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1

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity...

2

DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline...

3

ELECTRICITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of the electricity subsector. The program supports the ongoing development and measurement of cybersecurity capabilities within the electricity subsector, and the model can...

4

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014) The...

5

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) The Oil...

6

ELECTRICITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS U.S. Department of Energy May 2012 DOE/OE-0003 Acknowledgments This electricity subsector cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) guideline was developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). Members of industry and utility-specific trade groups were included in authoring this guidance designed to be meaningful and tailored for the electricity sector. The primary goal of this guideline is to describe an RMP that is tuned to the specific needs of electricity subsector organizations. The NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-39, Managing Information Security Risk, provides the foundational methodology for this document. The NIST Interagency Report

7

OIL AND NATURAL GAS SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

OIL AND NATURAL GAS SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL (ONG-C2M2) Version 1.1 February 2014 Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...

8

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural...

9

DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline May 23, 2012 - 9:30am Addthis News Media Contact: (202) 586-4940 For Immediate Release: May 23, 2012 Department of Energy Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline Public-Private Sector Collaboration Produces Guidance to Help Electric Utilities Better Understand and Assess Cybersecurity Risk WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), today released guidance to help

10

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2), which allows electric utilities and grid operators to assess their cybersecurity capabilities and prioritize their actions and investments to improve cybersecurity, combines elements from existing cybersecurity efforts into a common tool that can be used consistently across the industry. The Maturity Model was developed as part of a White House initiative led by the Department of Energy in partnership with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and involved close collaboration with industry, other Federal agencies, and other stakeholders. Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) -

11

Notice of Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process: Federal Register Notice Volume 77, No. 100 - May 23, 2012 Notice of Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process: Federal Register Notice Volume 77, No. 100 - May 23, 2012 This serves as public notification of the publication, by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process guideline. The guideline describes a risk management process that is targeted to the specific needs of electricity sector organizations. The objective of the guideline is to build upon existing guidance and requirements to develop a flexible risk management process tuned to the diverse missions, equipment, and business needs of the electric power

12

Notice of Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Notice of Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Notice of Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process: Federal Register Notice Volume 77, No. 100 - May 23, 2012 Notice of Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process: Federal Register Notice Volume 77, No. 100 - May 23, 2012 This serves as public notification of the publication, by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process guideline. The guideline describes a risk management process that is targeted to the specific needs of electricity sector organizations. The objective of the guideline is to build upon existing guidance and requirements to develop a flexible risk management process tuned to the diverse missions, equipment, and business needs of the electric power

13

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) is a derivative of the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Version 1.1.

14

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) was established as a result of the Administration’s efforts to improve electricity subsector cybersecurity capabilities,...

15

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Program Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Program Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Program The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) program is a public-private partnership effort that was established as a result of the administration's efforts to improve electricity subsector cybersecurity capabilities, and to understand the cybersecurity posture of the grid. The ES-C2M2 program comprises a maturity model, an evaluation tool, and DOE facilitated self-evaluations. The ES-C2M2 maturity model provides a mechanism to evaluate, prioritize, and improve cybersecurity capabilities. The model is a common set of

16

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) - May 2012.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ElEctricity SubSEctor ElEctricity SubSEctor cybErSEcurity capability Maturity MoDEl (ES-c2M2) Version 1.0 31 May 2012 Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Version 1.0 © 2012 Carnegie Mellon University TABLE OF CONTENTS i Acknowledgments ..................................................................................................................................................iii CAUTIONARY NOTE Intended Scope and Use of This Publication .................................................................................vi 1 Introduction .....................................................................................................................................................1 2 Background .....................................................................................................................................................1

17

Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) was established as a result of the Administration’s efforts to improve electricity subsector cybersecurity capabilities, and to understand the cybersecurity posture of the energy sector.

18

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

19

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3 618 1 7 * 45 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 15,536 * * 115 * 5 0 28 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,801 * * 51 * 4 0 8 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 974 1 * 17 * 1 * 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 9,721

20

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 317 15,464 * * 115 * 5 0 30 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 3115 Dairy Product

22

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Version 1.1, which allows electric utilities and grid operators to assess their cybersecurity capabilities and prioritize their actions and investments to improve cybersecurity, combines elements from existing cybersecurity efforts into a common tool that can be used consistently across the industry.

23

Comparison Study of Energy Intensity in the Textile Industry: A Case Study in Five Textile Sub-sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper contributes to the understanding of energy use in the textile industry by comparing the energy intensity of textile plants in five major sub-sectors, i.e. spinning, weaving, wet-processing, worsted fabric manufacturing, and carpet...

Hasanbeigi, A.; Hasanabadi, A.; Abdorrazaghi, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and...

25

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume III. Energy data on 15 selected states' manufacturing subsector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An examination is made of the current and future energy demands, and uses, and cost to characterize typical applications and resulting services in the US and industrial sectors of 15 selected states. Volume III presents tables containing data on selected states' manufacturing subsector energy consumption, functional uses, and cost in 1974 and 1976. Alabama, California, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin were chosen as having the greatest potential for replacing conventional fuel with solar energy. Basic data on the quantities, cost, and types of fuel and electric energy purchased by industr for heat and power were obtained from the 1974 and 1976 Annual Survey of Manufacturers. The specific indutrial energy servic cracteristics developed for each selected state include. 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electricity consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuel consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector average cost of purchsed fuels and electricity per million Btu by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electric energy intensity by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); manufacturing subsector average annual growth rates of (1) fuels and electricity consumption, (2) fuels and electric energy intensity, and (3) average cost of purchased fuels and electricity (1974 to 1976). Data are compiled on purchased fuels, distillate fuel oil, residual ful oil, coal, coal, and breeze, and natural gas. (MCW)

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

27

table2.4_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Combustible RSE NAICS Energy Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.5 0.6 1.1 1 1.1 0.7 1 1.4 311 Food 406 W 152 185 0 0 4 83 9.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling W 0 W 0 0 0 0 W 0.8 31131 Sugar 6 0 W W 0 0 4 W 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 14 W 6 0 0 0 0 9 5.6 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 31 W 5 W 0 0 0 15 12.4 3121 Beverages Q W 5 0 0 0 0 12 31.9 3122 Tobacco W 0 0 W 0 0 0 W 0.8

28

table10.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Distillate Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 1.1 0.7 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 1.1 311 Food 12,018 2,210 10,674 532 1,170 413 75 862 3 25 9.9 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 16 39 4 6 W W 6 0 W 1 31131 Sugar 62 23 51 W 4 13 4 0 W 0 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 416 113 337 4 67 49 W 32 W W 5.5 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

29

table10.5_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.3 1 1.5 0.7 1 0.8 0.6 1.2 1.4 0.8 311 Food 274 183 108 0 119 72 W Q 0 15 15.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3 W W 0 0 W 0 0 0 0 0.9 31131 Sugar 18 9 9 0 9 0 W 0 0 0 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 38 26 30 0 26 W 0 0 0 0 8.1 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 35 17 Q 0 17 6 W 0 0 0 8

30

table10.13_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 0.8 0.6 0.9 0.7 0.8 1 2.8 2.7 0.7 311 Food 3,159 793 2,492 570 533 147 225 22 20 21 21.9 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 W W W W 0 0 0 0 W 1.4 31131 Sugar 31 W W W 0 0 0 W 0 W 1.1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 229 15 215 11 4 W W 0 0 0 5.3 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

31

table10.11_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.5 1.2 1.5 0.7 1.1 0.8 1.1 1 0.5 311 Food 91 50 92 0 26 Q Q W W 10.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 19 8 17 0 7 0 0 W W 0.9 31131 Sugar 24 13 22 0 11 0 4 0 W 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 17 8 12 0 7 W 5 0 0 5.3 3121 Beverages 9 5 5 0 W W W 0 0 8.5

32

table4.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE NAICS Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.2 311 Food 1,079 233 13 19 575 5 184 1 50 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 24 * * 61 * 121 0 11 1.1 31131 Sugar 74 3 2 1 22 * 37 1 8 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 7 1 1 36 Q 0 0 1 12.4 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 104 27 2 2 46 1 17 0 9 4.3 3121 Beverages 84 22 1 2 42 1 8 0 9 5.9 3122 Tobacco 19 5 1 * 4 * 10 0 * 0.9 313 Textile Mills 206 87 4 2 74 2

33

table10.9_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 1.3 1 0.9 1.2 1 0.8 1.3 0.8 0.9 311 Food 2,418 789 1,899 129 447 176 W 280 0 40 12.4 311221 Wet Corn Milling 20 7 15 W 4 0 W W 0 W 1 31131 Sugar 40 W W W W 0 0 0 0 0 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 123 6 117 0 5 0 0 0 0 W 6.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 251 30 227

34

table4.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.2 311 Food 1,079 68,230 2 3 560 1 8 * 50 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 7,098 * * 59 * 5 0 11 1.1 31131 Sugar 74 733 * * 22 * 2 * 8 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0

35

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.4;" 3.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States"

36

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" 2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",27.5,"X",42,39.5,62,"X",0,9.8

37

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.4;" 4.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.3

38

ELECTRICITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS  

Energy Savers [EERE]

H. Romine Director, Information Technology Laboratory William C. Barker Cyber Security Advisor, Information Technology Laboratory Donna Dodson Chief, Computer Security Division...

39

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

40

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

42

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

43

table5.1_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6

44

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" 1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,8.9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.1,9.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0,0,21.1,14.7,8.4,13.3,7.9,"X",17.9,9.1

45

Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2013) More Documents & Publications "Cybersecurity for State Regulators" - NARUC Primer (June 2012) Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2013 -...

46

table5.2_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal RSE NAICS Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal Row Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.3 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 2,840 208 141 5,794 103 1,182 6,006 3.3 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12 127 25 2,162 8 776 -- 5.5 Conventional Boiler Use -- 9 76 25 1,306 8 255 -- 5.6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 51 10 857 * 521 -- 3.7 Direct Uses-Total Process

47

table7.8_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002; 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Establishment Counts. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Electricity Natural Gas Natural Gas Steam Steam from Only from Both from Only from Both from Only from Both Electricity Sources Local Utility Any Natural Gas Sources Local Utility Steam Sources Local Utility RSE NAICS Any from Only Other than and Natural from Only Other than and Any from Only Other than and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Electricity(b) Local Utility(c) Local Utility(d)

48

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

49

Table 7.10 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; 0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. Electricity Components Natural Gas Electricity Electricity from Sources Natural Gas NAICS Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Total United States 311 Food 5,328 4,635 692 3,391 1,675 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 932 850 82 673 261 311221 Wet Corn Milling 352 331 21 296 103 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 105 87 18 87 39 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 698

50

table11.5_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002; 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of RSE NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 0.9 1 311 Food 708 380 328 31 311221 Wet Corn Milling 248 W W 20.1 31131 Sugar 8 8 0 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 28 W W 1 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products W W W 1 3121 Beverages W W W 1 3122 Tobacco W W 0 1 313 Textile Mills W W W 1.8 314 Textile Product Mills 0 0 0 0 315 Apparel 0 0 0 0 316 Leather and Allied Products

51

Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 347 168 179 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 142 6 136 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 4 10 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 109 88 21 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 66 66 0 3115 Dairy Products 22 0 22 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 1 * 3121 Beverages 1 1 * 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills

52

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 5,666 5,414 81 171 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3,494 3,491 Q 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3,213 3,211 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,382 1,319 64 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 336 325 Q * 3115 Dairy Products 38 36 1 1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 19 Q Q 14 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 342 238 Q 7 3121 Beverages 308 204 Q 7 3122 Tobacco 34

53

table7.10_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002; 0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources RSE NAICS Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.3 1 1.4

54

Table 7.7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; 7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than NAICS Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million kWh) (million kWh) (million kWh) (billion cu ft) (billion cu ft)

55

Table 2.1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 10 * * 4 Q 0 0 2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6 0 * 1 Q 0 0 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 * * 1 * 0 0 * 3115 Dairy Products Q 0 * * * 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

56

table2.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 311 Food 8 * * 7 0 0 * * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar * 0 * * 0 0 * * 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning * * * 0 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 * * * 0 0 0 1 3121 Beverages * * * 0 0 0 0 *

57

Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,162 75,407 2 4 567 2 8 * 96 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 355 16,479 * * 119 Q 6 0 47 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 215 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 26 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

58

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,416 10,373 4,039 64 7 1,538 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 204 489 268 30 0 140 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 28 50 36 15 0 29 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 W 7 14 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 210 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908

59

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

60

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 871.7 4.3 1.8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,239.5 10.5 3.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 28,965.0 27.1 12.6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7,755.9 32.6 13.4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 861.3 4.8 2.2 3115 Dairy Products 854.8 3.5 1.1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 442.9 3.5 1.2 312

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

62

Table 7.3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; 3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than NAICS Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (kWh) (kWh) (kWh) (1000 cu ft) (1000 cu ft) (1000 cu ft) (million Btu)

63

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009 August 2009 Revised: October 2009 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Waste Blast Pulping Liquor Oils/Tars NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, and Waste Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Materials Total United States 311 Food 10 0 3 0 0 7 Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 7 0 1 0 0 6 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5 0 * 0 0 4 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food Q 0 * 0 0 0 Q 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * 0 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 1 0 1 0 0 * * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

64

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * 0 * 0 * 0 0 0 3121 Beverages * 0 * 0 0 0 0 0 3122 Tobacco * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0

65

table7.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002; 3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than RSE NAICS Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (kWh) (kWh) (kWh) (1000 cu ft) (1000 cu ft) (1000 cu ft)

66

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

67

table7.7_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002; 7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than RSE NAICS Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million kWh) (million kWh) (million kWh) (billion cu ft) (billion cu ft)

68

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

69

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 4,563 4,249 * 313 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,845 2,819 0 27 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,396 2,370 0 27 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 951 951 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 268 268 0 * 3115 Dairy Products 44 31 * Q 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17 0 0 17 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 659 623 Q * 3121 Beverages 587 551 Q * 3122 Tobacco 72

70

table9.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002; 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite RSE NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0 0 0 0 0 311 Food 751 15,089 102,589.2 26,438 3.0 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5 49 239,993.7 428 13.0 0 31131 Sugar 17 77 418,497.0 821 15.2 0

71

Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology (December 2013)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This technical update provides guidance to utilities on developing and implementing a risk assessment process using the failure scenarios developed by the National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR) program.

