Sample records for otec seawater cooling

  1. Study of the effects of interleakage of ammonia and seawater on corrosion and scaling of candidate materials for OTEC heat exchngers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimes, W D; Schrieber, C F; Manning, J A

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment has been made on the effect of small concentrations of ammonia in seawater and varying concentrations of seawater in anhydrous ammonia upon corrosion and scaling of candidate OTEC heat exchanger materials - A1-5052, Alclad 3003, copper alloys 706, 715 and 722, AL-6X stainless steel and CP titanium. Results are presented. AL-6X stainless steel and CP titanium showed exceptional corrosion resistance to all test environments. Alclad alloy 3003 showed satisfactory performance in seawater and seawater plus ammonia environments. Only minimal pitting was observed and this was limited to the sacrificial cladding in seawater plus ammonia only. Cladding alloy 7072 showed unacceptable corrosion resistance in anhydrous ammonia containing low seawater concentrations. Al-5052 tubes showed unsatisfactory corrosion behavior in the presence of seawater flow with ammonia interleakage. Copper alloys considered showed unacceptable corrosion resistance in all seawater environments containing ammonia. Low pressure differentials between seawater and anhydrous ammonia in the tube testing unit resulted in scaling and moderately efficient plug seal formation at the artificial leak sites of the tubes. It is recommended that Alclad 3003, CP titanium and AL-6X stainless steel tubes be assessed for suitability in the presence of probable OTEC cleaning systems.

  2. Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, T.R.; Althof, J.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

  3. Optimal Scheduling for Biocide and Heat Exchangers Maintenance Towards Environmentally Friendly Seawater Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binmahfouz, Abdullah

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR SEAWATER-COOLED POWER AND DESALINATION PLANTS....................................................... 127 5.1 Overview .............................................................................................. 127 5.2 Introduction... 5.2 Representation of a Once-Thorough Cooling System................................ 141 5.3 An Overall Representation of the Power/Desalination Plant ..................... 152 5.4 The Cooling System for the Case Study...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR OTEC PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Preoperational Test Platform,Thermal EnergyConversion (OTEC), Preoperational Ocean Test1979. Sands, M.D. , Draft OTEC Programmatic Environmental

  5. ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL OF OTEC ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Northwest in press). OTEC Compliance Documents EnvironmentalThermal Ener_g,z_ Conversion (OTEC)_. Preoperational Test r·and Institutional Aspects of OTEC, American Society of

  6. APPROPRIATE ZOOPLANKTON SAMPLING METHODOLOGY FOR OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites. Participants J.Zooplankton Sampling for OTEC Sites t~thodology Edited bywho gave an overview of the OTEC program, and the policies

  7. ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL OF OTEC ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants canWorkshop on Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), Houston,monitoring at Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCENARIO . . . . . . . . . . OTEC RESOURCE REGIONALC-1 ILLUSTRATIONS Number Title OTEC Systems Development Gulfof Mexico Moored OTEC Resource Area . . . . . . . . . . .

  9. Process integration techniques for optimizing seawater cooling sytems and biocide discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BinMahfouz, Abdullah S.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximize seawater temperature span while avoiding thermal pollution Calculate revised biocide amount Does biocide discharge in effluent seawater meet regulations? Screen candidates and add biocide- removal unit(s) to meet regulations Regulations met Yes... by process cold streams Residual heat Most negative Residual heat Fig. 4.4 General Cascade Diagram 33 Interval 1Heat added by process hot streams Heat removed by process cold streams Revised residual heat Interval 2Heat added by process...

  10. System studies of open-cycle OTEC components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B.K.; Link, H.F.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system model of open Rankine cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) was used to examine the effects of component performance and design on plant cost. Three components are examined in detail: an optional seawater deaeration subsystem, the flash evaporator, and a two-stage direct-contact condenser. Preliminary data quantifying noncondensable gas release in upcomers and a debubbler chamber were used to evaluate the effect of predeaeration (removing the dissolved gases in deaeration chambers before the seawater enters the heat exchangers) on system cost and performance. Little data on the interactions between geometry and performance of vertical spout flash evaporators operating under OTEC conditions are available; therefore, we performed independent parametric variations. For the direct-contact condenser previous numerical studies provide the basis for coupling geometry and performance. Results of these studies are useful in setting research priorities, in defining operating conditions for further seawater experiments, and in updating plant cost estimates.

  11. Commercializing/Financing OTEC Dr. Ted Johnson, Executive Director and VP of OTEC/SDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finance Architecture 6 (Baha Mar SDC Project & Bahamas Electricity Corporation OTEC power plants) Top (equivalent to ~42,000 tons CO2) per year, reducing electricity consumption by over 80% · Energy Services, LLC (NJ, USA) is a proven leader in the development of Central Energy Cooling, Combined Heat and Power

  12. Staging Rankine Cycles Using Ammonia for OTEC Power Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent focus on renewable power production has renewed interest in looking into ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Early studies in OTEC applicability indicate that the island of Hawaii offers a potential market for a nominal 40-MWe system. a 40-MWe system represents a large leap in the current state of OTEC technology. Lockheed Martin Inc. is currently pursuing a more realistic goal of developing a 10-MWe system under U.S. Navy funding (Lockheed 2009). It is essential that the potential risks associated with the first-of-its-kind plant should be minimized for the project's success. Every means for reducing costs must also be pursued without increasing risks. With this in mind, the potential for increasing return on the investment is assessed both in terms of effective use of the seawater resource and of reducing equipment costs.

  13. STATUS OF OTEC ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of nutrient data from four potential OTEC sites".Proceedings, 6th OTEC Conference, VoL 1, 13 .19~ 1 - 13.19~distribution potential OTEC sites." Proceedings, 6th ,2. ~EG

  14. OTEC Commercialization Update June 14, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Processes Faster Manufacturing Process 6/1/2011 9 #12;OTEC Thermodynamics Lab Manassas, VA OTEC Heat scale OTEC plants ­ Green Industry and New Jobs Summary 6/1/2011 16 #12;

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program preoperational testand biomass distribution at potential OTEC sites.6th OTEC conference, Washington, D.C. Payne, S.F. 1979. The

  16. PHYTOPLANKTON AND BIOMASS DISTRIBUTION AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, P.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISTRIBUTION AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES P. W. Johnson and A.DISTRIBUTION AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES LBL9054 P. W. Johnsonparameters at potential OTEC sites. Site Dactyliosolen

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) programprojected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants canmonitoring at Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites

  19. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  20. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  1. The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: • Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. • Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

  2. DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Hydrothermal Cooling 90% saving over Mechanical cooling Coordination With Offshore OTEC Plant to seep in #12;DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY BACKGROUND Not BOTH From the SAME Conduit Investment OFFSHORE Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant Cooling Power Biofuel / H2 Fresh Water DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL

  3. NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project Contract Number N62583-09-C-0083 CDRL A014 OTEC Mini-Spar Pilot Plant 9 December 2011 OTEC-2011-001-4 Prepared for: Naval Facilities; distribution is unlimited. #12; Configuration Report and Development Plan Volume 4 Site Specific OTEC

  4. Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, H.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the US Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open- cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat-and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude`s efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  5. OTEC- Residential Photovoltaic Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Customers of Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) who install photovoltaic systems are eligible for a rebate of $500 for the first kilowatt (kW) of installed capacity per year. ...

  6. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringthermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants by mid-1980 1 s.distributiion at potential OTEC sites. p. 7D-4/1-4/5. In

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

  8. COMPARISON OF NUTRIENT DATA FROM FOUR POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hung, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Con- version (OTEC) sites; Puerto Rico, St.THermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program, PreoperationalDATA FROM FOUR POTENTIAL OTEC SITES Mary S. Quinby-Hunt June

  9. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) programthe 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  14. COMPARISON OF NUTRIENT DATA FROM FOUR POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hung, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at three proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Con- version (OTEC)Im- pact Assessment: Ocean THermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)M. J. Barcelona (1976). Ocean thermal energy conver- sion:

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  16. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites to identify thefishery resources at potential OTEC sites. At this time, thethermal energy conversion (OTEC) program; preoperational

  17. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites toassessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  18. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.recommendations for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  19. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants. Argonne,

  20. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites tooperation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  1. OTEC- Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers two programs to agricultural customers. The first program, the Irrigation Sprinkler and Pump Motor Program, offers rebates to customers to...

  2. ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL OF OTEC ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDP) 1977. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DepartmentEDP) 1978. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. ~epartmentof projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

  3. OTEC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon Trail Electric Cooperative (OTEC) assists residential members in reducing electric consumption by providing rebates for energy efficient equipment. Rebates are for appliances, heat pumps,...

  4. OTEC- Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers a commercial lighting retrofit program that provides rebates for commercial businesses that change existing lighting to more energy...

  5. ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL OF OTEC ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plan (EDP) 1977. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S.Plan (EDP) 1978. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. ~of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

  6. http://www.xenesys.com/ 1 Xenesys's Development on OTEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://www.xenesys.com/ 1 Xenesys's Development on OTEC Process Engineering for OTEC Optimization about Process Flow, Heat & Material Balance, Specs of Main Equipment of OTEC Basic Design of Power for OTEC Improvement of Performance (High U- Value, Low Pressure Drop, Durability against High pressure

  7. DCNS, OTEC roadmap May 2013 DCNSDCNS -Ocean Energy Business Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © DCNS, OTEC roadmap ­ May 2013 © DCNSDCNS - Ocean Energy Business Unit Emmanuel BROCHARD, VP OTEC positioning for DCNS on Ocean Energy Provider of added-value · On Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Floating #12;© DCNS, OTEC roadmap ­ May 2013 4 DNCS invests in 4 ocean energy technologies Keypoints OTEC

  8. ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL OF OTEC ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power with a gas or steam turbine. An OTEC plant can bethe steam after passage through the turbine. OPTIONS Atand the steam produced being used to drive the turbine. Once

  9. COMPARISON OF NUTRIENT DATA FROM FOUR POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hung, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment: Ocean THermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program,the 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  10. ZOOPLANKTON FROM OTEC SITES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and October 1978, at two OTEC sites in the Gulf of Mexicohave been collected at three OTEC sites off Total Tampa andm and taxonomy at specific OTEC sites are lacking al- Total

  11. THE MARINE MAMMAL FAUNA OF POTENTIAL OTEC SITES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AND HAWAII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, S.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conver- sion (OTEC) Program; PreoperationalM M A FAUNA OF POTENTIAL OTEC SITES A M L IN THE GULF OFMAMMAL FAUNA OF POTENTIAL OTEC SITES IN THE GOLF OF MEXICO

  12. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department of Energy,aspects of the screens for OTEC intake systems. U.S. Energy

  13. PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA FROM THE OTEC PUNTA TUNA, PUERTO RICO SITE. SEPTEMBER 1979 - JUNE 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frye, Daniel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA FROM THE OTEC PUNTA TUNA, PUERTO RICOPunta Tuna, Puerto Rico OTEC site in September 1979 using2.0ojo28 Table 3-2. SHIP OTEC PR TVPE OF CASl CTD Computed

  14. OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Sub-System Dynamic Interaction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Sub-System Dynamic Interaction Validation (OPPSDIV) OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Sub-System Dynamic Interaction Validation (OPPSDIV) OTEC Cold Water...

  15. Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates: Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF METHODS FOR USE ON OTEC SAMPLES. Anthony T. Jones Eric 0.OF METHODS FOR USE ON OTEC SAMPLES. ABSTRACT Adenosine

  16. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

  17. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (The operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  18. OTEC -A collaborative effort Paul Dinnissen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the means of producing my electricity. From the sea? Yes, Professor, and I was at no loss to find depths, to obtain electricity by the difference of temperature to which they would have been exposed) ­ Richard Meyer (69, USA) ­ Paul Dinnissen (43, Netherlands) #12;Our observations · We see staggering OTEC

  19. Asia Pacific Clean Energy International OTEC Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in 2013 · NELHA Ocean Energy Research Center ­ Continued Heat Exchanger deployment & testing in relevantAsia Pacific Clean Energy Summit International OTEC Symposium Developer's Perspective Round Table · Invests in green related industries, products and services ­ property, new energy, aviation, agriculture

  20. Nature/Culture/Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmreich, Stefan

    This essay considers seawater as a substance and symbol in anthropological and social theory. Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place with respect to anthropological categories of nature and culture. Seawater as nature ...

  1. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aspects of siting OTEC plants offshore the United States ongas. phosgene Offshore ammonia plant-ships will presentan facility offshore may expose the plant to power outages

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    existing literature to characterize air/water emissions expected to be encountered in the production of chemicals at OTEC plants; develop applicable control technologies

  4. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  5. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  6. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  7. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Authors, Various

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

  8. Are We There Yet? A Developer's Roadmap to OTEC Commercialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is discussed from the perspective of one OTEC developer. Keywords: OTEC, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Commercialization I. WHERE ARE WE GOING? Ocean thermal energy is a large, to-date untapped renewable energy resource]. This thermal energy comes from an existing, vast energy storage mechanism, the tropical oceans. Ocean Thermal

  9. Conceptual design of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment (OC-OTEC NPPE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.; Link, H.F.; Parsons, B.K.; Parsons, J.M.; Zangrando, F.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the conceptual design of an experiment to investigate heat and mass transfer and to assess the viability of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The experiment will be developed in two stages, the Heat- and Mass-Transfer Experimental Apparatus (HMTEA) and the Net Power-Producing Experiment (NPPE). The goal for the HMTEA is to test heat exchangers. The goal for the NPPE is to experimentally verify OC-OTEC's feasibility by installing a turbine and testing the power-generating system. The design effort met the goals of both the HMTEA and the NPPE, and duplication of hardware was minimal. The choices made for the design resource water flow rates are consistent with the availability of cold and warm seawater as a result of the seawater systems upgrade carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the state of Hawaii, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. The choices regarding configuration of the system were made based on projected performance, degree of technical risk, schedule, and cost. The cost for the future phase of the design and the development of the HMTEA/NPPE is consistent with the projected future program funding levels. The HMTEA and NPPE were designed cooperatively by PICHTR, Argonne National Laboratory, and Solar Energy Research Institute under the guidance of DOE. The experiment will be located at the DOE's Seacoast Test Facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. 71 refs., 41 figs., 34 tabs.

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M. D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

  11. Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

  12. A Cold Water Pipe for an OTEC Pilot Plant: Design Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    A Cold Water Pipe for an OTEC Pilot Plant: Design Considerations Kara Silver Abstract Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) is a baseload renewable technology for tropical countries and islands. In order

  13. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gradients to drive a steam engine * A Preliminary Assessment of OTEC Resources ASME 3/2007 g Surface vs Deep

  14. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    factors including plant distance offshore, water depth, typeand entrainment by offshore 400-MW OTEC plant is small,

  15. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc.'s Recent OTEC Activities at NELHA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , and operator of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant and heat exchanger test facility at NELHA

  16. OTEC as an Economic Engine Barry R. Cole, Executive Vice President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dependence on foreign oil · Increased economic security 9 September 2013 7APCESE and OTEC Symposium 2013

  17. THE MARINE MAMMAL FAUNA OF POTENTIAL OTEC SITES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AND HAWAII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, S.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mental Assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conver- sion (OTEC)the 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  18. OTEC biofouling, corrosion, and materials program. Progress report, March 1978-March 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draley, J.E.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory has been responsible for the technical management of the OTEC Biofouling, Corrosion, and Materials Program since March 1978. By March of 1981, sensitive field-usable heat-transfer monitors had been developed, extensive open ocean testing had been done, a considerable understanding of the microbiofouling problem had been developed, and commercial methods of removal had been shown to be effective. As a material of construction for heat exchangers, titanium showed excellent corrosion resistance. New grades of stainless steel also showed excellent corrosion resistance, while the most common grades suffered from pitting and/or crevice corrosion. The best aluminum alloys and Alclads showed no pitting and moderate declining corrosion rates under optimum conditions in warm seawater, but were subject to accelerated attack from stagnant water, crevices, abrasive treatment, and ammoniated water; in cold seawater, limited data showed very good behavior. Copper-nickel alloys were similar to aluminum alloys in corrosion rate and were subject to accelerated attack from the same factors; ammonia had a particularly severe effect on these alloys.

  19. LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT, HAWAII, DERIVED FROM COMMERCIAL FISH RECORDS, 1959-1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Anthony T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first deployment of Mini-OTEC. Ocean Research Consulting64 LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT,LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT,

  20. Uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10/sup 5/, which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10/sup 3/ in seawater instead of the reported values of 10/sup 5/. However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10/sup 5/ in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater.

  1. Rankine Cycle Working Fluids for CC-OTEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung et al., Seoul, Korea 8 R32/R290 Similar efficiency High pressure Smaller volume Good size 2 CC-OTEC plant Boiler, condenser, turbine Initial cost Size of the equipment Working fluids al., Seoul, Korea 6 Efficiency #12;Dongsoo Jung et al., Seoul, Korea 7 Equipment size #12;Dongsoo

  2. OTEC Advanced Composite Cold Water Pipe: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Miller; Matthew Ascari

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion can exploit natural temperature gradients in the oceans to generate usable forms of energy (for example, cost-competitive baseload electricity in tropical regions such as Hawaii) free from fossil fuel consumption and global warming emissions.The No.1 acknowledged challenge of constructing an OTEC plant is the Cold Water Pipe (CWP), which draws cold water from 1000m depths up to the surface, to serve as the coolant for the OTEC Rankine cycle. For a commercial-scale plant, the CWP is on the order of 10m in diameter.This report describes work done by LMSSC developing the CWP for LM MS2 New Ventures emerging OTEC business. The work started in early 2008 deciding on the minimum-cost CWP architecture, materials, and fabrication process. In order to eliminate what in previous OTEC work had been a very large assembly/deployment risk, we took the innovative approach of building an integral CWP directly from theOTEC platform and down into the water. During the latter half of 2008, we proceeded to a successful small-scale Proof-of-Principles validation of the new fabrication process, at the Engineering Development Lab in Sunnyvale. During 2009-10, under the Cooperative Agreement with the US Dept. of Energy, we have now successfully validated key elements of the process and apparatus at a 4m diameter scale suitable for a future OTEC Pilot Plant. The validations include: (1) Assembly of sandwich core rings from pre-pultruded hollow 'planks,' holding final dimensions accurately; (2) Machine-based dispensing of overlapping strips of thick fiberglass fabric to form the lengthwise-continuous face sheets, holding accurate overlap dimensions; (3) Initial testing of the fabric architecture, showing that the overlap splices develop adequate mechanical strength (work done under a parallel US Naval Facilities Command program); and (4) Successful resin infusion/cure of 4m diameter workpieces, obtaining full wet-out and a non-discernable knitline between successive stepwise infusions.

  3. LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT, HAWAII, DERIVED FROM COMMERCIAL FISH RECORDS, 1959-1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Anthony T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Hawaii areproposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) site are A

  4. LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT, HAWAII, DERIVED FROM COMMERCIAL FISH RECORDS, 1959-1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Anthony T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Hawaii area presented. proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  5. Conceptual designs for modular OTEC SKSS. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume presents the results of the first phase of the Station Keeping Subsystem (SKSS) design study for 40 MW/sub e/ capacity Modular Experiment OTEC Platforms. The objectives of the study were: (1) establishment of basic design requirements; (2) verification of technical feasibility of SKSS designs; (3) identification of merits and demerits; (4) estimates of sizes for major components; (5) estimates of life cycle costs; (6) deployment scenarios and time/cost/risk assessments; (7) maintenance/repair and replacement scenarios; (8) identifications of interface with other OTEC subsystems; (9) recommendations for and major problems in preliminary design; and (10) applicability of concepts to commercial plant SKSS designs. A brief site suitability study was performed with the objective of determining the best possible location at the Punta Tuna (Puerto Rico) site from the standpoint of anchoring. This involved studying the vicinity of the initial location in relation to the prevailing bottom slopes and distances from shore. All subsequent studies were performed for the final selected site. The two baseline OTEC platforms were the APL BARGE and the G and C SPAR. The results of the study are presented in detail. The overall objective of developing two conceptual designs for each of the two baseline OTEC platforms has been accomplished. Specifically: (1) a methodology was developed for conceptual designs and followed to the extent possible. At this stage, a full reliability/performance/optimization analysis based on a probabilistic approach was not used due to the numerous SKSS candidates to be evaluated. A deterministic approach was used. (2) For both of the two baseline platforms, the APL BARGE and the G and C SPAR, all possible SKSS candidate concepts were considered and matrices of SKSS concepts were developed.

