimensions for large time or temperature.

  14. Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, Alexey

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

  15. 4-Poster Tick Management and White-tailed Deer Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    the methodologies for Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach #12;Environmental Assessment Purpose and NeedUpdate on: 4-Poster Tick Management and White-tailed Deer Management Tim Green Environmental been on hold until present #12;Environmental Assessment Current Status: · Adopting two existing EAs - U

  16. Environmental impact assessment of tailings dispersal from a uranium mine using toxicity testing protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rippon, G.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Canberra (Australia); Riley, S.J. [Univ. of Western Sydney-Nepean, Kingswood (Australia)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxicity testing is a means of establishing the environmental risk of uranium tailings release. It is valuable in designing tailings containment structures because it assists in setting acceptable levels of risk of the design. This paper presents details of toxicity tests of the tailings from Ranger Uranium Mine, Northern Territory, Australia. The results suggest that the non-radiological toxicity of the tailings is low. The environmental risk of a tailings release is more likely to be related to the physical impacts of the tailings, including infilling of billabongs and changes in the sedimentology of riparian ecosystems rather than their biogeochemical impact. Two major results were: (1) water from treatment with washed tailing fines was not toxic to Hydra viridissima, and (2) mixtures of washed tailings fines and natural floodplain sediment (overlying water or elutriates) were not toxic to Hydra viridissima or Moinodaphnia macleayi. 33 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Throughput Optimal Scheduling Over Time-Varying Channels in the Presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Krishna

    We study the problem of scheduling over time varying links in a network that serves both heavy-tailed and light tailed traffic. We consider a system consisting of two parallel queues, served by a single server. One of the ...

  18. Throughput Optimal Scheduling in the Presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Krishna Prasanna

    We investigate the tail behavior of the steady-state queue occupancies under throughput optimal scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic. We consider a system consisting of two parallel queues, served by a single ...

  19. QUANTILE OPTIMIZATION FOR HEAVY-TAILED DISTRIBUTIONS USING ASYMMETRIC SIGNUM FUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    -tailed crashes as happened recently during the 1987 meltdown, the LTCM crisis in 1998, the dot-com bubble burst

  20. Earthquake hazards in the Intermountain U.S.: Issues relevant to uranium mill tailings disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan G. Wong; Susan S. Olig; Bruce W. Hassinger; Richard E. Blubaugh

    . Consequently, the seismic safety of U.S. uranium mill tailings sites, which are located almost exclusively in

  1. Commingled uranium-tailings study. Volume I. Plan for stabilization and management of commingled uranium-mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, prepared in accordance with Section 213 of Public Law 96-540, presents a plan for a cooperative program to provide assistance in the stabilization and management of commingled uranium mill tailings. The report is organized in two volumes, a summary report (Volume I) and a companion technical report (Volume II). Contents of Volume I are: summary; background; amount and condition of the tailings; regulatory requirements; stabilization cost estimates; costsharing alternatives; administrative options and plan implementation; standards and regulations. The DOE recommends that the standards and regulations for tailings stabilization be relaxed and that any program of stabilization be limited to prevention of migration and erosion of the tailings and inadvertent exposure to them. The plan presented here shows the effort and costs that would be incurred if the government were to implement such a plan. The Department makes no recommendation as to the advisability of actually implementing legislation authorizing an assistance program, and stands ready to respond to comments on the plan by Congress, other government agencies, or interested parties.

  2. Long Tail or Steep Tail? A Field Investigation into How Online Popularity Information Affects the Distribution of Customer Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Catherine

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The internet has made it easier for customers to find and buy a wide variety of products. This may lead to a "long tail" effect as more customers buy low-volume products. However, the internet has also made it easier for ...

  3. Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Reconnaissance soil geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont County.....................................................................................................................................................link Figures Figure 1. Location of 19 soil samples collected from the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial

  4. Max-Weight Scheduling in Queueing Networks With Heavy-Tailed Traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markakis, Mihalis G.

    We consider the problem of scheduling in a single-hop switched network with a mix of heavy-tailed and light-tailed traffic and analyze the impact of heavy-tailed traffic on the performance of Max-Weight scheduling. As a ...

  5. SUPER-LUMINOUS TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE: CATCHING A MAGNETAR BY THE TAIL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Smith, K.; Chen, T.-W.; Kotak, R.; Nicholl, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Valenti, S. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102 Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Botticella, M. T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ergon, M. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Fynbo, J. P. U., E-mail: c.inserra@qub.ac.uk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report extensive observational data for five of the lowest redshift Super-Luminous Type Ic Supernovae (SL-SNe Ic) discovered to date, namely, PTF10hgi, SN2011ke, PTF11rks, SN2011kf, and SN2012il. Photometric imaging of the transients at +50 to +230 days after peak combined with host galaxy subtraction reveals a luminous tail phase for four of these SL-SNe. A high-resolution, optical, and near-infrared spectrum from xshooter provides detection of a broad He I {lambda}10830 emission line in the spectrum (+50 days) of SN2012il, revealing that at least some SL-SNe Ic are not completely helium-free. At first sight, the tail luminosity decline rates that we measure are consistent with the radioactive decay of {sup 56}Co, and would require 1-4 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni to produce the luminosity. These {sup 56}Ni masses cannot be made consistent with the short diffusion times at peak, and indeed are insufficient to power the peak luminosity. We instead favor energy deposition by newborn magnetars as the power source for these objects. A semi-analytical diffusion model with energy input from the spin-down of a magnetar reproduces the extensive light curve data well. The model predictions of ejecta velocities and temperatures which are required are in reasonable agreement with those determined from our observations. We derive magnetar energies of 0.4 {approx}< E(10{sup 51} erg) {approx}< 6.9 and ejecta masses of 2.3 {approx}< M{sub ej}(M{sub Sun }) {approx}< 8.6. The sample of five SL-SNe Ic presented here, combined with SN 2010gx-the best sampled SL-SNe Ic so far-points toward an explosion driven by a magnetar as a viable explanation for all SL-SNe Ic.

  6. Experimental determination of the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon: A transient photocurrent analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, D.P.; Chan, F.Y.M.; Zou, X.C.; Chan, Y.C.; Lam, Y.W.; Lin, S.H.; O'Leary, S.K.; Lim, P.K.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental developments have cast doubt on the validity of the common assumption that the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon exhibits a single exponential functional form. The authors employ transient photocurrent decay measurements to determine this distribution of tail states. In their approach, however, they determine the distribution of tail states directly from the experimental data, without assuming, a priori, a specific functional form. It is found that these experimental results are consistent with other more recent experimental determinations of the distribution of tail states, suggesting the possibility of deviations from a single exponential distribution of tail states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  7. First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  9. Data:41e52daf-f6fc-48ca-8a22-85f976bd0011 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Otter Tail...

  10. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence.

  11. Evidence for current sheet acceleration in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, L.R.; Speiser, T.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of the current sheet and the dawn to dusk electric field in the geomagnetic tail implies there is particle energization in the tail current sheet of the order 2--10% of the total solar wind energy incident upon the dayside magnetopause. In this paper we determine that ion acceleration in a current sheet with a small magnetic field across the sheet, via single-particle motion which violates the guiding center approximation, can account for this large energization in the tail. We calculate the distribution of accelerated ions which result from the urrent sheet acceleration and compare the results with distributions of accelerated ions frequently observed flowing earthwards along the outer boundary of the plasma sheet. The comparison indicates that the observed earthward flowing ions result from current sheet acceleration. Comparison with measurements of auroral ion predictions at low precipitation at low altitudes implies that the accelerated ions ejected from the current sheet are also an important source of auroral ion precipitation. In addition, these acceletated ions may be an important source of plasma sheet ions.

  12. Diversity in the Tail of the Intersecting Brane Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Rosenhaus; Washington Taylor

    2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are developed for exploring the complete space of intersecting brane models on an orientifold. The classification of all solutions for the widely-studied T^6/Z_2 x Z_2 orientifold is made possible by computing all combinations of branes with negative tadpole contributions. This provides the necessary information to systematically and efficiently identify all models in this class with specific characteristics. In particular, all ways in which a desired group G can be realized by a system of intersecting branes can be enumerated in polynomial time. We identify all distinct brane realizations of the gauge groups SU(3) x SU(2) and SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) which can be embedded in any model which is compatible with the tadpole and SUSY constraints. We compute the distribution of the number of generations of "quarks" and find that 3 is neither suppressed nor particularly enhanced compared to other odd generation numbers. The overall distribution of models is found to have a long tail. Despite disproportionate suppression of models in the tail by K-theory constraints, the tail in the distribution contains much of the diversity of low-energy physics structure.

  13. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Public Participation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to explain the Department of Energy`s plan for involving the public in the decision-making process related to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This project was authorized by Congress in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. The Act provides for a cooperative effort with affected states and Indian tribes for the eventual cleanup of abandoned or inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which are located in nine western states and in Pennsylvania. Section 111 of the Act states, ``in carrying out the provisions of this title, including the designation of processing sites, establishing priorities for such sites, the selection of remedial actions and the execution of cooperative agreements, the Secretary (of Energy), the Administrator (of the Environmental Protection Agency), and the (Nuclear Regulatory) Commission shall encourage public participation and, where appropriate, the Secretary shall hold public hearings relative to such matters in the States where processing sites and disposal sites are located.`` The objective of this document is to show when, where, and how the public will be involved in this project.

  14. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  15. The high energy X-ray tail of Eta Car revealed by BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Viotti; L. A. Antonelli; C. Rossi; S. Rebecchi

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the June 2000 long (100 ks) BeppoSAX exposure that has unveiled above 10 keV a new very high energy component of the X-ray spectrum of Eta Car extending to at least 50 keV. We find that the 2-150 keV spectrum is best reproduced by a thermal + non-thermal model. The thermal component dominates the 2-10 keV spectral range with kT_h=5.5 +/- 0.3 keV and log NH_h=22.68 +/- 0.01. The spectrum displays a prominent iron emission line centred at 6.70 keV. Its equivalent width of 0.94 keV, if produced by the thermal source, gives a slightly sub-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H]=-0.15 +/- 0.02). The high energy tail above 10 keV is best fitted by a power law with a photon index of 2.42 +/- 0.04. The integrated 13-150 keV luminosity of ~12 L-sun is comparable to that of the 2-10 keV thermal component. The present result can be explained, in the Eta Car binary star scenario, by Comptonisation of low frequency radiation by high energy electrons, probably generated in the colliding wind shock front, or in instabilities in the wind of the S Dor primary star. It is possible that the high energy tail had largely weakened near the minimum of the 5.53 yr cycle. With respect to the thermal component, it probably has a longer recovering time like that of the highest excitation optical emission lines. Both features can be associated with the large absorption measured by BeppoSAX at phase 0.05.

  16. Uranium mine and mill tailings - Liabilities in the European Union

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilden, Wolfgang; Murphy, Simon [European Commission, Maison de l'Europe, L-2920 (Luxembourg); Vrijen, Jan [KARUWEEG BV, Leliendaalsedreef 9, 4333 JZ Middelburg (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Uranium mining and milling has taken place on large scale in the Member States of the European Union (EU) for some 60 years. Although, compared to mining, milling activities are normally concentrated in fewer locations, this can still result in a relatively large number of disposal sites for the tailings, compared to other radioactive wastes. In addition these sites are also quite large, in terms of both volume and surface area. Coupled with the residual uranium in the tailings together with other radionuclides, heavy metals, chemicals etc this results in an environmental legacy continuing far into the future. Often during production no or little provision has been made for the closure, remediation and future supervision of such sites. In 1996 the European Commission funded an inventory of uranium mining and milling liabilities in nine Central and Eastern European Countries. Additionally, pilot projects were funded to carry out remediation activities at several sites. Almost ten years later the Commission has identified the need to address the situation of these large liabilities in all EU Member States and to assess the progress made in remediation of the sites, especially in view of the closure of almost all mining activities in Europe. The Commission study has identified the current tailings liabilities in Europe, their status, the future plans for these sites and the hazards that continue to be associated with them. It is clear that although considerable progress has been made in recent years, much work remains to be carried out in the areas of remediation, and ensuring the long-term safety of many of the identified objects. The paper presents the main findings of the study, as well as the challenges identified to ensure long-term safety of these wastes. (authors)

  17. Monticello Mill Tailings Site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at and near the inactive uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah. Environmental activities conducted at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) during 1992 included those associated with remedial action and compliance monitoring. Compliance monitoring consisted of both radiological and nonradiological monitoring of air, surface water, and ground water. Radiological and nonradiological air monitoring at the MMTS included measurements of atmospheric radon, particulate matter, and gamma radiation. Air particulate monitoring for radiological and nonradiological constituents was conducted at one location on and two locations off the millsite with high-volume particulate samplers. The maximum airborne concentrations of radium-226, thorium-230, and total uranium at all locations were several orders of magnitude below the regulatory limits specified by DOE Order 5400.5. Surface water monitoring included water quality measurements within Montezuma Creek. During 1992, maximum levels of selenium; gross alpha, gross beta, total dissolved solids, and iron exceeded their respective state standards in one or more samples collected from upstream, on-site, and downstream locations. Ground-water monitoring was conducted for two aquifers underlying the millsite. The shallow aquifer is contaminated by leached products of uranium mill tailings. During 1992, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act and state of Utah ground-water standards for arsenic, barium, nitrate, chromium, lead, selenium, molybdenum, uranium-234 and -238, gross alpha particle activity, and radium-226 and -228 were exceeded in one or more alluvial wells. This well will continue to be sampled to determine if the presence of these constituents was anomalous or if the measurements represented contamination in the aquifer.

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment of Energy OfficeFact Sheet Uranium Mill Tailings

  1. QUANTILE OPTIMIZATION FOR HEAVY-TAILED DISTRIBUTIONS USING ASYMMETRIC SIGNUM FUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    -tailed crashes as happened re- cently during the 1987 meltdown, the LTCM crisis in 1998, the dot-com bubble burst

  2. Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  4. AN EVALUATIONOF GEOTECHNICALANDHYDROLOGIC ASPECTSOF URANIUMMILL TAILINGS RECLAMATION IN THE USAANDCANADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Caldwell; A. Macg Robertson; Steffen Robertson

    Reclamation of inactive uranium mill tailings piles in the USA is currently in progress as part of a Federal remedial action program. Remedial work is done according to standards established by the Environmental Protec-tion Agency (EPA). Implementing the standards involves relocating the piles, if necessary, to suitable sites, and covering themwith a radon and infiltration control barrier and erosion resistant rock. A recent study in Canadadefines appropriate approaches to stabilization in Canadaof inactive uranium mill tailings piles. There are no legal standards governing such work in Canada. Generally the Canadian approach involves reduction of steep slopes, water control, sometimesa cover, and the establishment of a stable vegetation cover. Differences of approach in the two countries to remedial work reflect the differences in climate, population densities, vegetation, and the regulatory framework in each country. A recent evaluation of a less conservative approach to remedial action in the USA indicates that considerably increased probabilities of failure of the remedial works need to be accepted before a significant cost savings can be affected and therefore the conservative USA approach is generally reasonable and justifiable.

  5. UMTRA -- The US Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lightner, R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Cormier, C. [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bierley, D. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1970s, the United States (US) established the first comprehensive regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of wastes produced from its domestic uranium processing industry. This regulatory framework was established through the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, often referred to as UMTRCA. This legislation created the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project and assigned the US Department of Energy (DOE) the lead in conducting the required remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium ore processing sites. With the majority of these 22 sites complete, the DOE`s UMTRA Project has established a distinguished reputation for safely and effectively remediating these low-level waste sites in a complex regulatory and socioeconomic environment. This paper describes the past accomplishments and current status of the UMTRA Project and discusses the DOE`s plans for addressing ground water contamination associated with these sites and its commitment to continuing the long-term care and management of these disposal cells.

  6. UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project site management manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this manual is to summarize the organizational interfaces and the technical approach used to manage the planning, design development, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance, engineering, and remedial action required to stabilize and control the designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. This manual describes the Project's objective, participants' roles and responsibilities, technical approach for accomplishing the objective, and planning and managerial controls to be used in performing the site work. The narrative follows the flow of activities depicted in Figure 1.1, which provides the typical sequence of key Project activities. A list of acronyms used is presented at the end of the manual. The comparable manual for UMTRA Project vicinity properties is the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual'' (VPMIM) (UMTRA-DOE/AL-050601). Together, the two manuals cover the remedial action activities associated with UMTRA Project sites. The UMTRA Project's objective is to stabilize and control the uranium mill tailings, vicinity property materials, and other residual radioactive materials at the designated sites (Figure 1.2) in a safe and environmentally sound manner in order to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. 26 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Microbiological and geochemical characterization of fluvially deposited sulfidic mine tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wielinga, B.; Lucy, J.K.; Moore, J.N.; Seastone, O.F.; Gannon, J.E. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated.

  8. High-momentum tails from low-momentum effective theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Bogner; D. Roscher

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent work \\cite{Anderson:2010aq}, Anderson \\emph{et al.} used the renormalization group (RG) evolution of the momentum distribution to show that, under appropriate conditions, operator expectation values exhibit factorization in the two-nucleon system. Factorization is useful because it provides a clean separation of long- and short-distance physics, and suggests a possible interpretation of the universal high-momentum dependence and scaling behavior found in nuclear momentum distributions. In the present work, we use simple decoupling and scale-separation arguments to extend the results of Ref. \\cite{Anderson:2010aq} to arbitrary low-energy $A$-body states. Using methods that are reminiscent of the operator product expansion (OPE) in quantum field theory, we find that the high-momentum tails of momentum distributions and static structure factors factorize into the product of a universal function of momentum that is fixed by two-body physics, and a state-dependent matrix element that is the same for both and is sensitive only to low-momentum structure of the many-body state. As a check, we apply our factorization relations to two well-studied systems, the unitary Fermi gas and the electron gas, and reproduce known expressions for the high-momentum tails of each.

  9. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10710 Tail-assisted pitch control in lizards, robots and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10710 Tail-assisted pitch control in lizards, robots and dinosaurs Thomas in performance14,15 . Application of a control-theoretic framework could advance our general understanding angular momentum. To examine a known con- trolled tail response, we built a lizard-sized robot

  10. An Experimental Set-up to Investigate Tailings Liquefaction and Control Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    on liquefaction has focused on naturally occurring soils and has used conventional, small-scale testing equipment dedicated to the evaluation of the liquefaction potential of mine tailings. A mid-size (larger-scaleAn Experimental Set-up to Investigate Tailings Liquefaction and Control Measures Michael James

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley Site, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevalated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching; Treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

  12. The tail of fishes has attracted the attention of numerous hydrodynamicists and morphologists interested in locomotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    of many sharks, primitive ray- finned fishes and early fossil vertebrates is asymmetrical in external the stiffer dorsal tail edge, the caudal fin moves through the water at an angle to the horizontal, thus external structure (the dorsal and ventral lobes are similar in size and shape). In contrast, the tail

  13. PARAMETRIC STUDY ON THE WATER CONTENT PROFILES AND OXIDATION RATES IN NEARLY SATURATED TAILINGS ABOVE THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    ), the degree of saturation Sr varies between 90 to 99 % at the tailings surface, covered by a sand protection gas migration control. This physical process is used for instance in the case of covers with capillary is a promising concept that uses the tailings capillary properties to inhibit O2 diffusion and control AMD

  14. Processing Quantities with Heavy-Tailed Distribution of Measurement Uncertainty: How

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Processing Quantities with Heavy-Tailed Distribution of Measurement Uncertainty: How to Estimate, the distribution of measurement errors is sometimes heavy-tailed, when very large values have a reasonable, in the amount of oil in an oil well, etc. In such situations in which we cannot measure y directly, we can often

  15. Sloshing in the LNG shipping industry: risk modelling through multivariate heavy-tail analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloshing in the LNG shipping industry: risk modelling through multivariate heavy-tail analysis In the liquefied natural gas (LNG) shipping industry, the phenomenon of slosh- ing can lead to the occurrence in the LNG shipping industry. KEYWORDS: Sloshing, multivariate heavy-tail distribution, asymptotic depen

  16. Survival Estimates of White-tailed Deer Fawns at Fort Rucker, Alabama Angela Marie Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditchkoff, Steve

    Survival Estimates of White-tailed Deer Fawns at Fort Rucker, Alabama by Angela Marie Jackson for the Degree of Master of Science Auburn, Alabama August 6, 2011 Keywords: White-tailed deer, fawn survival, coyote, predator-prey theory Copyright 2011 by Angela Marie Jackson Approved by Stephen S. Ditchkoff

  17. Delay stability of back-pressure policies in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markakis, Mihalis G.

    We study scheduling and routing problems that arise in multi-hop wireline networks with a mix of heavy-tailed and light-tailed traffic. We analyze the delay performance of the widely studied class of Back-Pressure policies, ...

  18. Ages of Star Clusters in the Tidal Tails of Merging Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulia, A J; Whitmore, B C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the stellar content in the tidal tails of three nearby merging galaxies, NGC 520, NGC 2623, and NGC 3256, using BVI imaging taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The tidal tails in all three systems contain compact and fairly massive young star clusters, embedded in a sea of diffuse, unresolved stellar light. We compare the measured colors and luminosities with predictions from population synthesis models to estimate cluster ages and find that clusters began forming in tidal tails during or shortly after the formation of the tails themselves. We find a lack of very young clusters ($\\le 10$ Myr old), implying that eventually star formation shuts off in the tails as the gas is used up or dispersed. There are a few clusters in each tail with estimated ages that are older than the modeled tails themselves, suggesting that these may have been stripped out from the original galaxy disks. The luminosity function of the tail clusters can be described by a single powe...

