National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for oscillating water column

  1. Sandia Energy - Floating Oscillating Water Column Reference Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to provide publicly available technical and economic benchmarks for a variety of marine energy converters. The final reference model, an oscillating water column (OWC)...

  2. Model studies of oscillating water column wave-energy device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koola, P.M.; Ravindran, M.; Narayana, P.A.A.

    1995-04-01

    A harbor oscillating water column wave-energy device has been selected for the Indian pilot wave-energy program. The site has a water depth of about 12 m and an average annual wave-power potential of 13 kW/m. Such sites are attractive locations for fishing breakwaters. Due to the relatively low power potential, these oscillating water column devices arc intended to be modules of a multifunctional breakwater. The present paper highlights the results of the scale-model experiments carried out on a prototype wave-energy caisson.

  3. Wave forces on an array of oscillating water column type free standing wave energy caissons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelamani, S.; Thiruvenkatasamy, K.

    1995-12-31

    The wave induced in-line forces on a 1:50 scale model of an array of Multi resonant Oscillating Water Column (MOWC) type free standing wave energy caisson were experimentally investigated. A range of hydrodynamic parameters with different damping of oscillating water column (OWC) chamber and various center to center spacings between the caissons were used. In general, the force on the MOWC caisson array is two times that of a vertical wall, for maximum damping of OWC chamber. Reduction of damping of the OWC air chamber reduces the force on the array of caissons. With reduced damping, forces on OWC array can even be smaller than that the ones on a vertical wall. For smaller center to center (C/C) spacing between the caissons with respect to its harbor width, OWC array acts like a perforated breakwater, attracting smaller wave forces and for higher C/C spacing, it behaves like a vertical wall.

  4. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2013-09-30

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  5. An improved understanding of the natural resonances of moonpools contained within floating rigid-bodies: Theory and application to oscillating water column devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bull, Diana L.

    2015-09-23

    The fundamental interactions between waves, a floating rigid-body, and a moonpool that is selectively open to atmosphere or enclosed to purposefully induce pressure fluctuations are investigated. The moonpool hydrodynamic characteristics and the hydrodynamic coupling to the rigid-body are derived implicitly through reciprocity relations on an array of field points. By modeling the free surface of the moonpool in this manner, an explicit hydrodynamic coupling term is included in the equations of motion. This coupling results in the migration of the moonpool's natural resonance frequency from the piston frequency to a new frequency when enclosed in a floating rigid-body. Two geometriesmore » that highlight distinct aspects of marine vessels and oscillating water column (OWC) renewable energy devices are analyzed to reveal the coupled natural resonance migration. The power performance of these two OWCs in regular waves is also investigated. The air chamber is enclosed and a three-dimensional, linear, frequency domain performance model that links the rigid-body to the moonpool through a linear resistive control strategy is detailed. Furthermore, an analytic expression for the optimal linear resistive control values in regular waves is presented.« less

  6. An improved understanding of the natural resonances of moonpools contained within floating rigid-bodies: Theory and application to oscillating water column devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L.

    2015-09-23

    The fundamental interactions between waves, a floating rigid-body, and a moonpool that is selectively open to atmosphere or enclosed to purposefully induce pressure fluctuations are investigated. The moonpool hydrodynamic characteristics and the hydrodynamic coupling to the rigid-body are derived implicitly through reciprocity relations on an array of field points. By modeling the free surface of the moonpool in this manner, an explicit hydrodynamic coupling term is included in the equations of motion. This coupling results in the migration of the moonpool's natural resonance frequency from the piston frequency to a new frequency when enclosed in a floating rigid-body. Two geometries that highlight distinct aspects of marine vessels and oscillating water column (OWC) renewable energy devices are analyzed to reveal the coupled natural resonance migration. The power performance of these two OWCs in regular waves is also investigated. The air chamber is enclosed and a three-dimensional, linear, frequency domain performance model that links the rigid-body to the moonpool through a linear resistive control strategy is detailed. Furthermore, an analytic expression for the optimal linear resistive control values in regular waves is presented.