  6. www.utm.my innovative entrepreneurial global 1 OTEC International Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investments by deep-water oil and gas industry 4 MW x 6 = 24 MW OTEC plant [USD 240 million]; 3. Private; and - the Promotion of Investment Act of 1986; · Introduce new Law on Ocean Thermal Energy Development; and · Malaysia investment in OTEC development be a "promoted activity" with accelerated capital depreciation allowance of 40

  7. Study of integration issues to realize the market potential of OTEC energy in the aluminum industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Jr., M. S.; Thiagarajan, V.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Markel, A. L.; Snyder, III, J. E.; Sprouse, A. M.; Leshaw, D.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The various integration issues are studied which must be considered to realize the market potential for the use of OTEC by the aluminum industry. The chloride reduction process has been identified as an attractive candidate for use with OTEC systems, and drained-cathode Hall cells and two alternative chloride reduction processes are considered. OTEC power system and plantships for the different processes are described. Aluminum industry characteristics important for OTEC considerations are given, including economic models and case history analyses. Appended are supporting cost estimates and energy bridge concepts for getting OTEC energy to shore. (LEW)

  8. Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

  9. V.1 AN ANALYSIS OF SIX GROUPS OF ZOOPLANKTON IN SAMPLES TAKEN IN 1978/79 AT THE PROPOSED OTEC SITE IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO OFF TAMPA BAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flock, Mark E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions at a potential OTEC site in the Gulf of Mexico;in the upper 1000 m at the OTEC station off Tampa Bay. + = OTEC site. Taxon Ahyla spp.

  10. Composite turbine blade design options for Claude (open) cycle OTEC power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, T.R.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale turbine rotors made from composites offer several technical advantages for a Claude (open) cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system. Westinghouse Electric Corporation has designed a composite turbine rotor/disk using state-of-the-art analysis methods for large-scale (100-MW/sub e/) open cycle OTEC applications. Near-term demonstrations using conventional low-pressure turbine blade shapes with composite material would achieve feasibility and modern credibility of the open cycle OTEC power system. Application of composite blades for low-pressure turbo-machinery potentially improves the reliability of conventional metal blades affected by stress corrosion.

  11. MHK Technologies/Open Cycle OTEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC < MHK Technologies JumpOceanus <OTEC.jpg

  12. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  13. Physical and numerical modeling of the external fluid mechanics of OTEC pilot plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singarella, Paul N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the near field external fluid mechanics of symmetrical OTEC pilot plant designs (20-80 MWe) under realistic deep water conditions. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of different plant ...

  14. Seawater degradation of polymeric composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Timothy Sean

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEAWATER DEGRADATION OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES A Thesis by TIMOTHY SEAN GRANT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering SEAWATER DEGRADATION OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES A Thesis by TIMOTHY SEAN GRANT Approved as to style and content by: Walter L. Bradley (Chair of mmittee) lan Letton (Member) arry ogan (Member) r John Whitcomb...

  15. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Luis A. Vega Ph.D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OTC 21016 Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): An Update Luis A. Vega Ph and we will face a steadily diminishing petroleum supply. This situation justifies re-evaluating OTEC should begin to implement the first generation of OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine

  16. First Generation 50 MW OTEC Plantship for the Production of Electricity and Desalinated Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These are based on existing technology and current offshore industry practices. The CC-OTEC plant utilizes Michaelis, Energy Island Ltd. UK Copyright 2010, Offshore Technology Conference This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2010 Offshore Technology Conference held in Houston, Texas, USA, 3­6 May 2010. This paper

  17. Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez Buńo, Mariana

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

  18. Assessment of US shipbuilding current capability to build a commercial OTEC platform and a cold water pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komelasky, M. C. [ed.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lowry and Hoffman Associates Inc. (LHA) performed for ORI an analysis of the shipbuilding requirements for constructing an OTEC plant, and the available shipyard assets which could fulfill these requirements. In addition, several shipyards were queried concerning their attitudes towards OTEC. In assessing the shipbuilding requirements for an OTEC plant, four different platform configurations were studied and four different designs of the cold water pipe (CWP) were examined. The platforms were: a concrete ship design proposed by Lockheed; concrete spar designs with internal heat exchangers (IHE) (Rosenblatt) and external heat exchangers (XHE) (Lockheed); and a steel ship design proposed by Gibbs and Cox. The types of materials examined for CWP construction were: steel, fiber reinforced plastic (FPR), elastomer, and concrete. The report is organized io three major discussion areas. All the construction requirements are synthesized for the four platforms and CWPs, and general comments are made concerning their availability in the US. Specific shipbuilders facilities are reviewed for their applicability to building an OTEC plant, an assessment of the shipyards general interest in the OTEC program is presented providing an insight into their nearterm commercial outlook. The method of determining this interest will depend largely on a risk analysis of the OTEC system. Also included are factors which may comprise this analysis, and a methodology to ascertain the risk. In the appendices, various shipyard specifications are presented, shipyard assessment matrices are given, graphs of various shipyard economic outlooks are provided, and definitions of the risk factors are listed. (WHK)

  19. Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl Complexes with Glutarimidedioxime Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl...

  20. Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.J. (ed.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

  1. Current meter data report, September 1980 - December 1980: mooring OTEC-HB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roman, T M; Wang, D P

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data tapes contained current meter records from instrumented mooring OTEC-HB near the OTEC-1 site approximately 14 nautical miles northwest of Keahole Point, Island of Hawaii. Deployed in 1345 m of water, the mooring had five Aanderaa RCM-5 current meters, one at each of the following depths: 47 m, 70m, 99m, 154m, and 829 m. Raw data consisted of east-west (U) velocity, north-south (V) velocity, temperature (T), and pressure (P) time series from September 23, 1980, through December 20, 1980, with a recording interval of 15 min. The series (U, V, T) were filtered into various frequency domains, thereby removing very high frequencies and separating tidal oscillations from very low frequencies. Spectral analyses were performed on the nontidal U and V time series.

  2. Cool Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Links Explore Science Explore Explore these Topics Activities Videos Cool Links Favorite Q&A invisible utility element Cool Links Los Alamos National Laboratory links Los...

  3. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  4. STOCHASTIC COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisognano, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Stochastic Cooling i n ICE, IEEE Transaction's in Nucl. SICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling

  5. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B.K.; Althof, J.A.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations. 33 refs., 69 figs., 38 tabs.

  6. Public Attitudes Toward the Development of Seawater Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % 11% Natural gas 8% 3% OTEC 16% 3% Rooftop solar water heaters 44% 11% SWAC 11% 1% Solar power (PV) 68 connected to SWAC system by 30% 19% 63% Reduce fresh water use by 110 million gallons a year (1% of what O

  7. STOCHASTIC COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisognano, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led tol . . Physics and Techniques o f Stochastic Cooling, PhysicsCooling o f Momentum Spread by F i l t e r Techniques, CERN-

  8. RAPID DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN SEAWATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes in seawater samples for measurement. The new SRNL method employs a novel and effective pre-concentration step that utilizes a blend of calcium phosphate with iron hydroxide to collect both strontium and yttrium rapidly from the seawater matrix with enhanced chemical yields. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with rapid Sr Resin and DGA Resin cartridge separation options using vacuum box technology, allow seawater samples up to 10 liters to be analyzed. The total {sup 89}Sr + {sup 90}Sr activity may be determined by gas flow proportional counting and recounted after ingrowth of {sup 90}Y to differentiate {sup 89}Sr from {sup 90}Sr. Gas flow proportional counting provides a lower method detection limit than liquid scintillation or Cerenkov counting and allows simultaneous counting of samples. Simultaneous counting allows for longer count times and lower method detection limits without handling very large aliquots of seawater. Seawater samples up to 6 liters may be analyzed using Sr Resin for {sup 89}Sr and {sup 90}Sr with a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of 1-10 mBq/L, depending on count times. Seawater samples up to 10 liters may be analyzed for {sup 90}Sr using a DGA Resin method via collection and purification of {sup 90}Y only. If {sup 89}Sr and other fission products are present, then {sup 91}Y (beta energy 1.55 MeV, 58.5 day half-life) is also likely to be present. {sup 91}Y interferes with attempts to collect {sup 90}Y directly from the seawater sample without initial purification of Sr isotopes first and {sup 90}Y ingrowth. The DGA Resin option can be used to determine {sup 90}Sr, and if {sup 91}Y is also present, an ingrowth option with using DGA Resin again to collect {sup 90}Y can be performed. An MDA for {sup 90}Sr of <1 mBq/L for an 8 hour count may be obtained using 10 liter seawater sample aliquots.

  9. Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

  10. OTEC-1 Power System Test Program: test plan for first deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes in detail all tests planned for the first eight-month deployment of OTEC-1, a test facility constructed by the US Department of Energy in order to test heat exchangers for closed-cycle power plants using ocean thermal energy. Tests to be performed during the first-deployment period are aimed primarily at determining (1) the effectiveness of countermeasures in preventing biofouling of the heat exchanters, (2) the extent of environmental impacts associated with operation of an OTEC facility, and (3) the performance of a 1-MWe, titanium shell-and-tube evaporator and condenser pair. The condenser to be tested has plain tubes, and the evaporator employs the Linde High Flux surface on the working-fluid (ammonia) side to enhance the heat-transfer rate. This plan provides a statement of the objectives and priorities of the test program, describes the test equipment, gives a detailed account of all tests to be performed and the test schedule, and discusses provisions for management of the test program.

  11. Seawater Enhances the Corrosion of Nuclear Fuel Rods | Photosynthetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seawater Enhances the Corrosion of Nuclear Fuel Rods April 19, 2012 Seawater Enhances the Corrosion of Nuclear Fuel Rods PARC Post Doc Anne-Marie Carey is featured in DOE Frontiers...

  12. Development of cold seawater air conditioning systems for application as a demand side management tool for Hawaii and other subtropical climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaya, M.H. [State of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the proximity to deep cold seawater for many coastal regions in Hawaii and the high demand for air conditioning in large buildings, seawater air conditioning (SWAC) is a major potential sustainable energy resource for Hawaii and other subtropical regions of the world. The basic concept of seawater air conditioning is the use deep cold seawater to cool the chilled water in one or more air conditioned buildings as opposed to using energy intensive refrigeration systems. The economic viability of the seawater air conditioning is determined by comparing the construction and operating costs of the seawater supply system to the construction and operating costs of conventional air conditioning systems. The State of Hawaii commissioned an analysis to identify the technical and economic opportunities and limitations in the use of SWAC in Hawaii. The result of this work is a feasibility analysis of SWAC systems in the state and the potential associated energy savings. The study looked at the prospects of installing such a system at a major new resort development on Oahu called West Beach.

  13. Electron CoolingElectron Cooling Sergei Nagaitsev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    Electron CoolingElectron Cooling Sergei Nagaitsev FNAL - AD April 28, 2005 #12;Electron Cooling methods must "get around the theorem" e.g. by pushing phase-space around. #12;Electron Cooling - Nagaitsev 3 TodayToday''s Menus Menu What is cooling? Types of beam cooling Electron cooling Conclusions #12

  14. Corrosion of barrier materials in seawater environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser, J.H.; Soo, P.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review has been carried out on the performance of barrier materials for low-level radioactive wastes in seawater environments. The environments include those for shallower coastal waters as well as the deep ocean (down to 3800 m). The review is mainly focused on metallic materials since they are the most common for seawater service and they have the largest data base. Information from the literature is usually pertinent to shallower coastal locations, but there is a valuable source of corrosion data obtained from several studies of metallic specimens exposed to ocean-bed conditions. In addition, the corrosion of carbon steel barriers has been evaluated for actual waste containers that were retrieved from previously-used disposal sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Of the metallic materials studied, carbon steel showed the least corrosion resistance. Failure by non-uniform attack in a typical waste container could occur in as little as 25 y in some ocean environments ` Penetration by local attack, such as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance was also observed for more expensive materials such as low-alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium alloys, zirconium alloys, copper alloys, nickel alloys, aluminum alloys, and lead alloys.

  15. Cooled railplug

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  16. Seawater Air Conditioning for Downtown Engineering Project Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Seawater Air Conditioning for Downtown Honolulu Scott Higa Engineering Project Manager Honolulu Seawater Air Conditioning, LLC Abstract As a tropical island state, Hawaii has a year-round demand for air conditioning. Conventional air conditioning systems are energy intensive and represent close to 50 percent

  17. Lithium Isotope History of Cenozoic Seawater: Changes in Silicate Weathering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Lithium Isotope History of Cenozoic Seawater: Changes in Silicate Weathering and Reverse Weathering 70 Ma · Overview of the Marine Lithium Cycle · Analytical Challenges · 68 Million Year Seawater Lithium Isotope Record (Forams) · Interpretation Standard: NIST L-SVEC Li (SRM 8545) #12;100 Ma Climate

  18. Analysis of Proper Depth for Gaining Seawater Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and seawater temperatures near the city. · It is impossible to get deep sea water for Busan area, since Kim (Dongeui University) · Ki-Chang Chang (Korea Institute of Energy Research) #12;1. Introduction · Use of heat from seawater could be different from the weather conditions of a coastal city

  19. Ventilative cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

  20. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  1. Coral skeleton P/Ca proxy for seawater phosphate: Multi-colony calibration with a contemporaneous seawater phosphate record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grottoli, Andréa G.

    Coral skeleton P/Ca proxy for seawater phosphate: Multi-colony calibration with a contemporaneous physics, and primary production in the past. Previous work showed that coralline P/Ca, a novel seawater calibration of the new proxy, were lacking. Here we present further development of the P/Ca proxy in Porites

  2. Energy balance for uranium recovery from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.; Lindner, H. [The University of Texas, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy return on investment (EROI) of an energy resource is the ratio of the energy it ultimately produces to the energy used to recover it. EROI is a key viability measure for a new recovery technology, particularly in its early stages of development when financial cost assessment would be premature or highly uncertain. This paper estimates the EROI of uranium recovery from seawater via a braid adsorbent technology. In this paper, the energy cost of obtaining uranium from seawater is assessed by breaking the production chain into three processes: adsorbent production, adsorbent deployment and mooring, and uranium elution and purification. Both direct and embodied energy inputs are considered. Direct energy is the energy used by the processes themselves, while embodied energy is used to fabricate their material, equipment or chemical inputs. If the uranium is used in a once-through fuel cycle, the braid adsorbent technology EROI ranges from 12 to 27, depending on still-uncertain performance and system design parameters. It is highly sensitive to the adsorbent capacity in grams of U captured per kg of adsorbent as well as to potential economies in chemical use. This compares to an EROI of ca. 300 for contemporary terrestrial mining. It is important to note that these figures only consider the mineral extraction step in the fuel cycle. At a reference performance level of 2.76 g U recovered per kg adsorbent immersed, the largest energy consumers are the chemicals used in adsorbent production (63%), anchor chain mooring system fabrication and operations (17%), and unit processes in the adsorbent production step (12%). (authors)

  3. Uranium from Seawater Program Review; Fuel Resources Uranium from Seawater Program DOE Office of Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For nuclear energy to remain sustainable in the United States, economically viable sources of uranium beyond terrestrial ores must be developed. The goal of this program is to develop advanced adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater at twice the capacity of the best adsorbent developed by researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1.5 mg U/g adsorbent. A multidisciplinary team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Austin was assembled to address this challenging problem. Polymeric adsorbents, based on the radiation grafting of acrylonitrile and methacrylic acid onto high surface-area polyethylene fibers followed by conversion of the nitriles to amidoximes, have been developed. These poly(acrylamidoxime-co-methacrylic acid) fibers showed uranium adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. The essence of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area trunk material that considerably increases the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. This technology received an R&D100 Award in 2012. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials. Simultaneously, de novo structure-based computational design methods are being used to design more selective and stable ligands and the most promising candidates are being synthesized, tested and evaluated for incorporation onto a support matrix. Fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic studies are being carried out to improve the adsorption efficiency, the selectivity of uranium over other metals, and the stability of the adsorbents. Understanding the rate-limiting step of uranium uptake from seawater is also essential in designing an effective uranium recovery system. Finally, economic analyses have been used to guide these studies and highlight what parameters, such as capacity, recyclability, and stability, have the largest impact on the cost of extraction of uranium from seawater. Initially, the cost estimates by the JAEA for extraction of uranium from seawater with braided polymeric fibers functionalized with amidoxime ligands were evaluated and updated. The economic analyses were subsequently updated to reflect the results of this project while providing insight for cost reductions in the adsorbent development through “cradle-to-grave” case studies for the extraction process. This report highlights the progress made over the last three years on the design, synthesis, and testing of new materials to extract uranium for seawater. This report is organized into sections that highlight the major research activities in this project: (1) Chelate Design and Modeling, (2) Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Structure, (3) Advanced Polymeric Adsorbents by Radiation Induced Grafting, (4) Advanced Nanomaterial Adsorbents, (5) Adsorbent Screening and Modeling, (6) Marine Testing, and (7) Cost and Energy Assessment. At the end of each section, future research directions are briefly discussed to highlight the challenges that still remain to reduce the cost of extractions of uranium for seawater. Finally, contributions from the Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), which complement this research program, are included at the end of this report.

  4. Cooled railplug

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  5. Recovering oil by injecting ammoniated and nitrited seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schutt, H.U.

    1986-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A waterflood process is described for recovering oil from a subterranean reservoir in a location in which seawater is economically available, comprising: incorporating within the seawater, at least prior to its injection into the reservoir, ammonia or ammonia-yielding material to raise the pH to near 9.5, plus enough nitrite ion-containing or ion-yielding material to increase the oil displacing capability of the ammoniated seawater without causing an undesirable increase of the rate of growth of sessile bacteria; and injecting the ammoniated and nitrited seawater into the reservoir to displace the reservoir fluid at substantially the natural reservoir temperature toward a production location from which oil is recovered.

  6. Prospects for the recovery of uranium from seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, F. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer program entitled URPE (Uranium Recovery Performance and Economics) has been developed to simulate the engineering performance and provide an economic analysis O of a plant recovering uranium from seawater. The ...

  7. Systems studies on the extraction of uranium from seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Michael J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work done at MIT during FY 1981 on the overall system design of a uranium-from-seawater facility. It consists of a sequence of seven major chapters, each of which was originally prepared as a ...

  8. Seawater batteries for the Luna 27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 20 January 1996, the first installation of seawater batteries (SWBs) on a live subsea well was successfully completed on the Luna 27 well in 591 ft of water in the Ionian Sea. The SWB pack is composed of six cells, each measuring 3.3 ft in diameter by 6.6 ft high, and is designed to provide all the electrical energy required by the autonomous control system for the well. The only operations required in the future will be periodic replacement of the anodes by use of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) every 3 to 5 years. This application of the SWBs is a part of the continuing research by Agip SpA in the area of autonomous control that began with the subsea-wells autonomous-control system (SWACS) project. This project began in 1982 and culminated with the installation of a SWACS prototype in December 1987 on the Luna 27 gas well offshore Crotone and 2.5 miles form the Luna A platform. Notwithstanding the 5-year predicted life, the system was still operating in 1996 without any noticeable problems.

  9. The effect of freezing on the sulfate-chloride and density-chloride ratios of sea-water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhalter, Albert Charles

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the sulphate-chloride ratio would be expected to have a corresponi- ingly larger effect, on density than would one of the less abundant iona. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW Evidence for Sulphate Enricl ment in Ice The sulphate-chloride ratio was studied... as early as 1907 vhen Ringer performed laboratory freezing experiments vith sea-vater in which he cooled sea-water until solid salts began to freeze out. of solution. l Portions of the ice and the brine below the ice vere collected and analyzed...

  10. Cool Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOffice ofConversionCool

  11. Molecular Architecture for Polyphosphazene Electrolytes for Seawater Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason K. Harrup; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Christopher J. Orme; Eric S. Peterson

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a series of polyphosphazenes were designed to function as water resistant, yet ionically conductive membranes for application to lithium/seawater batteries. In membranes of this nature, various molecular architectures are possible and representatives from each possible type were chosen. These polymers were synthesized and their performance as solid polymer electrolytes was evaluated in terms of both lithium ion conductivity and water permeability. The impact that this molecular architecture has on total performance of the membranes for seawater batteries is discussed. Further implications of this molecular architecture on the mechanisms of lithium ion transport through polyphosphazenes are also discussed.

  12. Prevention of biofouling in seawater desalination via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofouling, the undesirable settlement and growth of organisms, occurs immediately when a clean surface is immersed in natural seawater. It is a universal problem and the bottleneck for seawater desalination, which reduces ...

  13. An experimental investigation of the surface tension of seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayar, Kishor Govind

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface tension of seawater was measured for absolute salinities S = (20.01, 35.18, 40.49, 79.39, 121.54) g/kg across a temperature range of T = (0 - 90)°C at atmospheric pressure using the Wilhelmy plate method. The ...