  19. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Pb, Zn and Ag Mine Tailings Originating From Carbonate-Rich Deposits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, Roberta 1981-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    control in the Zimapan area. Objectives of the study of the mine tailings are (1) to determine mineralogy of the tailings in order to identify acid-producing minerals and heavy metals at risk for release in acidic conditions, and (2) to quantify carbonate...

  20. Long Tail of Quantum Decay from Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowakowski, M.; Kelkar, N. G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, Cra 1E, 18A-10, Bogota (Colombia)

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Whereas the short time behaviour of an unstable quantum mechanical system is well understood from its theoretical as well as experimental side, the long time tail of the very same systems has neither been measured experimentally nor is there a theoretical agreement on how to handle it. We suggest a possible way out of this unsatisfactory state of art. Theoretically we suggest that the correct spectral function entering the Fock-Krylov method to calculate the survival amplitude is proportional to the density of states of a resonance. The latter is essentially the energy derivative of a phase shift. As a bonus, we can connect the survival probability to scattering data via the phase shift. The method then not only establishes the spectral function, but is per se a semi-empirical method to extract the large time behaviour from scattering data.

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollmer, A.T.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references.

  2. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.G.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Gunnison, Colorado, conducted in May 1976, are presented. Results of surface soil sample analyses and direct gamma radiation measurements indicate limited spread of tailings off the site. The only significant above background measurements off the site were obtained in an area previously covered by the tailings pile. There was little evidence of contamination of the surface or of unconfined groundwater in the vicinity of the tailings pile; however, the hydrologic conditions at the site indicate a potential for such contamination. The concentration of /sup 226/Ra in all water samples except one from the tailings pile was well below the concentration guide for drinking water. The subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra in 14 bore holes located on and around the tailings pile was calculated from gamma ray monitoring data obtained jointly with Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc.

  3. Regulatory impact analysis of environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title I of the Act pertains to tailings at inactive sites for which the Agency has developed standards as part of a separate rulemaking. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards developed under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the operations standards is very limited.

  4. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Falls City site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Falls City site in order to update the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranum mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrolgy and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,700,000 for stabilization in place, to about $35,100,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Falls City tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The tailings piles are presently being rewashed for uranium recovery by Solution Engineering, Inc. The cost for further reprocessing would be about $250/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive for the foreseeable future.

  5. Spectral Evolution of Swift Gamma-ray Burst Tails: an Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangano, V.; Sbarufatti, B. [INAF, Istituto di Astofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed study of the spectral evolution during the steep decay phase of early X-ray light curves of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) is a very important task that can give us information on different emission components contributing to the prompt-to-afterglow transition. Time resolved spectral analysis of bright GRBs detected by Swift has shown that a good modeling of the early X-ray light curves can be obtained with Band or cut-off power-law broad band spectra with evolving parameters (e.g., decaying peak energy). We developed a procedure to simultaneously fit the temporal evolution of all the spectral parameters of a GRB during the prompt to afterglow transition based on the analysis of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) count rate and hardness ratio light curves. The procedure has been tested on GRB 060614 and GRB 090618, two very peculiar bright GRB detected by Swift that show a long exponentially decaying tail with strong softening and peak energy crossing the XRT energy band.

  6. The Power (Law) of Indian Markets: Analysing NSE and BSE Trading Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Sitabhra

    The Power (Law) of Indian Markets: Analysing NSE and BSE Trading Statistics Sitabhra Sinha and Raj-tailed cumulative distribution, consistent with a power law having ex- ponent 3, similar to that observed in developed markets. However, the distributions of trading volume and the number of trades have a different na

  7. Site-specific study on stabilization of acid-generating mine tailings using coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, J.Q.; Wang, H.L.; Kovac, V.; Fyfe, J. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A site-specific study on stabilizing acid-generating mine tailings from Sudbury Mine using a coal fly ash from Nanticoke Generating Station is presented in this paper. The objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of codisposal of the fly ash and mine tailings to reduce environmental impacts of Sudbury tailings disposal sites. The study includes three phases, i.e., characterization of the mine tailings, and coal fly ash, oxidation tests on the mine tailings and kinetic column permeation tests. The results of the experiments indicate that when permeated with acid mine drainage, the hydraulic conductivity of Nanticoke coal fly ash decreased more than three orders of magnitude (from 1 x 10{sup -6} to 1 x 10{sup -9} cm/s), mainly due to chemical reactions between the ash solids and acid mine drainage. Furthermore, the hydraulic gradient required for acid mine drainage to break through the coal fly ash is increased up to ten times (from 17 to 150) as compared with that for water. The results also show that the leachate from coal fly ash neutralizes the acidic pore fluid of mine tailings. The concentrations of trace elements in effluents from all kinetic column permeation tests indicated that coplacement of coal fly ash with mine tailings has the benefit of immobilizing trace elements, especially heavy metals. All regulated element concentrations from effluent during testing are well below the leachate quality criteria set by the local regulatory authority.

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  9. UMTRA Project value engineering plan. [Design and construction of stabilized tailings embankments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of value engineering (VE) on the Uranium MILL Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is to ensure that remedial action at the UMTRA Project sites is performed to meet the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites at the lowest cost, while maintaining a high quality of work. Through review of designs and consideration of reasonable, less expensive alternatives, VE can be an effective cost reduction tool and a means to improve the design. The UMTRA Project products are the design and construction of stabilized tailings embankments.

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project: Project plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) [Public Law (PL) 95-604, 42 United States Code (USC) 7901], hereinafter referred to as the ``Act,`` authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination. To fulfill this mission, the DOE has established two projects under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. The Ground Water Project was established in April 1991 as a major project and a separate project plan will be prepared for that portion of the mission. This project plan covers the UMTRA Surface Project, a major system acquisition (MSA).

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action fiscal year 1992 roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is funded and managed as two separate projects: Surface remediation (UMTRA-S) and Groundwater compliance (UMTRA-G). Surface remediation is a Major System Acquisition and has been completed at 10 sites, 7 sites are under construction, and 7 sites are in the planning stage. The planning stages of the UMTRA-G Project, a major project, began in April 1991. A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) has been started. Site characterization work and baseline risk assessment will begin FY 1993. Thus, the UMTRA-S Project is a mature and ongoing program with the roles of various organizations well defined, while the UMTRA-G Project is still being formulated and the interfaces between the DOE, states and tribes, and the EPA are being established. The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) directed that all projects under its authority develop roadmaps for their activities. The UMTRA Project Roadmap was developed by the UMTRA Project Office with input from the TAC, RAC, the GJPO, and assistance from SAIC. A single roadmap has been prepared for both the UMTRA-S and UMTRA-G Projects. This was deemed appropriate due to the close relationship between the projects and to the fact that the same Government and contractor personnel are preparing the roadmaps. Roadmap development is a planning process that focuses on issue identification, root-cause analysis, and issues resolution. The methodology is divided into three phases: assessment, analysis, and issues resolution.

  12. ASSEMBLY METHODS OTTER -TRAWL NETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    > 21 Belly Line f.ttachr1E.nt at Quart er JW1cticn ·............... . 21 22 ':Ji n[ or lJoor Lnd Asse.'lbly ....... ..... ........... .......... 23 23 He2drope and Footrope Asse::lblies in Completed Otte - TraHl r

  13. Development and initial assessment of Texas Cooperative Extension's white-tailed dear management module 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedgood, Mark Andrew

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the development and initial use of Texas Cooperative Extension?s (TCE) White-tailed Deer Management Module (WDMM) delivered over the Internet. The results of this study will ...

  14. RADEMACHER CHAOS: TAIL ESTIMATES VS LIMIT RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    RADEMACHER CHAOS: TAIL ESTIMATES VS LIMIT THEOREMS RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We study 2, Date: May 29, 2002; revised September 24, 2002. 1 #12;2 RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON S q c

  15. RADEMACHER CHAOS: TAIL ESTIMATES VS LIMIT RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    RADEMACHER CHAOS: TAIL ESTIMATES VS LIMIT THEOREMS RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We study c(d) > 0 and every q 2, Date: May 29, 2002; revised May 26, 2003. 1 #12;2 RON BLEI AND SVANTE

  16. RADEMACHER CHAOS: TAIL ESTIMATES VS LIMIT RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    RADEMACHER CHAOS: TAIL ESTIMATES VS LIMIT THEOREMS RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We study #21; 2, Date: May 29, 2002; revised September 24, 2002. 1 #12; 2 RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON kSk q #21

  17. RADEMACHER CHAOS: TAIL ESTIMATES VS LIMIT RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    RADEMACHER CHAOS: TAIL ESTIMATES VS LIMIT THEOREMS RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We study #21; 2, Date: May 29, 2002; revised May 26, 2003. 1 #12; 2 RON BLEI AND SVANTE JANSON kSk q #21; c

  18. Long Tails vs. Superstars: The Effect of Information Technology on Product Variety and Sales Concentration Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brynjolfsson, Erik

    The Internet and related information technologies are transforming the distribution of product sales across products, and these effects are likely to grow in coming years. Both the Long Tail and the Superstar effect are ...

  19. Measuring Tail Thickness under GARCH and an Application to Extremal Exchange Rate Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Niklas; Marsh, Terry A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relations and Extremes of a GARCH(1,1) Process, Annals ofMeasuring Tail Thickness under GARCH And an Application todistribution functions including GARCH and propose a model-

  20. Assessment of the urban public's knowledge of white-tailed deer management in two Texas communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alderson, Jessica Lynn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Urbanization throughout much of Texas has resulted in diminished wildlife habitat, resulting from fragmented landscapes. Several previous studies addressed the public’s attitudes concerning the most acceptable white-tailed deer management techniques...

  1. Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VIENNA – The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has kept the United States at the forefront of characterization, remediation, and end-state reuse of uranium millsites around the world.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  3. Calculation of the number of cancer deaths prevented by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.L.; Pomatto, C.B. (Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Cornish, R.E. (Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Albuquerque Operations Office)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project has completed remedial action at 22 uranium mill tailings sites and about 5,000 properties (vicinity properties) where tailings were used in construction, at a total cost of $1.45 billion. This paper uses existing data from Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments, and vicinity property calculations, to determine the total number of cancer deaths averted by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The cost-effectiveness of remediating each site, the vicinity properties, and the entire project is calculated. The cost per cancer death averted was four orders of magnitude higher at the least cost-effective site than at the most cost-effective site.

  4. Regulatory impact analysis of final environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards promulgated under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public health and environment after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the standards during mill operations is very limited.

  5. Scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A National Research Council study panel, convened by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, has examined the scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings and issued this final report containing a number of recommendations. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the problem. Chapter 2 examines the processes of uranium extraction and the mechanisms by which radionuclides and toxic chemicals contained in the ore can enter the environment. Chapter 3 is devoted to a review of the evidence on health risks associated with radon and its decay products. Chapter 4 provides a consideration of conventional and possible new technical alternatives for tailings management. Chapter 5 explores a number of issues of comparative risk, provides a brief history of uranium mill tailings regulation, and concludes with a discussion of choices that must be made in mill tailing risk management. 211 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  7. Comparative foraging ecology of white-tailed deer and Angora goats on the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Roy Arthur

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated how seasonal patterns in forage abundance and quality influenced the feeding behavior of white-tailed deer ( Odocolieus virginianus) and Angora goats; two similar-sized ungulates with different digestive morphologies. I...

  8. Blade tonal noise reduction using tail articulation at high Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macumber, Daniel Lee, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biologically inspired method of tail articulation is investigated as a means of reducing tonal noise due to the stator wake blade interaction in underwater vehicles. This work is experimental in nature and conducted ...

  9. White-tailed deer population dynamics and management on the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisenant, Shane Weston

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas have increased in recent years and are a cause of urban-related accidents (e.g., deer...

  10. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in white-tailed deer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWoody, James Andrew

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS IN WHITE-TAILED DEER A Thesis by JAMES ANDREW DEWOODY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1994 Major Subject: Genetics ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE MARRERS IN WHITE-TAILED DEER A Thesis JAMES ANDREW DEWOODY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  11. The development of a flood routing model for the flow analyses of mine tailings materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rokohl, Don Richard

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FLOOD ROUTING MODEL FOR THE FLOW ANALYSES OF MINE TAILINGS MATERIALS A Thesis DON RICHARD ROKOHL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PLOOD ROUTING MODEL POR THE FLOW ANALTSES OF MINE TAILINGS MATERIALS A Thesis by DON RICHARD ROKOHL Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle (Co...

  12. Development and initial assessment of Texas Cooperative Extension's white-tailed dear management module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedgood, Mark Andrew

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT AND INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF TEXAS COOPERATIVE EXTENSION?S WHITE-TAILED DEER MANAGEMENT MODULE A Thesis by MARK ANDREW BEDGOOD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Agricultural Education DEVELOPMENT AND INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF TEXAS COOPERATIVE EXTENSION?S WHITE-TAILED DEER MANAGEMENT MODULE A Thesis by MARK ANDREW...

  13. Design, permitting, and construction issues associated with closure of the Panna Maria uranium tailings impoundment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, C.L. [Shepherd Miller, Inc., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Raabe, K.L. [Panna Maria Uranium Operations, Hobson, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992, Panna Maria Uranium Operations (PMUO) initiated licensing and engineering activities for closure of the Panna Maria mill and 150-acre tailings impoundment located in southeast Texas. Closure of the tailings impoundment is permitted by license amendment through the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and based on closure criteria outlined in Texas regulations. The closure plan for the Panna Maria tailings impoundment was submitted for Texas regulatory agency review in April 1993, with details of the closure plan modified in 1994, 1995, and 1996. The closure plan included a multi-layered cover over the regraded tailings surface which was designed for long-term isolation of tailings, reduction of radon emanation to regulated levels, and reduction of infiltration to TNRCC-accepted levels. The cover and embankment slope surfaces and surrounding areas were designed to provide acceptable erosional stability as compared to runoff velocities from the Probable Maximum Precipitation event. Cover materials were selected from on-site materials and evaluated for suitability based on permeability, radon attenuation, and soil dispersivity characteristics. Off-site materials were used when necessary. The cover over the tailings has a maximum slope of 0.5 percent, and the regraded embankment slopes outside the perimeter of the impoundment have a maximum slope of 20 percent. All reclaimed slopes are covered with topsoil and revegetated. A riprap-lined channel is to be used to convey runoff from within the perimeter of the reclaimed impoundment to the north of the impoundment.

  14. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachrach, A.; Hoopes, J.; Morycz, D. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Bone, M.; Cox, S.; Jones, D.; Lechel, D.; Meyer, C.; Nelson, M.; Peel, R.; Portillo, R.; Rogers, L.; Taber, B.; Zelle, P. (Weston (Roy F.), Inc., Washington, DC (USA)); Rice, G. (Sergent, Hauskins and Beckwith (USA))

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Gunnison uranium of mill tailings site located 0.5 miles south of Gunnison, Colorado. The site covers 56 acres and contains 35 acres of tailings, 2 of the original mill buildings and a water tower. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control of Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated (vicinity) properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the occurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four alternatives have been addressed in this document. The first alternative is to consolidate the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile on the southern portion of the existing site. A radon barrier of silty clay would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Two other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a location farther from the city of Gunnison. The no action alternative is also assessed.

  15. Advanced methods for uncertainty quantification in tail regions of climate model predictions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safta, Cosmin; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.; Sargsyan, Khachik

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional methods for uncertainty quantification are generally challenged in the 'tails' of probability distributions. This is specifically an issue for many climate observables since extensive sampling to obtain a reasonable accuracy in tail regions is especially costly in climate models. Moreover, the accuracy of spectral representations of uncertainty is weighted in favor of more probable ranges of the underlying basis variable, which, in conventional bases does not particularly target tail regions. Therefore, what is ideally desired is a methodology that requires only a limited number of full computational model evaluations while remaining accurate enough in the tail region. To develop such a methodology, we explore the use of surrogate models based on non-intrusive Polynomial Chaos expansions and Galerkin projection. We consider non-conventional and custom basis functions, orthogonal with respect to probability distributions that exhibit fat-tailed regions. We illustrate how the use of non-conventional basis functions, and surrogate model analysis, improves the accuracy of the spectral expansions in the tail regions. Finally, we also demonstrate these methodologies using precipitation data from CCSM simulations.

  16. X Ray Precursors in GRBs and SGRs: outer X tails around a Precessing Gamma Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion

    2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak isolated X-ray precursor events before the main Gamma Ray Burst, GRB, and also rare Soft Gamma Repeaters, SGR, events are in disagreement with any Fireball, or Magnetar, scenarios. These models are originated by an unique explosive event leading, by internal-external shock waves, to softer secondary trains following a main gamma signals. Indeed the earliest GRB980519,GRB981226 events as well as the latest and most distant identified one as GRB000131 are showing rare but well identified and distinct X Ray precursor, occurring tens of seconds or even a minute before the main GRB eruption. These weak X precursors bursts correspond to non-negligible energy powers, up to million Supernova ones. They are rare, about (3-6)% of all GRBs, but not unique. Similar huge explosive precursor are in total disagreement with a successive main Fireball GRB outburst. Comparable brief X-ray precursor flashes are found also in rarest and most detailed SGRs events as those observed on 27 and 29 August 1999 from SGR 1900+14. They are inconsistent with a Magnetar Fireball explosion. We interpret them as earlier marginal blazing of outlying X conical Jet tails surrounding a narrower gamma precessing,spinning beamed Jet in blazing mode toward the Earth; later re-crossing and better hitting of the target -the satellite detectors- is source of the main GRB (and SGR) observed structured event. The X Ray precursor existence is an additional remarkable evidence of the Precessing relativistic Jet Nature of both GRBs and SGRs.

  17. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data for the inactive uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meterological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs of the remedial actions.

  18. Analysis of drainage and consolidation at typical uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, M.J.; Conbere, W.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer code TRUNC was used to analyze three aspects of uranium mill tailings dewatering: the coupling of consolidation and fluid flow, drainage design, and cover load. One-dimensional simulations of the effects of consolidation on fluid flow within a tailings pile of either slimes or a sand/slimes mix showed that drainage flux was greater for a consolidating system early in the simulation. However, after days 1400 and 160 of the simulations for the slimes and sand/slimes mix, respectively, the fluxes from the nonconsolidating systems were greater. In the sand/slimes mix, the nonconsolidating system had a cumulative flux by day 5000 that was 93% of that of the consolidating system. At the same time, in the slimes tailings piles the nonconsolidating system had a cumulative flux of only 34% of that of the consolidating system. This difference indicates that consolidation and fluid flow should not be decoupled for the slimes. Two-dimensional simulations of an actual tailings pile drainage design showed that a sand blanket drain increased the rate of drainage and settlement. The sand blanket drain also significantly reduced differential settlement across the pile. This indicates that the use of a sand blanket drain could enable earlier placement of the cover system after tailings emplacement. In simulations of covered and uncovered tailings piles, nearly the same quantity of water was removed from each, but drainage occurred much more slowly without the cover; hence, surface settlement was slower when the tailings pile was not covered. 10 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Acidic C-terminal tail of the ssDNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 and ssDNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Charles C.

    Acidic C-terminal tail of the ssDNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 and ssDNA compete. Prokaryotic ssDNA-binding proteins share a conserved DNA-binding fold and an acidic C-terminal tail. It has been proposed that in the absence of ssDNA, the C-terminal tail contacts the ssDNA-binding cleft

  20. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium-mill tailings at Green River, Utah, are relatively low in /sup 226/Ra content and concentration (20 Ci and 140 pCi/g, respectively) because the mill was used to upgrade the uranium ore by separating the sand and slime fractions; most of the radium was transported along with the slimes to another mill site. Spread of tailings was observed in all directions, but near-background gamma exposure rates were reached at distances of 40 to 90 m from the edge of the pile. Water erosion of the tailings is evident and, since a significant fraction of the tailings pile lies in Brown's Wash, the potential exists for repetition of the loss of a large quantity of tailings such as occurred during a flood in 1959. In general, the level of surface contamination was low at this site, but some areas in the mill site, which were being used for nonuranium work, have gamma-ray exposure rates up to 143 ..mu..R/hr.

  1. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inactive uranium-mill tailings pile at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, contains approximately 1520 Ci of /sup 226/Ra in 2.4 million metric tons of tailings covering an area of 43 hectares. All of the former mill buildings were intact and, at the time of this survey, several were in use. The tailings have not been stabilized, but the crusty surface is reported to be resistant to wind erosion. The average gamma-ray exposure rate 1 m above the tailings is 720 ..mu..R/h while the average rate in the former mill area is 150 ..mu..R/h. The adjacent area, between the mill site, ponds, and tailings pile, has an average exposure rate of 230 ..mu..R/h. Gamma radiation measurements outside these areas, as well as the results of analyses of surface or near-surface sediment and soil samples, show fairly wide dispersion of contamination around the site. The subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra in 18 holes drilled at the site, calculated from gamma-ray monitoring data, is presented graphically and compared with measured concentrations in two holes.