72

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculation of the carbon intensity of fuel and electricitys announced a 2015 carbon intensity reduction target of 17%to calculate economic carbon intensities. The China average

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Investment performance of life-science venture capital investment funds, persistence, and subsector analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Venture capital investment performance data and performance attribution are not typically published. Venture investors articulate (and sell to LPs) conflicting strategies; the popular business literature and culture is ...

Behrens, Jeffrey S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal Washed Coal Coke Coke Oven Gas Other Gas Other CokingTJ) Coal Coke Coke Oven Gas Other Gas Other Coking Products

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conversion Factors methodology as well as conversion factors used for the CO 2related emissions. Conversion Factors This study uses the

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal equivalent unit. Limited data availability poses difficulties for calculation of physical and economic

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Description of the United States sorghum subsector and the development of a seasonal sorghum cash price forecasting model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twent -six Years of World Cereal Statistics, World Grain Trade Sta- tistics 1950-51/1972-73, the FAS, and various issues of the ~Forei n A riculture Circular. EEC countries and Japanese cattle, swine, and chicken numbers were obtained from the FAS... conventional grain drying systems, 40, 000-bu. capacity, 1976 . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 19 General trends in railroad rates and costs 1972 and 1975 . 64 20 Interstate Commerce Commission, Revenue/Cost analysis, Noncompensatory rates, 1975. 65 21 Ocean...

Jackson, David Michael

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

An assessment of infrastructure needs and project opportunities in the coal fired subsector of the former Soviet bloc republics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of Congress, the US Agency for International Development (AID) funded an assessment of the infrastructure needs of countries in the former Soviet bloc, consisting of the republics of Central and Eastern Europe, and Baltic States, the Newly Independent States (NIS), and Mongolia. This paper presents a summary of the finding submitted to AID`s Office of Capital Projects and Engineering. It describes the current status and outlook of the thermal electric infrastructure in the region and points to capital project opportunities for US products and services. The specific republics studied are listed.

Peterson, E. [Agency for International Development, Washington, DC (United States); Guerra, C. [Burns and Roe Co., Oradell, NJ (United States); Huber, D. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

80

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 879.8 5.0 2.2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,416.6 17.5 5.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 21,552.1 43.6 18.2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 6,629.2 31.3 12.2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,075.3 5.5 2.8 3115 Dairy Products 956.3 4.3 1.3 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 493.8 4.4 1.6 312

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

82

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,109 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,149 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 144 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 17 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 35 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 95

83

table10.10_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Thousand Short Tons. RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(c) Switchable Switchable Receipts(d) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 1.1 1.5 0.7 1.1 0.8 1.2 1.5 0.5 311 Food 8,290 1,689 7,112 0 1,410 Q 212 313 7 8.5 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5,462 771 5,201 0 766 0 0 249 6 0.9 31131 Sugar 1,648 388 1,260 0 243 0 W 0 2 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

84

table10.4_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Thousand Barrels. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(c) Switchable Switchable Receipts(d) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.9 1.4 1.9 0.6 1.5 0.6 0.6 0.9 0 0.7 311 Food 2,125 1,411 508 0 819 W W Q 0 Q 11.1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 61 W 45 0 0 W 0 0 0 0 0.8 31131 Sugar 346 193 98 0 169 0 W 0 0 0 0.7 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 153 29 Q 0 29 * 0 0 0 0 24.6 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

85

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,240 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 148 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 45 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 104 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

86

table3.4_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002; 4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any RSE NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.7 0.7 1.3 1.1 0.9 1.2 1.2 1 1.2 311 Food 15,089 15,045 274 2,418 12,018 3,159 91 19 1,858 5.1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 49 49 3 20 47 14 19 0 15 1 31131 Sugar 77 77 18 40 62 31 24 19 44 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 468 468 38 123 416 229 0 0 146 7.8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1,595 1,595 35 251 1,132 630 17 0 184 11 3121 Beverages 1,517 1,517

87

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 151 2,494 10,376 4,061 64 7 1,668 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 490 286 30 0 165 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 29 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 13 11 7 15 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987

88

Table 1.2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Shipments NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 1,162 257 12 23 583 8 182 2 96 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 355 56 * 1 123 Q 126 0 47 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 215 25 * * 53 * 110 0 26 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 0 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 67

89

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Coal NAICS TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (cu ft) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) Total United States 311 Food 9.12 0.26 0.00 53.43 90.85 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6.30 0.29 0.00 51.34 50.47 311221 Wet Corn Milling 4.87 0.48 0.00 47.74 50.47 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 5.02 0.31 0.00 53.34 236.66 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9.78 0.27 0.00 90.59 0.00 3115 Dairy Products 11.21 0.10 0.00 103.12 0.00 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

90

table6.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002; 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value RSE NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.1 0.9 1 311 Food 867.8 6.0 2.6 5.9 311221 Wet Corn Milling 24,113.7 65.7 26.2 1.8 31131 Sugar 8,414.5 54.2 17.9 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 824.1 5.4 2.5 10.6 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 670.4 1.6 1.0 2.7 3121 Beverages 658.6 2.8 1.3 3.9 3122 Tobacco 729.4 0.6 0.5 1 313 Textile Mills 798.7 11.2 4.3

91

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 10,111 5,328 130 431 3,391 150 442 29 210 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,130 932 2 12 673 Q 294 0 158 311221 Wet Corn Milling 1,002 352 1 5 296 1 239 0 107 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 367 105 7 18 87 1 118 29 2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,408 698 17 Q 579 18 7 0 18 3115 Dairy Products 1,186 695 20 40 412 8 1 0 10 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

92

table11.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood RSE NAICS Total Onsite and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.3 311 Food 5,622 5,375 0 247 12.5 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,755 2,717 0 38 2.6 31131 Sugar 1,126 1,077 0 48 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 388 W 0 W 1 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products W W * 1 1.6 3121 Beverages W W * * 3.8 3122 Tobacco W W 0 1 1 313 Textile Mills W 138 W W 11.9 314 Textile Product Mills 55 49 Q * 2.1

93

table10.6_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Natural Distillate Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Receipts(c) Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(d) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1.4 0.9 1.6 1.7 0.6 0.8 1.7 0.5 0.9 311 Food 68,230 2,270 49,890 239 2,125 17 9 72 0 Q 12.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 7,098 77 6,062 77 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.9 31131 Sugar 733 21 602 * 11 9 9 0 0 * 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 1,987 Q 1,764 Q Q 0 0 25

94

table10.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Billion Cubic Feet. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Distillate Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(c) Switchable Switchable Receipts(d) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 1 0.9 1.6 1 1 1.1 1.1 0.5 1.3 311 Food 560 155 298 20 70 40 2 63 * Q 12 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 11 41 3 3 3 * 4 0 * 2 31131 Sugar 22 7 10 * 2 5 * 0 * 0 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 35 10 19 2 6 2 * 1 * * 5.5 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

95

table8.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2002; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) Establishments with Any Cogeneration Technology in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0 1 0.7 0.8 1.7 0.6 0.8 1.7 311 Food 15,089 443 131 13,850 1,109 80 13,729 1,280 311221 Wet Corn Milling 49 11 8 40 1 3 45 1 31131 Sugar 77 45 44 27 5 8 61 8 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 468 50 42 375 51 44 374 50 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1,595 22 12 1,398 185 3 1,444 147

96

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297 99 11,338 2,691 51 11,217 2,860 10 11,333 2,786 164 11,129 2,836 9 11,235 2,884 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 53 Q 499 38 5 532 42 W 533 W Q 533 44 5 530 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 11 W 35 W W 43 W W 39 W 0 44 3 0 41 6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

97

table10.8_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Thousand Barrels. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(c) Switchable Switchable Receipts(d) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.7 1.6 1.7 0.9 1.5 0.6 0.7 1.7 0.3 0.8 311 Food 3,177 986 767 Q 297 Q 1 Q 0 Q 10.4 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 4 10 * 3 0 1 2 0 * 0.8 31131 Sugar 169 W 143 W W 0 0 0 0 0 0.7 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 242 Q 121 0 Q 0 0 0 0 * 27.1 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

98

table1.2_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; 2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Shipments RSE NAICS Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 230 13 19 582 5 184 1 89 0 6.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 23 * * 61 * 121 0 11 0 1.1 31131 Sugar 112 2 2 1 22 * 37 1 46 0 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 7 1 1 36 Q 0 0 1 0 11 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 26 2 2 46 1 17 0 11

99

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590 9,609 2,929 6,260 5,014 2,854 422 9,945 3,762 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 59 475 46 300 236 Q 154 398 28 446 95 Q 45 442 92 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 9 34 4 36 W W 27 15 6 38 3 6 8 24 16 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 77

100

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Total United States 311 Food 1,124 251 26 16 635 3 147 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 53 2 1 118 * 114 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 23 * * 52 * 95 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 3 9 1 18 * 31 1 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 33 2 1 126 1 1 0 3115 Dairy Product 121 34 1 1 83 * * 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 220 60 3 5 145 1 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 101 30 3 1 41 1 20 0 3121 Beverages 89 26 2 1 38 1 16 0 3122 Tobacco 13

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,475 11,399 2,947 67 15 1,210 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 183 449 269 35 0 148 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 45 61 35 26 15 45 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125

102

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,413 10,373 4,039 64 W 1,496 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 489 268 30 0 137 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 28 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 11 W 11 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 207 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908 161 W 0 79 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

103

table7.6_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 0.9 1.2 1.5 0.9 1.5 0.8 0.6 1.1 311 Food 1,082 W 2 3 566 1 9 * 40 8.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 220 W * * 59 * 6 0 9 1.1 31131 Sugar 71 733 * * 22 * 2 * 3 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0 0 1 12.6

104

table8.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002 Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0 1.1 0.7 1.2 1 0.9 1.3 311 Food 15,089 1,546 12,347 1,196 4,360 9,442 1,287 311221 Wet Corn Milling 49 14 34 1 38 10 1 31131 Sugar 77 4 68 5 59 14 4 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 468 64 352 52 142 275 51 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1,595 234 1,095 266 367 954 274 3121 Beverages 1,517 214 1,039 264 333 913 271 3122 Tobacco 78

105

table7.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Bituminous and NAICS Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Code(a) Subsector and Industry TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Coal Lignite Coke Coke Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.1 2.1 0.6 0.9 0.6 0.9 1.4 0.7 0.9 311 Food 6.42 113.78 0 1.46 W 1.46 0 5.18 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3.11 106.84 0 1.32 0 1.32 0 0 0 31131 Sugar 3.14 80.39 0 1.65 W 1.64 0 5.18 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 7.09 103.28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 7.53 123.52 0 2.32 0 2.32 0 0 0 3121 Beverages 7.96 124.83

106

table2.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE NAICS Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 311 Food 8 * Q 7 0 0 * * 10.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 0 * 0.7 31131 Sugar * 0 * * 0 0 * * 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning * * * 0 0 0 0 * 1.7 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 * * * 0 0 0 1 2.3 3121 Beverages * * * 0 0 0 0 * 28.9 3122 Tobacco 1 0 0 * 0 0 0 1 0.8 313 Textile Mills 1 0 * 1 0 0 0 * 0.8 314 Textile Product Mills * 0 0 * 0 * 0 * 2 315 Apparel