  14. Strontium isotopic variations of Neoproterozoic seawater: Implications for crustal evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asmerom, Y.; Jacobsen, S.B.; Knoll, A.H.; Butterfield, N.J. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Swett, K. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report high precision Sr isotopic data on carbonates from the Neoproterozoic Shaler Group, Victoria Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples with low {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr ratios (<0.01) were selected for Sr isotopic analysis. {delta}{sup 18}O, Mn, Ca, Mg, and Sr data were used to recognize altered samples. The altered samples are characterized by high Mn/Sr ({ge}2) and variable {delta}{sup 18}O; most are dolomites. The data indicate that between ca. 790-850 Ma the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of seawater varied between 0.70676 and 0.70561. The samples show smooth and systematic variation, with the lowest {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr value of 0.70561 at ca. 830 Ma. The low {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of carbonates from the lower parts of the section is similar to a value reported for one sample from the Adrar of Mauritania ({approx}900 Ma), West African Craton. Isotopic ratios from the upper part of the Shaler section are identical to values from the lower part of the Neoproterozoic Akademikerbreen Group, Spitsbergen. Although a paucity of absolute age determinations hinders attempts at the precise correlation of Neoproterozoic successions, it is possible to draw a broad outline of the Sr isotopic composition of seawater for this period. Data from this study and the literature are used to construct a curve of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of Neoproterozoic seawater. The Sr isotope composition of seawater reflects primarily the balance between continental Sr input through river input and mantle input via hydrothermal circulation of seawater through mid-ocean ridges. Coupling of Nd and Sr isotopic systems allows the authors to model changes in seafloor spreading rates (or hydrothermal flux) and continental erosion. The Sr hydrothermal flux and the erosion rate (relative to present-day value) are modeled for the period 500-900 Ma.

  15. Cooling Dry Cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.

    2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication discusses the effects of heat stress on dairy cows, methods of cooling cows, and research on the effects of cooling cows in the dry period....

  16. Development of Novel Sorbents for Uranium Extraction from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wenbin; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    As the uranium resource in terrestrial ores is limited, it is difficult to ensure a long-term sustainable nuclear energy technology. The oceans contain approximately 4.5 billion tons of uranium, which is one thousand times the amount of uranium in terrestrial ores. Development of technologies to recover the uranium from seawater would greatly improve the uranium resource availability, sustaining the fuel supply for nuclear energy. Several methods have been previously evaluated including solvent extraction, ion exchange, flotation, biomass collection, and adsorption; however, none have been found to be suitable for reasons such as cost effectiveness, long term stability, and selectivity. Recent research has focused on the amidoxime functional group as a promising candidate for uranium sorption. Polymer beads and fibers have been functionalized with amidoxime functional groups, and uranium adsorption capacities as high as 1.5 g U/kg adsorbent have recently been reported with these types of materials. As uranium concentration in seawater is only ~3 ppb, great improvements to uranium collection systems must be made in order to make uranium extraction from seawater economically feasible. This proposed research intends to develop transformative technologies for economic uranium extraction from seawater. The Lin group will design advanced porous supports by taking advantage of recent breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology and incorporate high densities of well-designed chelators into such nanoporous supports to allow selective and efficient binding of uranyl ions from seawater. Several classes of nanoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs), meta-organic frameworks (MOFs), and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), will be synthesized. Selective uranium-binding liagnds such as amidoxime will be incorporated into the nanoporous materials to afford a new generation of sorbent materials that will be evaluated for their uranium extraction efficiency. The initial testing of these materials for uranium binding will be carried out in the Lin group, but more detailed sorption studies will be carried out by Dr. Taylor-Pashow of Savannah River National Laboratory in order to obtain quantitative uranyl sorption selectivity and kinetics data for the proposed materials. The proposed nanostructured sorbent materials are expected to have higher binding capacities, enhanced extraction kinetics, optimal stripping efficiency for uranyl ions, and enhanced mechanical and chemical stabilities. This transformative research will significantly impact uranium extraction from seawater as well as benefit DOE’s efforts on environmental remediation by developing new materials and providing knowledge for enriching and sequestering ultralow concentrations of other metals.

  17. Simulation of radiant cooling performance with evaporative cooling sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Timothy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy sources of cooling supply water and an aggressiveas the primary source of cooling supply water. The analysisthermal mass to the cooling supply water source, nighttime

  18. Cooling Water System Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aegerter, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower...

  19. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    points for maximum cooling liquid supply temperatures thatLiquid cooling guidelines may include: Supply temperatureliquid supply temperature for liquid cooling guidelines. Due

  20. Cooling load estimation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, R.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

  1. Preparation of most promising braided and/or textile-based adsorbents for seawater testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris [ORNL] [ORNL; Sadananda, Das [ORNL] [ORNL; Mayes, Richard [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress Report...Prepare the most promising braided and/or textile-based adsorbents for seawater testing. M3FT-14OR0310012

  2. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium and Rare Earth Elements Using Biomass of Algae, Bioinorganic ChemistryRecovery of uranium from sea water. Chemistry & Industry (uranium recovery from seawater. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry

  3. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wai, Chien; Tian, Guoxin; Janke, Christopher

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium removal from the sorbent reaches only 80% after 10 hours of leaching. Some information regarding coordination of vanadium with amidoxime molecules and elution of vanadium from amidoxime- based sorbents is also given in the report.

  4. Iron speciation and its biological availability in seawater: A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.L.; Bruland, K.W.

    1995-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop brought together marine chemists with expertise in iron chemistry and biologists with expertise in the role of iron in phytoplankton production to discuss controversies regarding the role of iron in oceanic primary productivity and global climatic change. A new paradigm for marine iron biogeochemistry was generated. The five major new items within this paradigm included (1) the nature of iron inputs to the sea, (2) chemical speciation of iron in seawater, (3) relationships between iron chemistry and marine microbial community dynamics, (4) adaptations of marine microbes to iron input, and (5) ecological and biogeochemical implications of changes in iron supply to the sea.

  5. How Seawater Can Power the World | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPA addresses EMF BNitricHow Seawater

  6. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  7. I. IONIZATION COOLING A. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ionization cooling techniques to reduce the 6­dimensional phase space emittance. B. Cooling TheoryI. IONIZATION COOLING A. Introduction The muon beam at the end of the decay channel is very intense for beam cooling. Cooling by synchrotron radiation, conventional stochastic cooling and conventional

  8. DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM JAMES L. COX in the California current system were analyzed for DDT residues. DDT residue concentrations in whole seawater are discussed in relation to mechanisms of land-sea DDT residue transfer. DDT residue concentrations

  9. Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel Matthew Eisaman and their impact · Technology: Extracting CO2 from seawater · Application: Renewable liquid fuel #12;Outline: Renewable liquid fuel #12;The data on atmospheric CO2 2000 years ago http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/co2

  10. Gas turbine cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

  11. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanger, Philip Albert (Monroeville, PA); Lindberg, Frank A. (Baltimore, MD); Garcen, Walter (Glen Burnie, MD)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  12. Passive containment cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conway, Lawrence E. (Robinson Township, Allegheny County, PA); Stewart, William A. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  13. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

  14. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanger, P.A.; Lindberg, F.A.; Garcen, W.

    2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  15. Crevice and pitting corrosion behavior of stainless steels in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaragoza-Ayala, A.E.; Orozco-Cruz, R. [Univ. Autonoma de Campeche (Mexico). Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pitting and crevice corrosion tests in natural seawater were performed on a series of stainless steels (i.e., S31603, N08904, S32304, S31803, S32520, N08925 and S31266) in order to determine their resistance to these types of localized corrosion. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements for these alloys show for short exposure times an ennoblement in the OCP. After a certain time, occasional fall and rise in the OCP values was observed, which can be related to nucleation and repassivation of pits and/or crevices on the metal surface. Analysis of the electrochemical behavior and microscopic observations shows that only S31603 and S32304 alloys were susceptible to crevice and pitting corrosion, whereas the remaining alloys exhibited good resistance. Pitting potentials determined by the potentiodynamic technique also show S3 1603 and S32304 are susceptible to pitting corrosion under the experimental conditions used in this work.

  16. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  17. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  18. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  19. Secondary condenser Cooling water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Receiver Secondary condenser LC LC Reboiler TC PC Cooling water PC FCPC Condenser LC XC Throttling valve ¨ mx my l© ª y s § y m «¬ ly my wx l n® ® x np © ¯ Condenser Column Compressor Receiver Super-heater Decanter Secondary condenser Reboiler Throttling valve Expansion valve Cooling water

  20. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  1. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  2. Very Cool Close Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Scott Shaw; Mercedes Lopez-Morales

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new observations of cool <6000K and low mass <1Msun binary systems that have been discovered by searching several modern stellar photometric databases. The search has led to a factor of 10 increase in the number of known cool close eclipsing binary systems.

  3. Turbine blade cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  4. Turbine blade cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  5. Turbine blade cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  6. Water cooled steam jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  7. Radiant cooling research scoping study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Timothy; Bauman, Fred; Huizenga, Charlie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    61–65° F (16–18°C) cooling supply air temperatures requiredprovide appropriate cooling with supply water no cooler thancirculation of the cooling/heating supply water through the

  8. Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Homes & Buildings Space Heating & Cooling Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings...

  9. Multiphase cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Thomas

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the multiphase nature of the intracluster medium whose neglect can lead to overestimates of the baryon fraction of clusters by up to a factor of two. The multiphase form of the cooling flow equations are derived and reduced to a simple form for a wide class of self-similar density distributions. It is shown that steady-state cooling flows are \\emph{not} consistent with all possible emissivity profiles which can therefore be used as a test of the theory. In combination, they provide strong constraints on the mass distribution within the cooling radius.

  10. Natural Cooling Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the most important design considerations for any method of Natural Cool ing is the chil led water temperature range selected for use during Natural Cool ing. Figure VI shows that for a hypo thetical Chicago plant, the hours of operation for a Natural..." system on the Natural Cool ing cycle. As the pressures and flow rates of the condenser and chil led water systems are seldom the same, the designer must pay careful attention to the cross over system design to ensure harmonious operations on both...

  11. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    41. H. G. Bals, Uranium extraction from seawater. INIS.Report (1976), (INIS-mf-3844), 149 pp.From: INIS Atomindex 1977, 8(20), Abstr. No. 334731. 42. K.

  12. A numerical analysis of condenser performance of a seawater desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Hassan, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the numerical analysis of three type condensers for desalination of seawater system. The condensers that were analyzed were a finned tube condenser that was built in Malaysia desalination plant, a ...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - adapted seawater microbiota Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sydowii, a Summary: seawater and inoculated on KMV ((glucose (1 g l1 ), gelatin hydro- lysate (1 g l1 ), yeast extract (0.1 g... in fifteen 250 ml flasks containing...

  14. The influence of alkalilnity and pco2 on caco3 nucleation from variable composition phanerozoic seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Janie Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is strong evidence that variations in seawater chemistry occurred during the Phanerozoic Eon. Of particular importance are the changes in the Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio because they have been attributed to the oscillations between “calcite...

  15. The Development of a Synthesis Approach for Optimal Design of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Desalination Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alnouri, Sabla

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This work introduces a systematic seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane network synthesis approach, based on the coordinated use of process superstructure representations and global optimization. The approach makes use of superstructure...

  16. Rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gospodinova, Kalina Doneva

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this thesis is the design and development of a system for rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating. The Rapid Extraction of Dissolved Inorganic ...

  17. Proceedings of a topical meeting on the recovery of uranium from seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Michael J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the proceedings of a topical meeting on the recovery of uranium from seawater, held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on December 1-2, 1980. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Department ...

  18. Acidizing Dolomite Reservoirs Using HCL Acid Prepared with Seawater: Problems and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arensman, Dennis G

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    with seawater and no scale inhibitors. Scale inhibitors were also tested for effectiveness in reducing calcium sulfate scale during acidizing. Static jar tests of three phosphonate-based, two sulphonated polymer-based, and one polyacrylic-based scale...

  19. Silicate electrochemical measurements in seawater: Chemical and analytical aspects towards a reagentless sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Silicate electrochemical measurements in seawater: Chemical and analytical aspects towards Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex, France Keywords: Molybdenum Silicate Reagentless developed a semi-autonomous method to detect silicate in aqueous samples. Molybdenum oxidation was used

  20. Delayed neutron assay to test sorbers for uranium-from-seawater applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitta, Cynthia K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed Fission Neutron (DFN) assay has been applied to the measurement of uranium content in sorbers exposed to natural seawater for the purpose of evaluating advanced ion exchange resins. DFN assay was found to be ...

  1. Sisyphus Cooling of Lithium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Hamilton; Geena Kim; Trinity Joshi; Biswaroop Mukherjee; Daniel Tiarks; Holger Müller

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 \\mu K, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali species.

  2. Optimization of Cooling Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems....

  3. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  4. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  5. Radionuclides in sediments and seawater at Rongelap Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Robison, W.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Brunk, J.L.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present concentrations and distributions of long-lived, man-made radionuclides in Rongelap Atoll lagoon surface sediments, based on samples collected and analyzed in this report. The radionuclides were associated with debris generated with the 1954 Bravo thermonuclear test at Bikini Atoll. Presently, only {sup 90}Sr and the transuranic radionuclides are found associated with the surface sediments in any quantity. Other radionuclides, including {sup 60}Co and {sup 137} Cs, are virtually absent and have either decayed or migrated from the deposits to the overlying seawater. Present inventories of {sup 241}Am and {sup 249+240}Pu in the surface layer at Rongelap are estimated to be 3% of the respective inventories in surface sediments from Bikini Atoll. There is a continuous slow release of the transuranics from the sediments back to the water column. The inventories will only slowly change with time unless the chemical-physical processes that now regulate this release to the water column are changed or altered.

  6. Determination of thorium in seawater by neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, Chih-An

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of /sup 232/Th in seawater has made possible rapid sampling and analysis of this long-lived, non-radiogenic thorium isotope on small-volume samples. The marine geochemical utility of /sup 232/Th, whose concentration in seawater is extremely low, warrants the development of these sensitive techniques. The analytical methods and some results are presented and discussed in this article. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  7. An experimental investigation of high-temperature interactions between seawater and rhyolite, andesite, basalt and peridotite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandler, Gary Wayne

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SEAWATER AND RHYOLITE, ANDESITE, BASALT AND PERIDOTITE A Thesis by GARY WAYNE CHANDLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Geology AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SEAWATER AND RHYOLITE, ANDESITE, BASALT AND PERIDOTITE A Thesis by GARY WAYNE CHANDLER Approved...

  8. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Transpiration Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen SUMMARY Transpiration cooling using ceramic matrix composite (CMC

  10. Laser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    - velopment of techniques that have allowed the ion motion to be cooled into the ground state of the confiningLaser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION Laser cooling of neutral atoms in the past decades has been a breakthrough in the understanding of their dy- namics and led to the seminal proposals of laser cooling

  11. Microbial Oceanographer University of Hawaii at Manoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nutrient loading including the use of enhanced upwelling of deep seawater for use in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) and seawater- based air conditioning applications; interactions of nutrients and light

  12. Passive containment cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billig, Paul F. (San Jose, CA); Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA); Fitch, James R. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  13. Passive containment cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  14. Quantum thermodynamic cooling cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palao, J P; Gordon, J M; Palao, Jose P.; Kosloff, Ronnie; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum-mechanical and thermodynamic properties of a 3-level molecular cooling cycle are derived. An inadequacy of earlier models is rectified in accounting for the spontaneous emission and absorption associated with the coupling to the coherent driving field via an environmental reservoir. This additional coupling need not be dissipative, and can provide a thermal driving force - the quantum analog of classical absorption chillers. The dependence of the maximum attainable cooling rate on temperature, at ultra-low temperatures, is determined and shown to respect the recently-established fundamental bound based on the second and third laws of thermodynamics.

  15. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  16. Quantum thermodynamic cooling cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose P. Palao; Ronnie Kosloff; Jeffrey M. Gordon

    2001-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum-mechanical and thermodynamic properties of a 3-level molecular cooling cycle are derived. An inadequacy of earlier models is rectified in accounting for the spontaneous emission and absorption associated with the coupling to the coherent driving field via an environmental reservoir. This additional coupling need not be dissipative, and can provide a thermal driving force - the quantum analog of classical absorption chillers. The dependence of the maximum attainable cooling rate on temperature, at ultra-low temperatures, is determined and shown to respect the recently-established fundamental bound based on the second and third laws of thermodynamics.

  17. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOffice ofConversionCoolCool

  18. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControls onPolymersCookingCoolCool

  19. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool MagneticCool Magnetic

  20. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); McLaurin, Leroy Dixon (Winter Springs, FL); Bertsch, Oran Leroy (Titusville, FL); Lowe, Perry Eugene (Oviedo, FL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  1. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  2. TETRA MUON COOLING RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAHN,S.A.FERNOW,R.C.BALBEKOV,V.RAJA,R.USUBOV,Z.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief overview of recent simulation activities on the design of neutrino factories. Simulation work is ongoing on many aspects of a potential facility, including proton drivers, pion collection and decay channels, phase rotation, ionization cooling, and muon accelerators.

  3. Cooling Towers, The Debottleneckers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    Power generating plants and petro-chemical works are always expanding. An on-going problem is to identify and de-bottle neck restricting conditions of growth. The cooling tower is a highly visible piece of equipment. Most industrial crossflow units...

  4. Uptake of uranium from seawater by amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbent marine testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsouris, C.; Kim, J.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, R.; Hexel, C.; Sostre Gonzalez, F.; Janke, C.; Dai, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TE 37831-618 (United States); Gill, G.; Kuo, L.J.; Wood, J.; Choe, K.Y. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Pourmand, A.; D'Alessandro, E. [Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami (United States); Buesseler, K.; Pike, S. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents in the form of functionalized fibers were prepared at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and screened in laboratory experiments, in terms of uranium uptake capacity, using spiked uranium solution and seawater samples. Batch laboratory experiments conducted with 5-gallon seawater tanks provided equilibrium information. Based on results from 5-gallon experiments, the best adsorbent was selected for field-testing of uranium adsorption from seawater. Flow-through column tests have been performed at different marine sites to investigate the uranium uptake rate and equilibrium capacity under diverse biogeochemistry. The maximum amount of uranium uptake from seawater tests at Sequim, WA, was 3.3 mg U/g adsorbent after eight weeks of contact of the adsorbent with seawater. This amount was three times higher than the maximum adsorption capacity achieved in this study by a leading adsorbent developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), which was 1.1 mg U/g adsorbent at equilibrium. The initial uranium uptake rate of the ORNL adsorbent was 2.6 times higher than that of the JAEA adsorbent under similar conditions. A mathematical model derived from the mass balance of uranium was employed to describe the data. (authors)

  5. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2007-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with hydrogeology and some hydromancy. We estimate its cost at 1 billion dollars - about 0.01 per sent of the USA 2007 Gross Domestic Product.

  6. Gas Cooling Through Galaxy Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariwan A. Rasheed; Mohamad A. Brza

    Abstract-- Gas cooling was studied in two different boxes of sizes and by simulation at same redshifts. The gas cooling is shown in four different redshifts (z=1.15, 0.5, 0.1 and 0). In the simulation the positions of the clumps of cooled gas were studied with slices of the two volumes and also the density of cooled gas of the two volumes shown in the simulation. From the process of gas cooling it is clear that this process gives different results in the two cases. Index Term- Gas Cooling, Simulation, galaxy Formation. I.

  7. Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, M.

    Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!...

  8. Internal cathodic protection of seawater piping system by the use of the RCP method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnsen, R.; Gartland, P.O.; Valen, S. [CorrOcean as, Trondheim (Norway); Drugli, J.M. [SINTEF Corrosion Centre, Trondheim (Norway)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early eighties high alloyed stainless steels like austenitic steels with about 6% molybdenum (called 6Mo-steel) and duplex stainless steels with 25% Cr (called super duplex) have been widely used in seawater systems in connection with oil- and gas production. During the last ten years high alloyed stainless steels with 6% molybdenum (6Mo) or 25%Cr (super duplex) have been the most popular materials for seawater systems on offshore installations in the North Sea. The basis for this material selection was to obtain maintenance free systems with long lifetime. However, practical experience has shown that corrosion failures can occur. This paper presents a simple and economical method to avoid corrosion problems internally in piping systems transporting chlorinated seawater. The method is called RCP--Resistor controlled Cathodic Protection. Principles of the method including protection potential, current density requirements and anode design in addition to different practical applications are described.

  9. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

  10. Computer Room Fresh Air Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenger, J. D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the concept of a computer room fresh air cooling system with evaporative humidification. The system offers significantly lower energy consumption than conventional cooling units, with 24% reduction for Dallas and 56% reduction...

  11. Evaporative Cooling for Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, J. R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaporative cooling principle applies to all equipment that exchanges sensible heat for latent heat. Equipment of this type falls into two general categories: (1) equipment for heat rejection, such as cooling towers and (2) equipment for air...

  12. Model of calcareous deposit formation on cathodically protected steel in seawater: improvements and extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburne, Patricia Nicole

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ( ? ) g dm3 mol . dme conuersion factor ( ) g. cms (20) 16 Concentration of Major iona in Seawater of Various Salinitles . 1. 6 20- CII ' 15 oO j. :zto f o L o 0 . 0--- X -??)???&X e3-- X X X ? X- 10 20 30 40 Salinity('lg O s. 'o . 12 ~g... e of + 0 0. 6 o~ ox MCI ? tt ? Nt+ /~a- / ? + ? h/g+ ) ? o ? Ca2+ f ? x ? HXB. Fi8trre 6: Concentration of Major Iona in Seawater of Various Salinities and) At ? ? 49. 641 Ag = 67. 460 As ? 21. 028 Bt = ? 0. 077314 B2 = 0. 046580 Bs...