  2. Tail-ion transport and Knudsen layer formation in the presence of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmit, P. F. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1186, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1186, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States); Molvig, Kim; Nakhleh, C. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B259, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B259, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Knudsen layer losses of tail fuel ions could reduce significantly the fusion reactivity of highly compressed cylindrical and spherical targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). With the class of magnetized ICF targets in mind, the effect of embedded magnetic fields on Knudsen layer formation is investigated for the first time. The modified energy scaling of ion diffusivity in magnetized hot spots is found to suppress the preferential losses of tail-ions perpendicular to the magnetic field lines to a degree that the tail distribution can be at least partially, if not fully, restored. Two simple threshold conditions are identified leading to the restoration of fusion reactivity in magnetized hot spots. A kinetic equation for tail-ion transport in the presence of a magnetic field is derived, and solutions to the equation are obtained numerically in simulations. Numerical results confirm the validity of the threshold conditions for restored reactivity and identify two different asymptotic regimes of the fusion fuel. While Knudsen layer formation is shown to be suppressed entirely in strongly magnetized cylindrical hot spot cavities, uniformly magnetized spherical cavities demonstrate remnant, albeit reduced, levels of tail-ion depletion.

  3. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  4. Uranium-mill-tailings remedial-action project (UMTRAP) cover and liner technology development project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D.; Cline, J.F.; Beedlow, P.A.; Buelt, J.L.; Relyea, J.R.; Tamura, T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cover and liner systems for uranium mill tailings in the United States must satisfy stringent requirements regarding long-term stability, radon control, and radionuclide and hazardous chemical migration. The cover placed over a tailings pile serves three basic purposes: (1) to reduce the release of radon, (2) to prevent the intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into the tailings, and (3) to limit surface erosion. The liner placed under a tailings pile prevents the migration of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals to groundwater. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing and evaluating cover and liner systems that meet these objectives and conform to federal standards. The cover and liner technology discussed in this paper involves: (1) single and multilayer earthen cover systems, (2) asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems, (3) biobarrier systems, (4) revegetation and rock covers, and (5) asphalt, clay, and synthetic liner systems. These systems have been tested at the Grand Junction, Colorado, tailings pile, where they have been shown to effectively reduce radon releases and radionuclide and chemical migration.

  5. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fourteenth annual status report for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Surface (UMTRA-Surface) and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater (UMTRA-Groundwater) Projects undertaken during fiscal year (FY) 1992 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1993 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604. The DOE will continue to submit annual reports to DOE-Headquarters, the states, tribes, and local representatives through Project completion in order to inform the public of the yearly Project status. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive material (RRM) located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner, and to minimize or eliminate potential health hazards. Commercial and residential properties near designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as ``vicinity properties (VP),`` are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated VPs located in 10 states, and the VPs associated with the Edgemont, South Dakota, uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (Figure A.1, Appendix A).

  6. Bioremediation of ground water contaminants at a uranium mill tailings site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, L.L.; Nuttall, H.E.; Thomson, B.M.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water contaminated with uranium from milling operations must be remediated to reduce the migration of soluble toxic compounds. At the mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA) the approach is to employ bioremediation for in situ immobilization of uranium by bacterial reduction of uranyl, U(VI), compounds to uraninite, U(IV). In this initial phase of remediation, details are provided to indicate the magnitude of the contamination problem and to present preliminary evidence supporting the proposition that bacterial immobilization of uranium is possible. Additionally, consideration is given to contaminating cations and anions that may be at toxic levels in ground water at this uranium mill tailing site and detoxification strategies using bacteria are addressed. A model concept is employed so that results obtained at the Tuba City site could contribute to bioremediation of ground water at other uranium mill tailings sites.

  7. Revegetation and rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beedlow, P.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines for using vegetation and rock to protect inactive uranium mill tailings from erosion were developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technology Development program. Information on soils, climate, and vegetation were collected for 20 inactive tailings sites in the western United States. Sites were grouped according to similarities in climate and vegetation. Soil loss for those sites was characterized using the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Test plots were used to evaluate (1) the interaction between vegetation and sealant barrier systems and (2) the effects of surface rock on soil water and vegetation. Lysimeter and simulation studies were used to direct and support field experiments. 49 references, 17 figures, 16 tables.

  8. Follicular changes and reproductive hormones in captive white- tailed deer during the breeding season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biediger, Timothy Gerard

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by: Stephen W. J. Sea er (Chairman) Duane C. raemer (Member) Thomas H. Welsh, Jr. (Member) mes D. McCrady (H ad of Depar August 1986 ABSTRACT Follicular Changes and Reproductive Hormones in Captive White ? tailed Deer During the Breeding... during the estrous cycle of the white-tailed deer (Odocoi Jeus vgrgini anus) were obtained from this study. Does were observed for detection of estrus once daily during the 1984-85 season and twice daily during the 1985-86 season, using a penile...

  9. Numerical simulation of bump-on-tail instability with source and sink

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Breizman, B.N. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies]|[Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of the simulations of the bump-on-tail instability with a weak source and sink. This problem has been posed as a paradigm for the important problem in controlled fusion, that of the unstable excitation of Alfven waves in a tokamak by resonant energetic alpha particles. The source of alpha particles is the controlled fusion reaction produced by the background plasma and the sink is the collisional transport processes that slow down or scatter the energetic particles. The mathematical techniques that are needed to address this applied problem can be demonstrated in the much simpler bump-on-tail problem, which is explained in this paper.

  10. Evaluation of in vitro dissolution rates of throum in uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, R.G. [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolution rates of thorium from the uranium mill tailings piles at two Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) sites have been evaluated. The thorium dissolution rates were evaluated in vitro using simulated lung fluid. The former uranium mills at the UMTRAP sites employed different chemical processes (acid leach and alkaline pressure leach) to extract the uranium from the ore, and the thorium dissolution rates at these sites were found to be markedly different. A site specific annual limit on intake (ALI) value for {sup 230}Th was calculated for the UMTRAP Site that was associated with a multiple component dissolution curve.

  11. Evaluation of in vitro dissolution rates of thorium in uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, R.H. [RUST Federal Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolution rates of thorium from the uranium mill tailings piles at two Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) sites have been evaluated. The thorium dissolution rates were evaluated in vitro using simulated lung fluid. The former uranium mills at the UMTRAP sites employee different chemical processes (acid leach and alkaline pressure leach) to extract the uranium from the ore, and the thorium dissolution rates at these sites were found to be markedly different. A site specific annual limit on intake (ALI) value for {sup 230}Th was calculated for the UMTRAP site that was associated with a multiple component dissolution curve. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Spook uranium mill tailings site, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document assesses a joint remedial action proposed by the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project and the State of Wyoming Abandoned Mine Lands Program. The proposed action would consist of stabilizing uranium mill tailings and other associated contaminated materials within an inactive open pit mine on the site; backfilling the open pit with overburden materials that would act as a radon barrier and cover; and recontouring and seeding all disturbed areas to premining conditions. The impacts of no action at this site are addressed as the alternative to the proposed action. 74 refs., 12 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. Fusion reactions in plasmas as probe of the high-momentum tail of particle distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Coraddu; Marcello Lissia; Giuseppe Mezzorani; Piero Quarati

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In fusion reactions, the Coulomb barrier selects particles from the high-momentum part of the distribution. Therefore, small variations of the high-momentum tail of the velocity distribution can produce strong effects on fusion rates. In plasmas several potential mechanisms exist that can produce deviations from the standard Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Quantum broadening of the energy-momentum dispersion relation of the plasma quasi-particles modifies the high-momentum tail and could explain the fusion-rate enhancement observed in low-energy nuclear reaction experiments.

  14. Allozymic and mitochondrial DNA analysis of sympatric white-tailed and mule deer in West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballinger, Scott Webster

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Ma)or Sub)act: Wildlife and Fisheries Science ALLOZYMIC AND MITOCHONDRIAL DNA ANALYSIS OF SYMPATRIC WHITE-TAILED AND MULE DEER IN WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SCOTT WEBSTER BALLINGER Approved as to style... and content by: John . Bickham (Chairman) Ira . Gr enbaum er) Nova J, Silvy (Member) vid J. Schmidly (Mamba and Department H ad) December 1987 ABSTRACT Allozymic and Mitochondrial DNA Analysis of Sympatric White-tailed and Mule Deer in West Texas...

  15. DOE Signs Decision to Move Moab Tailings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergyBoilersPlant | Department ofPower|andContract at

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy Trust ofTribal EnergyNetLoanStateWest Penn PowerOtter Tail Power

  17. Switched system modeling and robust steering control of the tail end phase in a hot strip mill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Switched system modeling and robust steering control of the tail end phase in a hot strip mill Ivan`eres-l`es-Metz Cedex, France Abstract In this article, a robust steering control for the last phase of the rolling switched system. The switchings make the system unstable and the task of the tail end steering control

  18. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings site, Shiprock, New Mexico: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the shiprock uranium mill tailings site located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, one mile south of Shiprock, New Mexico. The site contains 72 acres of tailings and four of the original mill buildings. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile. A seven-foot-thick radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Three other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a more remote location. The no action alternative is also assessed. 99 refs., 40 figs., 58 tabs.

  19. Entity Linking at the Tail: Sparse Signals, Unknown Entities, and Phrase Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    · Naïve Bayes · PPP Achieves 95% Precision, with over 60% recall 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0.3 0) PPP (word) PPP (phrase) Most entities on web are "tail" entities More confounds; more uniform prior

  20. Naturally Saline Boreal Communities as Models for Reclamation of Saline Oil Sand Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    mining. Key words: boreal forest, community ecology, oil sands, ordination, reclamation, salinity mining have saline soils; yet, they are required to have similar biodiversity and productivity mining, with anti- cipated rates of disturbance of 2,000 ha/yr (CONRAD 1999). Saline tailings are left

  1. The sodium tail of the Moon M. Matta a,b,*, S. Smith a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendillo, Michael

    The sodium tail of the Moon M. Matta a,b,*, S. Smith a,1 , J. Baumgardner a,1 , J. Wilson a,1 , C was discovered soon after the 1998 Leonid meteor shower (Smith et al., 1999). On 19 November 1998, an all

  2. THE EFFECT OF WATER TABLE ELEVATION ON ACID MINE DRAINAGE FROM REACTIVE TAILINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    . A free-draining control column with no sand cover was also used. The experimental results were compared with different water table elevations. Each column contained a layer of reactive tailings overlain by a sand column tests have been completed to establish the hydraulic and geochemical conditions which control

  3. Optimization of plant growth-promoting bacteria-assisted phytostabilization of mine tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    , is a remediation strategy being explored to ameliorate wind and water erosion of tailings in a cost electrophoresis) analysis of bacterial DNA extracted from rhizosphere samples collected 75 d following planting. A comparative analysis of DGGE profiles was performed using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). DGGE

  4. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  5. Habitat selection and movement patterns of cattle and white-tailed deer in a temperate savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Depew, Jarrod Jason

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    similarity. Unsupervised classifications were conducted in each of the 9 soil type AOI?s (Fig 2.1) using Erdas Imagine 8.5. Pixels were grouped into 50 different spectral classes that were subsequently used for the unsupervised classification... ??...????????????????????????14 III HABITAT SELECTION AND PASTURE UTILIZATION BY WHITE-TAILED DEER AND CATTLE ????????????.???16 Materials and Methods ??..?..??????????.???????..17 Results ????????????????????????.???....21 Discussion...

  6. Influence of Body Size on Dietary Nutrition of White-Tailed Deer Odocoileus virginianus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    demonstrating a body size influence on diet quality are lacking. We examined diet quality across a range of body was greater for smaller bodied white-tailed deer. By consuming a diet higher in crude protein than did large that can have an effect on the resources utilized within a habitat. Differences in diet quality of selected

  7. HEPATIC MINERALS OF WHITE-TAILED AND MULE DEER IN THE SOUTHERN BLACK HILLS, SOUTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEPATIC MINERALS OF WHITE-TAILED AND MULE DEER IN THE SOUTHERN BLACK HILLS, SOUTH DAKOTA Teresa J status, and species. Key words: Black Hills, elements, fire, liver, mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus and laboratory animals (Robbins, 1983). Liver concentrations of some trace elements have been measured in elk

  8. Progress Toward Remediation of Uranium Tailings in Mailuu-Suu, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, P B; Ranville, J; Honeyman, B D; Smith, D K; Rosenberg, N; Knapp, R B

    2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The town of Mailuu-Suu in Kyrgyzstan inherited 23 distinct tailings deposits from Soviet-Era uranium mining operations. Mailuu-Suu is located in the narrow landslide-prone valley of the Mailuu-Suu River about 25 km from the Uzbekistan border. Large-scale release of the radioactive tailings, as a result of landslides, could lead to irreversible contamination of the river and downstream areas. The Mailuu-Suu River is a tributary to the Syr-Darya River, the Fergana valley's main source of irrigation water. The Fergana Valley is a key agricultural region and major population center that spans Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. The trans-boundary nature of the Mailuu-Suu tailings issue presents an opportunity for collaboration among these Central Asian states. A cooperative approach to addressing environmental issues such as Mailuu-Suu may contribute to the region's stability by facilitating peaceful associations. Experience from remediation of sites in the US under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project (UMTRA) will be useful in progressing toward remediation at Mailuu-Suu.

  9. Paleoclimatic data applications: Long-term performance of uranium mill tailings repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J. [Environmental Sciences Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Petersen, K.L. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abandoned uranium mill tailings sites in the Four Corners region are a lasting legacy of the Cold War. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is designing landfill repositories that will isolate hazardous constituents of tailings from biological intrusion, erosion, and the underlying aquifer for up to 1,000 years. With evidence of relatively rapid past climate change, and model predictions of global climatic variation exceeding the historical record, DOE recognizes a need to incorporate possible ranges of future climatic and ecological change in the repository design process. In the Four Corners region, the center of uranium mining and milling activities in the United States, proxy paleoclimatic records may be useful not only as a window on the past, but also as analogs of possible local responses to future global change. We reconstructed past climate change using available proxy data from tree rings, packrat middens, lake sediment pollen, and archaeological records. Interpretation of proxy paleoclimatic records was based on present-day relationships between plant distribution, precipitation, and temperature along a generalized elevational gradient for the region. For the Monticello, Utah, uranium mill tailings site, this first approximation yielded mean annual temperature and precipitation ranges of 2 to 10{degrees} C, and 38 to 80 cm, respectively, corresponding to late glacial and Altithermal periods. These data are considered to be reasonable ranges of future climatic conditions that can be input to evaluations of groundwater recharge, radon-gas escape, erosion, frost penetration, and biointrusion in engineered earthen barriers designed to isolate tailings.

  10. The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smythe, C. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE`s UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996.

  11. White-tailed Deer Management Employee Survey Results and Path Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    White-tailed Deer Management Employee Survey Results and Path Forward Community Advisory Council at ~700 animals 1999 ­ Initial discussions for population management 2001 ­ Routine population surveys marked "don't know" #12;13 Survey Results (cont.) Statement 7 ­ What is your preference for managing deer

  12. Session Reliability of Web Systems under Heavy-Tailed Workloads: An Approach Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goseva-Popstojanova, Katerina

    Session Reliability of Web Systems under Heavy-Tailed Workloads: An Approach Based on Design reliability modeling which integrates the user view represented by the session layer and the system view indicate that session reliability, which accounts for the distribution of failed requests within sessions

  13. Simulating the tail of the interference in a Poisson network model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medium Access Control (MAC) protocols and more advanced transmission schemes that better exploit of the cumulative distribution function of the interference. However, when the tail of the interference is small be inverted to obtain the law of the interference. This is possible, for instance, if = 4 and the system

  14. LADE-based Inference for ARMA Models with Unspecified and Heavy-tailed Heteroscedastic Noises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Shiqing

    and Van Dijk (1996) studied several stock market indexes by AR(1)-GJR(1, 1) models, Zhu and Ling (2011) fitted a MA(3)-GARCH(1, 1) model to the world oil prices, see also Tsay (2005) for more empiricalLADE-based Inference for ARMA Models with Unspecified and Heavy-tailed Heteroscedastic Noises

  15. Size-independent vs. size-dependent policies in scheduling heavy-tailed distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nham, John (John T.)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of scheduling jobs on a two-machine distributed server, where the job size distribution is heavy-tailed. We focus on two distributions, for which we prove that the performance of the optimal size-independent ...

  16. MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1099 MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE in intensively (>80%) cultivated areas. From January 2001 to August 2002, we monitored movements of 77 (61 adult of seasonal migration, whereas crop emergence and harvest had minimal effects. Four deer (8%) dispersed a mean

  17. Birds of Prey and the Band-Tailed Pigeon on Isla Guadalupe, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... BIRDS OF PREY AND THE BAND-TAILED PIGEON ON ISLA GUADALUPE, MEXICO JUAN-PABLO GALLO-REYNOSO, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación ... nascent recovery, such studies should be encouraged. Mexico has taken a major step toward the island’s conservation by declaring ...

  18. Determination of aerosol size distributions at uranium mill tailings remedial action project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, G.J.; Reif, R.H. [CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoover, M.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an ongoing program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, to stabilize piles of uranium mill tailings in order to reduce the potential radiological hazards to the public. Protection of workers and the general public against airborne radioactivity during remedial action is a top priority at the UMTRA Project. The primary occupational radionuclides of concern are {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po, and the short-lived decay products of {sup 222}Rn with {sup 230}Th causing the majority of the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from inhaling uranium mill tailings. Prior to this study, a default particle size of 1.0 {mu}m activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was assumed for airborne radioactive tailings dust. Because of recent changes in DOE requirements, all DOE operations are now required to use the CEDE methodology, instead of the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) methodology, to evaluate internal radiation exposures. Under the transition from AEDE to CEDE, with a 1.0 {mu}m AMAD particle size, lower bioassay action levels would be required for the UMTRA Project. This translates into an expanded internal dosimetry program where significantly more bioassay monitoring would be required at the UMTRA Project sites. However, for situations where the particle size distribution is known to differ significantly from 1.0 {mu}m AMAD, the DOE allows for corrections to be made to both the estimated dose to workers and the derived air concentration (DAC) values. For particle sizes larger than 1.0 {mu}m AMAD, the calculated CEDE from inhaling tailings would be relatively lower.

  19. TIDAL TAIL EJECTION AS A SIGNATURE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM WHITE DWARF MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raskin, Cody; Kasen, Daniel [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The merger of two white dwarfs may be preceded by the ejection of some mass in ''tidal tails,'' creating a circumstellar medium around the system. We consider the variety of observational signatures from this material, which depend on the lag time between the start of the merger and the ultimate explosion (assuming one occurs) of the system in a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). If the time lag is fairly short, then the interaction of the supernova ejecta with the tails could lead to detectable shock emission at radio, optical, and/or X-ray wavelengths. At somewhat later times, the tails produce relatively broad NaID absorption lines with velocity widths of the order of the white dwarf escape speed ({approx}1000 km s{sup -1}). That none of these signatures have been detected in normal SNe Ia constrains the lag time to be either very short ({approx}< 100 s) or fairly long ({approx}> 100 yr). If the tails have expanded and cooled over timescales {approx}10{sup 4} yr, then they could be observable through narrow NaID and Ca II H and K absorption lines in the spectra, which are seen in some fraction of SNe Ia. Using a combination of three-dimensional and one-dimensional hydrodynamical codes, we model the mass loss from tidal interactions in binary systems, and the subsequent interactions with the interstellar medium, which produce a slow-moving, dense shell of gas. We synthesize NaID line profiles by ray casting through this shell, and show that in some circumstances tidal tails could be responsible for narrow absorptions similar to those observed.

  20. Nuclear Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilhena and Bardo E.J. Bodmann Carbon-#1;? in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environment of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant: Sources of Production, Releases and Dose Estimates #3;?? Jonas Mazeika Impact of radionuclide discharges from Temel?n Nuclear Power... (chapter 5), ? Instrumentation and control (chapter 6), ? Diagnostics (chapter 7), ? Safety evaluation methods (chapters 6, 8, 9 and 10), ? Environment and nuclear power plants (chapters 11 - 15), ? Human factors (chapter 16), ? Software development...

  1. Direct Characterization of Airborne Particles Associated with Arsenic-rich Mine Tailings: Particle Size Mineralogy and Texture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Corriveau; H Jamieson; M Parsons; J Campbell; A Lanzirotti

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Windblown and vehicle-raised dust from unvegetated mine tailings can be a human health risk. Airborne particles from As-rich abandoned Au mine tailings from Nova Scotia, Canada have been characterized in terms of particle size, As concentration, As oxidation state, mineral species and texture. Samples were collected in seven aerodynamically fractionated size ranges (0.5-16 {micro}m) using a cascade impactor deployed at three tailings fields. All three sites are used for recreational activities and off-road vehicles were racing on the tailings at two mines during sample collection. Total concentrations of As in the <8 {micro}m fraction varied from 65 to 1040 ng/m{sup 3} of air as measured by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The same samples were analysed by synchrotron-based microfocused X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy ({micro}XANES) and X-ray diffraction ({micro}XRD) and found to contain multiple As-bearing mineral species, including Fe-As weathering products. The As species present in the dust were similar to those observed in the near-surface tailings. The action of vehicles on the tailings surface may disaggregate material cemented with Fe arsenate and contribute additional fine-grained As-rich particles to airborne dust. Results from this study can be used to help assess the potential human health risks associated with exposure to airborne particles from mine tailings.