107

table1.4_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002 4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002 Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.7 0.7 1.4 1.2 0.9 1.3 1.1 1.2 1.3 0.5 311 Food 15,089 15,045 275 2,536 12,106 3,159 91 23 1,911 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 49 49 3 20 47 14 19 0 15 0 31131 Sugar 77 77 18 41 63 31 24 23 45 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 468 468 40 128 416 229 0 0 153 0 312

108

table7.9_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. RSE NAICS Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 0.9 1.1 1.5 0.9 1.4 0.8 0.7 1.2 311 Food 6,943 3,707 58 135 2,546 38 276 8 175 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 683 252 2 1 237 * 165 0 26 1.1 31131 Sugar 224 39 11 8 84 * 63 8 10 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 333 139 5 8 168 Q 0 0 4 13.5 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 780 479 8 18 201 9 40 0 25 5.8 3121 Beverages 665 413 4 Q 182 8 16 0 25 5.6 3122 Tobacco 115

109

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 0 3115 Dairy Product 121 10,079 * * 80 * * 0 1 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 226 17,545 1 1 141 * 0 0 12 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 107

110

Table 11.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 75,652 21 5,666 347 80,993 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 16,620 0 3,494 142 19,972 311221 Wet Corn Milling 7,481 0 3,213 14 10,680 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,264 0 1,382 109 2,537 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9,258 0 336 66 9,528 3115 Dairy Products 9,585 2 38 22 9,602 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 20,121 15 19 0 20,155 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

111

table10.7_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Natural Distillate Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Receipts(d) Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 1.2 0.6 1.2 1.3 1 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.2 311 Food 15,045 582 14,905 185 437 30 W 170 0 55 11.4 311221 Wet Corn Milling 49 W W W 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.2 31131 Sugar 77 8 74 W 4 W W 0 0 W 1.1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 468 37 443 Q 34 0 0 13 0 0 10.4 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1,595 70 1,556

112

NEUTRON PRODUCTION BY NEUTRAL BEAM SOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HORSE Code—A Hultigroup Neutron and Gamma-Say Honte CarloR. Smith, "A Tantalus Fast Neutron Integrator," UCRL-17051.FiS- 9 Neutron dose during 3 months of typical TSUI

Berkner, K.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energy Department Broadens Public-Private Initiative to Help...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) leverages the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) which was launched...

114

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million sq ft)","(counts)","(sq ft)","(counts)","(counts)" ,,"Total United...

115

DOE Releases Maturity Model to Better Protect the Nation's Grid...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the Nation's Grid from Cybersecurity Threats May 31, 2012 - 4:32pm Addthis The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model, which allows electric utilities...

116

Department of Energy Releases New Roadmap to Guide Public-Private...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

said Gerry Cauley, president and chief executive officer at NERC and chairman of the Electricity Sub-sector Coordinating Council. "This public-private partnership brings...

117

The Department of Energy Launches Cybersecurity Initiative |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Grid from Cyber Threats Department of Energy Releases New Roadmap to Guide Public-Private Cybersecurity Initiatives DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk...

118

Protecting the Grid from All Hazards | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the NIST Cybersecurity Framework. In developing the draft Guidance, we collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council and the...

119

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and government. In developing this guidance, the Energy Department collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council and the...

120

Energy Department Releases Guidance for Implementation of Cybersecurit...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the framework's prioritized approach. In developing this guidance, we collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council and the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Draft Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC)...

122

Moving Forward in Protecting the Nation's Electric Grid | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

pilot with five electric sector companies to an industry-managed and funded public-private partnership. NERC's ES-ISAC currently has eight electricity subsector companies up...

123

ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAICS Code Sub-Sector Pulp mills Paper (except newsprint) mills Newsprint mills Paperboard mills Total % of Total Total Black Liquor Natural Gas

Kramer, Klaas Jan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the monitoring of energy intensity developments in theSchaeffer. 1997. Energy intensity in the iron and steelParity Internationally, Energy Intensity of GDP or subsector

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbon Footprint as a Single Indicator in Energy Systems: The Case of Biofuels and CO2 Capture Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy sector is one of the main sources of greenhouse gas emissions, in both the transport and electricity subsectors. Taking into account the current context of the energy sector, relevant case studies c...

Diego Iribarren; Javier Dufour

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Indicators of the Transformation Sector, Distribution Losses and Foreign Trade in Derived Energy Products in the Member States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of the transformation sector includes all the subsectors listed in the Energy Statistics Yearbook of EUROSTAT. As far as national data were available, the analysis also includes combined heat and ...

Dr. Tihomir Morovi?; Franz-Josef Gründing…

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Essays on Dynamics of Cattle Prices in Three Developing Countries of Mali, Kenya, and Tanzania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the growing agricultural subsectors in developing countries is livestock. Livestock and livestock products account for a third of the agricultural gross output. However, the lack of viable livestock market information systems to increase...

Bizimana, Jean-Claude

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

128

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(February 2014) The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) was derived from the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Version 1.1 by...

129

" Generation, by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation, by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected" " Industries, and Type of Energy-Management Program, 1994: Part 2" ,,,," Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs" ,,,,,"(1992 through 1994)" ,," " ,,,,,,"Federal, State, or" ,,"No Energy",,"Electric Utility",,"Local Government","Third Party","RSE" "SIC",,"Management","Any Type of","Sponsored","Self-Sponsored","Sponsored","Sponsored","Row" "Code(a)"," Industry Group and Industry","Program(b)","Sponsorship","Involvement","Involvement","Involvement","Involvement","Factors"

130

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 8990 of 9,640 results. 81 - 8990 of 9,640 results. Download Policy Flash 2012-32 Attached is Policy Flash 2012-32 Acquisition Guide Chapter 17.1 - Interagency Acquisitions, Interagency Transactions and Interagency Agreements http://energy.gov/management/downloads/policy-flash-2012-32 Download Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2), which allows electric utilities and grid operators to assess their cybersecurity capabilities and prioritize their... http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/electricity-subsector-cybersecurity-capability-maturity-model-may-2012 Download Smart Grid Investment Grant Program- Progress Report (July 2012) The SGIG program is structured as a public-private partnership to

131

Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(RMP) (RMP) Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) The electricity subsector cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) guideline was developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). Members of industry and utility-specific trade groups were included in authoring this guidance designed to be meaningful and tailored for the electricity subsector. The NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-39, Managing Information Security Risk, provides the foundational methodology for this document. The NIST Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628, Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security, and NERC critical infrastructure cybersecurity standards further refine the

132

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

133

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

134

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

135

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

136

"RSE Table N5.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

137

RSE Table 3.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

138

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

139

CLAUDE MENARD Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and sustainability goals. It can also form the basis for the evaluation of ongoing and proposed reforms that might forms of institutional reforms and technical modifications over the past two decades. Although such reforms are neither uniform across countries or across water subsectors, there are certain common trends

Boyer, Edmond

140

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Food Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

values make it $400 billion industry. While energy represents on average between one and two percent of total operating costs, in some industry sub-sectors energy comprises as much as 20%. Major energy end-uses include drying, refrigeration, process...

Adams, N.; Milmoe, P. H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Industrial Energy Use and Energy Efficiency in Developing Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The industrial sector accounts for over 50% of energy used in developing countries. Growth in this sector has been over 4.5% per year since 1980. Energy intensity trends for four energy-intensive sub-sectors (iron and steel, chemicals, building...

Price, L.; Martin, N.; Levine, M. D.; Worrell, E.

142

Policy Brief October 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard) for electricity generation, reduced fuel carbon intensity (Low Carbon Fuel Standard), improvement by each AB 32 sector or sub-sector for total particulate matter (PM), particulate elemental carbon (EC), particulate organic carbon (OC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), oxides of sulfur (SOx), reactive organic gases (ROG

California at Davis, University of

143

CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

Delaware, University of

144

Energy Policy 30 (2002) 151163 Aggregating physical intensity indicators: results of applying the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicators measure the energy used per dollar of GDP produced by some sector, sub-sector, industry or productEnergy Policy 30 (2002) 151­163 Aggregating physical intensity indicators: results of applying School of Resource and Environmental Management, Energy Research Group, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby

145

Meeting an 80% Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation by 2050: A Case Study in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of petroleum fuels. Aviation and marine make up just 3%Marine Agriculture Off-road All subsectors ef?ciency and using advanced technologies with alternative fuels.fuel type. All low-carbon biofuels are directed toward the aviation, marine,

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Table N13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,," " " "," ","Total of",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

147

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

148

table8.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002 Level: National Data; Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes; Column: Participation and Source of Financial Support for Activity; Unit: Establishment Counts. RSE NAICS Row Code(a) Energy-Management Activity No Participation Participation(b) In-house Other Don't Know Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1.4 0.9 0.9 1 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Activities 120,362 80,348 -- -- -- 1 Energy Audits 165,216 35,494 14,845 15,890 4,760 2.3 Direct Electricity Load Control 171,940 28,770 13,652 9,986 5,132 2.5 Special Rate Schedule (c)

149

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

150

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

151

table5.3_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Row Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: NF 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 966,231 33 24 5,641 26 53 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 6,714 20 6 2,105 2 35 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use

152

table4.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE Economic Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke and Row Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 0.6 1.3 2.2 0.7 1.4 1.5 0.6 1 Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,276 437 15 50 598 W 47 W 97 14.5 20-49 1,258 417 28 22 590 W 112 W 72 6.1 50-99 1,463 401 17 W 731 7 185 W 97 4.9 100-249 2,041 571 43 17 968 8 253 7 175 4.6 250-499 1,962 475 54 W 826 W 326 W 255 5.6 500 and Over 3,971 618 38 W 2,077 37 259 W 607 1.5 Total 11,970

153

table3.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption, 2002; Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE Economic Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke and Row Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 0.7 1.3 2.1 0.7 1.4 1.5 0.7 0.9 Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,312 436 15 50 598 W 47 W 132 13.9 20-49 1,465 407 28 22 590 W 112 W 289 6.9 50-99 1,598 394 17 W 731 7 185 W 237 4.5 100-249 2,385 561 43 17 972 8 253 7 525 4.2 250-499 2,598 458 57 W 826 W 326 W 906 5.4 500 and Over 6,914 584 47 21 2,077 55 259 530 3,342 1.5 Total 16,273 2,840

154

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

155

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,139 367 23 45 535 14 21 3 131 20-49 1,122 333 13 19 530 8 93 5 122 50-99 1,309 349 22 17 549 10 157 8 197 100-249 2,443 607 25 19 994 11 263 10 512 250-499 2,092 413 53 13 633 4 244 3 730 500 and Over 7,551 781 115 17 2,271 31 240 344 3,752 Total 15,657 2,851 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 374 5,445 Employment Size Under 50 1,103 334 10 45 550 10

156

List of Manufacturing Groups Displayed in the 1998 Manufacturing Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21 manufacturing subsectors (3-digit NAICS codes); 21 manufacturing subsectors (3-digit NAICS codes); 311 Food 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 313 Textile Mills 314 Textile Product Mills 315 Apparel 316 Leather and Allied Products 321 Wood Products 322 Paper 323 Printing and Related Support 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 325 Chemicals 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 331 Primary Metals 332 Fabricated Metal Products 333 Machinery 334 Computer and Electronic Products 335 Electrical Equip., Appliances, and Components 336 Transportation Equipment 337 Furniture and Related Products 339 Miscellaneous 6 industry groups (4-digit NAICS codes); 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 3219 Other Wood Products 3272 Glass and Glass Products 3312 Steel Products from Purchased Steel 3313 Alumina and Aluminum

157

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Industrial Demand Module Figure 7. Industrial Demand Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Economic Subsectors Within the IDM Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Industrial Demand Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Fuel Consuming Activities for the Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Subsectors Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing

158

Measuring Changes in Energy Efficiency for the Annual Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Changes in Energy Efficiency Changes in Energy Efficiency for the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 by Steven H. Wade This paper describes the construction of an aggregate energy efficiency index based on projections of sectoral and subsector energy consumption and subsector-specific energy service indicators. The results are compared with the ratio energy to real gross domestic product, which typically is pre- sented as a measure of energy intensity. Introduction Energy efficiency and conservation are currently impor- tant components of the debate about the direction of future energy policy. Measuring the actual energy effi- ciency of the U.S. economy is a daunting task because of the immense data requirements for a proper calculation. Appropriate data are difficult to obtain, and as a result historical descriptions of the economy usually are sum- marized in two energy intensity measures: (1) energy

159

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 1860 of 31,917 results. 51 - 1860 of 31,917 results. Article 16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology U.S. Department Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced nearly $17 million in funding over the next three years for research and development projects to advance hydropower technology. The list of 16 projects in 11 different states can be found here. http://energy.gov/articles/16-projects-advance-hydropower-technology Download Notice of Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process: Federal Register Notice Volume 77, No. 100- May 23, 2012 This serves as public notification of the publication, by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process guideline. The guideline describes a risk...