  13. Adsorbent materials development and testing for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, L.K.; Dai, S.; Hay, B.P.; Janke, C.J.; Mayes, R.T.; Sun, X.; Tsouris, C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6384 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extraction of uranium from seawater has been the focus of a research project for the U.S. Department of Energy to develop amidoxime functional group adsorbents using radiation-induced graphing on polymer-based fiber materials and subsequent chemical conversion of the radical sites to form the desired adsorbent material. Materials with promising uranium adsorption capacities were prepared through a series of parametric studies on radiation dose, time, temperature, graphing solutions, and properties of the base polymer materials. A laboratory screening protocol was developed to determine the uranium adsorption capacity to identify the most promising candidate materials for seawater testing. (authors)

  14. Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications.

  15. Cooling by heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mari; J. Eisert

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the idea of actually cooling quantum systems by means of incoherent thermal light, hence giving rise to a counter-intuitive mechanism of "cooling by heating". In this effect, the mere incoherent occupation of a quantum mechanical mode serves as a trigger to enhance the coupling between other modes. This notion of effectively rendering states more coherent by driving with incoherent thermal quantum noise is applied here to the opto-mechanical setting, where this effect occurs most naturally. We discuss two ways of describing this situation, one of them making use of stochastic sampling of Gaussian quantum states with respect to stationary classical stochastic processes. The potential of experimentally demonstrating this counter-intuitive effect in opto-mechanical systems with present technology is sketched.

  16. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  17. Cab Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damman, Dennis

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

  18. Skeletal P/Ca tracks upwelling in Gulf of Panama coral: Evidence for a new seawater phosphate proxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grottoli, Andréa G.

    Skeletal P/Ca tracks upwelling in Gulf of Panama´ coral: Evidence for a new seawater phosphate results that reveal annual cycles of P/Ca in a 4-year record from the scleractinian coral Pavona gigantea (mean P/Ca = 118 mmol mol�1 ). The P/Ca cycles track variations in past seawater phosphate concentration

  19. Preparation of Pt deposited nanotubular TiO{sub 2} as cathodes for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen production using seawater electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Wonsik [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Energy Research Center, 71-2 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Korea University of Technology and Education, Department of Applied Chemical Engineering, 1800 Chungjeollo, Byeongcheon-myun, Chungnam 330-708 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seichang [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Energy Research Center, 71-2 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Hyunku [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Energy Research Center, 71-2 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jaekyung, E-mail: jyoon@kier.re.kr [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Energy Research Center, 71-2 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop effective cathodes to increase the production of hydrogen and use the seawater, an abundant resource in the earth as the electrolyte in photoelectrochemical systems. In order to fabricate the Pt/TiO{sub 2} cathodes, various contents of the Pt precursor (0-0.4 wt%) deposited by the electrodeposition method were used. On the basis of the hydrogen evolution rate, 0.2 wt% Pt/TiO{sub 2} was observed to exhibit the best performance among the various Pt/TiO{sub 2} cathodes with the natural seawater and two concentrated seawater electrolytes obtained from single (nanofiltration) and combined membrane (nanofiltration and reverse osmosis) processes. The surface characterizations exhibited that crystal structures and morphological properties of Pt and TiO{sub 2} found the results of XRD pattern and SEM/TEM images, respectively. - Graphical abstract: On the basis of photoelectrochemical hydrogen production, 0.2 wt% Pt/TiO{sub 2} was observed to exhibit the best performance among the various Pt/TIO{sub 2} cathodes with natural seawater. In comparison of hydrogen evolution rate with various seawater electrolytes, 0.2 wt% Pt/TiO{sub 2} was found to show the better performance as cathode with the concentrated seawater electrolytes obtained from membrane. Highlights: > Pt deposited TiO{sub 2} electrodes are used as cathode in PEC H{sub 2} production. > Natural and concentrated seawater by membranes are used as electrolytes in PEC. > Pt/TiO{sub 2} shows a good performance as cathode with seawater electrolytes. > H{sub 2} evolution rate increases with more concentrated seawater electrolyte. > Highly saline seawater is useful resource for H{sub 2} production.

  20. Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural method for lithium isotope ratio (7 Li/6 Li) determinations with low total lithium consumption ( lithium from all matrix elements using small volume resin (2 ml/3.4 meq AG 50W-X8) and low volume elution

  1. Pitting corrosion control using regenerative biolms on aluminium 2024 in articial seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Pitting corrosion control using regenerative bio®lms on aluminium 2024 in arti®cial seawater D, CT 06269-3222, USA b Corrosion and Environment Eects Laboratory (CEEL), Department of Materials polyglutamate or polyaspartate, an additional small increase in corrosion inhibition occurred. Corrosion control

  2. Corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 belonging to the 1930s in seawater environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gujarathi, Kedar Kanayalal

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    seawater, conserve it, and display it in its museum, as part of their rich heritage. The objective was to study the aluminum alloy used on the aircraft for its chemical and mechanical properties, suggest the corrosion mechanism of aluminum alloy 2024...

  3. Z .Marine Chemistry 67 1999 3342 Differences in seawater particulate organic carbon concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the organic carbon retained by a glass-fiber filter against the volume filtered. The interceptZ .Marine Chemistry 67 1999 33­42 Differences in seawater particulate organic carbon concentration August 1998; accepted 11 May 1999 Abstract Z . Z . ZParticulate organic carbon POC data collected

  4. Thorium speciation in seawater P.H. Santschi a,*, J.W. Murray b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, James W.

    Thorium speciation in seawater P.H. Santschi a,*, J.W. Murray b , M. Baskaran c , C.R. Benitez October 2005 Available online 7 February 2006 Abstract Since the 1960s, thorium isotopes occupy a special of these applications are possible with little knowledge of the dissolved chemical properties of thorium, other than its

  5. Calcium Sulfate Formation and Mitigation when Seawater was Used to Prepare HCl-Based Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Jia

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    with sulfate ion in seawater (greater than 3000 ppm) and calcium sulfate will precipitate once it exceeds its critical scaling tendency. A few studies have provided evidence for this problem and how to address this problem has not been fully examined. Core...

  6. Preservation of seawater Sr and Nd isotopes in fossil sh teeth: bad news and good news

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ellen

    system, our Nd concentration data, combined with published isotopic and rare earth element data, suggest on the global seawater Sr isotope curve. For Sites 1090, 757, and 807 Sr isotopic values of the pore fluids Nd isotopic compositions from the time of deposition. Ă? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  7. Marketing Cool Storage Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L.

    storage has been substantiated. bv research conducted by Electric Power Research Institute, and by numerous installations, it has become acknowledged that cool stora~e can provide substantial benefits to utilities and end-users alike. A need was reco...~ned to improve utility load factors, reduce peak electric demands, and other-wise mana~e the demand-side use of electricity. As a result of these many pro~rams, it became apparent that the storage of coolin~, in the form of chilled water, ice, or other phase...

  8. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool Magnetic

  9. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControls onPolymersCookingCool

  10. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool Magnetic Molecules

  11. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool Magnetic

  12. Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  13. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Berglund, Robert C. (Saratoga, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  14. Simulation of radiant cooling performance with evaporative cooling sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Timothy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for Low-Energy Buildings, Proved in Practice”with optimized building envelopes, low-energy cooling waterbuilding perspective, thermal performance for the low-energy

  15. Emergency core cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  16. AGN and Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For two decades the steady-state cooling-flow model has dominated the literature of cluster and elliptical-galaxy X-ray sources. For ten years this model has been in severe difficulty from a theoretical point of view, and it is now coming under increasing pressure observationally. For two decades the steady-state cooling-flow model has dominated the literature of cluster and elliptical-galaxy X-ray sources. For ten years this model has been in severe difficulty from a theoretical point of view, and it is now coming under increasing pressure observationally. A small number of enthusiasts have argued for a radically different interpretation of the data, but had little impact on prevailing opinion because the unsteady heating picture that they advocate is extremely hard to work out in detail. Here I explain why it is difficult to extract robust observational predictions from the heating picture. Major problems include the variability of the sources, the different ways in which a bi-polar flow can impact on X-ray emission, the weakness of synchrotron emission from sub-relativistic flows, and the sensitivity of synchrotron emission to a magnetic field that is probably highly localized.

  17. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR ROOF COOLING BY EVAPORATION Fanjet Evaporative Roof Cooling Windsor Lake Landing #1 Windsor Point Road Columbia, S.C. 29206 G. V. Patterson National Sales Manager Evaporation is nature's way of cooling. By the The American Society... penetration through will include current engineering techniques, sys out the course of the day. tem designs and documented cases of 20% to 30% reduction in air-conditioning run time. Dr. John Yellott of the Yellott Solar Energy Labo ratories in Phoenix...

  18. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN) [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  19. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transitionone half of an air-cooled datacenter's energy consumption isof time if desired by the datacenter owner. If the building

  20. Parametric Study of Turbine Blade Internal Cooling and Film Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rallabandi, Akhilesh P.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    is used to remove heat from the hot turbine blade. This air flows through passages in the hollow blade (internal cooling), and is also ejected onto the surface of the blade to form an insulating film (film cooling). Modern land-based gas turbine engines...

  1. COOL03 Workshop September 27, 2003 Muon Cooling Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    , Japan 19 to 23 May 2003 My WWW home directory: http://keil.home.cern.ch/keil/ MuMu/Doc/COOL03/talk03.pdf and II and have ­ no dispersion ­ transverse cooling ­ no wedge-shaped absorbers ­ longitudinal heating and heating by multiple scattering and straggling rate of change per unit length of RMS relative momentum

  2. Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

  3. Spectropolarimetry of cool stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Petit

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the development of spectropolarimetric techniques deeply modified our knowledge of stellar magnetism. In the case of solar-type stars, the challenge is to measure a geometrically complex field and determine its evolution over very different time frames. In this article, I summarize some important observational results obtained in this field over the last two decades and detail what they tell us about the dynamo processes that orchestrate the activity of cool stars. I also discuss what we learn from such observations about the ability of magnetic fields to affect the formation and evolution of Sun-like stars. Finally, I evoke promising directions to be explored in the coming years, thanks to the advent of a new generation of instruments specifically designed to progress in this domain.

  4. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheels, Ronald H. (Concord, MA)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  5. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  6. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  7. Laser cooling to quantum degeneracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stellmer, Simon; Grimm, Rudolf; Schreck, Florian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a gas of strontium atoms, using laser cooling as the only cooling mechanism. The condensate is formed within a sample that is continuously Doppler cooled to below 1\\muK on a narrow-linewidth transition. The critical phase-space density for BEC is reached in a central region of the sample, in which atoms are rendered transparent for laser cooling photons. The density in this region is enhanced by an additional dipole trap potential. Thermal equilibrium between the gas in this central region and the surrounding laser cooled part of the cloud is established by elastic collisions. Condensates of up to 10^5 atoms can be repeatedly formed on a timescale of 100ms, with prospects for the generation of a continuous atom laser.

  8. Corrosion of Bare and Coated Al 5052-H3 and Al 6061-T6 in Seawater Work sponsored by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Corrosion of Bare and Coated Al 5052-H3 and Al 6061-T6 in Seawater Work sponsored by: US and Kentaro Kusada Hawaii Corrosion Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering College of Engineering

  9. Experimentation and application of directional solvent extraction for desalination of seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinguetl, Kevin (Kevin G.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently demonstrated directional solvent technique for desalination of water has been tested for desalting seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water. The premise behind directional solvent extraction is that when ...

  10. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Osgood, Sarah Jane (East Thetford, VT); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  11. Chemical exchange between seawater and nonstoichiometric dolomite: an experimental investigation in a flow-through system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Jennifer Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the composition of the pore fluid to be monitored as reactions occur. Average flow rates are contmlled by the volume of fluid sample removed and the time interval between samples. Cylindrical cores (4. 5 cm O. D. x 10. 2 cm) or chips of Burlington... time. The seawater evolved primarily by losing Mg and gaining Ca; however, examination of the solids by X-ray diffraction, mass spectrometry, and cathodoluminescence petrography could not detect the changes in the solid. Dissolution...

  12. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Linfeng

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature survey has been conducted to collect information on the International R&D activities in the extraction of uranium from seawater for the period from the 1960s till the year of 2010. The reported activities, on both the laboratory scale bench experiments and the large scale marine experiments, were summarized by country/region in this report. Among all countries where such activities have been reported, Japan has carried out the most advanced large scale marine experiments with the amidoxime-based system, and achieved the collection efficiency (1.5 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 30 days soaking in the ocean) that could justify the development of industrial scale marine systems to produce uranium from seawater at the price competitive with those from conventional uranium resources. R&D opportunities are discussed for improving the system performance (selectivity for uranium, loading capacity, chemical stability and mechanical durability in the sorption-elution cycle, and sorption kinetics) and making the collection of uranium from seawater more economically competitive.

  13. Predictive pre-cooling control for low lift radiant cooling using building thermal mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayeski, Nicholas (Nicholas Thomas)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low lift cooling systems (LLCS) hold the potential for significant energy savings relative to conventional cooling systems. An LLCS is a cooling system which leverages existing HVAC technologies to provide low energy cooling ...

  14. SRS reactor control rod cooling without normal forced convection cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.C. (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Easterling, T.C. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an analytical study of the coolability of the control rods in the Savannah River site (SRS) K production reactor under conditions of loss of normal forced convection cooling. The study was performed as part of the overall safety analysis of the reactor supporting its restart. The analysis addresses the buoyancy-driven boiling flow over the control rods that occurs when forced cooling is lost. The objective of the study was to demonstrate that the control rods will remain cooled (i.e., no melting) at powers representative of those anticipated for restart of the reactor.

  15. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM); Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  16. Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a Dual Heat Exchanger Rack Cooling Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Steve

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eliminating the need for compressor cooling. The plant modelunique design (using compressor cooling only when needed by

  17. Non-intrusive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, Edward F. (Burnt Hills, NY); Bergman, John W. (Barrington, NH)

    2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A readily replaceable heat exchange cooling jacket for applying fluid to a system conduit pipe. The cooling jacket comprises at least two members, separable into upper and lower portions. A chamber is formed between the conduit pipe and cooling jacket once the members are positioned about the pipe. The upper portion includes a fluid spray means positioned above the pipe and the bottom portion includes a fluid removal means. The heat exchange cooling jacket is adaptable with a drain tank, a heat exchanger, a pump and other standard equipment to provide a system for removing heat from a pipe. A method to remove heat from a pipe, includes the steps of enclosing a portion of the pipe with a jacket to form a chamber between an outside surface of the pipe and the cooling jacket; spraying cooling fluid at low pressure from an upper portion of the cooling jacket, allowing the fluid to flow downwardly by gravity along the surface of the pipe toward a bottom portion of the chamber; and removing the fluid at the bottom portion of the chamber.

  18. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

  19. Cooling load design tool for UFAD systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fraction (SPF) of cooling Supply Plenum SPF heat transfer bythrough the supply ple- Figure 2: Design day cooling loadsupply represent the????????????????????????????????????????????? air temperature, diffuser type and number, room setpoint instantaneous cooling

  20. Cooling arrangement for a tapered turbine blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling arrangement (11) for a highly tapered gas turbine blade (10). The cooling arrangement (11) includes a pair of parallel triple-pass serpentine cooling circuits (80,82) formed in an inner radial portion (50) of the blade, and a respective pair of single radial channel cooling circuits (84,86) formed in an outer radial portion (52) of the blade (10), with each single radial channel receiving the cooling fluid discharged from a respective one of the triple-pass serpentine cooling circuit. The cooling arrangement advantageously provides a higher degree of cooling to the most highly stressed radially inner portion of the blade, while providing a lower degree of cooling to the less highly stressed radially outer portion of the blade. The cooling arrangement can be implemented with known casting techniques, thereby facilitating its use on highly tapered, highly twisted Row 4 industrial gas turbine blades that could not be cooled with prior art cooling arrangements.

  1. Measurement of volume resistivity/conductivity of metallic alloy in inhibited seawater by optical interferometry techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib, K. [Materials Science Laboratory, Department of Advanced Systems KISR, P.O. Box 24885, SAFAT 13109 (Kuwait)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical interferometry techniques were used for the first time to measure the volume resistivity/conductivity of carbon steel samples in seawater with different concentrations of a corrosion inhibitor. In this investigation, the real-time holographic interferometry was carried out to measure the thickness of anodic dissolved layer or the total thickness, U{sub total}, of formed oxide layer of carbon steel samples during the alternating current (ac) impedance of the samples in blank seawater and in 5-20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater, respectively. In addition, a mathematical model was derived in order to correlate between the ac impedance (resistance) and the surface (orthogonal) displacement of the surface of the samples in solutions. In other words, a proportionality constant [resistivity ({rho}) or conductivity ({sigma})= 1/{rho}] between the determined ac impedance [by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique] and the orthogonal displacement (by the optical interferometry techniques) was obtained. The value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample in the blank seawater was found similar to the value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample air, around 1 x 10{sup -5}{Omega} cm. On the contrary, the measured values of the resistivity of the carbon steel samples were 1.85 x 10{sup 7}, 3.35 x 10{sup 7}, and 1.7 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm in 5, 10, and 20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater solutions, respectively. Furthermore, the determined value range of {rho} of the formed oxide layers, from 1.7 x 10{sup 7} to 3.35 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm, is found in a reasonable agreement with the one found in literature for the Fe oxide-hydroxides, i.e., goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and for the lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm. The {rho} value of the Fe oxide-hydroxides, 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm, was found slightly higher than the {rho} value range of the formed oxide layer of the present study. This is because the former value was determined by a dc method rather than by an electromagnetic method, i.e., holographic interferometry with applications of EIS, i.e., ac method. As a result, erroneous measurements were recorded due to the introduction of heat to Fe oxide-hydroxides.

  2. Evaporative Roof Cooling- A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernethy, D.

    Since the “Energy Crisis” Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retro-fit installations show direct energy savings...

  3. Cool Cities, Cool Planet (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Arthur; Pomerantz, Melvin; Levinson, Ronnen

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Science at the Theater: Berkeley Lab scientists discuss how cool roofs can cool your building, your city ... and our planet. Arthur Rosenfeld, Professor of Physics Emeritus at UC Berkeley, founded the Berkeley Lab Center for Building Science in 1974. He served on the California Energy Commission from 2000 to 2010 and is commonly referred to as California's godfather of energy efficiency. Melvin Pomerantz is a member of the Heat Island Group at Berkeley Lab. Trained as a physicist at UC Berkeley, he specializes in research on making cooler pavements and evaluating their effects. Ronnen Levinson is a staff scientist at Berkeley Lab and the acting leader of its Heat Island Group. He has developed cool roofing and paving materials and helped bring cool roof requirements into building energy efficiency standards.

  4. Evaporative Roof Cooling - A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernethy, D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the "Energy Crisis" Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retrofit installations show direct energy savings...

  5. CO$_2$ cooling experience (LHCb)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Lysebetten, Ann; Verlaat, Bart

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal control system of the LHCb VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a two-phase C0$_2$ cooling system based on the 2-Phase Accumulator Controlled Loop (2PACL) method. Liquid carbon dioxide is mechanically pumped in a closed loop, chilled by a water-cooled freon chiller and evaporated in the VELO detector. The main goal of the system is the permanent cooling of the VELO silicon sensors and of the heat producing front-end electronics inside a vacuum environment. This paper describes the design and the performance of the system. First results obtained during commissioning are also presented.

  6. New Approaches to Final Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuffer, David

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy muon collider scenario requires a "final cooling" system that reduces transverse emittance by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of the alternative approach. A more explicit understanding of solenoidal cooling beam dynamics is introduced.

  7. The Cooling of Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dany Page; Ulrich Geppert; Fridolin Weber

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cooling of a compact star depends very sensitively on the state of dense matter at supranuclear densities, which essentially controls the neutrino emission, as well as on the structure of the stellar outer layers which control the photon emission. Open issues concern the hyperon population, the presence of meson condensates, superfluidity and superconductivity, and the transition of confined hadronic matter to quark matter. This paper describes these issues and presents cooling calculations based on a broad collection of equations of state for neutron star matter and strange matter. These results are tested against the body of observed cooling data.

  8. NightCool: An Innovative Residential Nocturnal Radiation Cooling Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) will store sensible cooling to reduce daytime space conditioning needs. The concept may also be able to help with daytime heating needs in cold climates as well by using a darker roof as a solar collector. SIMULATION MODEL Within the assessment, we...NIGHTCOOL: AN INNOVATIVE RESIDENTIAL NOCTURNAL RADIATION COOLING CONCEPT Danny S. Parker John Sherwin Principal Research Scientist Research Engineer Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, FL ABSTRACT Using a...

  9. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  10. Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cooling towers regulate temperature by dissipating heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air-conditioning equipment, or other process equipment. Heat is rejected from the tower...

  11. Direct-Cooled Power Electronic Substrate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy 3 Barriers VTP Activities Related Challenges Conventional cooling methods for power electronics are typically based on conduction cooling through solids directly adjacent...