  2. Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site located near Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The designated site covers 196 acres and contains 111 acres of tailings and some of the original mill structures. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for th remedial action (40 CFR Part 192). Remedial action must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated materials into a recontoured pile. A radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion protection measures would be taken to assure the long-term stability of the pile. Another alternative which would involve moving the tailings to a new location is also assessed in this document. This alternative would generally involve greater short-term impacts and costs but would result in stabilization of the tailings at an undeveloped location. The no action alternative is also assessed in this document.

  3. Power LCAT

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drennen, Thomas

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  4. Power LCAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, Thomas

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  5. Engineering solutions for the long-term stabilization and isolation of uranium mill tailings in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lommler, J.C. [UMTRA Project AGRA Earth and Environmental, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cormier, C. [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanders, D.R. [Morrison Knudsen Environmental Services, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering solutions for the safe and environmentally protective disposal and isolation of uranium mill tailings in the United States include many factors. Among the factors discussed in this paper are cover design, materials selection, civil engineering, erosive forces, and cost effectiveness. Stabilization and isolation of tailings from humans and the environment are the primary goals of United States uranium mill tailings control standards. The performance of cover designs is addressed with respect to water infiltration, radon exhalation, geotechnical stability, erosion protection, human and animal intrusion prevention, and longevity. The need for and frequency of surveillance efforts to ensure continued disposal system performance are also assessed.

  6. Power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  7. Efficient Simulation and Conditional Functional Limit Theorems for Ruinous Heavy-tailed Random Walks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchet, Jose

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of this paper is to introduce change of measure based techniques for the rare-event analysis of heavy-tailed stochastic processes. Our changes-of-measure are parameterized by a family of distributions admitting a mixture form. We exploit our methodology to achieve two types of results. First, we construct Monte Carlo estimators that are strongly efficient (i.e. have bounded relative mean squared error as the event of interest becomes rare). These estimators are used to estimate both rare-event probabilities of interest and associated conditional expectations. We emphasize that our techniques allow us to control the expected termination time of the Monte Carlo algorithm even if the conditional expected stopping time (under the original distribution) given the event of interest is infinity -- a situation that sometimes occurs in heavy-tailed settings. Second, the mixture family serves as a good approximation (in total variation) of the conditional distribution of the whole process given the rar...

  8. Asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings: an overview of the technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, D.A.; Dunning, R.L.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, has developed an asphalt emulsion cover system to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. The system has been field tested at Grand Junction, Colorado. Results from laboratory and field tests indicate that this system is effective in reducing radon release to near-background levels (<2.5 pCi m/sup -2/s/sup -1/) and has the properties required for long-term effectiveness and stability. Engineering specifications have been developed, and analysis indicates that asphalt emulsion covers are cost-competitive with other cover systems. This report summarizes the technology for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. 59 references, 45 figures, 36 tables.

  9. Calculation of the fast ion tail distribution for a spherically symmetric hot spot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, X.-Z.; Guo, Z. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Berk, H. L. [Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fast ion tail for a spherically symmetric hot spot is computed via the solution of a simplified Fokker-Planck collision operator. Emphasis is placed on describing the energy scaling of the fast ion distribution function in the hot spot as well as the surrounding cold plasma throughout a broad range of collisionalities and temperatures. It is found that while the fast ion tail inside the hot spot is significantly depleted, leading to a reduction of the fusion yield in this region, a surplus of fast ions is observed in the neighboring cold plasma region. The presence of this surplus of fast ions in the neighboring cold region is shown to result in a partial recovery of the fusion yield lost in the hot spot.

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project fiscal year 1997 annual report to stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year (FY) 1997 annual report is the 19th report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping. Cleanup has been undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the groundwater project. This report addresses specifics about the UMTRA surface project.

  11. EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Environmental Impact Statement and associated supplements and amendments provides information on the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) proposal to (1) remediate approximately 11.9 million tons of contaminated materials located on the Moab site and approximately 39,700 tons located on nearby vicinity properties and (2) develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project (DOE/EIS-0198, October 1996). The surface remediation alternatives analyzed in the EIS include on-site disposal of the contaminated materials and off-site disposal at one of three alternative locations in Utah using one or more transportation options: truck, rail, or slurry pipeline.

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  13. Cleanup of inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites in the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, B.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978 to address potential and significant radiation health hazards to the public from active and inactive mill operations. Title I to the UMTRCA identified sites to be designated for remedial action. These include four uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) sites in the Navajo Nation. These sites are located in Shiprock, New Mexico; Tuba City, Arizona; Cane Valley, Arizona; and Halchita, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was directed to select and execute a plan of remedial action that provides long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials and satisfies the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards and other applicable laws and regulations.

  14. Fiscal year 1996 annual report to stakeholders, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 annual report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction of landscaping. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about the surface phase of the UMTRA Project.

  15. Observation of the 'head-tail' effect in nuclear recoils of low-energy neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Dujmic; H. Tomita; M. Lewandowska; S. Ahlen; P. Fisher; S. Henderson; A. Kaboth; G. Kohse; R. Lanza; J. Monroe; A. Roccaro; G. Sciolla; N. Skvorodnev; R. Vanderspek; H. Wellenstein; R. Yamamoto

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional detection of dark matter can provide unambiguous observation of dark matter interactions even in the presence of background. This article presents an experimental method to measure the direction tag ("head-tail") of the dark matter wind by detecting the scintillation light created by the elastic nuclear recoils in the scattering of dark matter particles with the detector material. The technique is demonstrated by tagging the direction of the nuclear recoils created in the scattering of low-energy neutrons with CF4 in a low-pressure time-projection chamber that is developed by the DMTPC collaboration. The measurement of the decreasing ionization rate along the recoil trajectory provides the direction tag of the incoming neutrons, and proves that the "head-tail" effect can be observed.

  16. The Radiation Tail in (e,e'p) Reactions and Corrections to Experimental Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Templon; C. E. Vellidis; R. E. J. Florizone; A. J. Sarty

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a direct calculation of the cross section for the reaction 3He(e,e'p) including the radiation tail originating from bremsstrahlung processes. This calculation is compared to measured cross sections. The calculation is carried out from within a Monte Carlo simulation program so that acceptance-averaging effects, along with a subset of possible energy losses, are taken into account. Excellent agreement is obtained between our calculation and measured data, after a correction factor for higher-order bremsstrahlung is devised and applied to the tail. Industry-standard radiative corrections fail miserably for these data, and we use the results of our calculation to dissect the failure. Implications for design and analysis of experiments in the Jefferson-Lab energy domain are discussed.

  17. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  18. Comment on "High-order contamination in the tail of gravitational collapse''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Z. Smith; Lior M. Burko

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We confront the predictions of S. Hod, Phys. Rev. D 60, 104053 (1999) for the late-time decay rate of black hole perturbations with numerical data. Specifically, we ask two questions: First, are corrections to the Price tail dominated by logarithmic terms, as predicted by Hod? Second, if there were logarithmic correction terms, do they take the specific form predicted in Hod's paper? The answer to both questions is ``no.''

  19. Mineralogical characterization of arsenic in gold mine tailings from three sites in Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Corriveau; H Jamieson; M Parsons; G Hall

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of arsenic (As) in windblown and vehicle-raised dust from tailings sites in Nova Scotia poses a potential health risk to recreational users of these areas and to nearby residents. The exposure may involve inhalation of dust, as well as oral ingestion of particles. It is important to understand the mineralogy and morphology of As-bearing dust particles in order to evaluate the risk posed by near-surface particulates in As-bearing tailings fields, as this will influence the stability and toxicity of As in the wastes. Optical mineralogy, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD) and micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}XANES), and sequential leach extractions were applied to tailings samples from three sites in eastern Nova Scotia. Arsenic occurs naturally in these gold deposits mainly in arsenopyrite (FeAsS). In the near-surface material of the tailings fields, sulphide minerals have almost completely oxidized to secondary minerals such as scorodite (FeAsO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) and Ca-Fe arsenates. Iron oxyhydroxides contain variable amounts of As{sub 2}O{sub 5} from trace to 30 wt.% and CaO up to 8 wt.%. The presence of multiple As-hosting solid phases, including relatively soluble Ca-Fe arsenates and Fe oxyhydroxides with adsorbed As has important implications for human health risk assessment and remediation design.

  20. Blood Chemistry of Free-Ranging and Captive White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Melanie Love

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    old. White-tailed deer were sampled by using six different capture methods: physical restraint (n=253), chemical immobilization using physical restraint method of drug administration (n=149), chemical immobilization using dart-gun method of drug... administration (n=31), netted by a drop net (n=98), netted using a net gun from a helicopter (n=56), and hunter harvest (n=14). Seasons were based on data received from the United States Naval Meteorology and Naval Observatory. The seasons started...

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings remedial action project waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to establish a waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness (WM/PPA) program for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The program satisfies DOE requirements mandated by DOE Order 5400.1. This plan establishes planning objectives and strategies for conserving resources and reducing the quantity and toxicity of wastes and other environmental releases.

  2. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  3. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy TrustDollarBusinessLacledeBlackRenewable EnergyOtter Tail Power Company-

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy TrustDollarBusinessLacledeBlackRenewable EnergyOtter Tail Power

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy TrustDollarBusinessLacledeBlackRenewable EnergyOtter Tail PowerSales and

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy TrustDollarBusinessLacledeBlackRenewable EnergyOtter Tail PowerSales

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy TrustDollarBusinessLacledeBlackRenewableCleanAlliantOtter Tail Power

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy TrustDollarBusinessLacledeBlackRenewableCleanAlliantOtter Tail PowerXcel

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy Trust ofTribal EnergyNetLoanStateWest Penn PowerOtter Tail

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,Energy Trust ofTribal EnergyNetLoanStateWest Penn PowerOtter TailEnterprise

  12. DEMONSTRATION OF A FULL-SCALE RETROFIT OF THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Hrdlicka; William Swanson

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector (AHPC), developed in cooperation between W.L. Gore & Associates and the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), is an innovative approach to removing particulates from power plant flue gas. The AHPC combines the elements of a traditional baghouse and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) into one device to achieve increased particulate collection efficiency. As part of the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy and Otter Tail Power Company. The EERC is the patent holder for the technology, and W.L. Gore & Associates was the exclusive licensee for this project. The project objective was to demonstrate the improved particulate collection efficiency obtained by a full-scale retrofit of the AHPC to an existing electrostatic precipitator. The full-scale retrofit was installed on an electric power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, Otter Tail Power Company's Big Stone Plant, in Big Stone City, South Dakota. The $13.4 million project was installed in October 2002. Project related testing concluded in December 2005. The following Final Technical Report has been prepared for the project entitled ''Demonstration of a Full-Scale Retrofit of the Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Technology'' as described in DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41420. The report presents the operation and performance results of the system.

  13. North Fork John Day Dredge Tailings Restoration Project Final Report 1997-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, John A. (US Forest Service, Pendleton, OR)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USDA Forest Service (USFS) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) worked together to rehabilitate 2.1 miles of Clear Creek floodplain, a tributary of the North Fork John Day River Basin. Dredge tailing were deposited from mining operations on Clear Creek's floodplain from the 1930's to the 1950's. These tailing confined the stream channel and degraded the floodplain. The work was completed by moving dredge tailing piles adjacent to the Clear Creek channel, using track-mounted excavators and dump trucks. A caterpillar tractor was used to contour the material placed outside the immediate floodplain, blending it into the hillside. The restored floodplain was very near channel bankfull level following excavation and contoured to accept future flood flows. Monitoring was initiated through pre and post-project photo points and cross-section measurements. Work was completed in two efforts. In 1997 and 1998 floodplain restoration was adjacent to the reconstruction of Road 13 from the junction with Road 10 from Clear Creek River Mile 1.9 to 3.1 for a distance of 1.2 miles. In 1999 the Environmental Assessment for Lower Clear Creek--Granite Creek Floodplain Restoration Project was completed for work proposed on Clear Creek from the mouth up to River mile 1.9 and the Granite Creek floodplain from River miles 5.9 to 7.7. Restoration proposed in the 1999 Environmental Assessment is the subject of this report.

  14. Coulomb-tail effect of electron-electron interaction on nonsequential double ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Yueming; Huang Cheng [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Lu Peixiang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wuhan Institute of Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the classical ensemble model, we investigate the manifestations of the Coulomb tail of electron-electron interaction in nonsequential double ionization by comparing the results from the short-range electron-electron interaction with those from the Coulombic electron-electron interaction. At the intensity below the recollision threshold, the two-electron momentum distributions in the direction parallel to the laser polarization show an anticorrelated behavior for the Coulombic electron-electron interaction while a correlated behavior for the short-range interaction, which indicates the responsibility of the Coulomb tail of the electron-electron interaction for the experimentally observed anticorrelated emission [Y. Liu, S. Tschuch, A. Rudenko, M. Durr, M. Siegel, U. Morgner, R. Moshammer, and J. Ullrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 053001 (2008)]. In the transverse direction, for the Coulombic electron-electron interaction, the two electrons exhibit no effect of repulsion at an intensity below the recollision threshold while a strong repulsion effect at an intensity above the threshold, which becomes weaker as the laser intensity further increases. Back analysis shows that the role of the Coulomb tail of electron-electron interaction leads asymmetric energy sharing (AES) to be prevalent at recollision. This AES results in the two electrons leaving the ion at different times or with different initial momenta, which is responsible for the anticorrelated behavior in the parallel direction and the intensity-dependent repulsion effect in the transverse direction.

  15. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  16. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office Quality Assurance Program Plan]. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites in accordance with Public Law 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRA Project`s mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office (UMTRA PO) directs the overall project. Since these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria (set forth in the reference documents) has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. The UMTRA PO shall require each Project contractor to prepare and submit for approval a more detailed QAPP that is based on the applicable criteria of this QAPP and the referenced documents. All QAPPs on the UMTRA Project shall fit within the framework of this plan.

  17. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office Quality Assurance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites in accordance with Public Law 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRA Project's mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office (UMTRA PO) directs the overall project. Since these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria (set forth in the reference documents) has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. The UMTRA PO shall require each Project contractor to prepare and submit for approval a more detailed QAPP that is based on the applicable criteria of this QAPP and the referenced documents. All QAPPs on the UMTRA Project shall fit within the framework of this plan.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  19. Summary report on reprocessing evaluation of selected inactive uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has been assisting the Department of Energy in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program (UMTRAP) the purpose of which is to implement the provisions of Title I of Public Law 95-604, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.'' As part of this program, there was a need to evaluate the mineral concentration of the residual radioactive materials at some of the designated processing sites to determine whether mineral recovery would be practicable. Accordingly, Sandia contracted Mountain States Research and Development (MSRD), a division of Mountain States Mineral Enterprises, to drill, sample, and test tailings at 12 sites to evaluate the cost of and the revenue that could be derived from mineral recovery. UMTRAP related environmental and engineering sampling and support activities were performed in conjunction with the MSRD operations. This summary report presents a brief description of the various activities in the program and of the data and information obtained and summarizes the results. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  20. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This eleventh annual status report summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project undertaken during Fiscal Year (FY) 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1990 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95--604. The DOE will continue to submit an annual report through project completion in order to inform the public of yearly project status. Title I of the UMTRCA authorizes the DOE, in cooperation with affected states and Indian tribes within whose boundaries designated uranium processing sites are located, to provide a program of assessment and remedial action at such sites. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive materials located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner and to minimize or eliminate potential radiation health hazards. Commercial and residential properties in the vicinity of designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as vicinity properties,'' are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties located in 10 states, and the vicinity properties associated with Edgemont, South Dakota, an inactive uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

  1. Strathclyde powerS ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Strathclyde powerS ahead the future of renewable energy SHARING AND ENHANCING RESEARCH Discover the vision of Principal Professor Jim McDonald THE FUTURE OF ENERGY Strathclyde pioneers renewableEdicinE Snapshot the reSearcher Following a decade of environmental research in her native egypt, nabila saleem

  2. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 84, 061143 (2011) Asymptotic solutions of decoupled continuous-time random walks with superheavy-tailed waiting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindenberg, Katja

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -time behavior of decoupled continuous-time random walks characterized by superheavy- tailed distributions of jump processes that are widely used to model a variety of physical, geological, biological, economic

  3. Strange Tails: Viral Discovery and Deep Sequencing (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRisi, Joe [UCSF

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joe DeRisi of UC San Francisco on "Strange Tails: Viral discovery & deep sequencing" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  4. Engineering solutions to the long-term stabilization and isolation of uranium mill tailings in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, D.R. [Morrison Knudsen Environmental Services, San Francisco, CA (United States). UMTRA Project; Lommler, J.C. [AGRA Earth and Environmental, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States). UMTRA Project

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering solutions to the safe and environmentally protective disposal and isolation of uranium mill tailings in the US include many factors. Cover design, materials selection, civil engineering, erosive forces, and cost effectiveness are only a few of those factors described in this paper. The systems approach to the engineering solutions employed in the US is described, with emphasis on the standards prescribed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. Stabilization and isolation of the tailings from humans and the environment are the primary goals of the US uranium mill tailings control standards. The performance of cover designs with respect to water infiltration, radon exhalation, geotechnical stability, erosion protection, human and animal intrusion prevention, and longevity are addressed. The need for and frequency of surveillance efforts to ensure continued disposal system performance are also assessed.

  5. Redescription of the enigmatic long-tailed rat Sigmodontomys aphrastus (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) with comments on taxonomy and natural history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCain, Christy M.; Timm, Robert M.; Weksler, Marcelo

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sigmodontomys aphrastus, the long-tailed rat, is an exceedingly rare rodent species from montane regions of Central and South America of which very little is known ecologically or systematically. It has been variously ...

  6. Personality in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): Investigating factor structure, and relationships with stress, grooming, and dominance. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Clare

    Examining personality in non-human primates provides a useful tool for understanding evolutionary bases. The following research focused on exploring the personality of captive ring-tailed lemurs, and its relationship with audience-related stress...

  7. Queue length asymptotics for generalized max-weight scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan

    We investigate the asymptotic behavior of the steady-state queue length distribution under generalized max-weight scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic. We consider a system consisting of two parallel queues, ...

  8. Controlling Badger Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service

    2004-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    furbearers include otter, mink, ring-tailed cat, beaver, skunk, nutria, weasel, raccoon, opossum, muskrat, fox and civet cat. Landowners wishing to live trap badgers and relocate them after they have been caught must notify a representative of the Texas...

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1989 by the US DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination in this risk assessment.

  10. Effects of short duration grazing on white-tailed deer in the Edwards PLateau and Rio Grande Plain of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Calvin Lemuiel

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF SHORT DURATION GRAZING ON WHITE-TAILED DEER IN THE EDWARDS PLATEAU AND RIO GRANDE PLAIN OF TEXAS A Thesis by CALVIN LEMUIEL RICHARDSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM L'niversity in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences EFFECTS OF SHORT DURATION GRAZING ON WHITE-TAILED DEER IN THE EDWARDS PLATEAU AND RIO GRANDE PLAIN OF TEXAS A Thesis by CALVIN LEMUIEL...

  11. Spatio-temporal distribution of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) relative to prescribed burns on rangeland in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meek, Michael Glenn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SPATIO-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER (Odocoileus virginianus) RELATIVE TO PRESCRIBED BURNS ON RANGELAND IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis by MICHAEL GLENN MEEK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SPATIO-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER...

  12. Power combiner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  13. Contents of environmental impact statements prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental impact statements (EISS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the statements; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the statements which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements and the definitions of terms established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE Order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. These requirements and definitions are implicity part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EISs Guidelines for preparation of environmental assessments for the UMTRA Project are available.

  14. Cleco Power- Power Miser New Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisiana's Cleco Power offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible customers. Cleco Power offers a rate discount for residential customers building homes that meet the Power Miser Program...

  15. Description of $?$-cluster tail in $^{8}$Be and $^{20}$Ne: Delocalization of $?$ cluster because of quantum penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the $\\alpha$-cluster wave functions in cluster states of $^8$Be and $^{20}$Ne by comparing the exact relative wave function obtained by the generator coordinate method (GCM) with various types of trial functions. For the trial functions, we adopt the fixed range shifted Gaussian of the Brink-Bloch (BB) wave function, the spherical Gaussian with the adjustable range parameter of the spherical Thosaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-R\\"opke (sTHSR), the deformed Gaussian of the deformed THSR (dTHSR), and a function with the Yukawa tail (YT). The quality of the description of the exact wave function with a trial function is judged by the squared overlap between the trial function and the GCM wave function. The better result is obtained with the sTHSR wave function than the BB wave function, and further improvement can be done with the dTHSR wave function because these wave functions can describe the outer tail better. The YT wave function gives almost the equal quality to or even better quality than the dTHSR wave function indicating that the outer tail of $\\alpha$ cluster states is characterized by the Yukawa-like tail rather than the Gaussian tail. In the weakly bound $\\alpha$ cluster states with the small $\\alpha$ separation energy and the low centrifugal and Coulomb barriers, the outer tail part is the slowly damping function described well by the quantum penetration through the effective barrier. This outer tail characterizes the almost zero-energy free $\\alpha$ gas behavior, i.e., the delocalization of cluster.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in-place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Currently, no points of exposure (e.g. a drinking water well); and no receptors of contaminated ground water have been identified at the Maybell site. Therefore, there are no current human health and ecological risks associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Furthermore, if current site conditions and land- and water-use patterns do not change, it is unlikely that contaminated ground water would reach people or the ecological communities in the future.