160

Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships ISER's partnerships with the private sector are a strength which has enabled the division to respond to the needs of the sector and the nation. The division's domestic capabilities have been greatly enhanced by the relationships that have been created over years of collaborations with companies from all parts the sector, including electricity, oil, and natural gas. Specific mission areas, such as risk and system analysis, modeling and visualization across subsectors, and incident response would not be possible without the participation of the private sector. The relationships ISER maintains with energy sector owners and operators and public associations representing energy subsectors, including the American

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Oil Price and Stock Returns of Consumers and Producers of Crude Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper we investigate how differently stock returns of oil producers and oil consumers are affected from oil price changes. We find that stock returns of oil producers are affected positively by oil price changes regardless of whether oil price is increasing or decreasing. For oil consumers, oil price changes do not affect all consumer sub-sectors and where it does, this effect is heterogeneous. We find that oil price returns have an asymmetric effect on stock returns for most sub-sectors. We devise simple trading strategies and find that while both consumers and producers of oil can make statistically significant profits, investors in oil producer sectors make relatively more profits than investors in oil consumer sectors

Dinh Hoang Bach Phan; Susan Sunila Sharma; Paresh Kumar Narayan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Scrutinising the influence of the performance of Malaysia agricultural sector on energy use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most sectors rely on energy as input to produce output. Though the use of energy by the agriculture sector is not as high as in other sectors, it is still necessary to study the links between the two. This is vital as there are only few studies that illustrate the bonds between them in Malaysia. This study resorts to input-output analysis to examine the link between the two sectors and assess their economic sustainability using input-output data for 1991 to 2005 period. This analysis and assessment show the existence of linkages between agriculture and energy sectors. However, the linkage is not strong for the named period. Among the three energy subsectors, the agriculture sector relies heavily on inputs from 'petrol and coal industries' as compared to the other two subsectors. As such, the current study introduces some policy implications to further diversify the sources of energy use and to promote the most efficient utilisation of energy in agriculture sector.

Hussain Ali Bekhet; Azlina Abdullah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

An examination of the relationship between energy consumption and performance of transportation sector in Malaysia: output multipliers approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the current study is to investigate the energy consumption and the performance of Malaysia's transportation sector. It applied output multiplier approach which is based on input-output model. Three input-output tables of Malaysia covering the 1991, 2000 and 2005 periods were used. The results indicate significant changes in the output multipliers of the transportation sector for the (1991-2005) period. Also, the transportation-to-energy subsector multipliers were found to increase over time. The increasing importance of transportation sector to the development of Malaysian economy resulted in a noticeable increase in the consumption of each energy subsector's output especially 'petrol and coal industries' products. Based on the research findings, several policy implications were suggested for the betterment of both sectors' performance and generally for the improvement of Malaysian economy.

Hussain Ali Bekhet; Azlina Abdullah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

165

"RSE Table C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;" C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",4,0,3,0,1,0,2,6

166

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy" " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",5666,5414,81,171 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",3494,3491,"Q",2

167

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

168

RSE Table 3.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,10

169

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)",,"NGL(d)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

170

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

171

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.8,1.1,1.3

172

Table 2.2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

173

Table N13.2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998;" 2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1,0.8,1.5,0.9

174

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

175

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009" August 2009" "Revised: October 2009" "Next MECS will be conducted in 2010" "Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,"Waste" ,,,,"Blast",,,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars" "NAICS",,,,"Furnace/Coke",,,"Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Oven Gases","Waste Gas",,"Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

176

"RSE Table C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;" C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States"

177

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",75652,21,5666,347,80993

178

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

179

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)","Factors"

180

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

182

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.2, 2006;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.2, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",18.4,"X",16.5,22.4,95.1,"X",0,0.1

183

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)"

184

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

185

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste" " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

186

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

187

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"," "

188

RSE Table 7.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" 9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,4,24,21,5,23,7,0,20

189

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

190

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

191

Future growth in the Texas dairy industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In these supply equations, regressor variables included the prices of inputs, such as feed and labor; the prices received by farmers per hundred weight of fluid milk; the returns to alternative enterprises, as measured by beef prices and non-agricultural wages... and the specialization of skilled labor. This monograph analyzed how specialization and vertical integration in the dairy subsector have led to an increase in supply contracts between producers and processors, processors and distributors, and processors and retailers...

Seton, Nora Janssen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

193

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",73242,309,4563,111,78003

194

Released: May 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

195

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.2, 2006;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.2, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4.7,4.1,21.5,13.1,7.1,15.7,1.1,0,18

196

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," ",,," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and"," ","Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)" ,,"Total United States"

197

Released: October 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006;" 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",111,86,25 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",72,51,21

198

"RSE Table C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;" C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States" ,

199

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2, 2006;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

200

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;" 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",347,168,179 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",142,6,136

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

"RSE Table C1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

202

RSE Table 1.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

203

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,,"Electricity Receipts",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)"," "

204

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 405.4 4.0 2.1 20-49 631.3 4.7 2.2 50-99 832.0 4.9 2.3 100-249 1,313.4 6.2 2.8 250-499 1,905.2 7.4 3.6 500 and Over 4,225.4 7.5 3.1 Total 1,449.6 6.4 2.8 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 576.6 5.9

205

table5.4_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal RSE NAICS for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal Row Code(a) End Use Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: NF 1 2.4 1.1 1.3 1 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,297 208 141 5,794 103 1,182 3.3 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 23 127 25 2,162 8 776 5.5 Conventional Boiler Use 11 76 25 1,306 8 255 5.6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 12 51 10 857 * 521 3.7 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,624

206

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2 50-99 830.1 5.9 2.7 100-249 1,130.0 6.7 3.1 250-499 1,961.4 7.6 3.6 500 and Over 3,861.9 9.0 3.6 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 979.3 10.3

207

table6.4_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002; 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value RSE NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Row Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.1 1 1 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 395.7 4.3 2.3 3.6 50-99 663.4 6.8 3.3 5 100-249 905.8 7.9 3.8 3.6 250-499 1,407.1 11.1 5.1 4.3 500-999 1,999.6 12.4 5.9 5.6 1000 and Over 1,597.7 8.5 3.9 2.5 Total 1,172.2 8.9 4.2 2 311 FOOD Employment Size Under 50 893.5 6.6 2.4

208

Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3 7.7 3.6 500-999 2,328.9 10.6 4.5 1000 and Over 1,415.5 5.7 2.5 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Employment Size Under 50 1,266.8 8.3 3.2 50-99 1,587.4 9.3 3.6 100-249 931.9 3.6 1.5 250-499 1,313.1 6.3

209

table6.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value RSE NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Row Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 1 1 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 281.0 3.9 2.2 3 20-49 583.7 6.1 3.0 4.6 50-99 889.2 8.1 3.8 4.9 100-249 1,268.8 8.7 4.1 4.6 250-499 2,146.6 11.2 5.3 7.6 500 and Over 3,807.1 12.5 5.4 2.3 Total 1,172.2 8.9 4.2 2 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts

210

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",3.8,4.3,4.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",8.2,5.8,5.6 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",7.3,6.7,6.2

211

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

212

RSE Table 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1;" 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",31,0,91,35,0,0,0,47 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",1,0,0,0,0,0,0,8

213

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

214

RSE Table 10.10 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10;" 0 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",6,18,5,0,20,85,29,20,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

215

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

216

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

217

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

218

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

219

RSE Table 10.13 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",8,17,8,20,21,43,34,35,37,29 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

220

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",5.4,0.9,4.9,9.1,1,2,0,0,3.3 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",7.9,2.9,8.4,9.1,2.9,5.9,"X",0,9.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " 2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

222

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

223

3219," Other Wood Products",0,0,0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",25,34,35 311221," Wet Corn Milling",29,40,7 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",0,0,0 3121," Beverages",0,0,0 3122," Tobacco ",0,0,0 313,"Textile Mills",3,0,52

224

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

225

,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.3;" 10.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",2,8.6,4,21.7,13.8,22.3,59.7,15.9,"X",24.9

226

RSE Table N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2;" N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,2,3,1,1,0,0,1

227

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

228

NAICS Search | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NAICS Search NAICS Search NAICS Search The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying businesses. 10000 21000 22000 23000 31000 32000 33000 42000 44000 45000 48000 49000 51000 53000 54000 56000 61000 62000 81000 92000 NAICS uses six-digit codes at the most detailed level, with the first two digits representing the largest business sector, the third designating a subsector, the fourth designating the industry group, and the fifth showing the particular industry. Use the documents below, which are labeled by series, to see Department of Energy facilities that have historically procured goods/services in that

229

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",879.8,5,2.2 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",6416.6,17.5,5.7

230

311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy" " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",2.8,1.1,86.8,37.8 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0.7,0.7,"X",0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,"X",0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",1.2,1.2,"X",44.1

231

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

232

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

233

RSE Table N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2;" N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,2,3,1,1,0,0,1

234

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

235

Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RSE Table 3.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.6;" RSE Table 3.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.6;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Black Liquor","Total(b)","Waste(c)","from Trees(d)","Processing(e)","Refuse(f)"

236

"RSE Table N13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1,8,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,0,1,0,4 313,"Textile Mills",2,8,7,0,2 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,0,22,0,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",11,73,8,90,11

237

RSE Table N1.1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" 1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

238

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

239

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

240

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(DOE) (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power (CHP) Richard Sweetser Senior Advisor DOE's Mid-Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center 32% Helping plants save energy today using efficient energy management practices and efficient new technologies Activities to spur widespread commercial use of CHP and other distributed generation solutions 10% Manufacturing Energy Systems 33% Industries of the Future R&D addressing top priorities in America's most energy-intensive industries and cross-cutting activities applicable to multiple industrial subsectors 25% Industrial Distributed Energy Industrial Technical Assistance DOE ITP FY'11 Budget: $100M Knowledge development and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

RSE Table 4.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,17 311221," Wet Corn Milling",1,0,0,1,3,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",8,11,46,45,8,57,0,0,3

242

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

243

Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,"Waste",," " ,,,"Blast",,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars" "NAICS",,,"Furnace/Coke",,"Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",9.1,"X",25,"X","X",6,55.6 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",8.9,"X",47.4,"X","X",0,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,"X",0,"X","X",0,"X"

244

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

245

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

246

RSE Table 7.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,20 311221," Wet Corn Milling",1,0,0,1,3,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",8,11,42,45,8,57,0,0,4

247

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

248

,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.9;" 0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.9;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",8,15,9,21,19,18,0,27,0,41 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

249

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

250

RSE Table 10.11 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",20,32,21,0,16,68,65,73,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

251

"RSE Table N13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",8,9,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",0,0,0 313,"Textile Mills",0,0,0 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",0,0,0 314,"Textile Product Mills",90,90,0 315,"Apparel",0,0,0 316,"Leather and Allied Products",0,0,0

252

Supermarket with Ground Coupled Carbon Dioxide Refrigeration Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refrigeration remains the last big subsector and the strongest emission source of the fluorinated hydrocarbons (HFC) in Germany? - Kauffeld [4] About 65 % of the cooling needs in Germany for frozen and refrigerated food products ? over 50.000 GWh.../a [2] In 2011, 72.4 % of the sales share of food retail industry realized in discounters and supermarkets in Germany [1] Supermarket: ? 600 ? 2.000 kWh/m2.a (PE) [3] Normal building: 200 ? 400 kWh/m2.a (PE) [4] [1] EHI retail institute 2012...

Rehault, N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assessment of the Energy Impacts of Outside Air in the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enormous quantity of energy consumed by U.S. commercial buildings places a significant burden on the energy supply and is a potential source of economic strain. To address this, the DOE Building Technologies Program has established the goal of developing market-viable zero energy buildings by 2025. This study focuses on the effects of outside air, and considers various outside air sources, types of building construction, building subsectors, and climates. Based on the information about energy consumption attributed to outside air, it identifies topics for further research that have the greatest potential to achieve energy savings.

Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Crawley, D.; Logee, T.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

255

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

256

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",6.9,22.9,9,33.5,29.1,29.3,3.3,"X","X",48.2

257

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)",,"LPG and",,"Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion",,"NGL(d)",,"(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)",,"short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

258

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)"

259

"RSE Table C10.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors" "NAICS"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

260

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.23;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.23;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","LPG Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","as a Fuel","LPG Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.22;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.22;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","as a Fuel","Coal Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

262

"RSE Table N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;" N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "NAICS"," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",8,4,5 313,"Textile Mills",3,2,3 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,4,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",7,5,5

263

"RSE Table C12.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" 2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" " Units: Percents." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" "NAICS"," ","of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",2,0,2,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",11,0,15,14,14

264

Cohomological Reduction of Sigma Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article studies some features of quantum field theories with internal supersymmetry, focusing mainly on 2-dimensional non-linear sigma models which take values in a coset superspace. It is discussed how BRST operators from the target space supersymmetry algebra can be used to identify subsectors which are often simpler than the original model and may allow for an explicit computation of correlation functions. After an extensive discussion of the general reduction scheme, we present a number of interesting examples, including symmetric superspaces $G/G^{\\mathbb{Z}_2}$ and coset superspaces of the form $G/G^{\\mathbb{Z}_4}$.

Constantin Candu; Thomas Creutzig; Vladimir Mitev; Volker Schomerus

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cohomological Reduction of Sigma Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article studies some features of quantum field theories with internal supersymmetry, focusing mainly on 2-dimensional non-linear sigma models which take values in a coset superspace. It is discussed how BRST operators from the target space supersymmetry algebra can be used to identify subsectors which are often simpler than the original model and may allow for an explicit computation of correlation functions. After an extensive discussion of the general reduction scheme, we present a number of interesting examples, including symmetric superspaces $G/G^{\\mathbb{Z}_2}$ and coset superspaces of the form $G/G^{\\mathbb{Z}_4}$.

Candu, Constantin; Mitev, Vladimir; Schomerus, Volker

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

SWERA borrador051110  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

informe nacional informe nacional GEF MEM DGE Preparado por: Ing. Norbert Bons Borrador 14-11-05 SWERA borrador 14-11-2005 1 2 MEM DGE - Fundación Solar Contenido Prefacio 5 Resumen ejecutivo 6 Introducción 7 Datos socioeconómicos 7 Geografía y clima de Guatemala 7 Las energías renovables en Guatemala 9 La situación energética del país 13 Balance de energía de Guatemala 13 Marco institucional del sub-sector eléctrico 14 Ministerio de Energía y Minas 14 Comisión Nacional de Energía 15 Administrador del Mercado Mayorista 15 Autoridad designada para los créditos de carbono 16 Marco regulatorio del sub-sector eléctrico 16 Ley general de electricidad 17 Ley de incentivos para el desarrollo de proyectos de energía renovable 17 Sistema eléctrico 17 Generación 17 Transporte 18 Distribución 19 Mercado eléctrico

267

Measuring energy efficiency: Is energy intensity a good evidence base?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There is a widespread assumption in energy statistics and econometrics that energy intensity and energy efficiency are equivalent measures of energy performance of economies. The paper points to the discrepancy between the engineering concept of energy efficiency and the energy intensity as it is understood in macroeconomic statistics. This double discrepancy concerns definitions (while engineering concept of energy efficiency is based on the thermodynamic definition, energy intensity includes economic measures) and use. With regard to the latter, the authors conclude that energy intensity can only provide indirect and delayed evidence of technological and engineering energy efficiency of energy conversion processes, which entails shortcomings for management and policymaking. Therefore, we suggest to stop considering subsectoral, sectoral and other levels of energy intensities as aggregates of lower-level energy efficiency. It is suggested that the insufficiency of energy intensity indicators can be compensated with the introduction of thermodynamic indicators describing energy efficiency at the physical, technological, enterprise, sub-sector, sectoral and national levels without references to any economic or financial parameters. Structured statistical data on thermodynamic efficiency is offered as a better option for identifying break-through technologies and technological bottle-necks that constrain efficiency advancements. It is also suggested that macro-level thermodynamic indicators should be based on the thermodynamic first law efficiency and the energy quality problem may be left to enterprise-level thermoeconomic optimization.

L. Proskuryakova; A. Kovalev

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Education and Training Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a baseline assessment of the current state of energy efficiency-related education and training programs and analyzes training and education needs to support expected growth in the energy efficiency services workforce. In the last year, there has been a significant increase in funding for 'green job' training and workforce development (including energy efficiency), through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Key segments of the energy efficiency services sector (EESS) have experienced significant growth during the past several years, and this growth is projected to continue and accelerate over the next decade. In a companion study (Goldman et al. 2009), our research team estimated that the EESS will increase two- to four-fold by 2020, to 220,000 person-years of employment (PYE) (low-growth scenario) or up to 380,000 PYE (high-growth scenario), which may represent as many as 1.3 million individuals. In assessing energy efficiency workforce education and training needs, we focus on energy-efficiency services-related jobs that are required to improve the efficiency of residential and nonresidential buildings. Figure ES-1 shows the market value chain for the EESS, sub-sectors included in this study, as well as the types of market players and specific occupations. Our assessment does not include the manufacturing, wholesale, and retail distribution subsectors, or energy efficiency-focused operations and maintenance performed by facility managers.

Goldman, Charles A.; Peters, Jane S.; Albers, Nathaniel; Stuart, Elizabeth; Fuller, Merrian C.

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Report #: DOE/EIA-0573(2005) Released Date: November 2006 Next Release Date: Not applicable Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing Mark Schipper 1 , Energy Information Administration (EIA) Abstract Based on the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA), this paper presents historical energy-related carbon dioxide emission estimates for energy-intensive sub-sectors and 23 industries. Estimates are based on surveys of more than 15,000 manufacturing plants in 1991, 1994, 1998, and 2002. EIA is currently developing its collection of manufacturing data for 2006.

270

Thailand-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy Thailand-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Biomass, - Biofuels, Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, Resource assessment, Background analysis Website http://www.adb.org/Documents/R Country Thailand UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Thailand-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy[1] Thailand-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy Screenshot Summary "The objectives of this study are to: identify promising areas for investment in the development of the biofuel subsector in Thailand, with due consideration of the country's

271

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://globalresearchalliance. References Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases [1] Background "The Alliance is a bottom-up network, founded on the voluntary, collaborative efforts of countries. It will coordinate research on agricultural greenhouse gas emission reductions by linking up existing and new research efforts across a range of sub-sectors and work areas. It will

272

"RSE Table N5.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Black Liquor","Total(b)","Waste(c)","from Trees(d)","Processing(e)","Refuse(f)"

273

New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of Energy New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of Energy November 1, 2011 - 9:50am Addthis The Electricity Advisory Committee approved three new reports at their meeting on October 20, 2011. These reports include recommendations on cyber security, storage, and the interdependence of electricity and natural gas. Recommendations on U. S. Grid Security The Electricity Advisory Committee recommends that the Department of Energy take a more active, complementary role in the efforts of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation with respect to the Critical Infrastructure Strategic Roadmap developed by the Electricity Sub-Sector Coordinating Council and approved by the NERC Board of Trustees in November

274

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 4a Table 4a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4a. Value of Shipments 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars ) Notes: 1. Received or receivable net selling values (exclusive of freight and taxes) of all primary and secondary products shipped, as well as all miscellaneous receipts for contract work performed for others, installation and repair, sales of scrap, and sales of products bought and resold without further processing. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), "Value of Shipments and Price Indexes by Detailed Industry 1998- 2007," Sept 2009. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 448 472 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing

275

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Released Date: May 2006 Page Last Modified: April 2010 Table 3a. Value of Shipments 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) Notes: The value received for the complete systems at the company's net billing price, freight-on-board factory, including charges for cooperative advertising and warranties. This does not include excise taxes, freight or transportation charges, or installation charges. Source: U.S. Department of CoSources: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufacturers, Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries, 2000 and 2006 (Sept 2009), Table 2. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 428 460 537 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 102 106 124 313

276

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3e. Gross Output by Selected Industries, 1998,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

e e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3e. Gross Output1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 417 444 526 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 114 128 144 313 Textile Mills 57 45 38 314 Textile Product Mills 31 30 32 315 Apparel Manufacturing 63 40 26 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 91 88 111 322 Paper Manufacturing 153 151 167 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 99 95 99 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 135 212 530 325 Chemical Manufacturing 407 444 639 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 162 169 208 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 91 94 126 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 166 139 230 332 Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing

277

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical JUMP TO: Introduction | Energy Consumption | Energy Expenditures | Producer Prices and Production | Energy Intensity | Energy Management Activities | Fuel Switching Capacity Introduction The chemical industries are a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as oil, natural gas, air, water, metals, and minerals into thousands of various products. Chemicals are key materials for producing an extensive assortment of consumer goods. They are also crucial materials in creating many resources that are essential inputs to the numerous industries and sectors of the U.S. economy.1 The manufacturing sector is classified by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) of which the chemicals sub-sector is NAICS

278

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3a. Value of Shipments by Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3a. Value of Shipments 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 428 457 538 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 102 104 125 313 Textile Mills 57 45 39 314 Textile Product Mills 31 32 33 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 45 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 7 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 91 88 112 322 Paper Manufacturing 155 153 170 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 100 96 100 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 138 216 549 325 Chemical Manufacturing 417 454 658 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 164 173 211

279

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4a. Value of Shipments by Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 4a Table 4a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4a. Value of Shipments1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars ) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 448 472 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 121 96 109 313 Textile Mills 56 47 37 314 Textile Product Mills 31 32 30 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 45 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 92 89 100 322 Paper Manufacturing 168 156 153 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 103 93 92 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 227 242 265 325 Chemical Manufacturing 440 452 509 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 168 171 175

280

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production a by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 468 552 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 98 120 131 313 Textile Mills 57 50 44 314 Textile Product Mills 31 34 36 315 Apparel Manufacturing 66 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 7 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 87 94 110 322 Paper Manufacturing 159 160 177 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 104 109 107 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 134 215 523 325 Chemical Manufacturing 415 470 657 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 158 183 212 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 85 97 134

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Released: February 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,,," " "NAICS" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

282

" "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," " " "," " ," " "NAICS Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","Establishments with Any Cogeneration Technology in Use(c)","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

283

"RSE Table N11.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,3,3,1,1,0,0,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,4,16,41,4,22,3,0,15 313,"Textile Mills",2,2,5,14,3,5,1,0,5

284

RSE Table N2.1 and N2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N2.1 and N2.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N2.1 and N2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N2.1 and N2.2;" N2.1 and N2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N2.1 and N2.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",6,0,8,0,0,0,0,7 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",10,0,82,0,0,0,0,9 313,"Textile Mills",19,0,77,3,20,0,0,48 314,"Textile Product Mills",38,0,0,38,27,0,0,42

285

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2, 2006;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",5.5,4.1,21.5,13.1,7.1,15.7,1.1,0,35.7 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",3.3,4.7,19.1,2.1,3.9,65.9,1.3,"X",22.1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"X",0

286

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) ES-C2M2 Background ES-C2M2 Facilitated Self-Evaluation v1.0 2 * Administration initiative: Led by DOE in collaboration with other public and private sector partners * Challenge: Develop capabilities to manage dynamic threats and understand cybersecurity posture of the grid * Approach: Develop a maturity model and self-evaluation survey to develop and measure cybersecurity capabilities * Results: A scalable, sector- specific model created in partnership with industry Future Objectives * Strengthen cybersecurity capabilities * Enable consistent evaluation and benchmarking of cybersecurity capabilities * Share knowledge and best practices ES-C2M2 Model Includes 10 Domains ES-C2M2 Facilitated Self-Evaluation v1.0

287

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Note: The Btu conversion factors used for primary electricity are 10,197 Btu/KWh, 10,173 Btu/KWh, and 9,919 Btu/KWh for 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. and Monthly Energy Review November 2005, and September 2009 DOE/EIA-0035(2005, 2009),Table A6. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14

288

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy) for  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1 8 3 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * 1 * 313 Textile Mills 2 1 0 314 Textile Product Mills 1 * 0 315 Apparel * 0 0 316 Leather and Allied Products * * 0 321 Wood Products 6 4 0 322 Paper 2 1 1 323 Printing and Related Support * * * 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,748 3,689 3,572 325 Chemicals 2,772 3,750 2,812 326 Plastics and Rubber Products * Q Q 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 10 7 12 331 Primary Metals 758 646 529 332 Fabricated Metal Products 3 1 1 333 Machinery Q 2 * 334 Computer and Electronic Products * 1 1 335 Electrical Equip., Appliances, and Components 27 69 21 336 Transportation Equipment

289

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3b. Value of Production a by Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2006 > Table 3b and 2006 > Table 3b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3b. Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 429 456 539 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 103 104 125 313 Textile Mills 57 45 39 314 Textile Product Mills 31 31 33 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 43 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 91 88 112 322 Paper Manufacturing 155 152 171 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 100 95 100 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 136 218 551 325 Chemical Manufacturing 419 452 662 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 164 172 212

290

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4b 4b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4b. Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars ) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 431 447 473 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 122 96 109 313 Textile Mills 56 46 37 314 Textile Product Mills 31 30 30 315 Apparel Manufacturing 66 43 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 92 89 100 322 Paper Manufacturing 168 155 153 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 103 93 93 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 224 244 266 325 Chemical Manufacturing 442 450 513 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 168 170 176 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 97 93 103 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 165 145 163 332