  12. Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system. While our engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified...

  13. A Successful Cool Storage Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air...

  14. Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling towers, in all too many industrial plants, are often the neglected units of the process chain which are hidden bonanzas for energy conservation and dollar savings. By lowering the entire systems temperature by the use of colder water...

  15. Desiccant Cooling Systems - A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kettleborough, C. F.; Ullah, M. R.; Waugaman, D. G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Desiccant cooling systems have been investigated extensively during the past decade as alternatives to electrically driven vapor compression systems because regeneration temperatures of the desiccant - about 160°F, can be achieved using natural gas...

  16. Cooling using complimentary tapered plenums

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Shawn Anthony (Pleasantville, NY)

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Where a fluid cooling medium cools a plurality of heat-producing devices arranged in a row along a generalized coordinate direction, with a space between each adjacent pair of devices, each space may have a partition that defines a boundary between a first plenum and a second plenum. The first plenum carries cooling medium across an entrance and thence into a first heat-producing device located on a first side of the partition facing the first plenum. The second plenum carries cooling medium away from a second heat-producing device located on a second side of the partition facing the second plenum and thence across an exit. The partition is disposed so that the first plenum becomes smaller in cross-sectional area as distance increases from the entrance, and the second plenum becomes larger in cross sectional area as distance decreases toward the exit.

  17. Energy Efficient Electronics Cooling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve O'Shaughnessey; Tim Louvar; Mike Trumbower; Jessica Hunnicutt; Neil Myers

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Parker Precision Cooling Business Unit was awarded a Department of Energy grant (DE-EE0000412) to support the DOE-ITP goal of reducing industrial energy intensity and GHG emissions. The project proposed by Precision Cooling was to accelerate the development of a cooling technology for high heat generating electronics components. These components are specifically related to power electronics found in power drives focused on the inverter, converter and transformer modules. The proposed cooling system was expected to simultaneously remove heat from all three of the major modules listed above, while remaining dielectric under all operating conditions. Development of the cooling system to meet specific customer's requirements and constraints not only required a robust system design, but also new components to support long system functionality. Components requiring further development and testing during this project included pumps, fluid couplings, cold plates and condensers. All four of these major categories of components are required in every Precision Cooling system. Not only was design a key area of focus, but the process for manufacturing these components had to be determined and proven through the system development.

  18. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IBM Corporation; Energy Efficient HPC Working Group; Hewlett Packard Corporation; SGI; Cray Inc.; Intel Corporation; U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center; Coles, Henry; Ellsworth, Michael; Martinez, David J.; Bailey, Anna-Maria; Banisadr, Farhad; Bates, Natalie; Coghlan, Susan; Cowley, David E.; Dube, Nicholas; Fields, Parks; Greenberg, Steve; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Kulesza, Peter R.; Loncaric, Josip; McCann, Tim; Pautsch, Greg; Patterson, Michael K.; Rivera, Richard G.; Rottman, Greg K.; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William; Vinson, Wade; Wescott, Ralph

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.

  19. Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, William A. (Murrysville, PA); Young, Robert R. (Murrysville, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler 18 and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor 24 where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap 50 which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator 26 and then out to a multiplicity of holes 52 to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber 58 to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole 62 also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator 68 from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe 66 to the suction plenum 64 and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum 64.

  20. Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, W.A.; Young, R.R.

    1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator and then out to a multiplicity of holes to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe to the suction plenum and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum. 3 figs.

  1. Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

  2. ANNUAL REPORT WESTERN COOLING EFFICIENCY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Sinks for Unitary Air Conditioners 10 Graywater Reuse for Evaporative Cooling 14 In-Home Energy Display COOLING EFFICIENCY CENTER WESTERN COOLING EFFICIENCY CENTER EXPLORING MANY OPTIONS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY and leadership in the field of energy efficiency. This document, the second Annual Report on Cooling in the West

  3. July 25, 2006 RHIC Stochastic Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (abandoned at SppS and Tevatron) ­ Not part of RHIC base line design #12;July 25, 2006 Heavy ions should before (red) and after (blue) cooling, Wall Current Monitor Schottky spectrum before cooling: blue trace "hot" beam best ·Good for counteracting IBS ·Effective for tails of distribution ·E-cooling cools "cold

  4. Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using Adaptive Multiscale Techniques Wolfgang Dahmen: finite volume method, film cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation AMS@igpm.rwth-aachen.de (Thomas Gotzen) #12;Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

  5. Muon Cooling via Ionization Andrea Kay Forget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    decay, as a result of their short lives many of the known cooling techniques (electron, stochastic this cooling technique has never been used many bugs need to be worked out, such as the setup and layout for muon ionization cooling to work efficiently. I. INTRODUCTION Muons need a faster beam cooling technique

  6. Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feustel, H.E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternatives to the Compressor Cooling Project sponsored byAlternatives to Compressor Cooling in Residences," Energy

  7. On-chip high speed localized cooling using superlattice microrefrigerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y; Christofferson, J; Shakouri, A; Zeng, G H; Bowers, J E; Croke, E T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semenyuk, “Thermoelectric Micro Modules for Spot Cooling ofthermoelectric module is still too large for spot cooling.

  8. Laser cooling with ultrafast pulse trains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Kielpinski

    2003-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new laser cooling method for atomic species whose level structure makes traditional laser cooling difficult. For instance, laser cooling of hydrogen requires vacuum-ultraviolet laser light, while multielectron atoms need laser light at many widely separated frequencies. These restrictions can be eased by laser cooling on two-photon transitions with ultrafast pulse trains. Laser cooling of hydrogen, antihydrogen, and carbon appears feasible, and extension of the technique to molecules may be possible.

  9. A better cooling water system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gale, T.E.; Beecher, J.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To prepare their newly constructed reduced crude conversion (RCC) open recirculating cooling water system for the implementation of a corrosion and deposit control water treatment program, Ashland Petroleum, Catlettsburg, Ky., made plans for and carried out precleaning and passivation procedures. Here, the authors share the results, and some potential guidelines for one's own operations. Inspection of equipment after precleaning showed that the precleaning procedures was very effective in removing undesirable matter. After precleaning and passivation of the system, the recommended cooling water treatment program was started. Corrosion rates for mild steel specimens ranged from 0.5 to 1.5 mils per year (mpy), with an average of 1.0 mpy. The corrosion rates for admiralty specimens ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 mpy. Benefits of the precleaning and passivating programs greatly outweigh the costs, since the normal cooling water treatment program for corrosion and deposit control can then operate more effectively.

  10. Improving Process Cooling Tower Eddiciency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turpish, W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 7 Improving Cooling Tower Efficiency ? Two Improvements in Capacity/Performance 1. Filtration for water quality control Side stream filtration Make up water quality...-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 2 Types of Cooling Towers Forced Draft Towers ESL-IE-13-05-08 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 3 Types...

  11. Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool MagneticCool

  12. Air Cooling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy Information LightningAiken Electric CoopCooling: Air cooling

  13. Lamination cooling system formation method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rippel, Wally E. (Altadena, CA); Kobayashi, Daryl M. (Monrovia, CA)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  14. Lamination cooling system formation method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rippel, Wally E [Altadena, CA; Kobayashi, Daryl M [Monrovia, CA

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  15. Cooling assembly for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Werth, John (Princeton, NJ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling assembly for fuel cells having a simplified construction whereby coolant is efficiently circulated through a conduit arranged in serpentine fashion in a channel within a member of such assembly. The channel is adapted to cradle a flexible, chemically inert, conformable conduit capable of manipulation into a variety of cooling patterns without crimping or otherwise restricting of coolant flow. The conduit, when assembled with the member, conforms into intimate contact with the member for good thermal conductivity. The conduit is non-corrodible and can be constructed as a single, manifold-free, continuous coolant passage means having only one inlet and one outlet.

  16. The Korean Roadmap to OTEC Industrialization [ International OTEC Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on time by contribution of Korea, a leading producer of ships, steel and so on 2 #12;Master Plan · Freezing desalination · Design of middle scale pipe · Heat flow simulator · Eco-friendly working fluid

  17. Flywheel Cooling: A Cooling Solution for Non Air-Conditioned Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernethy, D.

    "Flywheel Cooling" utillzes the natural cooling processes of evaporation, ventilation and air circulation. These systems are providing low-cost cooling for distribution centers, warehouses, and other non air-conditioned industrial assembly plants...

  18. CoolCab Thermal Load Reduction Project: CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Load Reduction Project: CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development CoolCab Thermal Load Reduction Project: CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

  19. CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  20. Solar-powered cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system uses nanostructural materials made of high specific surface area adsorption aerogel as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material. A circulation system circulates refrigerant from the nanostructural material to a cooling unit.

  1. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally recognized that as much as 60% of the air conditioning load in a building is generated by solar heat from the roof. This paper on SOLAR ROOF COOLING BY EVAPORATION is presented in slide form, tracing the history of 'nature's way...

  2. Heating and Cooling Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment for heating and cooling to reduce initial costs, increase homeowner comfort, increase operating efficiency, and greatly reduce utility costs.

  3. Cool, Dry, Quiet Dehumidification with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    CDQ unit, dewpoint is 3 to 8 degrees lower than a coil-only unit. An enhanced CDQ unit can have, or 100-percent dedicated outdoor air unit. Mixed air goes through an optional preheat coil, CDQ wheel, supply fan, cooling coil, optional reheat coil, optional final filters. A CDQ system in a Custom Climate

  4. Cooling Flows or Heating Flows?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now clear that AGN heat cooling flows, largely by driving winds. The winds may contain a relativistic component that generates powerful synchrotron radiation, but it is not clear that all winds do so. The spatial and temporal stability of the AGN/cooling flow interaction are discussed. Collimation of the winds probably provides spatial stability. Temporal stability may be possible only for black holes with masses above a critical value. Both the failure of cooling flows to have adiabatic cores and the existence of X-ray cavities confirm the importance of collimated outflows. I quantify the scale of the convective flow that the AGN Hydra would need to drive if it balanced radiative inward flow by outward flow parallel to the jets. At least in Virgo any such flow must be confined to r<~20 kpc. Hydrodynamical simulations suggest that AGN outbursts cannot last longer than ~25 Myr. Data for four clusters with well studied X-ray cavities suggests that heating associated with cavity formation approximately balances radiative cooling. The role of cosmic infall and the mechanism of filament formation are briefly touched on.

  5. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Peter (Cary, NC)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

  6. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  7. Multi-pass cooling for turbine airfoils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An airfoil for a turbine vane of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil includes an outer wall having pressure and suction sides, and a radially extending cooling cavity located between the pressure and suction sides. A plurality of partitions extend radially through the cooling cavity to define a plurality of interconnected cooling channels located at successive chordal locations through the cooling cavity. The cooling channels define a serpentine flow path extending in the chordal direction. Further, the cooling channels include a plurality of interconnected chambers and the chambers define a serpentine path extending in the radial direction within the serpentine path extending in the chordal direction.

  8. Annual Simulation Results for an Air-Cooled Binary Power Cycle Employing Flash Cooling Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buys, A.; Gladden, C.; Kutscher, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective is to perform detailed simulation of air cooled cycle with flash supplied cooling water using two types of evaporative enhancement, spray nozzels and evaporative media.

  9. Closed circuit steam cooled turbine shroud and method for steam cooling turbine shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Sexton, Brendan Francis (Simpsonville, SC); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine shroud cooling cavity is partitioned to define a plurality of cooling chambers for sequentially receiving cooling steam and impingement cooling of the radially inner wall of the shoud. An impingement baffle is provided in each cooling chamber for receiving the cooling media from a cooling media inlet in the case of the first chamber or from the immediately upstream chamber in the case of the second through fourth chambers and includes a plurality of impingement holes for effecting the impingement cooling of the shroud inner wall.

  10. Philippine Government Policies OTEC Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Management Bureau Philippine Department of Energy #12;DEPARMENT OF ENERGY Initiatives on Ocean in 1980's to map the ocean energy potentials of the country ­ In the early 1990's, Fugro OCEANOR of Norway mechanisms, rules under the RE Law completed by end- 2011 1st Ocean Energy facility operational Mandatory E10

  11. Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Shylesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

  12. Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operating the cooling tower at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces, tube bundles, refrigeration equipment, overhead condensers...

  13. IMPLEMENTATION OF ONCE-THROUGH COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLEMENTATION OF ONCE-THROUGH COOLING MITIGATION THROUGH ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING AND PROCUREMENT Michael R. Jaske Electricity Supply Analysis Division California Energy Commission Dennis C ...........................................................................................................................................1 Energy Agencies' Presumptions About Once-through Cooling Mitigation

  14. Alternate Cooling Methods for Industrial Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, M.; Moore, D.

    refrigerants has caused many plants to evaluate existing cooling methods. This paper presents case studies on alternate cooling methods used for space conditioning at several different industrial facilities. Methods discussed include direct and indirect...

  15. Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 90oC and 5M CaCl2 at 105oC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Day, S D; Lian, T; Saw, C K; Hailey, P D; Blue, C A; Peters, W; Payer, J H; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Branagan, D J; Buffa, E J; Aprigliano, L

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been identified that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022), based on measurements of breakdown potential and corrosion rate in seawater. Both chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo) provide corrosion resistance, boron (B) enables glass formation, and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). Amorphous Fe{sub 48.0}Cr{sub 15.0}Mo{sub 14.0}B{sub 6.0}C{sub 15.0}Y{sub 2.0} (SAM1651) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR) of less than 80 Kelvin per second, due to the addition of yttrium. The low CCR enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous material in practical materials processes. While the yttrium enables a low CCR to be achieved, it makes the material relatively difficult to atomize, due to increases in melt viscosity. Consequently, the powders produced thus far have had irregular shape, which had made pneumatic conveyance during thermal spray deposition difficult.

  16. Fate of corrosion products released from stainless steel in marine sediments and seawater. Part 1. Northeast Pacific pelagic red clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To provide information useful for determining the biogeochemical cycling of corrosion products in the benthic boundary layer of the deep ocean, neutron-activated stainless steel was exposed to seawater and to Northeast Pacific red clay under aerobic and non-oxygenated conditions. This report describes the trace metal geochemistry of the sediment and the chemical speciation of the corrosion products. The sediments generally consisted of reddish-brown clay at the surface grading to a dark-brown transition zone below which mottled olive-gray clay prevailed. Neutron-irradiated 347 stainless steel specimens were exposed to seawater and sediment slurry under aerobic and non-oxygenated conditions for 108 days. The presence of aerated sediment more than doubled the amount of corrosion products released compared to aerated seawater and non-oxygenated sediment treatments. The distribution of /sup 60/Co released from the stainless steel exposed to aerated seawater show that almost 70% of /sup 60/Co activity became associated with suspended particulate matter. No detectable /sup 60/Co activity was present in the soluble, readily dissolved, or inorganic or weakly complexed fractions of aerated sediment which had been used to treat neutron-activated stainless steel. Almost 50% of the /sup 60/Co activity was extracted in the combined soluble, easily dissolved, adsorbed, and organically complexed fractions from the non-oxygenated sediment treatment indicating that this much of the corrosion products may be initially released in ionic form.

  17. Bioaccumulation of essential metals (Co, Mn and Zn) in the king scallop Pecten maximus: seawater, food and sediment exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , food and sediment exposures Marc Metiana,b , Michel Warnaua* , Laetitia HĂ©douina,b , Paco Bustamanteb-feeding mollusks living in soft sediments, the uptake and depuration kinetics of three elements (Co, Mn and Zn) were investigated in the king scallop Pecten maximus exposed via seawater, food, or sediment, using

  18. Routine and Active Metabolic Rates of Migrating Adult Wild Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum) in Seawater and Freshwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    in freshwater at all swimming speeds except those approaching critical swimming speed. Dur- ing a 45-min- water. When fish performed a second swim test, active meta- bolic rates again remained 28%­81% higher for fish in seawater except at the critical swimming speed. Despite their differences in metabolic rates

  19. Determining the effect of seawater on the interfacial shear strength of fiber reinforced epoxies using the single fiber fragmentation test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Barbara Ann

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fiber reinforced polymer composite materials. The single fiber fragmentation test (SFFT) and Kelly-Tyson shear lag analysis were used to evaluate the effect of seawater on the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy composite...

  20. Performance Analysis of XCPC Powered Solar Cooling Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widyolar, Bennett

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar powered cooling system by producing a seamless output of cooling powersolar COP is the ratio of cooling output per available solar power

  1. Experimental Tests of Cooling: Expectations and Additional Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of established techniques for cooling a beam, the choice forionization cooling is a viable technique. The large initialionization cooling, so an experimental test of the technique

  2. Role of surface finishing on pitting corrosion of a duplex stainless steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salah-Rousset, N.B.; Chaouachi, M.A. [ENIT, Tunis (Tunisia). Lab. of Metallurgy and Materials; Chellouf, A. [STEG, Tunis (Tunisia)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized corrosion of duplex UNS S32550 stainless steel in seawater was investigated in the laboratory and in field trials for several surface finish conditions: polished, ground, and sandblasted. Electrochemical data obtained by polarization curves showed that the smoother, polished surface had better characteristics (higher pitting and protection potentials) than the ground or sandblasted surfaces. However, despite its high degree of roughness, the sandblasted surface was the most resistant in field conditions, exhibiting the lowest number of sites attacked. Internal compressive stresses created by sandblasting seem also to have an unsensitizing effect on sensitized zones that exist in cast steel (due to repairs of mold defects), reducing its susceptibility to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Such stresses are not generated in polished or ground surfaces, and localized MIC attack can occur.

  3. Cooling load design tool for UFAD systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ratio of time between Fan Coil Units Perimeter Zone Linearand underfloor fan coil units. cooling contribution of

  4. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Berry

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  5. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF COOLING WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF COOLING WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM GUIDELINES for Wet and Hybrid Cooling Towers at Power Plants May 17, 2004 A and needs, and may vary from the examples cited here. Staff recommend that such a cooling water management

  6. Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling Kamin Whitehouse, Juhi Ranjan, Jiakang Lu, Tamim Burke Parabola Architects Galen Staengl Staengl Engineering h HEATING, VENTILATION, AND cooling (HVAC required for heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) by 20%­30% by tailoring the conditioning of buildings

  7. Optomechanical laser cooling with mechanical modulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Bienert; Pablo Barberis-Blostein

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the laser cooling of cavity optomechanics when the mechanical resonance frequency and damping depend on time. In the regime of weak optomechanical coupling we extend the theory of laser cooling using an adiabatic approximation. We discuss the modifications of the cooling dynamics and compare it with numerical simulations in a wide range of modulation frequencies.

  8. Laser cooling of trapped ions Jurgen Eschner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatt, Rainer

    of the art is reported, and several new cooling techniques are outlined. The principles of ion trapping by elucidating several milestone experiments. In addition, a number of special cooling techniques pertainingLaser cooling of trapped ions Ju¨rgen Eschner Institut fu¨ r Experimentalphysik, Universita

  9. Air cooling for Vertex Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arantza Oyanguren

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertex detectors are crucial detectors for future linear e+e- colliders since they must give the most accurate location of any outgoing charged particles originating from the interaction point. The DEPFET collaboration is developing a new type of pixel sensors which provide very low noise and high spatial resolution. In order to precisely determine the track and vertex positions, multiple scattering in the detector has to be reduced by minimizing the material in the sensors, cooling, and support structures. A new method of cooling by blowing air over the sensors has been developed and tested. It is applied in the design and construction of the Belle-II detector and may be used in the new generation of vertex detectors for linear colliders.

  10. Cryo Utilities Room Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, G.S.; /Fermilab

    1989-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the mechanical equipment failures at the Laboratory are due to the loss of cooling water. In order to insure the proper operating temperatures and to increase the reliability of the mechanical equipment in the D0 Cryo Utilities Room it is necessary to provide an independent liquid cooling system. To this end, an enclosed glycoVwater cooling system which transfers heat from two vane-type vacuum pumps and an air compressor to the outside air has been installed in the Cryo Utilities Room. From the appended list it can be seen that only the Thermal Precision PFC-121-D and Ingersoll-Rand WAC 16 deserve closer investigation based on price. The disadvantages of the WAC 16 are that: it runs a little warmer, it requires more valving to properly install a backup pump, inlet and outlet piping are not included, and temperature and pressure indicators are not included. Its only advantage is that it is $818 cheaper than the PFC-121-D. The advantages of the PFC-121-D are that: it has automatic pump switching during shutdown, it has a temperature regulator on one fan control, it has a switch which indicates proper operation, has a sight glass on the expansion tank, and comes with an ASME approved expansion tank and relief valve. For these reasons the Thermal Precision PFC-121-D was chosen. In the past, we have always found the pond water to be muddy and to sometimes contain rocks of greater than 1/2 inch diameter. Thus a system completely dependent on the pond water from the accelerator was deemed unacceptable. A closed system was selected based on its ability to greatly improve reliability, while remaining economical. It is charged with a 50/50 glycol/water mixture capable of withstanding outside temperatures down to -33 F. The fluid will be circulated by a totally enclosed air cooled Thermal Precision PFC-121-D pump. The system will be on emergency power and an automatically controlled backup pump, identical to the primary, is available should the main pump fail. The fan unit is used as a primary cooler and the trim cooler cools the fluid further on extremely hot days. The trim cooler has also been sized to cool the system in the event of a total shutdown provided that the pond water supply has adequate pressure. Due to a broken filter, we found it necessary to install a strainer in the pond water supply line. The expansion tank separates air bubbles, ensures a net positive suction head, protects against surges and over pressurization of the system, and allows for the filling of the system without shutting it off. All piping has been installed, flushed, charged with the glycol/water mix, and hydrostatically tested to 55 psi. The condition of all pumps and flow conditions will be recorded at the PLC. It has been decided not to include the regulator valve in the pond water return line. This valve was designated by the manufacturer to reduce the amount of water flowing through the trim cooler. This is not necessary in our application. There is some concern that the cooling fluid may cool the mechanical eqUipment too much when they are not operating or during very cold days. This issue will be addressed and the conclusion appended to this engineering note.