  17. Vegetative covers: Special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

  18. Contents of environmental assessments prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental assessments (EAS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the assessments; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the assessments which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements (40 CFR Part 1501) and the definitions of terms (40-' CFR Part 1508) established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022). These requirements and definitions are implicitly part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EAs. The UMTRA Project EAs will be used in determining whether the DOE should prepare an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact for the actions at each of the sites. If no impact statement is necessary, the environmental assessment for that site will aid the DOE in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act before beginning remedial actions. If an impact statement is needed, the assessment will aid its preparation. These purposes, established by the Council on Environmental Quality in 40 CFR Part 1508.9(a), have guided the construction of the outline presented in this document. Remedial actions at each site will include the cleanup of properties in the vicinity of the tailings sites that have been contaminated by the tailings.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  20. Contents of environmental assessments prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental assessments (EAS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the assessments; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the assessments which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements (40 CFR Part 1501) and the definitions of terms (40-` CFR Part 1508) established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022). These requirements and definitions are implicitly part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EAs. The UMTRA Project EAs will be used in determining whether the DOE should prepare an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact for the actions at each of the sites. If no impact statement is necessary, the environmental assessment for that site will aid the DOE in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act before beginning remedial actions. If an impact statement is needed, the assessment will aid its preparation. These purposes, established by the Council on Environmental Quality in 40 CFR Part 1508.9(a), have guided the construction of the outline presented in this document. Remedial actions at each site will include the cleanup of properties in the vicinity of the tailings sites that have been contaminated by the tailings.

  1. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  2. Binding-induced Stabilization and Assembly of the Phage P22 Tail Accessory Factor gp4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olia,A.; Al-Bassam, J.; Winn-Stapley, D.; Joss, L.; Casjens, S.; Cingolani, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To infect and replicate, bacteriophage P22 injects its 43 kbp genome across the cell wall of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The attachment of phage P22 to the host cell as well as the injection of the viral DNA into the host is mediated by the virion's tail complex. This 2.8 MDa molecular machine is formed by five proteins, which include the portal protein gp1, the adhesion tailspike protein gp9, and three tail accessory factors: gp4, gp10, gp26. We have isolated the tail accessory factor gp4 and characterized its structure and binding interactions with portal protein. Interestingly, gp4 exists in solution as a monomer, which displays an exceedingly low structural stability (T{sub m} 34 {sup o}C). Unfolded gp4 is prone to aggregation within a narrow range of temperatures both in vitro and in Salmonella extracts. In the virion the thermal unfolding of gp4 is prevented by the interaction with the dodecameric portal protein, which stabilizes the structure of gp4 and suppresses unfolded gp4 from irreversibly aggregating in the Salmonella milieu. The structural stabilization of gp4 is accompanied by the concomitant oligomerization of the protein to form a ring of 12 subunits bound to the lower end of the portal ring. The interaction of gp4 with portal protein is complex and likely involves the distinct binding of two non-equivalent sets of six gp4 proteins. Binding of the first set of six gp4 equivalents to dodecameric portal protein yields a gp(1){sub 12}:gp(4){sub 6} assembly intermediate, which is stably populated at 30 {sup o}C and can be resolved by native gel electrophoresis. The final product of the assembly reaction is a bi-dodecameric gp(1){sub 12}:gp(4){sub 12} complex, which appears hollow by electron microscopy, suggesting that gp4 does not physically plug the DNA entry/exit channel, but acts as a structural adaptor for the other tail accessory factors: gp10 and gp26.

  3. The botanical composition of the diet of white-tailed deer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, James Michael

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 'nnual love?. -rasa Cane blueste~s Care' Co~on curly". ae quite Pall I1itchgras no~co-"r--s o - ts "ran- 10 1 -5 7 10 -9 Pa, stures 10 2 10 10 1 n 10 1 Q ? 1 -d 1 Q 10 o. JIIon horehound LeavenIrorth vetch ittlc salle', . ' r... ! ' . . (. , member / / j///z' ( ember 1&iembe r Hember Fiembe r December 1972 ABSTRACT The Botanical Composit1on of the Diet of White-tailed Deer. (December 1972) James Michael McCollum, B. S, , Texas MM Un1versity Directed by: Dr. M. M. Kothmann A. 9...

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  5. Control of SOx emission in tail gas of the Claus Plant at Kwangyang Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, H.S.; Park, J.W.; Hyun, H.D. [POSCO, Cheonnam (Korea, Republic of). Kwangyang Works; Lee, D.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Environmental Catalysis; Paik, S.C. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Chung, J.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Environmental Catalysis; [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pilot and/or laboratory studies were conducted in order to find methods for reducing the SOx emission in the Claus tail gas of the cokes unit. The TGT process which is based on the complete hydrogenation of the sulfur-containing compounds (SO{sub 2}, S) into H{sub 2}S and returning to the COG main line can reduce the SOx emission to zero. In case the return to the COG main is impossible, the SPOR process (Sulfur removal based on Partial Oxidation and Reduction) can be successfully applied to reduce the SOx emission.

  6. Observation of the cervix and artificial insemination in captive white-tailed deer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magyar, Stephen John

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Veterinary Physiology OBSERVATION OF THE CERVIX AND ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION IN CAPTIVE WHITE-TAILED DEER A Thesis by STEPHEN JOHN MAGYAR Approved as to style and content by: Stephen W. J. Sea er (Chairman of Co.... , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Stephen W. J. Seager Five does and one buck (penile deviated and vasectomized) were used during the breeding seasons of 1984- 85 and 1985-86. The does were checked for estrus by introducing...

  7. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment (Attachment 1) and a floodplain/wetlands assessment (Assessment 2) are included as part of this EA. The following sections and attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  8. Engineering guides for estimating cover material thickness and volume for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Merrell, G.B.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five nomographs have been prepared that facilitate the estimation of cover thickness and cover material volume for the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action Program. Key parameters determined include the cover thickness with either a surface radon flux or a boundary radon air concentration criterion and the total volume of cover material required for two different treatments of the edge slopes. Also included in the engineering guide are descriptions and representative values for the radon source term, the diffusion coefficients and the key meteorological parameters. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Star Power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  10. Star Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  11. s-wave scattering for deep potentials with attractive tails falling off faster than -1/r{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Tim-Oliver; Kaiser, Alexander; Friedrich, Harald [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For potentials with attractive tails, as occur in typical atomic interactions, we present a simple formula for the s-wave phase shift {delta}{sub 0}. It exposes a universal dependence of {delta}{sub 0}(E) on the potential tail and the influence of effects specific to a given potential, which enter via the scattering length a, or equivalently, the noninteger part {Delta}{sub th} of the threshold quantum number n{sub th}. The formula accurately reproduces {delta}{sub 0}(E) from threshold up to the semiclassical regime, far beyond the validity of the effective-range expansion. We derive the tail functions occurring in the formula for {delta}{sub 0}(E) and demonstrate the validity of the formula for attractive potential tails proportional to 1/r{sup 6} or to 1/r{sup 4}, and also for a mixed potential tail consisting of a 1/r{sup 4} term together with a non-negligible 1/r{sup 6} contribution.

  12. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miquel County. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 63 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 15 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The sites are within 1 mile of each other and are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,300 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}). In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designing site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

  13. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  14. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and...

  15. The Stellar Content of the Southern Tail of NGC 4038/9 and a Revised Distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saviane, I; Rich, R M

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the Hubble Space Telescope and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to image the putative tidal dwarf galaxy located at the tip of the Southern tidal tail of NGC 4038/9, the Antennae. We resolve individual stars, and identify two stellar populations. Hundreds of massive stars are present, concentrated into tight OB associations on scales of 200 pc, with ages ranging from 2-100 Myr. An older stellar population is distributed roughly following the outer contours of the neutral hydrogen in the tidal tail; we associate these stars with material ejected from the outer disks of the two spirals. The older stellar population has a red giant branch tip at I=26.5+/-0.2 from which we derive a distance modulus (m-M)_0=30.7+/-0.25. The implied distance of 13.8+/-1.7 Mpc is significantly smaller than commonly quoted distances for NGC 4038/9. In contrast to the previously studied core of the merger, we find no super star clusters. One might conclude that SSCs require the higher pressures found in the central regions i...

  16. Particle scattering and current sheet stability in the geomagnetic tail during the substorm growth phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J.; Koskinen, H.E.J. (Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland)); Baker, D.N. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Buechner, J. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Aussenstellung Berlin (Germany)); Lopez, R.E. (Applied Research Corp., Landover, MD (United States)); Dyson, R.L.; Frank, L.A. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of pitch angle scattering and chaotization of various particle populations in the geomagnetic tail during the substorm growth phase is studied by utilizing the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model. A temporally evolving magnetic field model for the growth phase is constructed by enhancing the near-Earth currents and thinning the current sheet from the values given by the static Tsyganenko model. Changing the field geometry toward an increasingly taillike configuration leads to pitch angle scattering of particles whose Larmor radii become comparable to the field line radius of curvature. Several different cases representing substorms with varying levels of magnetic disturbance have been studied. In each case, the field development during the growth phase leads to considerable scattering of the thermal electrons relatively close to the Earth. The current sheet regions where the electron motion is chaotic are magnetically mapped to the ionosphere and compared with low-altitude measurements of electron precipitation. The chaotization of the thermal electron population occurs within a few minutes of the substorm onset, and the ionospheric mappings of the chaotic regions in the equatorial plane compare well with the region of brightening auroras. Even though the temporal evolution of the complex plasma system cannot be self-consistently described by the temporal evolution of the empirical field model, these models can provide the most accurate estimates of the field parameters for tail stability calculations.

  17. Daily movements of female white-tailed deer relative to parturition and breeding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gino J. D'Angelo; Christopher E. Comer; John C. Kilgo; Cory D. Drennan; David A. Osborn; Karl V. Miller

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: To assess how white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herd demographics influence reproductive behaviors, we examined 24-h diel movements of female whitetailed deer relative to parturition and breeding in a low-density population with a near even sex ratio at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina. We conducted a series of intensive, 24-h radio-tracking periods of 13 females during spring and fall 2002. We compared daily range (ha), rate of travel (m/h), and distance between extreme daily locations (m), among the periods of pre-parturition and post-parturition and pre-, peak-, and post-rut. From pre-parturition to post-parturition, we observed decreases in diel range size (�¢����38.2%), distance between extreme diel locations (�¢����17.0%), and diel rate of travel (�¢����18.2%). Diel range size, distance between extreme diel locations, and diel rate of travel during the pre-rut and rut exceeded those observed during post-rut. We further identified substantial increases in mobility during 12 24-h diel periods for eight females during our fall monitoring. Our data suggest that female white-tailed deer reduce mobility post-fawning following exaggerated movements during pre-parturition. Furthermore, despite a near equal sex ratio, estrous does may be required to actively seek potential mates due to low population density.

  18. Leak detection systems for uranium mill tailings impoundments with synthetic liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.A.; Tyler, S.W.; Gutknecht, P.J.; Mitchell, D.H.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the performance of existing and alternative leak detection systems for lined uranium mill tailings ponds. Existing systems for detecting leaks at uranium mill tailings ponds investigated in this study included groundwater monitoring wells, subliner drains, and lysimeters. Three alternative systems which demonstrated the ability to locate leaks in bench-scale tests included moisture blocks, soil moisture probes, and a soil resistivity system. Several other systems in a developmental stage are described. For proper performance of leak detection systems (other than groundwater wells and lysimeters), a subgrade is required which assures lateral dispersion of a leak. Methods to enhance dispersion are discussed. Cost estimates were prepared for groundwater monitoring wells, subliner drain systems, and the three experimental systems. Based on the results of this report, it is suggested that groundwater monitoring systems be used as the primary means of leak detection. However, if a more responsive system is required due to site characteristics and groundwater quality criteria, subliner drains are applicable for ponds with uncovered liners. Leak-locating systems for ponds with covered liners require further development. Other recommendations are discussed in the report.

  19. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Lowman Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lowman, Idaho. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document assesses the environmental impacts of stabilization on site of the contaminated materials at the Lowman uranium mill tailings site. The Lowman site is 0.5 road mile northeast of the unincorporated village of Lowman, Idaho, and 73 road miles from Boise, Idaho. The Lowman site consists of piles of radioactive sands, an ore storage area, abandoned mill buildings, and windblown/waterborne contaminated areas. A total of 29.5 acres of land are contaminated and most of this land occurs within the 35-acre designated site boundary. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings and other contaminated materials on the site. A radon barrier would be constructed over the consolidated residual radioactive materials and various erosion control measures would be implemented to ensure the long-term stability of the disposal cell. Radioactive constituents and other hazardous constituents were not detected in the groundwater beneath the Lowman site. The groundwater beneath the disposal cell would not become contaminated during or after remedial action so the maximum concentration limits or background concentrations for the contaminants listed in the draft EPA groundwater protection standards would be met at the point of compliance. No significant impacts were identified as a result of the proposed remedial action at the Lowman site.

  20. Preplanning guidance document for groundwater restoration. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to present decision makers on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project with a strategy for evaluating the need for and accomplishing groundwater restoration at those UMTRA Project sites that will require restoration as specified in Subpart B of 40 CFR 192. A synopsis of the Uranium Mill Tailings Restoration Control Act (UMTRCA) and a discussion of the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater cleanup standards in 40 CFR 192 are provided to define the regulatory basis of groundwater cleanup. Once the EPA groundwater standards are finalized, this document may be revised, depending on the changes in the final standards. A procedure for determining the need for groundwater restoration is outlined and a cost-effective strategy for selecting, designing, implementing, and evaluating appropriate restoration procedures is presented. The determination of the need for groundwater restoration is based on the EPA groundwater cleanup standards and must be compatible with and complementary to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Therefore, this document describes a programmatic approach for compliance with the NEPA process.

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, fiscal year 1995 annual report to stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1978, Congress authorized the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping projects. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about both phases of the UMTRA Project. DOE`s UMTRA Project is the world`s largest materials management project ever undertaken to reduce or eliminate risk to the general public from exposure to potentially hazardous and radioactive materials. With an estimated cost at completion of nearly $2 billion for both phases of the UMTRA Project, and with the responsibility for encapsulating and isolating almost one-fourth of all the uranium mill tailings generated across the entire US (more than 44 million cubic yards), the UMTRA Project and its people have achieved a long record of safely and effectively completing its mission. It continually enhances its national reputation through its diligent process and cost efficiency as well as its international recognition for its technological innovation.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates the possibility of health and environmental risks from contaminated ground water at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. The former uranium processing site`s contaminated soil and material were removed and placed at a disposal site located in Body Canyon, Colorado, during 1986--1991 by the US Departments of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach similar to that used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The first step is to determine what site-related contaminants are found in ground water samples. The next step in the risk assessment is to determine how much of these contaminants people might ingest if they got their drinking water from a well on the site. In accordance with standard practice for this type of risk assessment, the highest contaminant concentrations from the most contaminated wells are used. The risk assessment then explains the possible health problems that could result from this amount of contamination.

  3. Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind Awards Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind...

  4. Tidal power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, T.J. (Glasgow Univ., Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the physics of tidal power considering gravitational effects of moon and sun; semidiurnal, diurnal, and mixed tides; and major periodic components that affect the tidal range. Shelving, funneling, reflection, and resonance phenomena that have a significant effect on tidal range are also discussed. The paper then examines tidal energy resource for principal developments estimated from parametric modeling in Europe and worldwide. Basic parameters that govern the design of tidal power schemes in terms of mean tidal range and surface area of the enclosed basin are identified. While energy extracted is proportional to the tidal amplitude squared, requisite sluicing are is proportional to the square root of the tidal amplitude. Sites with large tidal amplitudes are therefore best suited for tidal power developments, whereas sites with low tidal amplitudes have sluicing that may be prohibitive. It is shown that 48% of the European tidal resource is in the United Kingdom, 42% in France and 8% in Ireland, other countries having negligible potential. Worldwide tidal resource is identified. Tidal barrage design and construction using caissons is examined, as are alternative operating modes (single-action generation, outflow generation, flood generation, two-way generation, twin basin generation, pumping, etc), development trends and possibilities, generation cost at the barrage boundary, sensitivity to discount rates, general economics, and markets. Environmental effects, and institutional constraints to the development of tidal barrage schemes are also discussed.

  5. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report.

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  7. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Rifle sites. That remedial action consists of removing approximately 4,185,000 cubic yards (cy) of tailings and contaminated materials from their current locations, transporting, and stabilizing the tailings material at the Estes Gulch disposal site, approximately six miles north of Rifle. The tailings and contaminated materials are comprised of approximately 597,000 cy from Old Rifle, 3,232,000 cy from New Rifle, and 322,000 cy from vicinity properties and about 34,000 cy from demolition. The remedial action plan includes specific design requirements for the detailed design and construction of the remedial action. An extensive amount of data and supporting information have been generated for this remedial action and cannot all be incorporated into this document. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  8. The U.S. Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act -- An environmental legacy of the Cold War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, C.D.; Nelson, R.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Albuquerque Operations Office; Mann, P. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has guided the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project through its first 10 years of successful remediation. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), passed in 1978, identified 24 uranium mill tailings sites in need of remediation to protect human health and the environment from the residual contamination resulting from the processing of uranium ore. The UMTRCA was promulgated in two titles: Title 1 and Title 2. This paper describes the regulatory structure, required documentation, and some of the technical approaches used to meet the Act`s requirements for managing and executing the $1.4 billion project under Title 1. Remedial actions undertaken by private industry under Title 2 of the Act are not addressed in this paper. Some of the lessons learned over the course of the project`s history are presented so that other countries conducting similar remedial action activities may benefit.

  9. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernoff, A.R. (USDOE Albuquerque Field Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Lacker, D.K. (Texas State Dept. of Health, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Radiation Control)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1990 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine what remedial actions are necessary for contaminated ground water at the site.

  11. The use of fecal nitrogen as an indicator of dietary protein content in white-tailed deer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascorro, Paul Eugene

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE USE 01' FEC. " L NITROGEN AS AN 1NDICATOR OF DIETARy PROTEIN CONTENT IN WHITE-TAILED DEER A Thesis PE UL EUGENE NASCORRO Submitted to the Grarluate College of Texas A6, N University . n partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1982 Na jor Subject: Nildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE USE OF FECAL NITROGEN AS AN INDICATOR OF DIETARY PROTEIN CONTENT IN WHITE-TAILED DEER Thesis by PAUL EUGENE MASCORRO Approved as to style and content by: '(Chairman...

  12. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  13. Power Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    , will be the use of the ASTM Theoretical Steam Rate Tables. In addition, the author's experience regarding the minimum size for power recovery units that are economic in a Culf Coast plant will be presented. INTROD\\Jr.'rION When surveying an operation... will be discussed in detail. Each term in the equation will be considered in English units. Secondly, the use of Mollier diagrams to estimate the enthalphy change between the initial and final conditions will be considered. The last method, specific to steam...

  14. Yakama Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12 recognized for ...BER/NERSCYakama Power May

  15. Fusion Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding Opportunity fromFusion Links Fusion

  16. The Unique C-terminal Tail of the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase ERK5 Regulates Its Activation and Nuclear Shuttling*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Axel

    The Unique C-terminal Tail of the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase ERK5 Regulates Its Activation-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Molecular Biology, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany ERK5 is unique among mitogen this tail could affect the signaling capacity of ERK5. Gradual deletion of the C-terminal domains resulted

  17. Comment and response document for the final remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document for the final remedial action plan and site design has been prepared for US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action plan. Comments and responses are included for the site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado.

  18. The structure of the hantavirus zinc finger domain is conserved and represents the only natively folded region of the Gn cytoplasmic tail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, D. Fernando; Conner, Michael; St. Jeor, Stephen C.; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    genomic segments that encode for a nucleocapsid protein, two membrane glycoproteins (Gn and Gc), and an RNA polymerase. Recently, the pathogenicity of hantaviruses has been mapped to the carboxyl end of the 150 residue Gn cytoplasmic tail. The Gn tail has...

  19. Power management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  20. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, uses concentrated solar power to split water. Figurethe main reason the potential for solar power is boundless.a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible, fairly

  1. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric power generating plant, and the distributionrequired on the power-generating plant and not on the vehi-in either power-generating plants or combustion engines,

  2. Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Power Operations Training Center You'll find the "Power" of learning at Southwestern's Power Operations Training Center (POTC). POTC's...

  3. ARM - Campaign Instrument - uav-met-otter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to heargovInstrumentstdma Comments? We wouldaltus Comments? We

  4. bib-otter | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing Coal(tm): An IntegratedEffects

  5. POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT between DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY ("Buyer") and BLUEWATER WIND 3.5 Energy Forecasts, Scheduling and Balancing.......................................... 39 3

  6. A Theory of the Beam Transfer Function (BTF) with Chromaticity Induced Head-Tail Phase Shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fartoukh, S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of chromaticity determination by measuring head-tail phase shifts has been demonstrated both in the CERN-SPS, at HERA (DESY) and at RHIC (BNL). This method, however, requires to apply sizable transverse kick to the beam which might turn to be detrimental to the LHC performance in view of the tight emittance growth budget allowed for this machine. The aim of this paper is to extend the theory to the case of a coherent beam excitation of small amplitude, in particular at a frequency equal to the beam betatron tune (Phase Locked Loop mode), with, as a result, the possibility of envisaging a chromaticity feed-back system based on this technique for the LHC.