291

Complex Queries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Complex Queries Complex Queries < User:Jweers Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Using Nested Queries 1.1 Programs 2 Using Inverse Property Ask Query 3 Using Wildcards Plus Array Print with Count 3.1 States start with A (4) Using Nested Queries Complex Help:Inline queries are queries which involve multiple subjects, properties, or nested queries. The following is an example of a nested query which will return only Programs (Category:Programs) in the Energy Sector (Property:ProgramSector = Energy) within the subsector of Wind (Property:Sector = Wind) which have been developed by National Labs (Category:United States Department of Energy National Laboratories). The last piece mentioned is where the nested query comes into play. To find Programs which have been developed by National Labs, we must search the

292

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 23740 of 28,905 results. 31 - 23740 of 28,905 results. Article Students Compete to Design Energy-Efficient Appliances What is an efficient building without efficient appliances? That's the question students must face as part of the Energy Department's Max Tech and Beyond competition. http://energy.gov/articles/students-compete-design-energy-efficient-appliances Article DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), has released guidance to help utilities better understand their cybersecurity risks, assess severity, and allocate resources more efficiently to manage

293

,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Residual Fuel Oil ","Unswitchable Residual","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed as a Fuel","Fuel Oil Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

294

Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May 2012) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May 2012) Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May 2012) This electricity subsector cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) guideline was developed by the Department of Energy, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). The RMP is written with the goal of enabling organizations- regardless of size or organizational or governance structure-to apply effective and efficient risk management processes and tailor them to meet their organizational requirements. This guideline may be used to implement a new cybersecurity program within an organization or to build upon an organization's existing internal

295

Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity ii Acknowledgements The Energy Sector Control Systems Working Group (ESCSWG) developed this roadmap in support of the Electricity Sub-sector Coordinating Council, Oil and Natural Gas Sector Coordinating Council, and the Government Coordinating Council for Energy under the Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council (CIPAC) Framework; the roadmap has been approved for release by these councils. The ESCSWG members volunteered their time and expertise to this effort and would like to thank the other participants for their valuable perspectives and contributions to this important effort. Special thanks go to the U.S. Department of Energy, which provided the funds and support needed to convene participants

296

DOE Releases Maturity Model to Better Protect the Nation's Grid from  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Maturity Model to Better Protect the Nation's Grid Releases Maturity Model to Better Protect the Nation's Grid from Cybersecurity Threats DOE Releases Maturity Model to Better Protect the Nation's Grid from Cybersecurity Threats May 31, 2012 - 4:32pm Addthis The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model, which allows electric utilities and grid operators to assess their cybersecurity capabilities and prioritize their actions and investments to improve cybersecurity, combines elements from existing cybersecurity efforts into a common tool that can be used consistently across the industry. The Maturity Model was developed as part of a White House initiative led by the Department of Energy in partnership with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and involved close collaboration with industry, other

297

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2a. First Use for All Purposes (Primary a  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2a. Consumption of Energy (Primary 1 Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,579 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 157 164 313 Textile Mills 459 377 304 314 Textile Product Mills 86 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 652 520 625 322 Paper 3,224 2,805 2,825 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 7,571 7,051 7,125 325 Chemicals 7,211 7,499 6,135 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 692 710 684 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,245 1,338 1,394

298

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,,," " "NAICS" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

299

Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May 2012) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May 2012) Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May 2012) This electricity subsector cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) guideline was developed by the Department of Energy, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). The RMP is written with the goal of enabling organizations- regardless of size or organizational or governance structure-to apply effective and efficient risk management processes and tailor them to meet their organizational requirements. This guideline may be used to implement a new cybersecurity program within an organization or to build upon an organization's existing internal

300

Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2013 - Wednesday,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting Presentations June 2013 - Meeting Presentations June 2013 - Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2013 - Wednesday, June 5, 2013 The Department of Energy's Electricity Advisory Committee held a meeting on Wednesday, June 5 and Thursday, June 6 at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). Wednesday, June 5, 2013 EAC Race to the Top Initiative Working Group Discussion - Sonny Popowsky, Working Group Chair Panel: Key Federal Roles to Enhance Cybersecurity in the Power Sector - Chris Peters, moderator Marianne Swanson, NIST Jason Christopher, DOE Robert Coles, National Grid DOE's Race to the Top - Sonny Popowsky Cybersecurity Panel - NIST and Smart Grid Cybersecurity - Marianne Swanson, NIST Cybersecurity Panel - Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3d. Value Added by Selected Industries, 1998,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3d. Value Added1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Brillion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 173 205 233 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 62 67 79 313 Textile Mills 24 19 17 314 Textile Product Mills 13 13 15 315 Apparel Manufacturing 32 21 16 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 5 3 3 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 34 35 44 322 Paper Manufacturing 73 76 80 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 60 59 60 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 32 37 126 325 Chemical Manufacturing 230 254 340 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 86 92 99 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 53 55 72 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 69 57 84 332 Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing

302

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production a by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 432 459 487 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 116 110 115 313 Textile Mills 55 52 42 314 Textile Product Mills 32 34 32 315 Apparel Manufacturing 67 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 88 95 98 322 Paper Manufacturing 172 163 160 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 107 106 99 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 221 241 254 325 Chemical Manufacturing 437 468 510 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 162 181 175

303

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

e e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3e. Gross Output 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) Note: 1. Gross output of an industry is the market value of the goods and services produced by an industry, including commodity taxes. The components of gross output include sales or receipts and other operating income, commodity taxes, plus inventory change. Gross output differs from value added, which measures the contribution of the industry's labor and capital to its gross output. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, "Gross Domestic Product by Industry 1998-2007," October 2009. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 417 444 526 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product

304

Exploring the Potential Business Case for Synergies Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas and renewable energy each contribute to economic growth, energy independence, and carbon mitigation, sometimes independently and sometimes collectively. Often, natural gas and renewables are considered competitors in markets, such as those for bulk electricity. This paper attempts to address the question, 'Given near- and long-term needs for abundant, cleaner energy sources and decarbonization, how can more compelling business models be created so that these two domestic forms of energy work in greater concert?' This paper explores revenue opportunities that emerge from systems-level perspectives in 'bulk energy' (large-scale electricity and natural gas production, transmission, and trade) and four 'distribution edge' subsectors: industrial, residential, commercial, and transportation end uses.

Cochran, J.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.; Arent, D.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2006 > Table 3b and 2006 > Table 3b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3b. Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) Notes: 1. Value of production is the name for inventory-adjusted value of shipment data. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, "Value of Shipments by Detailed Industry 1998- 2007," December 2005, September 2009 and U.S. Census Bureau, Annual Survey of Manufacturers, Industry Statistics 2001, 2004, and 2006, Table 6. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 429 456 539 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 103 104 125 313 Textile Mills 57 45 39 314 Textile Product Mills 31 31 33 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 43 30 316 Leather and Allied Product

306

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4d. Value Added by Selected Industries, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4d. Value Added1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 193 182 214 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 70 59 73 313 Textile Mills 23 18 17 314 Textile Product Mills 13 13 15 315 Apparel Manufacturing 32 22 17 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 5 3 3 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 35 35 37 322 Paper Manufacturing 84 77 85 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 62 56 59 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 38 46 53 325 Chemical Manufacturing 225 248 291 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 84 88 99 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 55 54 66

307

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 468 552 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 98 120 131 313 Textile Mills 57 50 44 314 Textile Product Mills 31 34 36 315 Apparel Manufacturing 66 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 7 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 87 94 110 322 Paper Manufacturing 159 160 177 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 104 109 107 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 134 215 523 325 Chemical Manufacturing 415 470 657 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 158 183 212 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 85 97 134 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing

308

Study on Prompting Mechanism of Energy EFficiency Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Prompting Mechanism of on Prompting Mechanism of Energy Efficiency Technology The Second U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum 2011-5-7 San Francisco China Quality Certification Center Shaoshan Xu Contents  Background  Energy Efficiency Technology  Prompting Mechanism of Energy Efficiency Technology  Information Collection and Evaluation of Energy Efficiency Technologies  Grading and Sub-sector Classification of Energy Efficiency Technologies  Dynamic Tracking and Verification of Energy Efficiency Technologies  Methods/Tools of prompting Energy Efficiency Technologies  China-U.S. Technical Exchange of Energy Efficiency Technologies  Shaoshan(Kevin) Xu 0086-10-83886686(Office)0086-13911564619(MP) E-Mail:xushaoshan@cqc.com.cn Director, Office of Resource-Saving Product Certification

309

New Draft of Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline Now  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft of Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline Draft of Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline Now Available for Public Comment (March 2012) New Draft of Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline Now Available for Public Comment (March 2012) March 1, 2012 - 3:26pm Addthis The Department of Energy, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), has released a second draft of the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) guideline for public comment. This new draft, which will be the last opportunity for public comment prior to final publication, incorporates input submitted by the electric sector during the first public comment period. Many of the submitted comments suggested that the guideline:

310

Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Title Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors de la du Can, Stephane Rue, Ali Hasanbeigi, and Jayant A. Sathaye Journal Energy Policy Volume 46 Pagination 234-245 Keywords california, co2 emissions, energy intensity, energy use Abstract In 2008, the gross domestic product (GDP) of California industry was larger than GDP of industry in any other U.S. states. This study analyses the energy use of and output from seventeen industry subsectors in California and performs decomposition analysis to assess the influence of different factors on California industry energy use. The logarithmic mean Divisia index method is used for the decomposition analysis. The decomposition analysis results show that the observed reduction of energy use in California industry since 2000 is the result of two main factors: the intensity effect and the structural effect. The intensity effect has started pushing final energy use downward in 2000 and has since amplified. The second large effect is the structural effect. The significant decrease of the energy-intensive "Oil and Gas Extraction" subsector's share of total industry value added, from 15% in 1997 to 5% in 2008, and the increase of the non-energy intensive "Electric and electronic equipment manufacturing" sector's share of value added, from 7% in 1997 to 30% in 2008, both contributed to a decrease in the energy intensity in the industry sector

311

Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy)For Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002 and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 992 1,079 1,124 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 109 104 101 313 Textile Mills 255 206 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 285 198 296 322 Paper 1,648 1,413 1,350 323 Printing and Related Support 97 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 1,475 1,290 1,434 325 Chemicals 3,377 3,154 2,772 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 347 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 921 960 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,010 1,614 1,353 332 Fabricated Metal Products 441 387 396

312

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

f f Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4f. Industrial Production Indexes by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (2000 = 100) Source: The Federal Reserve System, http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/g17/ipdisk/ip_sa.txt February 2006 and December 2009. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 97.3 102.6 107.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 109.0 90.0 99.4 313 Textile Mills 108.1 88.5 71.9 314 Textile Product Mills 93.0 88.1 88.6 315 Apparel Manufacturing 109.7 71.9 50.8 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 108.0 62.2 62.7 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 97.4 96.5 106.1 322 Paper Manufacturing 101.4 95.3 92.7 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 98.4 88.5 88.2 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing

313

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,116 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 104 109 313 Textile Mills 254 205 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 504 375 445 322 Paper 2,744 2,361 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,622 3,202 3,396 325 Chemicals 3,704 3,769 3,195 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 348 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 969 1,052 1,105 331 Primary Metals

314

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1b. Fuel Consumption for Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,116 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 104 109 313 Textile Mills 254 205 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 504 375 445 322 Paper 2,744 2,361 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,622 3,202 3,396 325 Chemicals 3,704 3,769 3,195 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 348 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 969 1,052 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,576 2,123 1,744 332 Fabricated Metal Products 441 387 397

315

Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network toolkit search  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Inventory of Support for Low Emission Planning Are we missing something? Add a Tool software models, databases, training materials, publications Add a Program climate-related activites or strategies How to search the CLEAN Inventory: To find information on low emission development planning activities you can search a number of categories below including by whether it is a Program or Tool, the resource type, the Topic, the Sector, the Sub-Sector and/or Organization involved. On the right-hand side of the screen you can also search by Country or Region. This faceted search is meant to allow you to combine as many search options as you would like to narrow down your search and once you have done this the results will be displayed in the middle of the screen. If you would like to start over, press Reset all Filters at the top center of the screen. If you find that we are missing certain tools or programs you can also add to the site clicking on Add a Tool or Add a Program in the upper right-hand corner. ....[read more][show less]

316

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 647 518 619 322 Paper 3,221 2,803 2,833 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,873 3,454 3,657 325 Chemicals 4,851 4,803 4,181 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 691 707 683 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,235 1,331 1,385 331 Primary Metals 3,660 3,100 2,617 332 Fabricated Metal Products 791 706 670 333 Machinery 404 341 416 334 Computer and Electronic Products