  11. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  12. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, Mark P. (Knoxville, TN); Kedl, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a process for formation of a gas hydrate to be used as a cool storage medium using a refrigerant in water. Mixing of the immiscible refrigerant and water is effected by addition of a surfactant and agitation. The difficult problem of subcooling during the process is overcome by using the surfactant and agitation and performance of the process significantly improves and approaches ideal.

  13. Gas cooled traction drive inverter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a modular circuit card configuration for distributing heat among a plurality of circuit cards. Each circuit card includes a housing adapted to dissipate heat in response to gas flow over the housing. In one aspect, a gas-cooled inverter includes a plurality of inverter circuit cards, and a plurality of circuit card housings, each of which encloses one of the plurality of inverter cards.

  14. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peinado, Charles O. (La Jolla, CA); Koutz, Stanley L. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

  15. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Arnold, Phillip A. (Livermore, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

  16. SPL RF Coupler Cooling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonomi, R; Montesinos, E; Parma, V; Vande Craen, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy saving is an important challenge in accelerator design. In this framework, reduction of heat loads in a cryomodule is of fundamental importance due to the small thermodynamic efficiency of cooling at low temperatures. In particular, care must be taken during the design of its critical components (e.g. RF couplers, coldwarm transitions). In this framework, the main RF coupler of the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cryomodule at CERN will not only be used for RF powering but also as the main mechanical support of the superconducting cavities. These two functions have to be accomplished while ensuring the lowest heat in-leak to the helium bath at 2 K. In the SPL design, the RF coupler outer conductor is composed of two walls and cooled by forced convection with helium gas at 4.5 K. Analytical, semi-analytical and numerical analyses are presented in order to defend the choice of gas cooling. Temperature profiles and thermal performance have been evaluated for different operating conditions; a sensitivit...

  17. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

  18. RHIC stochastic cooling motion control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Olsen, R.H.; Fu, W.; Brennan, J.M.; Liaw, CJ; Bellavia, S.; Brodowski, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams are subject to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) that causes an emittance growth in all three-phase space planes. The only way to increase integrated luminosity is to counteract IBS with cooling during RHIC stores. A stochastic cooling system for this purpose has been developed, it includes moveable pick-ups and kickers in the collider that require precise motion control mechanics, drives and controllers. Since these moving parts can limit the beam path aperture, accuracy and reliability is important. Servo, stepper, and DC motors are used to provide actuation solutions for position control. The choice of motion stage, drive motor type, and controls are based on needs defined by the variety of mechanical specifications, the unique performance requirements, and the special needs required for remote operations in an accelerator environment. In this report we will describe the remote motion control related beam line hardware, position transducers, rack electronics, and software developed for the RHIC stochastic cooling pick-ups and kickers.

  19. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birx, D.L.; Arnold, P.A.; Ball, D.G.; Cook, E.G.

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method are disclosed for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air. 9 figs.

  20. Structural stability of cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrik Omma; James Binney

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations are used to investigate the structural stability of cooling flows that are episodically heated by jets from a central AGN. The radial profile of energy deposition is controlled by (a) the power of the jets, and (b) the pre-outburst density profile. A delay in the ignition of the jets causes more powerful jets to impact on a more centrally concentrated medium. The net effect is a sufficient increase in the central concentration of energy deposition to cause the post-outburst density profile to be less centrally concentrated than that of an identical cluster in which the outburst happened earlier and was weaker. These results suggest that the density profiles of cooling flows oscillate around an attracting profile, thus explaining why cooling flows are observed to have similar density profiles. The possibility is raised that powerful FR II systems are ones in which this feedback mechanism has broken down and a runaway growth of the source parameters has occurred.

  1. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conway, Lawrence E. (Hookstown, PA); Fanto, Susan V. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  2. Algorithmic Cooling in Liquid State NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosi Atia; Yuval Elias; Tal Mor; Yossi Weinstein

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Algorithmic cooling is a method that employs thermalization to increase the qubits' purification level, namely it reduces the qubit-system's entropy. We utilized gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE), an optimal control algorithm, to implement algorithmic cooling in liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance. Various cooling algorithms were applied onto the three qubits of 13C2-trichloroethylene, cooling the system beyond Shannon's entropy bound in several different ways. For example, in one experiment a carbon qubit was cooled by a factor of 4.61. This work is a step towards potentially integrating tools of NMR quantum computing into in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  3. Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Cupertino, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

  4. CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) | OpenMinor PermitControllingCook, Minnesota:CoolEarth

  5. A new cylinder cooling system using oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harashina, Kenichi; Murata, Katsuhiro; Satoh, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Hamamura, Masahiro

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of engine cylinders must satisfy two conflicting requirements, good cooling performance and ease of manufacture. A cooling system was designed to permit the circulation of engine lubricating oil as a coolant at high speed through grooves provided on the external periphery of the cylinder liner. Testing in an actual operating engine confirmed that this cooling system design not only provides better heat transfer and higher cooling performance but also simplifies the manufacturing of the cylinder since external cooling fins are not required. In this paper, the authors will discuss the cylinder cooling effect of the new cylinder cooling system, referring mainly to the test results of a single-cylinder motorcycle engine with lubricating oil from the crankcase used as the coolant.

  6. Photometric Identification of Cool White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kilic; D. E. Winget; Ted von Hippel; C. F. Claver

    2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the use of a narrow-band DDO51 filter for photometric identification of cool white dwarfs. We report photometric observations of 30 known cool white dwarfs with temperatures ranging from 10,000 K down to very cool temperatures (<3500 K). Follow-up spectroscopic observations of a sample of objects selected using this filter and our photometric observations show that DDO51 filter photometry can help select cool white dwarf candidates for follow-up multi--object spectroscopy by rejecting 65% of main sequence stars with the same broad--band colors as the cool white dwarfs. This technique is not selective enough to efficiently feed single--object spectrographs. We present the white dwarf cooling sequence using this filter. Our observations show that very cool white dwarfs form a sequence in the r-DDO vs. r-z color--color diagram and demonstrate that significant improvements are needed in white dwarf model atmospheres.

  7. Two-Phase Spray Cooling of Hybrid Vehicle Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudawar, I.; Bharathan, D.; Kelly, K.; Narumanchi, S.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray cooling is a feasible cooling technology for hybrid vehicle electronics; HFE 7100 is a promising coolant.

  8. Information technology equipment cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  9. Cavity cooling of an atomic array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxana Mishina

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    While cavity cooling of a single trapped emitter was demonstrated, cooling of many particles in an array of harmonic traps needs investigation and poses a question of scalability. This work investigates the cooling of a one dimensional atomic array to the ground state of motion via the interaction with the single mode field of a high-finesse cavity. The key factor ensuring the cooling is found to be the mechanical inhomogeneity of the traps. Furthermore it is shown that the pumped cavity mode does not only mediate the cooling but also provides the necessary inhomogeneity if its periodicity differs from the one of the array. This configuration results in the ground state cooling of several tens of atoms within a few milliseconds, a timescale compatible with current experimental conditions. Moreover, the cooling rate scaling with the atom number reveals a drastic change of the dynamics with the size of the array: atoms are either cooled independently, or via collective modes. In the latter case the cavity mediated atom interaction destructively slows down the cooling as well as increases the mean occupation number, quadratically with the atom number. Finally, an order of magnitude speed up of the cooling is predicted as an outcome the optimization scheme based on the adjustment of the array versus the cavity mode periodicity.

  10. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Plutonium in Sediment and Seawater from the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leisvik, M; Hamilton, T

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer 2000, I was given the opportunity to work for about three months as a technical trainee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, or LLNL as I will refer to it hereafter. University of California runs this Department of Energy laboratory, which is located 70 km east of San Francisco, in the small city of Livermore. This master thesis in Radioecology is based on the work I did here. LLNL, as a second U.S.-facility for development of nuclear weapons, was built in Livermore in the beginning of the 1950's (Los Alamos in New Mexico was the other one). It has since then also become a 'science center' for a number of areas like magnetic and laser fusion energy, non-nuclear energy, biomedicine, and environmental science. The Laboratory's mission has changed over the years to meet new national needs. The following two statements were found on the homepage of LLNL (http://www.llnl.gov), at 2001-03-05, where also information about the laboratory and the scientific projects that takes place there, can be found. 'Our primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide'. 'Our goal is to apply the best science and technology to enhance the security and well-being of the nation and to make the world a safer place.' The Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology group at the Health and Ecological Assessments division employed me, and I also worked to some extent with the Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) group. The work I did at LLNL can be divided into two parts. In the first part Plutonium (Pu) measurements in sediments from the Rongelap atoll in Marshall Islands, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) were done. The method for measuring these kinds of samples is well understood at LLNL since soil samples have been measured with AMS for Pu in the past. Therefore it was the results that were of main interest and not the technique. The second part was to take advantage of AMS's very high sensitivity by measure the Pu-concentrations in small volumes (0.04-1 L) of seawater. The technique for using AMS at Pu-measurements in seawater is relatively new and the main task for me was to find out a method that could work in practice. The area where the sediment samples and the water samples were collected are high above background levels for many radionuclides, including Pu, because of the detonation of the nuclear bomb code-named Castle Bravo, in 1954.

  11. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd [Environmental Effects Branch, EM50, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  12. Mechanically-reattachable liquid-cooled cooling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arney, Susanne; Cheng, Jen-Hau; Kolodner, Paul R; Kota-Venkata, Krishna-Murty; Scofield, William; Salamon, Todd R; Simon, Maria E

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus comprising a rack having a row of shelves, each shelf supporting an electronics circuit board, each one of the circuit boards being manually removable from the shelve supporting the one of the circuit boards and having a local heat source thereon. The apparatus also comprises a cooler attached to the rack and being able to circulate a cooling fluid around a channel forming a closed loop. The apparatus further comprises a plurality of heat conduits, each heat conduit being located over a corresponding one of the circuit boards and forming a path to transport heat from the local heat source of the corresponding one of the circuit boards to the cooler. Each heat conduit is configured to be manually detachable from the cooler or the circuit board, without breaking a circulation pathway of the fluid through the cooler.

  13. MEIC Electron Cooling Simulation Using Betacool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, He [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cooling of ion beams is the most critical R&D issue in Jefferson Lab's MEIC design. In the ion collider ring, a bunched electron beam driven by an energy-recovery SRF linac assisted by a circulate ring will be employed to cool protons or ions with energies up to 100 GeV/u, a parameter regime that electron cooling has never been applied. It is essential to understand how efficient the electron cooling is, particularly in the high energy range, to confirm the feasibility of the design. Electron cooling is also important in LEIC design although the ion energy is 25 GeV/u, lower than MEIC. In this paper, we will present first results of the simulation studies of electron cooling processes in the collider ring of both MEIC and LEIC using BETACOOL code.

  14. Cooling and Clusters: When Is Heating Needed?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greg L. Bryan; G. Mark Voit

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There are (at least) two unsolved problems concerning the current state of the thermal gas in clusters of galaxies. The first is identifying the source of the heating which offsets cooling in the centers of clusters with short cooling times (the ``cooling flow'' problem). The second is understanding the mechanism which boosts the entropy in cluster and group gas. Since both of these problems involve an unknown source of heating it is tempting to identify them with the same process, particular since AGN heating is observed to be operating at some level in a sample of well-observed ``cooling flow'' clusters. Here we show, using numerical simulations of cluster formation, that much of the gas ending up in clusters cools at high redshift and so the heating is also needed at high-redshift, well before the cluster forms. This indicates that the same process operating to solve the cooling flow problem may not also resolve the cluster entropy problem.

  15. Hot gas path component cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  16. Cooling of Kilauea Iki lava lake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, R.G.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1959 Kilauea Iki erupted leaving a 110 to 120 m lake of molten lava in its crater. The resulting lava lake has provided a unique opportunity to study the cooling dynamics of a molten body and its associated hydrothermal system. Field measurements taken at Kilauea Iki indicate that the hydrothermal system above the cooling magma body goes through several stages, some of which are well modeled analytically. Field measurements also indicate that during most of the solidification period of the lake, cooling from above is controlled by 2-phase convection while conduction dominates the cooling of the lake from below. A summary of the field work related to the study of the cooling dynamics of Kilauea Iki is presented. Quantitative and qualitative cooling models for the lake are discussed.

  17. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  18. Cooling Performance Assessment of Building America Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chasar, D.; Chandra, S.; Parker, D.; Sherwin, J.; Beal, D.; Hoak, D.; Moyer, N.; McIlvaine, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nine homes in three climate regions. Data from potential zero energy homes and minimum code homes provide upper and lower performance bounds. Comparisons are based on regression analysis of daily cooling energy per 1,000 square foot of floor area... and construction and with cooling equipment of varying efficiency. Plotting such data on a common graph required generalizations that limit the ability to make direct house to house comparisons, but instead provides a broad assessment of cooling performance...

  19. Air oxidation and seawater corrosion of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program is currently under way at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to develop the data and technology needed to permit the licensing of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ as a radioisotope heat source fuel for terrestrial applications. The WESF /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ storage capsule consists of a Hastelloy C-276 inner capsule (2 in. I.D. x 19 in. long) and a 316L stainless steel outer capsule (2-3/8 in. I.D. x 20 in. long). Preliminary experimental tests and theoretical calculations show that the WESF storage capsule is incapable of meeting current licensing requirements for heat sources that are to be used for terrestrial applications. Therefore, the DOE decision was to develop a new heat source design that would retain the existing WESF Hastelloy C-276 inner capsule and replace the current WESF outer capsule with a new outer capsule capable of meeting current licensing requirements. Based on a number of factors, Hastelloy S was selected as the outer capsule material. Hastelloy C-4 was selected as a backup material in case the Hastelloy S had to be rejected for any reason. This report summarizes the results of studies carried out to determine the effects of both air oxidation at heat source operating temperatures and seawater corrosion on the tensile properties of the outer capsule materials.

  20. Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

  1. Direct Liquid Cooling for Electronic Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Henry; Greenberg, Steve

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a demonstration of an electronic--equipment cooling system in the engineering prototype development stage that can be applied in data centers. The technology provides cooling by bringing a water--based cooling fluid into direct contact with high--heat--generating electronic components. This direct cooling system improves overall data center energy efficiency in three ways: High--heat--generating electronic components are more efficiently cooled directly using water, capturing a large portion of the total electronic equipment heat generated. This captured heat reduces the load on the less--efficient air--based data center room cooling systems. The combination contributes to the overall savings. The power consumption of the electronic equipment internal fans is significantly reduced when equipped with this cooling system. The temperature of the cooling water supplied to the direct cooling system can be much higher than that commonly provided by facility chilled water loops, and therefore can be produced with lower cooling infrastructure energy consumption and possibly compressor-free cooling. Providing opportunities for heat reuse is an additional benefit of this technology. The cooling system can be controlled to produce high return water temperatures while providing adequate component cooling. The demonstration was conducted in a data center located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. Thirty--eight servers equipped with the liquid cooling system and instrumented for energy measurements were placed in a single rack. Two unmodified servers of the same configuration, located in an adjacent rack, were used to provide a baseline. The demonstration characterized the fraction of heat removed by the direct cooling technology, quantified the energy savings for a number of cooling infrastructure scenarios, and provided information that could be used to investigate heat reuse opportunities. Thermal measurement data were used with data center energy use modeling software to estimate overall site energy use. These estimates show that an overall data center energy savings of approximately 20 percent can be expected if a center is retrofitted as specified in the models used. Increasing the portion of heat captured by this technology is an area suggested for further development.

  2. Dew-Point Evaporative Comfort Cooling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on innovative indirect evaporative cooling technology developed by Coolerado Corporation given at the Rocky Mountain Chapter ASHRAE conference in April 2012.

  3. Cooling load design tool for UFAD systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Design Guide. Atlanta:Load Design Tool for Underfloor Air Distribution Systems. ”for design cooling loads in underfloor air distribution (

  4. Depolarisation cooling of an atomic cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hensler; A. Greiner; J. Stuhler; T. Pfau

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a cooling scheme based on depolarisation of a polarised cloud of trapped atoms. Similar to adiabatic demagnetisation, we suggest to use the coupling between the internal spin reservoir of the cloud and the external kinetic reservoir via dipolar relaxation to reduce the temperature of the cloud. By optical pumping one can cool the spin reservoir and force the cooling process. In case of a trapped gas of dipolar chromium atoms, we show that this cooling technique can be performed continuously and used to approach the critical phase space density for BEC

  5. Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

  6. Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Derbenev, Y.S.; Morozov, V.S.; /Jefferson Lab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

  7. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Peterson; A. C. Fabian

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  8. Why Cool Roofs? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills. Speakers...

  9. GAS COOLED ELECTRICAL LEADS FOR USE ON FORCED COOLED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smits, R.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11-14, 1981 GAS COOLED ELECTRICAL LEADS FOR USE ON FORCEDim mumii P mm GAS COOLED ELECTRICAL LEADS FOR USE ON FORCEDD. Henning, "Cryogenic Electrical Leads," Proceedings of the

  10. Cool Versus Ultracool White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Farihi

    2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary $BVRIJHK$ analysis of the white dwarfs SSSPM J2231$-$7514 and SSSPM J2231$-$7515 is presented. Although both stars were reported to have $T_{\\rm eff}<4000$ K, the analysis here indicates $T_{\\rm eff}\\approx4250$ K for both SSSPM J2231$-$7514 and SSSPM J2231$-$7515. Given substantial scientific interest in the coolest extant degenerate stars, it is necessary to distinguish sub 4000 K objects from the bulk of cool white dwarfs. This analysis reiterates the importance of near infrared observations in constraining the spectral energy distributions and effective temperatures of the coolest white dwarfs and briefly discusses their possible origins.

  11. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  12. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  13. Cooled turbine vane with endcaps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cunha, Frank J. (Avon, CT); Schiavo, Jr., Anthony L. (Ovideo, FL); Nordlund, Raymond Scott (Orlando, FL); Malow, Thomas (Oviedo, FL); McKinley, Barry L. (Chuluota, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine vane assembly which includes an outer endcap having a plurality of generally straight passages and passage segments therethrough, an inner endcap having a plurality of passages and passage segments therethrough, and a vane assembly having an outer shroud, an airfoil body, and an inner shroud. The outer shroud, airfoil body and inner shroud each have a plurality of generally straight passages and passage segments therethrough as well. The outer endcap is coupled to the outer shroud so that outer endcap passages and said outer shroud passages form a fluid circuit. The inner endcap is coupled to the inner shroud so that the inner end cap passages and the inner shroud passages from a fluid circuit. Passages in the vane casting are in fluid communication with both the outer shroud passages and the inner shroud passages. Passages in the outer endcap may be coupled to a cooling system that supplies a coolant and takes away the heated exhaust.

  14. Emergency cooling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Cheung, Y.K.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved emergency cooling system and method are disclosed that may be adapted for incorporation into or use with a nuclear BWR wherein a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) containing a nuclear core and a heat transfer fluid for circulation in a heat transfer relationship with the core is housed within an annular sealed drywell and is fluid communicable therewith for passage thereto in an emergency situation the heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and any noncondensibles present in the RPV, an annular sealed wetwell houses the drywell, and a pressure suppression pool of liquid is disposed in the wetwell and is connected to the drywell by submerged vents. The improved emergency cooling system and method has a containment condenser for receiving condensible heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and noncondensibles for condensing at least a portion of the heat transfer fluid. The containment condenser has an inlet in fluid communication with the drywell for receiving heat transfer fluid and noncondensibles, a first outlet in fluid communication with the RPV for the return to the RPV of the condensed portion of the heat transfer fluid and a second outlet in fluid communication with the drywell for passage of the noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles. The noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles passed to the drywell from the containment condenser are mixed with the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles from the RPV for passage into the containment condenser. A water pool is provided in heat transfer relationship with the containment condenser and is thermally communicable in an emergency situation with an environment outside of the drywell and the wetwell for conducting heat transferred from the containment condenser away from the wetwell and the drywell. 5 figs.