  7. Free cooling and high-energy tails of granular gases with variable restitution coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo J. Alonso; Bertrand Lods

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove the so-called generalized Haff's law yielding the optimal algebraic cooling rate of the temperature of a granular gas described by the homogeneous Boltzmann equation for inelastic interactions with non constant restitution coefficient. Our analysis is carried through a careful study of the infinite system of moments of the solution to the Boltzmann equation for granular gases and precise Lp estimates in the selfsimilar variables. In the process, we generalize several results on the Boltzmann collision operator obtained recently for homogeneous granular gases with constant restitution coefficient to a broader class of physical restitution coefficients that depend on the collision impact velocity. This generalization leads to the so-called L1-exponential tails theorem. for this model.

  8. Fat-tailed distribution derived from first eigenvector of symmetric random sparse matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisanao Takahashi

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Many solutions for scientific problems rely on finding the first (largest) eigenvalue and eigenvector of a particular matrix. We explore the distribution of the first eigenvector of a symmetric random sparse matrix. To analyze the properties of the first eigenvalue/vector, we employ a methodology based on the cavity method, a well-established technique in the statistical physics. A symmetric random sparse matrix in this paper can be regarded as an adjacency matrix for a network. We show that if a network is constructed by nodes that have two different types of degrees then the distribution of its eigenvector has fat tails such as the stable distribution ($\\alpha distribution of its first eigenvector becomes the Gaussian approximately. The cavity method is used to clarify these results.

  9. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of radiological surveys of two inactive uranium-mill sites near Rifle, Colorado, in May 1976 are presented. These sites are referred to as Old Rifle and New Rifle. The calculated /sup 226/Ra inventory of the latter site is much higher than at the older mill location. Data on above-ground measurements of gamma exposure rates, surface and near-surface concentration of /sup 226/Ra in soil and sediment samples, concentration of /sup 226/Ra in water, calculated subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra, and particulate radionuclide concentrations in air samples are given. The data serve to define the extent of contamination in the vicinity of the mill sites and their immediate surrounding areas with tailings particles. Results of these measurements were utilized as technical input for an engineering assessment of these two sites.

  10. Management and overview Quality Assurance Program Plan. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office (DOE/ UMTRA-PO) is the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) organization charged with the responsibility of managing and coordinating the activities of the various participating organizations and support contractors working on the UMTRA Project. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes how the DOE/UMTRA-PO, as assisted by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC), performs the quality assurance (QA) aspects of managing and coordinating UMTRA Project activities. This QAPP was developed to comply with DOE Order 5700.6A, August, 1981, and AL Order 5700.6B, April, 1984, which contain the criteria applicable to Project QA activities.

  11. The US uranium revitalization, Tailings Reclamation and Enrichment Act, Title 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 4, 1987, the US Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources reported out to the Senate bill number S.1846 (Uranium Revitalization, Tailings Reclamation and Enrichment Act of 1987). In early 1988, the bill was reintroduced as S.2097, withut some of its earlier provisions that had caused jurisdictional conflict with the Senate Finance Committee. One of the deleted provisions comprised most of Title I of S.1846, dealing primarily with establishing a fee on the use of imported uranium by US utilities. These provisions were reintroduced by amendment on the floor of the Senate on March 30, 1988. In a key vote, a motion to block the reintroduction of the deleted provisions was defeated by a 47-45 margin. The full bill S.2097, again with uranium import provisions, was subsequently passed by a vote of 62-28 in the Senate. The bill now goes to the US House of Representatives for its consideration.

  12. Contents of environmental impact statements prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental impact statements (EISS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the statements; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the statements which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements and the definitions of terms established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE Order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. These requirements and definitions are implicity part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EISs Guidelines for preparation of environmental assessments for the UMTRA Project are available.

  13. Evidence for non-Gaussian tail in 3D pion emission source at the SPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P Chung; P Danielewicz; for The NA49 Collaboration

    2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA49 experiment at CERN SPS has acquired a huge data set of Pb+Pb events over a broad range of energy and centrality during the last several years. This high statistics data set, coupled with a state-of-the-art analysis technique, allows for the first model-independent extraction and energy scan of 3D emission sources for pion pairs at SPS energies. These 3D pion emission sources provide new insights into the nature of a long-range source previously reported by PHENIX at RHIC. The new results indicate that the pion source displays significant non-Gaussian tails in the longitudinal direction at 40 and 158 AGeV and in the outward direction at 158 AGeV.

  14. Robust emergent climate phenomena associated with the high-sensitivity tail.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Levy, Michael Nathan; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because the potential effects of climate change are more severe than had previously been thought, increasing focus on uncertainty quantification is required for risk assessment needed by policy makers. Current scientific efforts focus almost exclusively on establishing best estimates of future climate change. However, the greatest consequences occur in the extreme tail of the probability density functions for climate sensitivity (the 'high-sensitivity tail'). To this end, we are exploring the impacts of newly postulated, highly uncertain, but high-consequence physical mechanisms to better establish the climate change risk. We define consequence in terms of dramatic change in physical conditions and in the resulting socioeconomic impact (hence, risk) on populations. Although we are developing generally applicable risk assessment methods, we have focused our initial efforts on uncertainty and risk analyses for the Arctic region. Instead of focusing on best estimates, requiring many years of model parameterization development and evaluation, we are focusing on robust emergent phenomena (those that are not necessarily intuitive and are insensitive to assumptions, subgrid-parameterizations, and tunings). For many physical systems, under-resolved models fail to generate such phenomena, which only develop when model resolution is sufficiently high. Our ultimate goal is to discover the patterns of emergent climate precursors (those that cannot be predicted with lower-resolution models) that can be used as a 'sensitivity fingerprint' and make recommendations for a climate early warning system that would use satellites and sensor arrays to look for the various predicted high-sensitivity signatures. Our initial simulations are focused on the Arctic region, where underpredicted phenomena such as rapid loss of sea ice are already emerging, and because of major geopolitical implications associated with increasing Arctic accessibility to natural resources, shipping routes, and strategic locations. We anticipate that regional climate will be strongly influenced by feedbacks associated with a seasonally ice-free Arctic, but with unknown emergent phenomena.

  15. Most elasmobranchs and basal ray-finned fishes possess an asymmetrical tail morphology in which the dorsal lobe,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    Most elasmobranchs and basal ray-finned fishes possess an asymmetrical tail morphology in which the dorsal lobe, containing the extension of the vertebral column, is longer than the ventral lobe. Over of a freely swimming leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata) produces lift when the body is moving horizontally

  16. Notable altitudinal range extension of the northern naked-tailed armadillo Cabassous centralis (Cingulata: Dasypodidae) in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad

    (Cingulata: Dasypodidae) in Colombia Juan F. Díaz-N. & Camilo Sánchez-Giraldo Grupo de Mastozoología - CTUA. Instituto de Biología, Universidad de Antioquia. Apartado Aéreo 1226 Medellín, Colombia. juanfdiazn, Colombia The Northern naked-tailed armadillo, Cabassous centralis Miller 1899, is distributed through

  17. Using Tailed Radio Galaxies to Probe the Environment and Magnetic Field of Galaxy Clusters in the SKA Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston-Hollitt, M; Pratley, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The morphology of tailed radio galaxies is an invaluable source of environmental information, in which a history of the past interactions in the intra-cluster medium, such as complex galaxy motions and cluster merger shocks, are preserved. In recent years, the use of tailed radio galaxies as environmental probes has gained momentum as a method for galaxy cluster detection, examining the dynamics of individual clusters, measuring the density and velocity flows in the intra-cluster medium, and for probing cluster magnetic fields. To date instrumental limitations in terms of resolution and sensitivity have confined this research to the local (z < 0.7) Universe. The advent of SKA1 surveys however will allow detection of roughly 1,000,000 tailed radio galaxies and their associated galaxy clusters out to redshifts of 2 or more. This is in fact ten times more than the current number of known clusters in the Universe. Additionally between 50,000 and 100,000 tailed radio galaxies will be sufficiently polarized to a...

  18. Proposed ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the US DOE water resources protection strategy for the Green River, Utah mill tailings disposal site. The modifications in the original plan are based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. All aspects are discussed in this report.

  19. Health assessment for Richardson Flat Tailings, Park City, Summit County, Utah, Region 8. CERCLIS No. UTD980952840. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Richardson Flat Tailings, an Update 7 site proposed for the National Priorities List, is located 3.5 miles northeast of Park City, Summit County, Utah. From 1975 to 1981, the 160-acre site was used for disposing mine tailing wastes from the Keetly Ontario Mine and other mines owned by United Park City Mines. Currently no tailings are dumped at the site; however, soil from the site is being excavated and used to cover the tailings piles. Several metal contaminants, including arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and zinc, have been detected in on-site and off-site areas. Contaminants may migrate from the site to off-site areas through surface water, groundwater, and airborne-associated pathways. Human exposure to site contaminants may occur through the ingestion of contaminated groundwater, food-chain entities, and soil; through dermal contact with contaminants; and through the inhalation of airborne dusts. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the high levels of on-site contaminants.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Monticello Mill Tailings site, San Juan County, UT. (First remedial action), August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The 300-acre Monticello Mill Tailings site is comprised of a 78-acre inactive uranium and vanadium milling operation and affected peripheral properties in Monticello, San Juan County, Utah. Surrounding land use is rural residential and agricultural. Milling of ore began in 1942, and a vanadium/uranium sludge product was produced onsite from 1943 to 1944. The mill was permanently closed in 1960, and the tailings piles were covered and vegetated. In 1972, 15,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil were excavated and disposed of on the onsite tailings piles. Site investigations from 1989 to 1990 identified the presence of onsite and offsite radioactively-contaminated soil and ground water, and elevated concentrations of metals within the tailings piles. The Record of Decision (ROD)addresses remediation of two Operable Units (OUs): the 78-acre Millsite area (OU1), and the 240-acres of peripheral properties (OU2). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and radioactive materials including radium-226 and radon.

  1. Power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  2. Structural implications of the C-terminal tail in the catalytic and stability properties of manganese peroxidases from ligninolytic fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Acebes, Sandra [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, María Jesús; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Guallar, Victor, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Martínez, Angel T., E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variable C-terminal tail of manganese peroxidases, a group of enzymes involved in lignin degradation, is implicated in their catalytic and stability properties, as shown by new crystal structures, molecular-simulation and directed-mutagenesis data. Based on this structural–functional evaluation, short and long/extralong manganese peroxidase subfamilies have been accepted; the latter are characterized by exceptional stability, while it is shown for the first time that the former are able to oxidize other substrates at the same site where manganese(II) is oxidized. The genome of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes 13 manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes representative of the three subfamilies described in ligninolytic fungi, which share an Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and have varying lengths of the C-terminal tail. Short, long and extralong MnPs were heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized, and the first structure of an extralong MnP was solved. Its C-terminal tail surrounds the haem-propionate access channel, contributing to Mn{sup 2+} oxidation by the internal propionate, but prevents the oxidation of 2, 2?-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), which is only oxidized by short MnPs and by shortened-tail variants from site-directed mutagenesis. The tail, which is anchored by numerous contacts, not only affects the catalytic properties of long/extralong MnPs but is also associated with their high acidic stability. Cd{sup 2+} binds at the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and competitively inhibits oxidation of both Mn{sup 2+} and ABTS. Moreover, mutations blocking the haem-propionate channel prevent substrate oxidation. This agrees with molecular simulations that position ABTS at an electron-transfer distance from the haem propionates of an in silico shortened-tail form, while it cannot reach this position in the extralong MnP crystal structure. Only small differences exist between the long and the extralong MnPs, which do not justify their classification as two different subfamilies, but they significantly differ from the short MnPs, with the presence/absence of the C-terminal tail extension being implicated in these differences.

  3. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the e?e? C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(?3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments ?n. To eliminate an O(?QCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter ?1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in ?1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for ?s(mZ) and ?1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ? 2.5% at Q=mZ.

  4. The rounding of the phase transition for disordered pinning with stretched exponential tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubert Lacoin

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of frozen-in or quenched disorder in a system can often modify the nature of its phase transition. A particular instance of this phenomenon is the so-called rounding effect: it has been shown in many cases that the free-energy curve of the disordered system at its critical point is smoother than that of the homogenous one. In particular some disordered systems do not allow first-order transitions. We study this phenomenon for the pinning of a renewal with stretched-exponential tails on a defect line (the distribution $K$ of the renewal increments satisfies $K(n) \\sim c_K\\exp(-n^{\\alpha}),$ $\\alpha\\in (0,1)$) which has a first order transition when disorder is not present. We show that the critical behavior of the disordered system depends on the value of $\\alpha$: when $\\alpha>1/2$ the transition remains first order, whereas the free-energy diagram is smoothed for $\\alpha\\le 1/2$. Furthermore we show that the rounding effect is getting stronger when $\\alpha$ diminishes.

  5. Substructure in clusters containing wide-angle tailed radio galaxies. I. New redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinkney, J C; Ledlow, M J; Gómez, P L; Hill, J M; Pinkney, Jason; Burns, Jack O.; Ledlow, Michael J.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hill, John M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new redshifts and positions for 635 galaxies in nine rich clusters containing Wide-Angle Tailed (WAT) radio galaxies. Combined with existing data, we now have a sample of 18 WAT-containing clusters with more than 10 redshifts. This sample contains a substantial portion of the WAT clusters in the VLA 20 cm survey of Abell clusters, including 75% of WAT clusters in the complete survey (z0.09. It is a representative sample which should not contain biases other than selection by radio morphology. We graphically present the new data using histograms and sky maps. A semi-automated procedure is used to search for emission lines in the spectra in order to add and verify galaxy redshifts. We find that the average apparent fraction of emission line galaxies is about 9% in both the clusters and the field. We investigate the magnitude completeness of our redshift surveys with CCD data for a test case, Abell 690. This case indicates that our galaxy target lists are deeper than the detection limit of a typical M...

  6. Substructure in clusters containing wide-angle tailed radio galaxies. I. New redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Pinkney; Jack O. Burns; Michael J. Ledlow; Percy L. Gomez; John M. Hill

    2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new redshifts and positions for 635 galaxies in nine rich clusters containing Wide-Angle Tailed (WAT) radio galaxies. Combined with existing data, we now have a sample of 18 WAT-containing clusters with more than 10 redshifts. This sample contains a substantial portion of the WAT clusters in the VLA 20 cm survey of Abell clusters, including 75% of WAT clusters in the complete survey (z0.09. It is a representative sample which should not contain biases other than selection by radio morphology. We graphically present the new data using histograms and sky maps. A semi-automated procedure is used to search for emission lines in the spectra in order to add and verify galaxy redshifts. We find that the average apparent fraction of emission line galaxies is about 9% in both the clusters and the field. We investigate the magnitude completeness of our redshift surveys with CCD data for a test case, Abell 690. This case indicates that our galaxy target lists are deeper than the detection limit of a typical MX exposure, and they are 82% complete down to R=19.0. The importance of the uniformity of the placement of fibers on targets is posited, and we evaluate this in our datasets. We find some cases of non-uniformities which may influence dynamical analyses. A second paper will use this database to look for correlations between the WAT radio morphology and the cluster's dynamical state.

  7. Mobile water treatment plant special study. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. To begin implementation of Phase 11 groundwater remediation, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested that (1) the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) conduct a study to provide for the design of a mobile water treatment plant to treat groundwater extracted during site characterization studies at completed Phase I UMTRA sites, and (2) the results of the TAC investigations be documented in a special study report. This special study develops the design criteria for a water treatment plant that can be readily transported from one UMTRA site to another and operated as a complete treatment system. The 1991 study provides the basis for selecting a mobile water treatment system to meet the operating requirements recommended in this special study. The scope of work includes the following: Determining contaminants, flows, and loadings. Setting effluent quality criteria. Sizing water treatment unit(s). Evaluating non-monetary aspects of alternate treatment processes. Comparing costs of alternate treatment processes. Recommending the mobile water treatment plant design criteria.

  8. Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-juan Chang; Aaron D. Peacock; Philip E. Long; John R. Stephen; James P. Mckinley; Sarah J. Macnaughton; A. K. M. Anwar Hussain; Arnold M. Saxton; David C. White

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex., was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from ?-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least 52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0. Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within ?-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P ? 0.0001). This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable

  9. Groundwater protection management program plan. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a groundwater protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office has prepared a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (groundwater protection plan) of sufficient scope and detail to reflect the program's significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter 3, for special program planning. The groundwater protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor groundwater resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies project technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA groundwater protection management program. In addition, the groundwater protection plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA sites (long-term care at disposal sites and groundwater restoration at processing sites). This plan will be reviewed annually and updated every 3 years in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  10. Selection of water treatment processes special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. The restoration of contaminated aquifers is to be undertaken in Phase II of the UMTRA Project. To begin implementation of Phase II, DOE requested that groundwater restoration methods and technologies be investigated by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). and that the results of the TAC investigations be documented in special study reports. Many active and passive methods are available to clean up contaminated groundwater. Passive groundwater treatment includes natural flushing, geochemical barriers, and gradient manipulation by stream diversion or slurry walls. Active groundwater.cleanup techniques include gradient manipulation by well extraction or injection. in-situ biological or chemical reclamation, and extraction and treatment. Although some or all of the methods listed above may play a role in the groundwater cleanup phase of the UMTRA Project, the extraction and treatment (pump and treat) option is the only restoration alternative discussed in this report. Hence, all sections of this report relate either directly or indirectly to the technical discipline of process engineering.

  11. Analysis of BIOMOVS II Uranium Mill Tailings scenario 1.07 with the RESRAD computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnanapragasam, E.K.; Yu, C.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory was selected for participation in the model intercomparison test scenario, version 1.07, conducted by the Uranium Mill Tailings Working Group in the second phase of the international Biospheric Model Validation Study. The RESRAD code was enhanced to provide an output attributing radiological dose to the nuclide at the point of exposure, in addition to the existing output attributing radiological dose to the nuclide in the contaminated zone. A conceptual model to account for off-site accumulation following atmospheric deposition was developed and showed the importance of considering this process for this off-site scenario. The RESRAD predictions for the atmospheric release compared well with most of the other models. The peak and steady-state doses and concentrations predicted by RESRAD for the groundwater release also agreed well with most of the other models participating in the study; however, the RESRAD plots shows a later breakthrough time and sharp changes compared with the plots of the predictions of other models. These differences were due to differences in the formulation for the retardation factor and to not considering the effects of longitudinal dispersion.

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium.

  13. An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

  14. Cooling process for inelastic Boltzmann equations for hard spheres, Part II: Self-similar solutions and tail behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stéphane Mischler; Clément Mouhot

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the spatially homogeneous Boltzmann equation for inelastic hard spheres, in the framework of so-called constant normal restitution coefficients. We prove the existence of self-similar solutions, and we give pointwise estimates on their tail. We also give general estimates on the tail and the regularity of generic solutions. In particular we prove Haff 's law on the rate of decay of temperature, as well as the algebraic decay of singularities. The proofs are based on the regularity study of a rescaled problem, with the help of the regularity properties of the gain part of the Boltzmann collision integral, well-known in the elastic case, and which are extended here in the context of granular gases.

  15. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  16. Treatment of primary tailings and middlings from the hot water extraction process for recovering bitumen from tar sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cymbalisty, L. M. O.; Cymerman, J.

    1995-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary tailings and middlings are combined and fed to a vessel having the general form of a deep cone thickener. The feed is deflected outwardly and generally horizontally by a baffle, as it is delivered to the vessel. Simultaneously, the outwardly radiating layer of newly added feed is contacted from below by an upwelling stream of aerated middlings, which stream moves in parallel with the aforesaid layer. Bitumen froth is formed and recovered. The upwelling stream is provided by circulating middlings through eductor/aerator assemblies and a plenum chamber mounted centrally in the body of middlings in the vessel. A generally circular circulation of middlings is generated. In this manner, the newly added bitumen is quickly and efficiently recovered. Recirculation of middlings to the aeration zone yields an additional recovery of bitumen. Use of the deep cone ensures that the tailings from the vessel are relatively low in water and bitumen content.

  17. Comment and response document for the ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) responses to comments from both the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Utah are provided in this document. The Proposed Ground Water Protection Strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah, presents the proposed (modified) ground water protection strategy for the disposal cell at the Green River disposal site for compliance with Subpart A of 40 CFR Part 192. Before the disposal cell was constructed, site characterization was conducted at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to determine an acceptable compliance strategy. Results of the investigation are reported in detail in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a). The NRC and the state of Utah have accepted the final RAP. The changes in this document relate only to a modification of the compliance strategy for ground water protection.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  20. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VP) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial actions at the Slick Rock sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  1. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Appendix D, Addenda D1--D7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation foe the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Project Office, in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. the objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on-pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra-226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  2. LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled dpa) § Removes ion threat and mitigates x-ray threat ­ allows simple steel piping § No need

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project sites are near Slick Rock, Colorado: the North Continent site and the Union Carbide site. Currently, no one uses the contaminated ground water at either site for domestic or agricultural purposes. However, there may be future land development. This risk assessment evaluates possible future health problems associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Since some health problems could occur, it is recommended that the contaminated ground water not be used as drinking water.

  4. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment (Attachment 1) and a floodplain/wetlands attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

  5. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment and a floodplain/wetlands assessment are included as part of this EA. This report and attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

  6. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Plans to Resume Train Shipments in March; All of the Laid Off Workers Will Return

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grand Junction, CO ? All 27 employees of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) to the U.S. Department of Energy will return to work on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project on March 4, following a 3-month planned furlough. Project shipping and disposal operations have been shut down, as planned, since late November 2012, but are scheduled to resume March 7, after the contractor ensures employees have received refresher training, reviewed procedures, and measures are in place for a safe startup.