317

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1a 1a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1a. Consumption of Energy (Site Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,123 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 105 107 313 Textile Mills 256 207 178 314 Textile Product Mills 50 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 509 377 451 322 Paper 2,747 2,363 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 7,320 6,799 6,864 325 Chemicals 6,064 6,465 5,149 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 328 351 337 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 979 1,059

318

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1a. Table 1a. Consumption of Site Energy For  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1a. Consumption of Energy (Site Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,123 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 105 107 313 Textile Mills 256 207 178 314 Textile Product Mills 50 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 509 377 451 322 Paper 2,747 2,363 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 7,320 6,799 6,864 325 Chemicals 6,064 6,465 5,149 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 328 351 337 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 979 1,059 1,114 331 Primary Metals 2,560 2,120 1,736

319

Vintage-level energy and environmental performance of manufacturing establishments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the relationship between an industrial plant`s vintage and its energy and environmental performance. Basic questions related to defining vintage and measuring the effects of the manufacturing industry`s vintage distribution of plant-level capacity and energy intensity are explored in general for six energy-intensive sectors (paper, chlorine, nitrogenous fertilizer, aluminum, steel, and cement) at the four-digit standard industrial classification (SIC) level and in detail for two sectors (steel and cement). Results show that greenfield (i.e., newly opened) plants in the paper, steel, and cement industries exhibit low fossil fuel intensities. These results are consistent with expectations. New plants in the paper and steel industries, where processes are undergoing electrification, exhibit high electricity intensities. An analysis of a subsector of the steel industry -- minimills that use scrap-based, electric arc furnaces -- reveals a decline in electricity intensity of 6.2 kilowatt-hours per ton for each newer year of installed vintage. This estimate is consistent with those of engineering studies and raises confidence that analyses of vintage effects in other industries could be conducted. When a vintage measure is assigned on the basis of investment data rather than trade association data, the vintage/performance relationship results for the cement industry are reasonably robust; thus, the analysis of vintage and performance could be extended to sectors for which only US Bureau of the Census data are available.

Boyd, G.A.; Bock, M.J.; Neifer, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Karlson, S.H. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

To regulate or not to regulate off-grid electricity access in developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As off-grid electrification receives global attention in the Sustainable Energy for All initiative, the role of regulation for this alternative form of electricity delivery requires a careful investigation. This paper asks whether the activity has to be regulated or not. It then tries to find out where regulation can be used and what type of regulation is appropriate. It suggests that for product-type delivery options, there is no justification for regulatory intervention in the sense of utility regulation but such intervention makes sense in the case of mini-grid-based off-grid delivery options. The paper considers the pros and cons of a generic license waiver, a simplified regulatory arrangement and a full-fledged regulatory supervision and suggests that a light-handed approach is appropriate in general to promote the activities of the sub-sector but more formal approaches may be required if the players do not abide by the rules. The paper also highlights some regulatory challenges and issues.

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "otherf codea subsector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Methods to detect faulty splices in the superconducting magnet system of the LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incident of 19 September 2008 at the LHC was caused by a faulty inter-magnet splice of about 200 n{Omega} resistance. Cryogenic and electrical techniques have been developed to detect other abnormal splices, either between or inside the magnets. The existing quench protection system can be used to detect internal splices with R > 20 n{Omega}. Since this system does not cover the bus between magnets, the cryogenic system is used to measure the rate of temperature rise due to ohmic heating. Accuracy of a few mK/h, corresponding to a few Watts, has been achieved, allowing detection of excess resistance, if it is more than 40 n{Omega} in a cryogenic subsector (two optical cells). Follow-up electrical measurements are made in regions identified by the cryogenic system. These techniques have detected two abnormal internal magnet splices of 100 n{Omega} and 50 n{Omega} respectively. In 2009, this ad hoc system will be replaced with a permanent one to monitor all splices at the n{Omega} level.

Bailey, R.; Bellesia, B.; Lasheras, N.Catalan; Dahlerup-Petersen, K.; Denz, R.; Robles, C.; Koratzinos, M.; Pojer, M.; Ponce, L.; Saban, R.; Schmidt, R.; /CERN /Fermilab /Moscow, INR /Cracow, INP

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Rigid Holography and Six-Dimensional N=(2,0) Theories on AdS_5 times S^1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field theories on anti-de Sitter (AdS) space can be studied by realizing them as low-energy limits of AdS vacua of string/M theory. In an appropriate limit, the field theories decouple from the rest of string/M theory. Since these vacua are dual to conformal field theories (CFTs), this relates some of the observables of these field theories on AdS to a subsector of the dual CFTs. We exemplify this `rigid holography' by studying in detail the 6d N=(2,0) A_{K-1} superconformal field theory (SCFT) on AdS_5xS^1, with equal radii for AdS_5 and for S^1. We choose specific boundary conditions preserving sixteen supercharges that arise when this theory is embedded into Type IIB string theory on AdS_5xS^5/Z_K. On R^{4,1}xS^1, this 6d theory has a 5(K-1)-dimensional moduli space, with unbroken 5d SU(K) gauge symmetry at (and only at) the origin. On AdS_5xS^1, the theory has a 2(K-1)-dimensional `moduli space' of supersymmetric configurations. We argue that in this case the SU(K) gauge symmetry is unbroken everywhere in...

Aharony, Ofer; Rey, Soo-Jong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The causes of the high energy intensity of the Kazakh economy: A characterization of its energy system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The primary energy intensity of Kazakhstan is among the highest in the world. The aim of this paper is to explore, in a quantitative way, the reasons for this condition, and to highlight the opportunities for improvement. To do so, we have developed a detailed ‘bottom-up’ model of the Kazakh energy sector. With this model, we have calculated the potential energy savings on both the demand and supply sides, and for all the economy sectors. This potential is defined as the difference between the current energy consumption in each sector/activity and the energy consumption if best available technologies or energy efficiency standards prevailing in developed countries were adopted in Kazakhstan. We conclude that the main causes of the energy inefficiency in Kazakhstan are: the excessive energy demand of buildings (especially for space heating) in the household and service sector, the inefficiency of the industry sector, particularly in the iron and steel and non-ferrous metals subsectors, the obsolescence of the heating and power generation assets, and the inefficient management of associated gas (flaring and re-injection in oil wells). With current energy efficiency standards prevailing in developed countries, the primary energy consumption in Kazakhstan in 2010 would be reduced by 48.6%, from 75.4 to 38.7 Mtoe.

Antonio Gómez; César Dopazo; Norberto Fueyo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Chapter 2 - Historical Development of the Gas Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of the gas turbine took place in several countries. Several different schools of thought and contributory designs led up to Frank Whittle’s 1941 gas turbine flight. The development of the gas turbine is a source of great pride to many engineers worldwide and, in some cases, takes on either industry sector fervor (for instance, the aviation versus land-based groups) or claims that are tinged with pride in one’s national roots. People from these various sectors and subsectors can therefore get selective in their reporting. So for understanding the history of the gas turbine, one would have to read several different papers and select material written by personnel from the aviation, and land-based sectors. This chapter covers three different accounts of the gas turbine’s development, each mainly a matter of perspective. “I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing—that it was all started by a mouse.” —Walt Disney

Claire Soares

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model's parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Hwang, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model`s parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Hwang, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Determination of gamma from Charmless B --> M1 M2 Decays Using U-Spin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In our previous paper we applied U-spin symmetry to charmless hadronic B+- --> M0 M+- decays for the purpose of precise extraction of the unitarity angle gamma. In this paper we extend our approach to neutral B0 and Bs --> M1 M2 decays. A very important feature of this method is that no assumptions regarding relative sizes of topological decay amplitudes need to be made. As a result, this method avoids an uncontrollable theoretical uncertainty that is often related to the neglect of some topological diagrams (e.g., exchange and annihilation graphs) in quark-diagrammatic approaches. In charged B+- decays, each of the four data sets, P0 P+-, P0 V+-, V0 P+- and V0 V+-, with P=pseudoscalar and V=vector, can be used to obtain a value of gamma. Among neutral decays, only experimental data in the B0, Bs --> P- P+ subsector is sufficient for a U-spin fit. Application of the U-spin approach to the current charged and neutral B decay data yields: gamma=(80^{+6}_{-8}) degrees. In this method, which is completely data dr...

Soni, A; Soni, Amarjit; Suprun, Denis A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Determination of gamma from Charmless B --> M1 M2 Decays Using U-Spin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In our previous paper we applied U-spin symmetry to charmless hadronic B+- --> M0 M+- decays for the purpose of precise extraction of the unitarity angle gamma. In this paper we extend our approach to neutral B0 and Bs --> M1 M2 decays. A very important feature of this method is that no assumptions regarding relative sizes of topological decay amplitudes need to be made. As a result, this method avoids an uncontrollable theoretical uncertainty that is often related to the neglect of some topological diagrams (e.g., exchange and annihilation graphs) in quark-diagrammatic approaches. In charged B+- decays, each of the four data sets, P0 P+-, P0 V+-, V0 P+- and V0 V+-, with P=pseudoscalar and V=vector, can be used to obtain a value of gamma. Among neutral decays, only experimental data in the B0, Bs --> P- P+ subsector is sufficient for a U-spin fit. Application of the U-spin approach to the current charged and neutral B decay data yields: gamma=(80^{+6}_{-8}) degrees. In this method, which is completely data driven, in a few years we should be able to obtain a model independent determination of gamma with an accuracy of O(few degrees).

Amarjit Soni; Denis A. Suprun

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Testing the nested light-cone Bethe equations of the AdS_5 x S^5 superstring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a detailed test of the quantum integrability of the AdS_5 x S^5 superstring in uniform light-cone gauge in its near plane-wave limit. For this we establish the form of the general nested light-cone Bethe equations for the quantum string from the long range psu(2,2|4) Bethe equations of Beisert and Staudacher. Moreover the scheme for translating excited string states into Bethe root excitations is given. We then confront the direct perturbative diagonalization of the light-cone string Hamiltonian in the near plane-wave limit with the energy spectrum obtained from the general nested light-cone Bethe equations in various higher rank sectors. The analysis is performed both analytically and numerically up to the level of six impurity states and subsectors of maximal rank four. We find perfect agreement in all cases lending strong support to the quantum integrability of the AdS_5 x S^5 superstring.

Alexander Hentschel; Jan Plefka; Per Sundin

2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002 and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 992 1,079 1,124 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 109 104 101 313 Textile Mills 255 206 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 285 198 296 322 Paper 1,648 1,413 1,350 323 Printing and Related Support 97 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 1,475 1,290 1,434 325 Chemicals 3,377 3,154 2,772 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 347 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 921 960 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,010 1,614

332

Addressing an Uncertain Future Using Scenario Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has had a longstanding goal of introducing uncertainty into the analysis it routinely conducts in compliance with the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) and for strategic management purposes. The need to introduce some treatment of uncertainty arises both because it would be good general management practice, and because intuitively many of the technologies under development by EERE have a considerable advantage in an uncertain world. For example, an expected kWh output from a wind generator in a future year, which is not exposed to volatile and unpredictable fuel prices, should be truly worth more than an equivalent kWh from an alternative fossil fuel fired technology. Indeed, analysts have attempted to measure this value by comparing the prices observed in fixed-price natural gas contracts compared to ones in which buyers are exposed to market prices (see Bolinger, Wiser, and Golove and (2004)). In addition to the routine reasons for exploring uncertainty given above, the history of energy markets appears to have exhibited infrequent, but troubling, regime shifts, i.e., historic turning points at which the center of gravity or fundamental nature of the system appears to have abruptly shifted. Figure 1 below shows an estimate of how the history of natural gas fired generating costs has evolved over the last three decades. The costs shown incorporate both the well-head gas price and an estimate of how improving generation technology has gradually tended to lower costs. The purpose of this paper is to explore scenario analysis as a method for introducing uncertainty into EERE's forecasting in a manner consistent with the preceding observation. The two questions are how could it be done, and what is its academic basis, if any. Despite the interest in uncertainty methods, applying them poses some major hurdles because of the heavy reliance of EERE on forecasting tools that are deterministic in nature, such as the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is the source of the influential Annual Energy Outlook whose business-as-usual (BAU) case, the Reference Case, forms the baseline for most of the U.S. energy policy discussion. NEMS is an optimizing model because: 1. it iterates to an equilibrium among modules representing the supply, demand, and energy conversion subsectors; and 2. several subsectoral models are individually solved using linear programs (LP). Consequently, it is deeply rooted in the recent past and any effort to simulate the consequences of a major regime shift as depicted in Figure 1 must come by applying an exogenously specified scenario. And, more generally, simulating futures that lie outside of our recent historic experience, even if they do not include regime switches suggest some form of scenario approach. At the same time, the statistical validity of scenarios that deviate significantly outside the ranges of historic inputs should be questioned.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