  15. HEATING AND COOLING PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, S. [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showamachi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan); Turner, N. J., E-mail: shirose@jamstec.go.jp, E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine heating and cooling in protostellar disks using three-dimensional radiation-MHD calculations of a patch of the Solar nebula at 1 AU, employing the shearing-box and flux-limited radiation diffusion approximations. The disk atmosphere is ionized by stellar X-rays, well coupled to magnetic fields, and sustains a turbulent accretion flow driven by magnetorotational instability, while the interior is resistive and magnetically dead. The turbulent layers are heated by absorbing the light from the central star and by dissipating the magnetic fields. They are optically thin to their own radiation and cool inefficiently. The optically thick interior in contrast is heated only weakly, by re-emission from the atmosphere. The interior is colder than a classical viscous model and isothermal. The magnetic fields support an extended atmosphere that absorbs the starlight 1.5 times higher than the hydrostatic viscous model. The disk thickness thus measures not the internal temperature, but the magnetic field strength. Fluctuations in the fields move the starlight-absorbing surface up and down. The height ranges between 13% and 24% of the radius over timescales of several orbits, with implications for infrared variability. The fields are buoyant, so the accretion heating occurs higher in the atmosphere than the stresses. The heating is localized around current sheets, caused by magnetorotational instability at lower elevations and by Parker instability at higher elevations. Gas in the sheets is heated above the stellar irradiation temperature, even though accretion is much less than irradiation power when volume averaged. The hot optically thin current sheets might be detectable through their line emission.

  16. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  17. Laser cooling and sympathetic cooling in a linear quadrupole rf trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryjkov, Vladimir Leonidovich

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    LASER COOLING AND SYMPATHETIC COOLING IN A LINEAR QUADRUPOLE RF TRAP A Dissertation by VLADIMIR LEONIDOVICH RYJKOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2003 Major Subject: Physics LASER COOLING AND SYMPATHETIC COOLING IN A LINEAR QUADRUPOLE RF TRAP A Dissertation by VLADIMIR LEONIDOVICH RYJKOV Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  18. Method for passive cooling liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, and system thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Busboom, Herbert J. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel.

  19. EHS-Net Cooling Study EHS-Net Cooling Study Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EHS-Net Cooling Study 1 EHS-Net Cooling Study Protocol 1. Title EHS-Net Cooling Study 2. Research (EHS-Net) special study. EHS-Net is a collaboration involving the Centers for Disease Control confirmed foodborne outbreaks in the US (unpublished FoodNet data). These data clearly indicate

  20. Cooling and Trapping Atoms Atoms are slowed and cooled by radiation pressure from laser light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    Cooling and Trapping Atoms Atoms are slowed and cooled by radiation pressure from laser light and then trapped in a bottle whose "walls" are magnetic fields. Cooled atoms are ideal for exploring basic. research has traditionally been the study of the intrinsic prop erties of isolated atoms. In the early part

  1. Cooling circuit for steam and air-cooled turbine nozzle stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Itzel, Gary Michael (Clifton Park, NY); Yu, Yufeng (Guilderland, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The turbine vane segment includes inner and outer walls with a vane extending therebetween. The vane includes leading and trailing edge cavities and intermediate cavities. An impingement plate is spaced from the outer wall to impingement-cool the outer wall. Post-impingement cooling air flows through holes in the outer wall to form a thin air-cooling film along the outer wall. Cooling air is supplied an insert sleeve with openings in the leading edge cavity for impingement-cooling the leading edge. Holes through the leading edge afford thin-film cooling about the leading edge. Cooling air is provided the trailing edge cavity and passes through holes in the side walls of the vane for thin-film cooling of the trailing edge. Steam flows through a pair of intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling of the side walls. Post-impingement steam flows to the inner wall for impingement-cooling of the inner wall and returns the post-impingement cooling steam through inserts in other intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling the side walls of the vane.

  2. PROJECT REPORT WESTERN COOLING CHALLENGE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    that reduce energy, water consumption and peak electricity demand associated with cooling in the Western-cool- er to reduce the refrigerant condensing temperature of a vapor compression system, then cycles Davis Energy Efficiency Center in 2007 through a grant from the California Clean Energy Fund

  3. Water Management for Evaporatively Cooled Condensers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Water Management for Evaporatively Cooled Condensers Theresa Pistochini May 23rd, 2012 ResearchAirCapacity,tons Gallons of Water Continuous Test - Outdoor Air 110-115 Deg F Cyclic Test - Outdoor Air 110-115 Deg F #12 AverageWaterHardness(ppm) Cooling Degree Days (60°F Reference) 20% Population 70% Population 10

  4. Feedback cooling of a single trapped ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel Bushev; Daniel Rotter; Alex Wilson; Francois Dubin; Christoph Becher; Juergen Eschner; Rainer Blatt; Viktor Steixner; Peter Rabl; Peter Zoller

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a real-time measurement of the motion of a single ion in a Paul trap, we demonstrate its electro-mechanical cooling below the Doppler limit by homodyne feedback control (cold damping). The feedback cooling results are well described by a model based on a quantum mechanical Master Equation.

  5. Sisyphus Cooling of Electrically Trapped Polyatomic Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeppenfeld, M; Glöckner, R; Prehn, A; Mielenz, M; Sommer, C; van Buuren, L D; Motsch, M; Rempe, G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rich internal structure and long-range dipole-dipole interactions establish polar molecules as unique instruments for quantum-controlled applications and fundamental investigations. Their potential fully unfolds at ultracold temperatures, where a plethora of effects is predicted in many-body physics, quantum information science, ultracold chemistry, and physics beyond the standard model. These objectives have inspired the development of a wide range of methods to produce cold molecular ensembles. However, cooling polyatomic molecules to ultracold temperatures has until now seemed intractable. Here we report on the experimental realization of opto-electrical cooling, a paradigm-changing cooling and accumulation method for polar molecules. Its key attribute is the removal of a large fraction of a molecule's kinetic energy in each step of the cooling cycle via a Sisyphus effect, allowing cooling with only few dissipative decay processes. We demonstrate its potential by reducing the temperature of about 10^6 ...

  6. Dry cooling: Perspectives on future needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guyer, E.C. (Yankee Scientific, Inc., Ashland, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The factors that can be expected to determine the future role of dry cooling in the United States electric power generation industry are identified and characterized. Focus is primarily on the issues of water availability for the electric power industry and the environmental impacts of evaporative cooling systems. The question of future water availability is addressed in terms of both limitations and opportunities facing the industry. A brief review of the status of dry cooling applications is provided. Included is a summary of an extensive survey of electric utility industry perspectives on the future requirements and role for dry cooling. Some regional assessments of the expected future requirements for this technology are also provided. Conclusions are a qualitative characterization of the expected future role of dry cooling in the electric power industry. 72 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. Debris trap in a turbine cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a turbine having a rotor and a plurality of stages, each stage comprising a row of buckets mounted on the rotor for rotation therewith; and wherein the buckets of at least one of the stages are cooled by steam, the improvement comprising at least one axially extending cooling steam supply conduit communicating with an at least partially annular steam supply manifold; one or more axially extending cooling steam feed tubes connected to the manifold at a location radially outwardly of the cooling steam supply conduit, the feed tubes arranged to supply cooling steam to the buckets of at least one of the plurality of stages; the manifold extending radially beyond the feed tubes to thereby create a debris trap region for collecting debris under centrifugal loading caused by rotation of the rotor.

  8. Operational feasibility of underwater Stirling engine systems using oxygen-seawater extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, I.J.; Reader, G.T. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The exploration of the oceans whether for societal, commercial, scientific or military reasons requires efficient and cost effective underwater vehicles. In turn, these vessels require efficient means of producing on board power for the propulsion and hotel load requirements of long endurance missions. The Stirling engine, because of its inherent closed-cycle operation, has long been an attractive candidate for underwater use and now has proved its reliability and maintainability in the arduous environment of a naval submarine application. More recently the Stirling has been considered for use in small long endurance unmanned underwater vessels (UUVs). However, with these type of vehicles the need to carry an on board oxygen supply in a very confined space has presented a number of design problems. The concept of using multi-stage vehicles with disposable energy pods has been explored and appears attractive although a major change in submarine design philosophy will be required if such vehicles are to launched from submarines. Another approach is to use a more space efficient source of oxygen. As seawater contains dissolved oxygen then if this source could be utilized to meet all or at least part of the engine`s need than a major design problem could be overcome. In this paper the findings of an initial study into the use of membranes or artificial gill techniques to provide oxygen for a Stirling powered DARPA type vehicle are presented. It has been found that only in certain sea areas is the concept of oxygen extraction feasible for use with power systems. Even in situations where there are sufficient levels of dissolved oxygen the gill system approach appears to have limited utility for UUV applications and a number of practical problems still need to be addressed.

  9. Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, M.R.

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

  10. NumericalS imulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    words:fi nite volume method,fi lm cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation] for cooling turbine blades. An overview of previous experim0 tal studies and theoreticalm dels is given

  11. Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

  12. Improving the Efficiency of Your Process Cooling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many industries require process cooling to achieve desired outcomes of specific processes. This cooling may come from cooling towers, once-through water, mechanical refrigeration, or cryogenic sources such as liquid nitrogen or dry ice. This paper...

  13. On stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the stochastic cooling technique. Stochastic cooling testswhat the stochastic cooling technique does. A large amountPhysics and Techniques of Stochastic Cooling, PHy. Reports,

  14. Solar desiccant cooling: an evolving technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, S.A.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for improved solar cooling economics has not been realized. The absorption cycle, and heat activated Rankine engine suffer from low efficiency. Desiccant cooling is simple and can acheive a Coefficient of Performance (COP) double that of the other systems. The basic desiccant system technology is described. This has been integrated with solar collecter regeneration to demonstrate feasibility. A performance analysis shows that desiccant cooling can be competitive, but that the capital cost penalty of solar-desiccant systems was the most serious detriment to economic competitiveness. Tax incentives are recommended.

  15. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Russel B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  16. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Russell B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  17. Feedback Cooling of a Single Neutral Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Koch; Christian Sames; Alexander Kubanek; Matthias Apel; Maximilian Balbach; Alexei Ourjoumtsev; Pepijn W. H. Pinkse; Gerhard Rempe

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate feedback cooling of the motion of a single rubidium atom trapped in a high-finesse optical resonator to a temperature of about 160 \\mu K. Time-dependent transmission and intensity-correlation measurements prove the reduction of the atomic position uncertainty. The feedback increases the 1/e storage time into the one second regime, 30 times longer than without feedback. Feedback cooling therefore rivals state-of-the-art laser cooling, but with the advantages that it requires less optical access and exhibits less optical pumping.

  18. Cool Roofs | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool MagneticCoolCool

  19. Chemical Treatment Fosters Zero Discharge by Making Cooling Water Reusable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boffardi, B. P.

    dramatically. Once-through cooling has been largely replaced by open recirculating cooling water methods. This approach reduces water consumption by increasing the use of recycled water. Simplistically, the circulating cooling water flows through heat... exchanger equipment and is cooled by passing through a cooling tower. The recycled water is cooled by evaporation of some of the circulating water as it passes through the tower. As a result of the evaporation process, the dissolved solids in the water...

  20. Cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket and tip shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willett, Fred Thomas (25 Long Creek Dr., Burnt Hills, NY 12027); Itzel, Gary Michael (12 Cider Mill Dr., Clifton Park, NY 12065); Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (11 Wyngate Rd., Glenmont, NY 12077); Plemmons, Larry Wayne (late of Hamilton, OH); Plemmons, Helen M. (2900 Long Ridge Trails, Hamilton, OH 45014); Lewis, Doyle C. (444 River Way, Greer, SC 29651)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An open cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket wherein the bucket has an airfoil portion, and a tip shroud, the cooling circuit including a plurality of radial cooling holes extending through the airfoil portion and communicating with an enlarged internal area within the tip shroud before exiting the tip shroud such that a cooling medium used to cool the airfoil portion is subsequently used to cool the tip shroud.

  1. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  2. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performanc...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Improves Cooling System Performance Case study details Marshall Space Flight Center's innovative technologies to improve water efficiency and cooling performance for one of its...

  3. Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

  4. High-Temperature, Air-Cooled Traction Drive Inverter Packaging...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High-Temperature, Air-Cooled Traction Drive Inverter Packaging High-Temperature, Air-Cooled Traction Drive Inverter Packaging 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

  5. Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    50 degrees cooler. A study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help...

  6. Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement Cool Roofs at DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    emissions. A recent study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help...

  7. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the ice storage system, during direct cooling, thethe building cooling load. In dynamic systems, ice is formedcooling/demand-limited storage / electric load management / full storage / ice

  8. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Industry: A Market Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cooling, Heating, and Power for Industry: A Market Assessment, August 2003 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Industry: A Market Assessment, August 2003 Industrial applications of CHP...

  9. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 In this...

  10. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

  11. Case Study: Evaluating Liquid versus Air Cooling in the Maui...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Case Study: Evaluating Liquid versus Air Cooling in the Maui High Performance Computing Center Case Study: Evaluating Liquid versus Air Cooling in the Maui High Performance...

  12. actively cooled resonators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effect H2OLiBr absorption cooling cycles, Applied Thermalabsorption chillers5, 6, 7, adsorption chillers 8, and open cooling cyclesabsorption chiller works by using thermal...

  13. Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices 2012 DOE...

  14. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," SeminarTHERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGS OF COMMERCIAL

  15. advanced sodium cooled: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in industrial cooling systems Michael R. Muller and Michael B. Muller Center for Advanced Energy Systems Rutgers University Piscataway, NJ 08854 Abstract Industrial cooling remains...

  16. Air Cooling Technology for Power Electronic Thermal Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * FY10 - Develop novel micro-fin air cooled heat sink - prototype and test - Research new novel cooling technologies - synthetic jets - Evaluate fan efficiency for input into...

  17. Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel Coolants Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel Coolants 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  18. Best Management Practice #9: Single-Pass Cooling Equipment |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tower or an air-cooled chiller may also be an economical alternative. Excess usable cooling capacity may already exist within the building. Find another use for the...

  19. Analysis of oscillating flow cooled SMA actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachalla Seshadri, Rajagopal

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    literature, most of the cooling mechanisms involve unidirectional forced convection. This may not be the most effective method. Oscillating flow in a channel can sometimes enhance heat transfer over a unidirectional flow. One possible explanation...

  20. Polymer-based electrocaloric cooling devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qiming; Lu, Sheng-Guo; Li, Xinyu; Gorny, Lee; Cheng, Jiping; Neese, Bret P; Chu, Baojin

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling devices (i.e., refrigerators or heat pumps) based on polymers which exhibit a temperature change upon application or removal of an electrical field or voltage, (e.g., fluoropolymers or crosslinked fluoropolymers that exhibit electrocaloric effect).

  1. Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loving care is paid to the compressors, condensers, and computer programs of refrigeration systems. When problems arise, operator: run around in circles with expensive "fixes", but historically ignore the poor orphan, the cooling tower perched...

  2. An analysis of electrothermodynamic heating and cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honea, Mark Stephen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Bhattacharyya, et al. 1995; Rowe 1995; Goodfellow 1994). First, the results for a positive J when heat is absorbed at the interface, i. e. , when the interface cools (initially), is reported. An examination of various product catalogs (for example, Melcor...

  3. Stability analysis of supercritical water cooled reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jiyun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is a concept for an advanced reactor that will operate at high pressure (25MPa) and high temperature (500°C average core exit). The high coolant temperature as it leaves the ...

  4. Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    slows the transfer of heat inside but doesn't eliminate it. Researchers have measured energy savings up to 10 to 15 percent for homes with cool roof coatings. And if a standard...

  5. Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

    The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

  6. Hydraulic Cooling Tower Driver- The Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, J. A.

    One of the weaknesses of present day cooling tower drives are fan wrecks caused by shaft couplings breaking, gear box malfunctions due to inadequate lubrication, gear tooth wear, and inaccessibility for inspection and routine maintenance. The hydro...

  7. Advanced Open-Cycle Desiccant Cooling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Y. J.; Charoensupaya, D.; Lavan, Z.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of staged regeneration as means of improving the desiccant cooling system performance is the subject of investigation in this study. In the staged regeneration, the regeneration section of desiccant dehumidifier is divided into two parts...

  8. EVAPORATIVE COOLING - CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR ATLAS SCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niinikoski, T O

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of an evaporative two-phase flow cooling system for the ATLAS SCT detector is described, using perfluorinated propane (C3F8) as a coolant. Comparison with perfluorinated butane (C4F10) is made, although the detailed design is presented only for C3F8. The two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are calculated in order to determine the dimensions of the cooling pipes and module contacts for the Barrel SCT. The region in which the flow is homogeneous is determined. The cooling cycle, pipework, compressor, heat exchangers and other main elements of the system are calculated in order to be able to discuss the system control, safety and reliability. Evaporative cooling appears to be substantially better than the binary ice system from the point of view of safety, reliability, detector thickness, heat transfer coefficient, cost and simplicity.

  9. Cooling scheme for turbine hot parts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); Owen, Brian Charles (Orlando, FL); Dowman, Steven Wayne (Orlando, FL); Nordlund, Raymond Scott (Orlando, FL); Smith, Ricky Lee (Oviedo, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed-loop cooling scheme for cooling stationary combustion turbine components, such as vanes, ring segments and transitions, is provided. The cooling scheme comprises: (1) an annular coolant inlet chamber, situated between the cylinder and blade ring of a turbine, for housing coolant before being distributed to the turbine components; (2) an annular coolant exhaust chamber, situated between the cylinder and the blade ring and proximate the annular coolant inlet chamber, for collecting coolant exhaust from the turbine components; (3) a coolant inlet conduit for supplying the coolant to said coolant inlet chamber; (4) a coolant exhaust conduit for directing coolant from said coolant exhaust chamber; and (5) a piping arrangement for distributing the coolant to and directing coolant exhaust from the turbine components. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the cooling scheme further comprises static seals for sealing the blade ring to the cylinder and flexible joints for attaching the blade ring to the turbine components.

  10. Cooling circuit for and method of cooling a gas turbine bucket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacala, Ariel C. P. (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed internal cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket includes axial supply and return passages in the dovetail of the bucket. A first radial outward supply passage provides cooling medium to and along a passageway adjacent the leading edge and then through serpentine arranged passageways within the airfoil to a chamber adjacent the airfoil tip. A second radial passage crosses over the radial return passage for supplying cooling medium to and along a pair of passageways along the trailing edge of the airfoil section. The last passageway of the serpentine passageways and the pair of passageways communicate one with the other in the chamber for returning spent cooling medium radially inwardly along divided return passageways to the return passage. In this manner, both the leading and trailing edges are cooled using the highest pressure, lowest temperature cooling medium.

  11. Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    COOLING TOWERS, THE NEGLECTED ENERGY RESOURCE ROBERT BURGER President, Burger Associates, Inc. Dallas, Texas (USA) Loving care is paid to the compress ors, condensers, and computer programs of refrigeration and air conditioning systems... is too hot, high temperature cut-outs occur and more energy must be provided to the motors to maintain the refrigeration cycle. COOLING TOWERS: 1) are just as important a link in the chain as the other equipment, 2) are an important source...

  12. Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAllister, J.E. Jr.

    1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

  13. Bucket platform cooling scheme and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR); Barb, Kevin Joseph (Halfmoon, NY); Chopra, Sanjay (Greenville, SC); Kercher, David Max (Ipswich, MA); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC); Lenahan, Dean Thomas (Cincinnati, OH); Nellian, Sankar (Mauldin, SC); Starkweather, John Howard (Sharonville, OH); Lupe, Douglas Arthur (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine bucket includes an airfoil extending from a platform, having high and low pressure sides; a wheel mounting portion; a hollow shank portion located radially between the platform and the wheel mounting portion, the platform having an under surface. An impingement cooling plate is located in the hollow shank portion, spaced from the under surface, and the impingement plate is formed with a plurality of impingement cooling holes therein.

  14. Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Little, David Allen (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustion turbine may have a cooling circuit for directing a cooling medium through the combustion turbine to cool various components of the combustion turbine. This cooling circuit may include a compressor, a combustor shell and a component of the combustion turbine to be cooled. This component may be a rotating blade of the combustion turbine. A pressure changing mechanism is disposed in the combustion turbine between the component to be cooled and the combustor shell. The cooling medium preferably flows from the compressor to the combustor shell, through a cooler, the component to the cooled and the pressure changing mechanism. After flowing through the pressure changing mechanism, the cooling medium is returned to the combustor shell. The pressure changing mechanism preferably changes the pressure of the cooling medium from a pressure at which it is exhausted from the component to be cooled to approximately that of the combustor shell.