  7. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  8. Derivation and implementation of an annual limit on intake and a derived air concentration value for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, R.H. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Andrews, D.W. [RUST Federal Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring workers and work areas at the Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites is complex because all radionuclides in the {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U decay chains may be present in an airborne uranium mill tillings matrix. Previous monitoring practices involved isotopic analysis of the air filter to determine the activity of each radionuclide of concern and comparing the results to the specified derived air concentration. The annual limit on intake and derived air concentration values have been derived here for the uranium mill tailings matrix to simplify the procedure for evaluation of air monitoring results and assessment of the need for individual monitoring. Implementation of the derived air concentration for uranium mill tailings involves analyzing air samples for long-lived gross alpha activity and comparing the activity concentration to the derived air concentration. Health physics decisions regarding assessment of airborne concentrations is more cost-effective because isotopic analysis of air samples is not necessary. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  10. XAFS determination of the chemical form of lead in smelter-contaminated soils and mine tailings: Importance of adsorption processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morin, G.; Juillot, F.; Ildefonse, P.; Calas, G. [Univ. de Paris 6 et 7 (France). Lab. de Mineralogie-Cristallographie; Ostergren, J.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences; Brown, G.E. Jr. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences]|[Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors investigated smelter-contaminated soils from Evin-Malmaison, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, and mine tailings from Leadville, Colorado, U.S.A. Bulk Pb concentrations range from 460 to 1900 ppm in the topsoils at Evin-Malmaison site and from 6000 to 10,000 ppm in the tailings samples from the Leadville site. These concentrations necessarily raise human health and environmental concerns, but bioavailability and chemical lability of Pb in these materials vary dramatically and show little correlation with bulk concentrations. This study provides detailed information on the speciation of Pb in these materials. Emphasis is on the identification and characterization of poorly crystalline and/or fine-grained species, such as sorption complexes and poorly crystalline (co)precipitates, which are likely to control Pb bioavailability and mobility in these natural systems. In the Evin-Malmaison samples, direct spectroscopic evidence for Pb sorbed to humic acids was found, as well as to both manganese and iron (oxyhydr)oxides. In the Leadville samples, variations in Pb speciation with pH are consistent with predictions based on simplified model system studies of adsorption processes; specifically, the carbonate-buffered tailings with near-neutral pH contain up to 50% of total Pb as adsorption complexes on iron (oxyhydr)oxides, whereas Pb speciation in sulfide-rich low pH samples is dominated by Pb-bearing jarosites with no evidence for adsorbed Pb in these latter samples.

  11. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are many solar photovoltaic power plants internationally andUSA, Blythe, CA Solar electric power plant, Blythe USA, SanTX Blue Wing solar electric power plant USA, Jacksonville,

  12. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the electrical power output to the solar power input), aSolar Energy Calculator using Google Maps 23 Table 1.24: PV System Power Production Average Daily Irradiance (kWh/m2) Instillation Efficiency Labeled Efficiency Output

  13. The role of the tail in stability and maneuverability during running, climbing, mid-air orientation and gliding in both animals and robots.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jusufi, Ardian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006). Dynamics of geckos running vertically. J Exp Biolof the tail in attaining high running speed in CnemidophorusDaniels, C.B. (1983). Running: an escape strategy enhanced

  14. ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ecosystem Function in Alluvial Tailings after Biosolids and Lime Addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    JournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ecosystem Function in Alluvial Tailings after Biosolids and Lime Addition Sally Brown,* Mark Sprenger, this site requires an alternative assessment meth-Municipal biosolids and agricultural limestone were

  15. A genetic approach to the study of population structure in white-tailed deer :: evidence from the Noble Foundation Wildlife Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Joel David

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A panel of DNA microsatellite markers was developed in order to simultaneously analyze multiple genetic loci in the white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). These markers were multiplexed and visualized on an automated fluorescence detection...

  16. Personality in Captive Ring-tailed Lemurs (Lemur Catta): Trait Structure and the Interaction with Dominance Hierarchy and Zoo Visitor Effects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Camille

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personality ratings for a captive group of ring-tailed lemurs were obtained and factor analysis revealed four personality factors labelled Dominance, High Neuroticism/Low Conscientiousness, Extraversion and Agreeableness. The study also explored...

  17. Nesting success of the great-tailed grackle (Cassidix mexicanus prosopidicola) in relation to certain density dependent and density independent factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotie, Robert Francis

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NESTING SUCCESS OF THE GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE (CASSIDIX MEXICANUS PROSOPIDICOLA) IN RELATION TO CERTAIN DENSITY DEPENDENT AND DENSITY INDEPENDENT FACTORS A Thesis by ROBERT FRANCIS GOTIE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... AND DENSITY INDEPENDENT FACTORS A Thesis by ROBERT FRANCIS GOTIE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1972 ABSTRACT Nesting Success of the Great-tailed Grackle (Cassidix...

  18. Nesting success of the great-tailed grackle (Cassidix mexicanus prosopidicola) in relation to certain density dependent and density independent factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotie, Robert Francis

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NESTING SUCCESS OF THE GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE (CASSIDIX MEXICANUS PROSOPIDICOLA) IN RELATION TO CERTAIN DENSITY DEPENDENT AND DENSITY INDEPENDENT FACTORS A Thesis by ROBERT FRANCIS GOTIE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subject: Wildlife Science NESTING SUCCESS OF THE GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE (CASSIDIX MEXICANUS PROSOPIDICOLA) IN RELATION TO CERTAIN DENSITY DEPENDENT...

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 30, 2013, Santa Clara, CA 2 Outline * Introduction Power Electronics in Electric Drive Vehicles Automotive Power Electronics Module Operation Automotive...

  20. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PROGRAM REVIEW 2013 Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power Principal Investigator: Prof. Gang Chen Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA...

  1. TVA- Green Power Providers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and participating power distributors of TVA power offer a performance-based incentive program to homeowners and businesses for the installation of renewable...

  2. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

  3. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

  4. Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect...

  5. New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems January 30, 2008 - 6:47pm Addthis Artist's concept...

  6. Peptides derived from human galectin-3 N-terminal tail interact with its carbohydrate recognition domain in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berbís, M. Álvaro [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); André, Sabine [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany)] [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Cañada, F. Javier [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pipkorn, Rüdiger [Central Peptide Synthesis Unit, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Central Peptide Synthesis Unit, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ippel, Hans [Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands) [Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mayo, Kevin H. [Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kübler, Dieter [Biomolecular Interactions, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Biomolecular Interactions, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gabius, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany)] [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús, E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Galectin-3 is composed of a carbohydrate recognition domain and an N-terminal tail. •Synthetic peptides derived from the tail are shown to interact with the CRD. •This interaction is modulated by Ser- and Tyr-phosphorylation of the peptides. -- Abstract: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multi-functional effector protein that functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, as well as extracellularly following non-classical secretion. Structurally, Gal-3 is unique among galectins with its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) attached to a rather long N-terminal tail composed mostly of collagen-like repeats (nine in the human protein) and terminating in a short non-collagenous terminal peptide sequence unique in this lectin family and not yet fully explored. Although several Ser and Tyr sites within the N-terminal tail can be phosphorylated, the physiological significance of this post-translational modification remains unclear. Here, we used a series of synthetic (phospho)peptides derived from the tail to assess phosphorylation-mediated interactions with {sup 15}N-labeled Gal-3 CRD. HSQC-derived chemical shift perturbations revealed selective interactions at the backface of the CRD that were attenuated by phosphorylation of Tyr 107 and Tyr 118, while phosphorylation of Ser 6 and Ser 12 was essential. Controls with sequence scrambling underscored inherent specificity. Our studies shed light on how phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail may impact on Gal-3 function and prompt further studies using phosphorylated full-length protein.

  7. Multi-functional foot use during running in the zebra-tailed lizard (Callisaurus draconoides)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen Li; S. Tonia Hsieh; Daniel I. Goldman

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A diversity of animals that run on solid, level, flat, non-slip surfaces appear to bounce on their legs; elastic elements in the limbs can store and return energy during each step. The mechanics and energetics of running in natural terrain, particularly on surfaces that can yield and flow under stress, is less understood. The zebra-tailed lizard (Callisaurus draconoides), a small desert generalist with a large, elongate, tendinous hind foot, runs rapidly across a variety of natural substrates. We use high speed video to obtain detailed three-dimensional running kinematics on solid and granular surfaces to reveal how leg, foot, and substrate mechanics contribute to its high locomotor performance. Running at ~10 body length/s (~1 m/s), the center of mass oscillates like a spring-mass system on both substrates, with only 15% reduction in stride length on the granular surface. On the solid surface, a strut-spring model of the hind limb reveals that the hind foot saves about 40% of the mechanical work needed per step, significant for the lizard's small size. On the granular surface, a penetration force model and hypothesized subsurface foot rotation indicates that the hind foot paddles through fluidized granular medium, and that the energy lost per step during irreversible deformation of the substrate does not differ from the reduction in the mechanical energy of the center of mass. The upper hind leg muscles must perform three times as much mechanical work on the granular surface as on the solid surface to compensate for the greater energy lost within the foot and to the substrate.

  8. Acceleration of Microbially Mediated U(VI) Reduction at a Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phil Long; Todd Anderson; Aaron Peacock; Steve Heald; Yun-Juan Chang; Dick Dayvault; Derek R. Lovley; C.T. Resch; Helen Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; D.C. White

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A second field-scale electron donor amendment experiment was conducted in 2003 at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado. The objective of the 2003 experiment (done in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy's UMTRA Groundwater Project) was to test the hypothesis that amendment of increased concentration of electron donor would result in an increased export of electron donor down gradient which in turn would create a larger zone of down-gradient U(VI) bioreduction sustained over a longer time period relative to the 2002 experiment (Anderson et al. 2003). During the first experiment (2002), {approx}3 mM acetate was amended to subsurface over a period of 3 months in a 15m by 18m by 2.5m volume comprised of 3 upgradient monitoring wells, 20 injection wells, and 15 down-gradient monitoring wells. After an initial one-month phase of metal reduction, bioavailable oxidized Fe was consumed near the injection gallery and the dominant terminal electron accepting process became sulfate reduction, rapidly consuming the injected acetate. For the 2003 experiment, we amended sufficient acetate ({approx}10 mM) to consume available sulfate and export acetate down-gradient where bioavailable oxidized Fe was still present. Data from the experiment indicate that acetate was exported further down gradient, resulting in a larger zone of microbial U(VI) reduction than for the 2002 experiment. Geohydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological data collected during the course of both experiments enable assessment of relative importance of a number of factors controlling the experimental outcomes. Companion posters by Anderson et al. and White et al. provide additional results.

  9. DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF ENGINEERED COVERS FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W. Jody

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Final remedies at most uranium mill tailings sites include engineered covers designed to contain metals and radionuclides in the subsurface for hundreds of years. Early cover designs rely on compacted soil layers to limit water infiltration and release of radon, but some of these covers inadvertently created habitats for deep-rooted plants. Root intrusion and soil development increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity several orders of magnitude above design targets. These covers may require high levels of maintenance to sustain long-term performance. Relatively low precipitation, high potential evapotranspiration, and thick unsaturated soils favor long-term hydrologic isolation of buried waste at arid and semiarid sites. Later covers were designed to mimic this natural soil-water balance with the goal of sustaining performance with little or no maintenance. For example, the cover for the Monticello, Utah, Superfund site relies on a thick soil-sponge layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to store precipitation while plants are dormant and on native vegetation to dry the soil sponge during the growing season. Measurements of both off-site caisson lysimeters and a large 3-ha lysimeter built into the final cover show that drainage has been well below a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency target of less than 3.0 mm/yr. Our stewardship strategy combines monitoring precursors to failure, probabilistic riskbased modeling, and characterization of natural analogs to project performance of covers for a range of possible future environmental scenarios. Natural analogs are needed to understand how ecological processes will influence cover performance, processes that cannot be predicted with short-term monitoring and existing numerical models.

  10. Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yun-Juan (Unknown); Peacock, A D. (Tennessee, Univ Of); Long, Philip E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephen, John R. (Unknown); McKinley, James P. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Mcnaughton, Sarah J. (Unknown); Hussain, A K M A.; Saxton, A M.; White, D C. (Unknown)

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of U(VI) to U(TV) plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex,, was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from F-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least,52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0, Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within F-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (less than or equal to 302 ppb) samples. One Desulfotomaculum like sequence cluster overwhelmingly dominated high-U (> 1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P= 0.0001), This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable tolerance and adaptation to high levels of uranium and suggests the organism's possible involvement in natural attenuation of uranium. The in situ activity level of Desulfotomaculum in uranium-contaminated environments and its comparison to the activities of other SRB and other functional groups should be an important area for future research.

  11. Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Smith, G. [GeoSmith Engineering, LLC, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Danforth, B. [Cordilleran Compliance Services, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Gee, G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Kothari, V.; Pauling, T. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is evaluating the performance of disposal cell covers at LM sites and exploring ways to enhance their sustainability. The cover of the Lakeview, Oregon, disposal cell relies on a compacted soil layer (CSL) to limit radon escape and water percolation into underlying tailings. The design created habitat favorable for growth of woody plants that sent roots through the CSL. The mean saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub sat}) of the CSL, measured at 17 locations, was 3.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, 300 times greater than the design target. The highest K{sub sat} values were measured near the top of the CSL at locations both with and without roots; the lowest K{sub sat} values were measured deeper in the CSL. Water flux meters (WFMs) installed in 2005 to directly measure percolation flux show significant percolation through the cover. Three WMFs began recording percolation in mid-November, 7 days after the start of a prolonged precipitation event, and continued until early June 2006. Percolation flux during this period ranged between 3.1 x 10{sup -5} and 8.5 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}. The cumulative percolation was greater than total precipitation during the period, probably because of a water-harvesting effect. The WFMs were strategically placed in down-gradient positions on the cover top slope where water likely accumulated in a sand drainage layer. Routine monitoring at Lakeview shows that the ground water remains protected. LM plans to evaluate potential effects of high percolation rates in covers to ensure that disposal cells remain protective for the long term. (authors)

  12. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  13. Power Series Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Power Series 16.4 Introduction In this section we consider power series. These are examples of infinite series where each term contains a variable, x, raised to a positive integer power. We use the ratio test to obtain the radius of convergence R, of the power series and state the important result

  14. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  15. Dispersed power and renewables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Sullivan, J.B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed power generation and renewable energy sources are discussed: The following topics are discussed: distributed resources, distributed generation, commercialization requirements, biomass power, location of existing biomass feedstocks, biomass business plan components, North Carolina BGCC partnership, New York biomass co-firing project, alfalfa for power and feed, Hawaii Pioneer Mill LOI project, next steps for biomass, wind power activity, photovoltaic modules and arrays, lead-acid batteries, superconducting magnetic energy storage, fuel cells, and electric power industry trends.

  16. An Evolutionarily Conserved Family of Virion Tail Needles Related to Bacteriophage P22 gp26: Correlation between Structural Stability and Length of the -Helical Trimeric Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Walker-Kopp, N; Casjens, S; Cingolani, G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteriophages of the Podoviridae family use short noncontractile tails to inject their genetic material into Gram-negative bacteria. In phage P22, the tail contains a thin needle, encoded by the phage gene 26, which is essential both for stabilization and for ejection of the packaged viral genome. Bioinformatic analysis of the N-terminal domain of gp26 (residues 1-60) led us to identify a family of genes encoding putative homologues of the tail needle gp26. To validate this idea experimentally and to explore their diversity, we cloned the gp26-like gene from phages HK620, Sf6 and HS1, and characterized these gene products in solution. All gp26-like factors contain an elongated {alpha}-helical coiled-coil core consisting of repeating, adjacent trimerization heptads and form trimeric fibers with length ranging between about 240 to 300 {angstrom}. gp26 tail needles display a high level of structural stability in solution, with Tm (temperature of melting) between 85 and 95 C. To determine how the structural stability of these phage fibers correlates with the length of the {alpha}-helical core, we investigated the effect of insertions and deletions in the helical core. In the P22 tail needle, we identified an 85-residue-long helical domain, termed MiCRU (minimal coiled-coil repeat unit), that can be inserted in-frame inside the gp26 helical core, preserving the straight morphology of the fiber. Likewise, we were able to remove three quarters of the helical core of the HS1 tail needle, minimally decreasing the stability of the fiber. We conclude that in the gp26 family of tail needles, structural stability increases nonlinearly with the length of the {alpha}-helical core. Thus, the overall stability of these bacteriophage fibers is not solely dependent on the number of trimerization repeats in the {alpha}-helical core.

  17. Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  18. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  20. Cleanup protocols when encountering thorium-230 at U.S. DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.L.; Hylko, J.M.; Cornish, R.E.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, established the regulatory framework, under which the US EPA charged with developing standards for the cleanup and disposal of tailings at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites located in 10 states. 40 CFR 192.12 requires that the concentration of Ra-226 in land averaged over any area of 100 square meters shall not exceed the background level by more than 5 pCi/g, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, 15 pCi/g, averaged over 15-cm-thick layers of soils more than 15 cm below the surface. However, Th-230 is not specifically addressed by the EPA in 40 CFR 192.12, which naturally decays with a half-life of 77,000 years to form Ra-226. Consequently, the cleanup of the initial Ra-226 contamination according to the standards will not necessarily mitigate against the eventual ingrowth of residual Ra-226 with time, due to the radioactive decay of residual Th-230. Therefore, to direct the excavation of residual Th-230, four generic protocols are being used at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, as follows: Determining the allowable remaining concentration of Th-230 in surface and subsurface soils; Encountering Th-230 contamination in the unsaturated subsurface soil; Encountering Th-230 contamination in the saturated zone; and Verification sampling. The four generic protocols, developed in conjunction with the supplemental standards provision, ensure protection of the general public by reducing exposures to levels that are As Low As Reasonably Achievable, while considering practical measures necessary to excavate Th-230 under conditions encountered at the UMTRA Project site.

  1. A clinical, histopathological, and immuno-fluorescent study of Babesia spp. infection in white-tailed deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emerson, Harold Ray

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' 1 *d t* ' ' 1 1 th th U 'td States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and was finally 1'' tdbythd' t' f't t'k t . ~BI'1 lt Babesia canis, which produces a disease in dogs, and Babesia ecCui and Babesia cabelli, which produce diseases... Tyler County in East Texas. Anemia and death occurred in a susceptible, Theileria- 9 free, splenectoxnized white-tailed deer inoculated with 10 ml. of blood taken from a deer in Tyler County. An increase in body texnpexature to 104. 5 F...

  2. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  3. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  4. Uranium Revitalization and Tailings Reclamation Act of 1986. Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, September 20, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. 1004 authorizes and directs the Energy Secretary to establish a program to provide for reclamation and other remedial actions with respect to mill tailings at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The committee recommends passage with an amendment to both the text and the title. The purpose of the bill is to ensure an adequate long-term supply of domestic uranium and enrichment capacity, to establish a viable industry, and to expedite the financing for reclamation. The report summarizes the legislative background, gives a section-by-section analysis, presents additional and minority views, and outlines necessary changes in existing law.

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE), Operable Unit 3, Monticello, UT, September 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for Operable Unit (OU) 3 surface water and ground water at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) in San Juan County, Utah. The selected alternative for the interim remedial action for OU 3 surface water runoff, continuation of ongoing monitoring efforts, and evaluation of a permeable reactive treatment (PeRT) wall through the use of a pilot-scale treatability study. If monitoring results indicate that the interim remedial action is not achieving the objectives of preventing exposure to and reducing contaminants in contaminated ground water, other alternatives will be evaluated from the OU 3 feasibility study.

  6. S. 341: A Bill to extend the authorization of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This bill proposes to modify the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 by modifying section 112(a) by striking `1996` and inserting `1998`.

  7. UGP Power Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wildlife and power generation on the Missouri River. Seven dams and powerplants have the installed capacity of 2,610 MW. That hydroelectric power is delivered across about 7,919...

  8. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  9. Power production and ADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the power production process in Accelerator Driven Sub-critical systems employing Thorium-232 and Uranium-238 as fuel and examine the demands on the power of the accelerator required.

  10. Power Factor Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: marcelo@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Temperature and High Power Density SiC Power Electronic...

  12. Idaho Power- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: mschupb@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Power Density Silicon Carbide Power Electronic Converters...

  14. Space Solar Power Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arif, H.; Barbosa, H.; Bardet, C.; Baroud, M.; Behar, A.; Berrier, K.; Berthe, P.; Bertrand, R.; Bibyk, I.; Bisson, J.; Bloch, L.; Bobadilla, G.; Bourque, D.; Bush, L.; Carandang, R.; Chiku, T.; Crosby, N.; De Seixas, M.; De Vries, J.; Doll, S.; Dufour, F.; Eckart, P.; Fahey, M.; Fenot, F.; Foeckersperger, S.; Fontaine, J.E.; Fowler, R.; Frey, H.; Fujio, H.; Gasa, J.M.; Gleave, J.; Godoe, J.; Green, I.; Haeberli, R.; Hanada, T.; Ha

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information pertaining to the Space Solar Power Program is presented on energy analysis; markets; overall development plan; organizational plan; environmental and safety issues; power systems; space transportation; space manufacturing, construction, operations; design examples; and finance.