China's industrial sector in an international context  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The industrial sector accounts for 40% of global energy use. In 1995, developing countries used an estimated 48 EJ for industrial production, over one-third of world total industrial primary energy use (Price et al., 1998). Industrial output and energy use in developing countries is dominated by China, India, and Brazil. China alone accounts for about 30 EJ (National Bureau of Statistics, 1999), or about 23% of world industrial energy use. China's industrial sector is extremely energy-intensive and accounted for almost 75% of the country's total energy use in 1997. Industrial energy use in China grew an average of 6.6% per year, from 14 EJ in 1985 to 30 EJ in 1997 (Sinton et al., 1996; National Bureau of Statistics, 1999). This growth is more than three times faster than the average growth that took place in the world during the past two decades. The industrial sector can be divided into light and heavy industry, reflecting the relative energy-intensity of the manufacturing processes. In China, about 80% of the energy used in the industrial sector is consumed by heavy industry. Of this, the largest energy-consuming industries are chemicals, ferrous metals, and building materials (Sinton et al., 1996). This paper presents the results of international comparisons of production levels and energy use in six energy-intensive subsectors: iron and steel, aluminum, cement, petroleum refining, ammonia, and ethylene. The sectoral analysis results indicate that energy requirements to produce a unit of raw material in China are often higher than industrialized countries for most of the products analyzed in this paper, reflecting a significant potential to continue to improve energy efficiency in heavy industry.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Lehman, Bryan; Sinton, Jonathan

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

17 - Protecting Commercial and Institutional Critical Infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter focuses on protecting commercial and institutional sectors, including retail businesses, banks and financial businesses, educational institutions (a subsector of government facilities), and healthcare and public health institutions. Each of these topics begins with a broad perspective from U.S. Department of Homeland Security Sector-Specific Plans. Keywords shrinkage, shopping service, checkout counters, point-of-sale (POS) accounting systems, exception reporting, counterfeiting, kleptomania, organized retail theft, electronic article surveillance, source tagging, civil recovery, robbery, burglary, substitutability, U.S. Department of the Treasury, Bank Protection Act (BPA) of 1968, savings and loan (S&L) scandal, Bank Secrecy Act of 1986, Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, The Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999, USA Patriot Act of 2001, Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act of 2002, Regulation H, Code of Federal Regulations, suspicious activity reports, money laundering, tear gas/dye packs, Global Positioning System (GPS), skimming, Gun-Free Schools Act, zero-tolerance policy, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT), “soft” targets, Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, “hard” targets, Columbine High School massacre, Beslan Elementary School massacre, Virginia Tech massacre, Student-Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990, Campus Sexual Assault Victims’ Bill of Rights, community policing, Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), The Joint Commission, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Controlled Substances Act of 1970, first receivers, personal protective equipment (PPE), Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Philip P. Purpura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: A literature review and a preliminary characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy use patterns in many of California's fastest-growing industries are not typical of those in the mix of industries elsewhere in the US. Many California firms operate small and medium-sized facilities, often in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services'' to provide occupant comfort and necessities (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. In this report, published or unpublished information on energy use for building services in the industrial sector have been compiled and analyzed. Seven different sources of information and data relevant to California have been identified. Most of these are studies and/or projects sponsored by the Department of Energy, the California Energy Commission, and local utilities. The objectives of these studies were diverse: most focused on industrial energy use in general, and, in one case, the objective was to analyze energy use in commercial buildings. Only one of these studies focused directly on non-process energy use in industrial buildings. Our analysis of Northern California data for five selected industries shows that the contribution of total electricity consumption for lighting ranges from 9.5% in frozen fruits to 29.1% in instruments; for air-conditioning, it ranges from nonexistent in frozen fruits to 35% in instrument manufacturing. None of the five industries selected had significant electrical space heating. Gas space heating ranges from 5% in motor vehicles facilities to more than 58% in the instrument manufacturing industry. 15 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

Akbari, H.; Borgers, T.; Gadgil, A.; Sezgen, O.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

SCENARIOS FOR MEETING CALIFORNIA'S 2050 CLIMATE GOALS California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall Scenario Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides an updated analysis of long-term energy system scenarios for California consistent with the State meeting its 2050 climate goal, including detailed analysis and assessment of electricity system build-out, operation, and costs across the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region. Four key elements are found to be critical for the State to achieve its 2050 goal of 80 percent greenhouse (GHG) reductions from the 1990 level: aggressive energy efficiency; clean electricity; widespread electrification of passenger vehicles, building heating, and industry heating; and large-scale production of low-carbon footprint biofuels to largely replace petroleum-based liquid fuels. The approach taken here is that technically achievable energy efficiency measures are assumed to be achieved by 2050 and aggregated with the other key elements mentioned above to estimate resultant emissions in 2050. The energy and non-energy sectors are each assumed to have the objective of meeting an 80 percent reduction from their respective 1990 GHG levels for the purposes of analysis. A different partitioning of energy and non-energy sector GHG greenhouse reductions is allowed if emission reductions in one sector are more economic or technically achievable than in the other. Similarly, within the energy or non-energy sectors, greater or less than 80 percent reduction from 1990 is allowed for sub-sectors within the energy or non-energy sectors as long as the overall target is achieved. Overall emissions for the key economy-wide scenarios are considered in this report. All scenarios are compliant or nearly compliant with the 2050 goal. This finding suggests that multiple technical pathways exist to achieve the target with aggressive policy support and continued technology development of largely existing technologies.

Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey; Donovan, Sally; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Determination of {gamma} from charmless B{yields}M{sub 1}M{sub 2} decays using U-spin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our previous paper we applied U-spin symmetry to charmless hadronic B{sup {+-}}{yields}M{sup 0}M{sup {+-}} decays for the purpose of precise extraction of the unitarity angle {gamma}. In this paper we extend our approach to neutral B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{yields}M{sub 1}M{sub 2} decays. A very important feature of this method is that no assumptions regarding relative sizes of topological decay amplitudes need to be made. As a result, this method avoids an uncontrollable theoretical uncertainty that is often related to the neglect of some topological diagrams (e.g., exchange and annihilation graphs) in quark-diagrammatic approaches. In charged B{sup {+-}} decays, each of the four data sets, P{sup 0}P{sup {+-}}, P{sup 0}V{sup {+-}}, V{sup 0}P{sup {+-}} and V{sup 0}V{sup {+-}}, with P{identical_to}pseudoscalar and V{identical_to}vector, can be used to obtain a value of {gamma}. Among neutral decays, only experimental data in the B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{yields}P{sup -}P{sup +} subsector is sufficient for a U-spin fit. Application of the U-spin approach to the current charged and neutral B decay data yields: {gamma}=(80{sub -8}{sup +6}) deg. In this method, which is completely data driven, in a few years we should be able to obtain a model-independent determination of {gamma} with an accuracy of O(few degrees)

Soni, Amarjit; Suprun, Denis A. [High Energy Theory Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects Title China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Lynn K. Price, Stephanie Ohshita, David Fridley, Nina Zheng Khanna, Nan Zhou, and Mark D. Levine Keywords energy saving, energy trends, industrial energy efficiency, top-1000 Abstract This study analyzes China's industrial energy consumption trends from 1996 to 2010 with a focus on the impact of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects. From 1996 to 2010, China's industrial energy consumption increased by 134%, even as the industrial economic energy intensity decreased by 46%. Decomposition analysis shows that the production effect was the dominant cause of the rapid growth in industrial energy consumption, while the efficiency effect was the major factor slowing the growth of industrial energy consumption. The structural effect had a relatively small and fluctuating influence. Analysis shows the strong association of industrial energy consumption with the growth of China's economy and changing energy policies. An assessment of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects indicates that the economic energy intensity of major energy-intensive industrial sub-sectors, as well as the physical energy intensity of major energy-intensive industrial products, decreased significantly during China's 11th Five Year Plan (FYP) period (2006-2010). This study also shows the importance and challenge of realizing structural change toward less energy-intensive activities in China during the 12th FYP period (2011-2015).

340

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

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341

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The industrial sector is the most important end-use sector in developing countries in terms of energy use and was responsible for 50% of primary energy use and 53% of associated carbon dioxide emissions in 1995 (Price et al., 1999). The industrial sector is extremely diverse, encompassing the extraction of natural resources, conversion of these resources into raw materials, and manufacture of finished products. Five energy-intensive industrial subsectors account for the bulk of industrial energy use and related carbon dioxide emissions: iron and steel, chemicals, petroleum refining, pulp and paper, and cement. In this paper, we focus on the steel and cement sectors in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico.1 We review historical trends, noting that China became the world's largest producer of cement in 1985 and of steel in 1996. We discuss trends that influence energy consumption, such as the amount of additives in cement (illustrated through the clinker/cement ratio), the share of electric arc furnaces, and the level of adoption of continuous casting. To gauge the potential for improvement in production of steel and cement in these countries, we calculate a ''best practice'' intensity based on use of international best practice technology to produce the mix of products manufactured in each country in 1995. We show that Brazil has the lowest potential for improvement in both sectors. In contrast, there is significant potential for improvement in Mexico, India, and especially China, where adoption of best practice technologies could reduce energy use and carbon dioxide emissions from steel production by 50% and cement production by 37%. We conclude by comparing the identified potential for energy efficiency improvement and carbon dioxide emissions reduction in these key developing countries to that of the U.S. This comparison raises interesting questions related to efforts to improve energy efficiency in developing countries, such as: what is the appropriate role of industrialized countries in promoting the adoption of low carbon technologies, how do international steel and cement companies influence the situation, and how can such information be used in the context of Clean Development Mechanism in the Kyoto Protocol?

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Community Wind: Once Again Pushing the Envelope of Project Finance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, the 'community wind' sector - loosely defined here as consisting of relatively small utility-scale wind power projects that sell power on the wholesale market and that are developed and owned primarily by local investors - has historically served as a 'test bed' or 'proving grounds' for up-and-coming wind turbine manufacturers that are trying to break into the U.S. wind power market. For example, community wind projects - and primarily those located in the state of Minnesota - have deployed the first U.S. installations of wind turbines from Suzlon (in 2003), DeWind (2008), Americas Wind Energy (2008) and later Emergya Wind Technologies (2010), Goldwind (2009), AAER/Pioneer (2009), Nordic Windpower (2010), Unison (2010), and Alstom (2011). Thus far, one of these turbine manufacturers - Suzlon - has subsequently achieved some success in the broader U.S. wind market as well. Just as it has provided a proving grounds for new turbines, so too has the community wind sector served as a laboratory for experimentation with innovative new financing structures. For example, a variation of one of the most common financing arrangements in the U.S. wind market today - the special allocation partnership flip structure (see Figure 1 in Section 2.1) - was first developed by community wind projects in Minnesota more than a decade ago (and is therefore sometimes referred to as the 'Minnesota flip' model) before being adopted by the broader wind market. More recently, a handful of community wind projects built over the past year have been financed via new and creative structures that push the envelope of wind project finance in the U.S. - in many cases, moving beyond the now-standard partnership flip structures involving strategic tax equity investors. These include: (1) a 4.5 MW project in Maine that combines low-cost government debt with local tax equity, (2) a 25.3 MW project in Minnesota using a sale/leaseback structure, (3) a 10.5 MW project in South Dakota financed by an intrastate offering of both debt and equity, (4) a 6 MW project in Washington state that taps into New Markets Tax Credits using an 'inverted' or 'pass-through' lease structure, and (5) a 9 MW project in Oregon that combines a variety of state and federal incentives and loans with unconventional equity from high-net-worth individuals. In most cases, these are first-of-their-kind structures that could serve as useful examples for other projects - both community and commercial wind alike. This report describes each of these innovative new financing structures in some detail, using a case-study approach. The purpose is twofold: (1) to disseminate useful information on these new financial structures, most of which are widely replicable; and (2) to highlight the recent policy changes - many of them temporary unless extended - that have facilitated this innovation. Although the community wind market is currently only a small sub-sector of the U.S. wind market - as defined here, less than 2% of the overall market at the end of 2009 (Wiser and Bolinger 2010) - its small size belies its relevance to the broader market. As such, the information provided in this report has relevance beyond its direct application to the community wind sector. The next two sections of this report briefly summarize how most community wind projects in the U.S. have been financed historically (i.e., prior to this latest wave of innovation) and describe the recent federal policy changes that have enabled a new wave of financial innovation to occur, respectively. Section 4 contains brief case studies of how each of the five projects mentioned above were financed, noting the financial significance of each. Finally, Section 5 concludes by distilling a number of general observations or pertinent lessons learned from the experiences of these five projects.

bolinger, Mark A.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z