  15. Prospects and Limitations of Algorithmic Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilles Brassard; Yuval Elias; Tal Mor; Yossi Weinstein

    2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat-bath algorithmic cooling (AC) of spins is a theoretically powerful effective cooling approach, that (ideally) cools spins with low polarization exponentially better than cooling by reversible entropy manipulations alone. Here, we investigate the limitations and prospects of AC. For non-ideal and semioptimal AC, we study the impact of finite relaxation times of reset and computation spins on the achievable effective cooling. We derive, via simulations, the attainable cooling levels for given ratios of relaxation times using two semioptimal practicable algorithms. We expect this analysis to be valuable for the planning of future experiments. For ideal and optimal AC, we make use of lower bounds on the number of required reset steps, based on entropy considerations, to present important consequences of using AC as a tool for improving signal-to-noise ratio in liquid-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We discuss the potential use of AC for noninvasive clinical diagnosis and drug monitoring, where it may have significantly lower specific absorption rate (SAR) with respect to currently used methods.

  16. Methods and apparatus for cooling electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Shawn Anthony; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are provided for choosing an energy-efficient coolant temperature for electronics by considering the temperature dependence of the electronics' power dissipation. This dependence is explicitly considered in selecting the coolant temperature T.sub.0 that is sent to the equipment. To minimize power consumption P.sub.Total for the entire system, where P.sub.Total=P.sub.0+P.sub.Cool is the sum of the electronic equipment's power consumption P.sub.0 plus the cooling equipment's power consumption P.sub.Cool, P.sub.Total is obtained experimentally, by measuring P.sub.0 and P.sub.Cool, as a function of three parameters: coolant temperature T.sub.0; weather-related temperature T.sub.3 that affects the performance of free-cooling equipment; and computational state C of the electronic equipment, which affects the temperature dependence of its power consumption. This experiment provides, for each possible combination of T.sub.3 and C, the value T.sub.0* of T.sub.0 that minimizes P.sub.Total. During operation, for any combination of T.sub.3 and C that occurs, the corresponding optimal coolant temperature T.sub.0* is selected, and the cooling equipment is commanded to produce it.

  17. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  18. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pendergrass, Joseph C. (Gainesville, GA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  19. Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for supersonic flows. Film cooling for supersonic flows is, for instance, considered in scramjet applications

  20. Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    exchanger was configured to use higher temperature water produced by a cooling tower alone. The other coilLBNL-6660E Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a Dual Heat Exchanger-temperature cooling water, so that it can support many more hours of free cooling compared to traditional systems

  1. On-chip high speed localized cooling using superlattice microrefrigerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y; Christofferson, J; Shakouri, A; Zeng, G H; Bowers, J E; Croke, E T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling, microrefrigerators, optoelectronics, superlattice,in high power, high-speed optoelectronics devices, and

  2. A Possible Hybrid Cooling Channel for a Neutrino Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    notably the question of hydrogen embrittlement of structuralare resistant to hydrogen embrittlement, but other cooling

  3. Rate of cooling and power consumption of farm milk coolers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCardle, Arthur, Jr

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ;:, s. . . ical oooling is more economica1 and convenient than cooling ?ith ice. (~) Ths mechanical rsfrir. eration methods for cooling milk as developed to hate include: (1) Cooling in cans in re- frigerated aix; (8) cooling in a cold water bath...

  4. ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION IN COOLING LOAD CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Duška; Martin Barták; František Drkal; Jan Hensen

    equation in cooling load calculations. The performance of nine different procedures (the four methods and

  5. Convective Cooling and Passive Stack Improvements in Motors (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL in convective cooling and passive stack improvements in motors.

  6. Cooling for a rotating anode X-ray tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for cooling a rotating anode X-ray tube. An electromagnetic motor is provided to rotate an X-ray anode with cooling passages in the anode. These cooling passages are coupled to a cooling structure located adjacent the electromagnetic motor. A liquid metal fills the passages of the cooling structure and electrical power is provided to the motor to rotate the anode and generate a rotating magnetic field which moves the liquid metal through the cooling passages and cooling structure.

  7. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  8. Coolerado Cooler Helps to Save Cooling Energy and Dollars: New Cooling Technology Targets Peak Load Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is about a new evaporative cooling technology that can deliver cooler supply air temperatures than either direct or indirect evaporative cooling systems, without increasing humidity. The Coolerado Cooler technology can help Federal agencies reach the energy-use reduction goals of EPAct 2005, particularly in the western United States.

  9. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  10. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc.; Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc.

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  11. Laser cooling of two trapped ions: Sideband cooling beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit G. Morigi,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatt, Rainer

    of ultracold atoms, have provided renewed interest and applications for laser cooling techniques 1- onstrated to be a successful technique for cooling single ions to the ground state of a harmonic trap 9Laser cooling of two trapped ions: Sideband cooling beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit G. Morigi,1 J

  12. Single Pass Electron Cooling Simulations for MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, G. I. [Tech-X Corp.; Pogorelov, I. V. [Tech-X Corp.; Schwartz, B. T. [Tech-X Corp.; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB; Zhang, He [JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling of medium energy protons is critical for the proposed Jefferson Lab Medium Energy Ion Collider (MEIC). We present simulations of electron cooling of protons up to 60 GeV. In the beam frame in which the proton and electrons are co-propagating, their motion is non-relativistic. We use a binary collision model which treats the cooling process as the sum of a large number of two-body collisions which are calculated exactly. This model can treat even very close collisions between an electron and ion with high accuracy. We also calculate dynamical friction using a delta-f PIC model. The code VSim (formerly Vorpal) is used to perform the simulations. We compare the friction rates with that obtained by a 3D integral over electron velocities which is used by BETACOOL.

  13. Large Diameter Lasing Tube Cooling Arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jerome P.; Alger, Terry W.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Arnold, Philip A.

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling structure (16) for use inside a ceramic cylindrical tube (11) of a metal vapor laser (10) to cool the plasma in the tube (11), the cooling structure (16) comprising a plurality of circular metal members (17,31) and mounting members (18, 34) that position the metal members (17,31) coaxially in the tube (11) to form an annular lasing volume, with the metal members (17, 31) being axially spaced from each other along the length of the tube (11) to prevent the metal members from shorting out the current flow through the plasma in the tube (11) and to provide spaces through which the heat from localized hot spots in the plasma may radiate to the other side of the tube (11).

  14. Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  15. Opto-Electrical Cooling of Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zeppenfeld; M. Motsch; P. W. H. Pinkse; G. Rempe

    2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an opto-electrical cooling scheme for polar molecules based on a Sisyphus-type cooling cycle in suitably tailored electric trapping fields. Dissipation is provided by spontaneous vibrational decay in a closed level scheme found in symmetric-top rotors comprising six low-field-seeking rovibrational states. A generic trap design is presented. Suitable molecules are identified with vibrational decay rates on the order of 100Hz. A simulation of the cooling process shows that the molecular temperature can be reduced from 1K to 1mK in approximately 10s. The molecules remain electrically trapped during this time, indicating that the ultracold regime can be reached in an experimentally feasible scheme.

  16. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  17. Passive cooling system for a vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Thoensen, Thomas

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  18. Method of fabricating a cooled electronic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating a liquid-cooled electronic system is provided which includes an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket. The method includes providing a liquid-cooled cold rail at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader to couple the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  19. Stirling Air Conditioner for Compact Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEETIT Project: Infinia is developing a compact air conditioner that uses an unconventional high efficient Stirling cycle system (vs. conventional vapor compression systems) to produce cool air that is energy efficient and does not rely on polluting refrigerants. The Stirling cycle system is a type of air conditioning system that uses a motor with a piston to remove heat to the outside atmosphere using a gas refrigerant. To date, Stirling systems have been expensive and have not had the right kind of heat exchanger to help cool air efficiently. Infinia is using chip cooling technology from the computer industry to make improvements to the heat exchanger and improve system performance. Infinia’s air conditioner uses helium gas as refrigerant, an environmentally benign gas that does not react with other chemicals and does not burn. Infinia’s improvements to the Stirling cycle system will enable the cost-effective mass production of high-efficiency air conditioners that use no polluting refrigerants.

  20. Cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ian David (Mauldin, SC); Salamah, Samir Armando (Niskayuna, NY); Bylina, Noel Jacob (Niskayuna, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of arcuate circumferentially spaced supply and return manifold segments are arranged on the rim of a rotor for respectively receiving and distributing cooling steam through exit ports for distribution to first and second-stage buckets and receiving spent cooling steam from the first and second-stage buckets through inlet ports for transmission to axially extending return passages. Each of the supply and return manifold segments has a retention system for precluding substantial axial, radial and circumferential displacement relative to the rotor. The segments also include guide vanes for minimizing pressure losses in the supply and return of the cooling steam. The segments lie substantially equal distances from the centerline of the rotor and crossover tubes extend through each of the segments for communicating steam between the axially adjacent buckets of the first and second stages, respectively.

  1. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  2. Two-Beam Instability in Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, Alexey V.; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The drift motion of cooling electrons makes them able to respond to transverse perturbations of a cooled ion beam. This response may lead to dipole or quadrupole transverse instabilities at specific longitudinal wave numbers. While the dipole instabilities can be suppressed by a combination of the Landau damping, machine impedance, and the active damper, the quadrupole and higher order modes can lead to either emittance growth, or a lifetime degradation, or both. The growth rates of these instabilities are strongly determined by the machine x-y coupling. Thus, tuning out of the coupling resonance and/or reduction of the machine coupling can be an efficient remedy for these instabilities.

  3. Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elpern, David G. (Los Angeles, CA); McCabe, Niall (Torrance, CA); Gee, Mark (South Pasadena, CA)

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

  4. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  5. Liquid metal reactor air cooling baffle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, A.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A baffle is provided between a relatively hot containment vessel and a relatively cold silo for enhancing air cooling performance. The baffle includes a perforate inner wall positionable outside the containment vessel to define an inner flow riser therebetween, and an imperforate outer wall positionable outside the inner wall to define an outer flow riser therebetween. Apertures in the inner wall allow thermal radiation to pass laterally therethrough to the outer wall, with cooling air flowing upwardly through the inner and outer risers for removing heat. 3 figs.

  6. Liquid metal reactor air cooling baffle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A baffle is provided between a relatively hot containment vessel and a relatively cold silo for enhancing air cooling performance. The baffle includes a perforate inner wall positionable outside the containment vessel to define an inner flow riser therebetween, and an imperforate outer wall positionable outside the inner wall to define an outer flow riser therebetween. Apertures in the inner wall allow thermal radiation to pass laterally therethrough to the outer wall, with cooling air flowing upwardly through the inner and outer risers for removing heat.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Cool Earth Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandia Involves Wind-FarmCool Earth Solar Cool Earth Solar

  8. Biological control of Cl/Br and low sulfate concentration in a 3.5-Gyr-old seawater from North Pole, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey, Patrice F.

    of early life. Insights into the composition of Archaean seawater and hydrothermal fluids can be obtained by direct analysis of fluid inclusions preserved in Archaean sediments and hydrothermal systems. Here, we investigated a suite of well-preserved intrapillow quartz­carbonate pods that formed during oceanic

  9. Northeastern Geology & Environmental Sciences, v. 30, no. 4, 2008, p. 330-343. STABLE ISOTOPE SIGNATURE OF MIDDLE DEVONIAN SEAWATER FROM HAMILTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soja, Constance M.

    SIGNATURE OF MIDDLE DEVONIAN SEAWATER FROM HAMILTON GROUP BRACHIOPODS, CENTRAL NEW YORK STATE Bruce Selleck and Drew Koff Department of Geology, 13 Oak Drive, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY 13346; bselleck the Middle Devonian Hamilton Group of Central New York State. The sample set includes multiple specimens

  10. Resolving discrepancies between hydraulic and chemical calibration data for seawater intrusion groundwater flow models by considering climate-driven sea level change.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Chapman; A. Hassan; K. Pohlmann

    2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater models of seawater intrusion environments can be calibrated using both hydraulic and chemical information. The possible impact of the long-term transient process of sea level change is difficult to identify, but important to accurate simulation of present conditions. The response times of the pressure and chemical fields to major fluctuations in sea level change are investigated

  11. Development of a Kelp-type Structure Module in a Coastal Ocean Model to Assess the Hydrodynamic Impact of Seawater Uranium Extraction Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Long, Wen; Gill, Gary A.

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, with the rapid growth of global energy demand, the interest in extracting uranium from seawater for nuclear energy has been renewed. While extracting seawater uranium is not yet commercially viable, it serves as a “backstop” to the conventional uranium resources and provides an essentially unlimited supply of uranium resource. With recent advances in seawater uranium extraction technology, extracting uranium from seawater could be economically feasible when the extraction devices are deployed at a large scale (e.g., several hundred km2). There is concern however that the large scale deployment of adsorbent farms could result in potential impacts to the hydrodynamic flow field in an oceanic setting. In this study, a kelp-type structure module was incorporated into a coastal ocean model to simulate the blockage effect of uranium extraction devices on the flow field. The module was quantitatively validated against laboratory flume experiments for both velocity and turbulence profiles. The model-data comparison showed an overall good agreement and validated the approach of applying the model to assess the potential hydrodynamic impact of uranium extraction devices or other underwater structures in coastal oceans.

  12. The effect of tungsten and molybdenum additions on the cavitation corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Hashem, A.; Abdullah, A.; Shalaby, H.M. [Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait). Materials Application Dept.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavitation corrosion studies were conducted on two duplex stainless steel (DSS) specimens of which one was containing tungsten and more molybdenum than the other. Experiments were conducted in seawater using an ultrasonically-induced cavitation facilities. The rate of mass-loss, free corrosion potential, and microscopic examinations were compared for the two alloys in the presence and absence of cavitation. There was negligible mass loss for the two alloys under stagnant conditions. However, some differences were observed between the two alloys with respect to mass-loss, corrosion potential and morphology of attacked areas. The alloy containing tungsten and mover molybdenum experienced more loss in weight regardless of their more noble corrosion potential during cavitation. This difference in behavior was explained in terms of the effect of the alloying elements on the microstructure of the alloys and their susceptibility to absorb the impact energy of cavitation.

  13. Simulation of plasmaneutral dynamics for radiation cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    the heat flux effectively for future power plants. That is, radiation due to impurities will lower and increase the required pumping speed con- siderably in a power plant. In principle, the plasma energySimulation of plasma­neutral dynamics for radiation cooling Bong Ju Lee , F. Najmabadi Fusion

  14. Leafy Green Preparation and Cooling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leafy Green Preparation and Cooling Study Dominique N. Bibbins #12;Background : Leafy Greens z In the past, leafy greens have been the source of food borne-illnesses and outbreaks. z It is important Lasting knowledge of survey practices, procedures, and protocol. #12;Acknowledgements z Laura Green, Ph

  15. Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  16. Right-Size Heating and Cooling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment size for heating and cooling to improve comfort and reduce costs, maintenance, and energy use.

  17. Optimization of materials for thermomagnetic cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Migliori, A.; Darling, T.W.; Freibert, F.; Trugman, S.A.; Moshopoulou, E.; Sarrao, J.L.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors review thermoelectric transport in a magnetic field. The key physical effect for thermomagnetic cooling is the Ettingshausen effect. They describe the design principles, measurement difficulties and areas where more work can prove fruitful in an exploration of cryogenic refrigeration based on this effect. New principles are discussed to guide the search for new materials and their development.

  18. Passive Cooling for Your North Carolina Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into passive or active solar heating as a way of reducing the amount of energy used in their home. In most designed home in North Carolina, whether it is solar or not, should be designed to require a minimum amountPassive Cooling for Your North Carolina Home As energy costs rise, and the public becomes more

  19. Blowing Ratio Effects on Film Cooling Effectiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kuo-Chun

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The research focuses on testing the film cooling effectiveness on a gas turbine blade suction side surface. The test is performed on a five bladed cascade with a blow down facility. Four different blowing ratios are used in this study, which are 0...

  20. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  1. ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like from the Duke Energy South Bay and Morro Bay power plants and the PG&E Diablo Canyon Power Plant

  2. Energy Piles in Cooling Dominated Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akrouch, Ghassan

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    this be true in hot, cooling dominated climates? To achieve the ultimate goal and answer the above question, this study considered the different elements of a full SGES, namely: soil, climate, energy pile, and ground source heat pump. First, The need for a new...

  3. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Le, Khiet (Mission Viejo, CA); Ward, Terence G. (Redondo Beach, CA); Mann, Brooks S. (Redondo Beach, CA); Yankoski, Edward P. (Corona, CA); Smith, Gregory S. (Woodland Hills, CA)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  4. Conductive Thermal Interaction in Evaporative Cooling Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, B. S.; Degelman, L. O.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be considered. Usually the dry-bulb depression performed by an evaporative cooler depends solely on the ambient wet-bulb temperature. The cool underground water in an evaporative cooler can cause not only adiabatic evaporation but also sensible heat transfer...

  5. Industrial stator vane with sequential impingement cooling inserts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A; Goebel, Gloria E; Krueger, Judson J; Rawlings, Christopher K; Memmen, Robert L

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine stator vane for an industrial engine, the vane having two impingement cooling inserts that produce a series of impingement cooling from the pressure side to the suction side of the vane walls. Each insert includes a spar with a row of alternating impingement cooling channels and return air channels extending in a radial direction. Impingement cooling plates cover the two sides of the insert and having rows of impingement cooling holes aligned with the impingement cooling channels and return air openings aligned with the return air channel.

  6. Turbine component cooling channel mesh with intersection chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mesh (35) of cooling channels (35A, 35B) with an array of cooling channel intersections (42) in a wall (21, 22) of a turbine component. A mixing chamber (42A-C) at each intersection is wider (W1, W2)) than a width (W) of each of the cooling channels connected to the mixing chamber. The mixing chamber promotes swirl, and slows the coolant for more efficient and uniform cooling. A series of cooling meshes (M1, M2) may be separated by mixing manifolds (44), which may have film cooling holes (46) and/or coolant refresher holes (48).

  7. Surface cooling of scramjet engine inlets using heat pipe, transpiration, and film cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modlin, J.M.; Colwell, G.T. (U.S. Army, Strategic Defense Command, Huntsville, AL (United States) Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (United States))

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports the results of applying a finite-difference-based computational technique to the problem of predicting the transient thermal behavior of a scramjet engine inlet exposed to a typical hypersonic flight aerodynamic surface heating environment, including type IV shock interference heating. The leading-edge cooling model utilized incorporates liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling. Results include transient structural temperature distributions, aerodynamic heat inputs, and surface coolant distributions. It seems that these cooling techniques may be used to hold maximum skin temperatures to near acceptable values during the severe aerodynamic and type IV shock interference heating effects expected on the leading edge of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle scramjet engine. 15 refs.

  8. Experimental investigation of turbine blade platform film cooling and rotational effect on trailing edge internal cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Lesley Mae

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work has been an experimental investigation to evaluate the applicability of gas turbine cooling technology. With the temperature of the mainstream gas entering the turbine elevated above the melting temperature of the metal components...

  9. Cooling Water Systems - Energy Savings/Lower Costs By Reusing Cooling Tower Blowdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puckorius, P. R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reuse of cooling tower blow down cannot only provide energy conservation, but can provide water conservation and chemical conservation. To be effective, it is critical that the water treatment program be coordinated with the treatment of the blow...

  10. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

  11. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuan; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G Mark; O'Shea, Brian W; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations...

  12. Forced cooling of underground electric power transmission lines : design manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jay A.

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methodology utilized for the design of a forced-cooled pipe-type underground transmission system is presented. The material is divided into three major parts: (1) The Forced-cooled Pipe-Type Underground Transmission ...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Cool Earth Solar and Sandia Team...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergyRenewable EnergySolarConcentrating Solar PowerCool Earth Solar and Sandia Team Up in First-Ever Public-Private Partnership on Livermore Valley Open Campus Cool Earth...

  14. Rebates Bring Cool Air, Business to South Carolina | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Rebates Bring Cool Air, Business to South Carolina Rebates Bring Cool Air, Business to South Carolina July 8, 2010 - 11:10am Addthis Lindsay Gsell In the weeks leading up to the...

  15. Air Cooling R&D | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air Cooling R&D Air Cooling R&D 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ape019lustbader2013o.pd...

  16. Cool Roofs: Your Questions Answered | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Answer: The West Building cool roof is estimated to save about 2,000 per year in reduced energy costs. In the spring, we will also be installing a cool roof on the Headquarters'...

  17. CCHP System with Interconnecting Cooling and Heating Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, L.; Geng, K.; Zheng, Z.; Jiang, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consistency between building heating load, cooling load and power load are analyzed in this paper. The problem of energy waste and low equipment usage in a traditional CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) system with generated electricity...

  18. The Thermodynamic and Cost Benefits of Floating Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svoboda, K. J.; Klooster, H. J.; Johnnie, D. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The application of a floating cooling concept to evaporative heat rejection systems can have significant impact on improving plant performance. The floating cooling concept refers to the optimization of yearly plant output and energy consumption by taking...

  19. Improving the Water Efficiency of Cooling Production System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maheshwari, G.; Al-Hadban, Y.; Al-Taqi, H. H.; Alasseri, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For most of the time, cooling towers (CTs) of cooling systems operate under partial load conditions and by regulating the air circulation with a variable frequency drive (VFD), significant reduction in the fan power can be achieved. In Kuwait...

  20. Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.