  15. Green Power Purchase Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Class I renewable energy resources include solar, wind, new sustainable biomass, landfill gas, fuel cells (using renewable or non-renewable fuels), ocean thermal power, wave or tidal power, low...

  16. Body powered thermoelectric systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settaluri, Krishna Tej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great interest exists for and progress has be made in the effective utilization of the human body as a possible power supply in hopes of powering such applications as sensors and continuously monitoring medical devices ...

  17. Soldier power. Battery charging.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    hours runtime at full load 50 W #12; (%) (kW) 300 1-5 Siemens-Power 30 (hr) 10,000 Siemens 300 Acumentrics 80 (mW/cm2) 600 400 Siemens-Power 85 (hr) 70,000 3,000 Siemens-Power 15 () 500 25 Siemens-Power 60 >2013 - , Bloom, MHI, Rolls Royce 6 #12; SOFCSOFC * (LSCF ) ( Ag

  18. Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

  19. Power Prepayment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power Electronics PowerPower

  20. Tail effects in the third post-Newtonian gravitational wave energy flux of compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K G Arun; Luc Blanchet; Bala R Iyer; Moh'd S S Qusailah

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The far-zone flux of energy contains hereditary (tail) contributions that depend on the entire past history of the source. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism, we propose and implement a semi-analytical method in the frequency domain to compute these contributions from the inspiral phase of a binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits up to 3PN order. The method explicitly uses the quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits at 1PN order and exploits the doubly periodic nature of the motion to average the 3PN fluxes over the binary's orbit. Together with the instantaneous (non-tail) contributions evaluated in a companion paper, it provides crucial inputs for the construction of ready-to-use templates for compact binaries moving on quasi-elliptic orbits, an interesting class of sources for the ground based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and Virgo as well as space based detectors like LISA.

  1. Evaluation of sulfidic mine tailings solidified/stabilized with cement kiln dust and fly ash to control acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nehdi, M.; Tariq, A. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present research, industrial byproducts, namely, cement kiln dust (CKD) and Class C fly ash (FAC) have been used as candidate materials along with the partial addition of sulfate-resistant cement (SRC) in the Stabilization/solidification of polymetallic sulfidic mine tailings (MT). The effectiveness of S/S was assessed by comparing laboratory experimental values obtained from unconfined compressive strength, hydraulic conductivity and leaching propensity tests of S/S samples with regulatory standards for safe surface disposal of such wastes. Despite general regulatory compliance of compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity, some solidified/stabilized-cured matrices were found unable to provide the required immobilization of pollutants. Solidified/stabilized and 90-day cured mine tailings specimens made with composite binders containing (10% CKD + 10% FAC), (5% SRC + 15% FAC) and (5% SRC + 5% CKD + 10% FAC) significantly impaired the solubility of all contaminants investigated and proved successful in fixing metals within the matrix, in addition to achieving adequate unconfined compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity values, thus satisfying USEPA regulations. Laboratory investigations revealed that, for polymetallic mining waste, leachate concentrations are the most critical factor in assessing the effectiveness of S/S technology.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the Surface Project and the Ground Water Project. At the UMTRA Project site near Riverton, Wyoming, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1990. Tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were taken from the Riverton site to a disposal cell in the Gas Hills area, about 60 road miles (100 kilometers) to the east. The surface cleanup reduces radon and other radiation emissions and minimizes further ground water contamination. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the Riverton site that has resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. Such evaluations are used at each site to determine a strategy for complying with UMTRA ground water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and if human health risks could result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could hypothetically occur if drinking water were pumped from a well drilled in an area where ground water contamination might have occurred. Human health and environmental risks may also result if people, plants, or animals are exposed to surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water.

  3. Analysis of infiltration through a clay radon barrier at an UMTRA disposal cell. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An infiltration study was initiated in January 1988 to assess the percent saturation in, and infiltration through, clay radon barriers of typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cells. Predicting infiltration through the radon barrier is necessary to evaluate whether the disposal cell will comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards (40 CFR 192). The groundwater standards require demonstrating that tailings seepage will not cause background concentrations or maximum concentration limits (MCLs) to be exceeded at the downgradient edge of the disposal facility (the point of compliance, or POC). This demonstration generally consists of incorporating the predicted seepage flux and the concentration of the specific hazardous constituents into a contaminant transport model, and predicting the resultant concentrations at the POC. The infiltration study consisted of a field investigation to evaluate moisture conditions in the radon barrier of the completed Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project disposal cell and previously completed UMTRA Project disposal cells at Clive, Utah, and Burrell, Pennsylvania. Coring was conducted to measure percent saturation profiles in the radon barriers at these disposal cells. In addition, a detailed investigation of the Shiprock radon barrier was conducted to establish the effects of meteorological stresses on moisture conditions in the filter layer and radon barrier. The Shiprock infiltration study was also intended to characterize hydraulic gradients and operational unsaturated hydraulic conductivities in the radon barrier.

  4. Review and analysis of proposed EPA groundwater standards for the UMTRA Project. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Title I groundwater standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which were promulgated on January 5, 1983, by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, were remanded to the EPA on September 3, 1985, by the US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Court instructed the EPA to compile general groundwater standards for all sites. On September 24, 1987, the EPA published proposed standards in response to the remand. This Summary Report includes an evaluation of the potential effects of the proposed EPA groundwater standards on the UMTRA Project as well as a discussion of the DOE's position on the proposed standards. This report is accompanied by a detailed Technical Report and Appendices which provide supporting information and analyses. This Summary Report results from a study undertaken to: determine the impact of the proposed standards on the UMTRA Project; and recommend provisions for the implementation of the final standards that will minimize adverse impact to the conduct of the UMTRA Project while ensuring protection of human health and the environment. Specifically, the following were considered: the flexibility of the proposed standards; interpretations of the proposed standards; the extent of aquifer restoration that may be required to implement the proposed standards at each site; the costs of aquifer restoration; and design changes necessary to meet the standards.

  5. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  8. Power/Privilege Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Major; People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, New Orleans 2. Power is the ability to define reality and to convince other people that it is their definition. ~ Dr. Wade Nobles 3. Power is the capacity to act. 4 different cultures. [JL] RACISM Racism is race prejudice plus power [See Racist]. People's Institute calls

  9. EXTERIOR POWERS KEITH CONRAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    form on a manifold is related to exterior powers of the dual space of the tangent space of a manifoldEXTERIOR POWERS KEITH CONRAD 1. Introduction Let R be a commutative ring. Unless indicated the alternating multilinear functions on Mk: the exterior power k(M). It is a certain quotient module of Mk

  10. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  11. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 8-10, 2014 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  12. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 9-11, 2013 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  13. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 10 & 12, 2012 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  14. Green Power Inverter Prvningsrapport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Power Inverter Prøvningsrapport SolenergiCentret Søren Poulsen Ivan Katic Oktober 2004 #12;Green Power Inverter målerapport.doc SolenergiCentret - 04-03-2005 2 Forord Nærværende rapport indeholder Teknologisk Instituts bidrag til målinger i forbindelse med PSO projektet "Green Power Inverter

  15. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place: India...

  16. How Power is Lost: Illusions of Alliance Among the Powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brion, Sebastien

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    while most accounts of power loss focus on ethical breachesPower Loss .1. Proposed Model of Power Loss Figure 2. Social Monitoring

  17. High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    power source among renewables, is poised to emerge also as a flexible power source, balancing intermittent wind and solar power production and reducing variability in energy...

  18. Using government purchasing power to reduce equipment standby power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Jeffrey; Meier, Alan; Bartholomew, Emily; Thomas, Alison; Glickman, Joan; Ware, Michelle

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or external power supply, other specifications, and purchasethe consumer to purchase extra power strips and extensionan internal standby power function, shall purchase Although

  19. Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the...

  20. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in accordance with the final standards. The EPA reserves the right to modify the ground water standards, if necessary, based on changes in EPA drinking water standards. Appendix A contains a copy of the 1983 EPA ground water compliance standards, the 1987 proposed changes to the standards, and the 1995 final rule. Under UMTRA, DOE is responsible for bringing the designated processing sites into compliance with the EPA ground water standards and complying with all other applicable standards and requirements. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must concur with DOE's actions. States are full participants in the process. The DOE also must consult with any affected Indian tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Uranium processing activities at most of the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as but not limited to uranium and nitrates. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate or reduce to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA ground water standards.

  1. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Rifle sites. That remedial action consists of removing approximately 4,185,000 cubic yards (cy) of tailings and contaminated materials from their current locations, transporting, and stabilizing the tailings material at the Estes Gulch disposal site, approximately six miles north of Rifle. The tailings and contaminated materials are comprised of approximately 597,000 cy from Old Rifle, 3,232,000 cy from New Rifle, and 322,000 cy from vicinity properties and about 34,000 cy from demolition. The remedial action plan includes specific design requirements for the detailed design and construction of the remedial action. An extensive amount of data and supporting information have been generated for this remedial action and cannot all be incorporated into this document. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  2. ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

  3. Multimegawatt space power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dearien, J.A.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the need of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and long range space exploration and extra-terrestrial basing by the National Air and Space Administration (NASA), concepts for nuclear power systems in the multi-megawatt levels are being designed and evaluated. The requirements for these power systems are being driven primarily by the need to minimize weight and maximize safety and reliability. This paper will discuss the present requirements for space based advanced power systems, technological issues associated with the development of these advanced nuclear power systems, and some of the concepts proposed for generating large amounts of power in space. 31 figs.

  4. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

  5. Multimode power processor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, George A. (Pottersville, NJ); O'Sullivan, Joseph A. (St. Louis, MO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources.

  6. Multimode power processor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, G.A.; O'Sullivan, J.A.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources. 31 figs.

  7. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Appendix D, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the proposed disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  8. Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Chacon, J.; Romanowitz, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

  9. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  10. Dynamic Reactive Power Control of Isolated Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falahi, Milad

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents dynamic reactive power control of isolated power systems. Isolated systems include MicroGrids in islanded mode, shipboard power systems operating offshore, or any other power system operating in islanded mode intentionally...

  11. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. William Hirst Hirst Enterprises, Inc. P.O. Box=

  12. Model for Eukaryotic Tail-anchored Protein Binding Based on the Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. William Hirst Hirst Enterprises,MODELof Get3

  13. CM&SP Group -List of PUBLICATIONS (2010) -total 63 Akemann, G.; Fischmann, J.; Vivo, P. 2010. Universal correlations and power-law tails in financial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .E.; Tosatti, E. 2010. Ballistic nanofriction. Nature Materials 9 634-637 Bhattacharya S. Kr.; Finn, J.; Diep.; Verdini, A.; Gebauer, R.; Ghosh, P.; Sangaletti, L. 2010. The Effects of Potassium on the Supramolecular, S. 2010. Material progress in Africa. Nature Phys. 6, 830 De Martino, A.; Figliuzzi, M.; Marsili, M

  14. OutBack Power Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesource HistoryOsramOtherOtterOutBack

  15. PASSIVE CONTROL OF FLUID POWERED HUMAN POWER AMPLIFIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    PASSIVE CONTROL OF FLUID POWERED HUMAN POWER AMPLIFIERS Perry Y. Li and Venkat Durbha Center is proposed for the control of fluid powered human power amplifiers. Human power amplifiers are mechanical as a torque/force source. The control objective is to amplify the power that the human exerts on the machine

  16. Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    #12;Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Power;Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Reflector material is Aluminum or Silver Tube material ..... Several possible ............... Mexico, Canada, Peru Alumina ............Guinea, Brazil, Australia, Jamaica Manganese ....... S. Africa

  17. A small X-ray corona of the narrow-angle tail radio galaxy NGC 1265 soaring through the Perseus cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sun; D. Jerius; C. Jones

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A deep Chandra observation of NGC 1265 (3C 83.1B), the prototype for the narrow-angled-tailed (NAT) radio galaxy, reveals a small cool X-ray thermal corona (~ 0.6 keV) embedded in the hot ICM of the Perseus cluster (~ 6.7 keV). The corona is asymmetric with a sharp edge (~ 2.2'', or 0.8 kpc from the nucleus) to the south and an extension to the north (at least ~ 8'' from the nucleus), which is interpreted as the action of ram pressure while solely the static ICM confinement is unable to explain. We estimate that the corona is moving with a velocity of ~ 2.4 - 4.2 times the local sound speed to the south. The presence of the sharp edge for this small corona indicates that the transport processes are largely suppressed by the magnetic field there. The magnetic field around the corona also suppresses heat conduction by at least a factor of ~ 60 across the corona boundary. We conclude that it is unrealistic to study the interaction of the small X-ray coronae with the hot ICM without the consideration of the roles that magnetic field plays, a factor not included in current simulations. An absorbed (N_H=1.5-3x10^22 cm^-2) nucleus is also detected, which is not usual for FR I radio galaxies. Weak X-ray emission from three inner radio knots in the jets is also detected. Indentations at the east and west of the corona indicate interaction between the jets and the X-ray corona. Narrow jets carry great amounts of energy out of the central AGN and release the energy outside the corona, preserving the tiny and vulnerable corona. This case reveals that the inner kpc core of the corona of massive galaxies can survive both high-speed stripping and powerful AGN feedback. Thus, the cooling of the X-ray coronae potentially provides fuel to the central SMBH in rich environments where the amount of the galactic cold gas is at a minimum.

  18. Injection to the pick-up ion regime from high energies and induced ion power laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -J. Fahr; I. V. Chashei; D. Verscharen

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Though pick-up ions (PUIs) are a well known phenomenon in the inner heliosphere their phase-space distribution nevertheless is a theoretically unsettled problem. Especially the question of how pick-up ions form their suprathermal tails, extending to far above their injection energies, still now is unsatistactorily answered. Though Fermi-2 velocity diffusion theories have revealed that such tails are populated, they nevertheless show that resulting population densities are much less than seen in observations showing power-laws with a velocity index of "-5". We first investigate here, whether or not observationally suggested power-laws can be the result of a quasi-equilibrium state between suprathermal ions and magnetohydrodynamic turbulences in energy exchange with eachother. We demonstrate that such an equilibrium cannot be established, since it would require too high pick-up ion pressures enforcing a shock-free deceleration of the solar wind. We furthermore show that Fermi-2 type energy diffusion in the outer heliosphere is too inefficient to determine the shape of the distribution function there. As we can show, however, power-laws beyond the injection threshold can be established, if the injection takes place at higher energies of the order of 100 keV. As we demonstrate here, such an injection is connected with modulated anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) particles at the lower end of their spectrum when they again start being convected outwards with the solar wind. Therefore, we refer to these particles as ACR-PUIs. In our quantitative calculation of the pick-up ion spectrum resulting under such conditions we in fact find again power-laws, however with a velocity power index of "-4" and fairly distance-independent spectral intensities.

  19. Entangling Power of Permutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieven Clarisse; Sibasish Ghosh; Simone Severini; Anthony Sudbery

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of entangling power of unitary matrices was introduced by Zanardi, Zalka and Faoro [PRA, 62, 030301]. We study the entangling power of permutations, given in terms of a combinatorial formula. We show that the permutation matrices with zero entangling power are, up to local unitaries, the identity and the swap. We construct the permutations with the minimum nonzero entangling power for every dimension. With the use of orthogonal latin squares, we construct the permutations with the maximum entangling power for every dimension. Moreover, we show that the value obtained is maximum over all unitaries of the same dimension, with possible exception for 36. Our result enables us to construct generic examples of 4-qudits maximally entangled states for all dimensions except for 2 and 6. We numerically classify, according to their entangling power, the permutation matrices of dimension 4 and 9, and we give some estimates for higher dimensions.

  20. Interleaved power converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Lizhi (Canton, MI)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

  1. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  2. Power System load management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, Yu.N.; Semenov, V.A.; Sovalov, S.A.; Syutkin, B.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation in demand nonuniformity is analyzed for the Unified Electric Power System of the USSR and certain interconnected power systems; the conditions for handling such nonuniformity with utilization of generating equipment having differing flexibility capabilities are also considered. On this basis approaches and techniques for acting on user loads, load management, in order to assure a balance between generated and consumed power are considered.

  3. Final Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Falls City uranium mill tailings site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This EA examines the short- and long-term effects of the DOE`s proposed remedial action for the Falls City tailings site. The no action alternative is also examined. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented here to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an EIS will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE will issue an official ``Finding of No Significant Impact`` and implement the proposed action.

  4. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation: 1982 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Story, J.D.; Kitchings, J.T.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred nine white-tailed deer were killed by vehicles on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation during 1982, a decrease of six from the vehicle kills in 1981. Spatial and temporal patterns of mortality were similar to those reported previously. The highest number of deer killed was recorded during November. The sex ratio of road-kills was 0.6:1 (males to females) from January through September, but it shifted to 3.6:1 for the October through December period, presumably reflecting the effects of rutting season on bucks' movements. Reproductive data collected indicated a breeding season from early October through late March. Postmortem examination of deer revealed that animals were in good condition (only a few abnormalities were observed), and endoparasite burdens continue to reflect no overcrowding in the deer population. 5 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Supercritical fluid extraction of bitumen free solids separated from Athabasca oil sand feed and hot water process tailings pond sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotlyar, L.S.; Sparks, B.D.; Woods, J.R.; Ripmeester, J.A. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Div. of Chemistry)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of strongly bound organic matter (SOM), in association with certain solids fractions, causes serious problems in the processability of Athabasca oil sands as well as in the settling and compaction of hot water process tailing pond sludge. It has been demonstrated that a substantial amount of this SOM can be separated from oil sands feed and sludge solids, after removal of bitumen by toluene, using a supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method. The extracted material is soluble in common organic solvents which allows a direct comparison, between the SOM separated from oil sands and sludges, from the point of view of both gross analysis of the major compound types and detailed analysis of chemical structures.

  6. Policy and procedures for classification of Class III groundwater at UMTRA Project sites. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed groundwater regulations for the US Department of Energy's )DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. These regulations allow the application of supplemental standards at UMTRA Project sites in specific situations. The designation of groundwater as Class III permits the application of supplemental standards. This document discusses a final UMTRA Project policy and procedures for identifying Class III groundwater, including identification of a review area, definition of water quality, quantification of aquifer yield, and identification of methods reasonably employed for public water supply systems. These items, either individually or collectively, need to be investigated in order to determine if groundwaters at UMTRA Project sites are Class III. This document provides a framework for the DOE to determine Class III groundwaters.

  7. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

  8. Ground-water protection standards for inactive uranium tailings sites (40 CFR 192): Background information for final rule. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Background Information Document summarizes the information and data considered by the Agency in developing the ground-water protection standards. The report presents a brief description of the Title II ground water standard and how it can be used to develop the Title I rulemaking. A description of the 24 designated uranium-tailings sites and their current status in the DOE remedial-action program is included as well as a detailed analysis of the available data on the ground water in the vicinity of 14 of the 24 sites. It also describes different methods that can be used for the restoration of ground water and the costs of using these restoration methods.

  9. Lessons Learned: Tribal Community Engagement, Remediation and Restoration of a Uranium Mine Tailings Site, Navajo Nation - 12484

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, Donald K. [New World Environmental Inc., Livermore California 94550 (United States); Hicks, Allison H. [New World Environmental Inc., Irvine California 92614 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May, 2011 New World Environmental Inc. was awarded a contract by the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency to remediate an illegal radioactive waste disposal site located in the Navajo Nation. The initial scope included the excavation and shipment of an estimated 3,000 cubic yards of Uranium mine tailings and associated industrial waste. In this instance Stakeholders were supportive of the project, remediation and restoration, yet the movement of residual radioactive materials through tribal communities was a controversial issue. Other Stakeholder issues included site security, water sources for remediation activities, local residents' temporary re-location and care of livestock, right of way permissions and local workforce development. This presentation recaps the technical and non-technical issues encountered in the remediation and restoration the seven acre site and the outreach to surrounding communities. Cultural and equity issues resulting from historical problems associated with this and other sites in the immediate area and education and training. (authors)

  10. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Characterization (SciChar) Workshop Characterization Capabilities Battery Questions Neutron Advantages * Scattering Power unrelated to Z - Many low Z elements have high cross...

  12. 2025 Power Marketing Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the LAP FES contracts and has developed a plan for marketing and allocating LAP hydroelectric power after the current FES contracts expire. We call this plan our 2025...

  13. Power Supply Negotiations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Southeastern Federal Power Alliance Incremental Decay in Energy March 11, 2014 2 Incremental Decay in Energy Hydropower customers observations from our review of the Buford...

  14. Power Purchase Agreements Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers an update on power purchase agreements and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  15. Green Power Offer (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes requirements, standards and procedures and a competitive bidding process to implement the green power offer program. The program is designed to make renewable energy...

  16. Municipal Electric Power (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes energy procurement for local utilities operating in Minnesota and provides a means for Minnesota cities to construct and operate hydroelectric power plants. The statute gives...

  17. Alabama Power- UESC Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

  18. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  19. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    including natural gas, and competing renewable power resources such as solar photovoltaics. Figure 4-3. Wind turbine hub height trends in Germany from 2007 to 2014 Source:...

  20. Critical pulse power components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.; Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical components for pulsed power conditioning systems will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on those components requiring significant development efforts. Capacitors, for example, are one of the weakest elements in high-power pulsed systems, especially when operation at high-repetition frequencies for extended periods of time are necessary. Switches are by far the weakest active components of pulse power systems. In particular, opening switches are essentially nonexistent for most applications. Insulaton in all systems and components requires development and improvement. Efforts under way in technology base development of pulse power components will be discussed.