  7. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will improve the capability of engineers to design heat pump systems that utilize surface water or standing column wells (SCW) as their heat sources and sinks.

  8. Ultrasonic testing device having an adjustable water column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roach, Dennis P.; Neidigk, Stephen O.; Rackow, Kirk A.; Duvall, Randy L.

    2015-09-01

    An ultrasonic testing device having a variable fluid column height is disclosed. An operator is able to adjust the fluid column height in real time during an inspection to to produce optimum ultrasonic focus and separate extraneous, unwanted UT signals from those stemming from the area of interest.

  9. Sandia Energy - Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, a backward--bent duct buoy (BBDB) oscillating water column wave energy converter design. The team from HMRC included Tom Walsh, Brian Holmes, Florent Thiebaut, Neil...

  10. Biodegradation of jet fuel in vented columns of water-unsaturated sandy soil. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coho, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of soil water content on the rate of jet fuel (JP-4) biodegradation in air-vented, water-unsaturated columns of sandy soil was investigated. The contaminated soil was obtained from a spill site located on Tyndall AFB, Fla. The initial soil loading was 4590 mg of JP-4/kg of dry soil. Three laboratory columns were packed with the contaminated soil, saturated and drained for periods of 81-89 days. Two columns were continuously vented with air, and the third, intended to provide an anaerobic control, was vented with nitrogen. The venting gas flows were maintained between 1 and 2.5 soil pore volume changeouts per day. The total JP-4 removal in the air-vented columns averaged 44% of the mass originally present. Biodegradation and volatilization accounted for 93% and 7% of the total removal, respectively. A maximum biodegradation rate of 14.3 mg of JP-4/kg of moist soil per day was observed at a soil water content of approximately 72% saturation. Soil drainage characteristics indicated that this water content may have corresponded to 100% of the in situ field capacity water content. Theses.

  11. Evaluation of an ambient air sampling system for tritium (as tritiated water vapor) using silica gel adsorbent columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, G.W.; Cooper, A.T.; Tinker, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    Ambient air samples for tritium analysis (as the tritiated water vapor [HTO] content of atmospheric moisture) are collected for the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) using the solid adsorbent silica gel. The silica gel has a moisture sensitive indicator which allows for visual observation of moisture movement through a column. Despite using an established method, some silica gel columns showed a complete change in the color indicator for summertime samples suggesting that breakthrough had occurred; thus a series of tests was conducted on the sampling system in an environmental chamber. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum practical sampling volume and overall collection efficiency for water vapor collected on silica gel columns. Another purpose was to demonstrate the use of an impinger-based system to load water vapor onto silica gel columns to provide realistic analytical spikes and blanks for the Hanford Site SESP. Breakthrough volumes (V{sub b}) were measured and the chromatographic efficiency (expressed as the number of theoretical plates [N]) was calculated for a range of environmental conditions. Tests involved visual observations of the change in the silica gel`s color indicator as a moist air stream was drawn through the column, measurement of the amount of a tritium tracer retained and then recovered from the silica gel, and gravimetric analysis for silica gel columns exposed in the environmental chamber.

  12. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitler, J.D.; Culling, J.R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

    2012-11-30

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used sustainable heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

  13. Removal of pollutant compounds from water supplies using ozone, ultraviolet light, and a counter, current packed column. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, E.L.

    1991-01-01

    Many water pollutants are determined to be carcinogenic and often appear in very low concentrations and still pose a health risk. Conventional water treatment processes cannot remove these contaminants and there is a great demand for the development of alternative removal technologies. The use of ozone and ultraviolet light in a counter current packed column could prove to be an effective treatment process to remove these contaminants.

  14. Leachate concentrations from water leach and column leach tests on fly ash-stabilized soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bin-Shafique, S.; Benson, C.H.; Edil, T.B.; Hwang, K.

    2006-01-15

    Batch water leaching tests (WLTs) and column leaching tests (CLTs) were conducted on coal-combustion fly ashes, soil, and soil-fly ash mixtures to characterize leaching of Cd, Cr, Se, and Ag. The concentrations of these metals were also measured in the field at two sites where soft fine-grained soils were mechanically stabilized with fly ash. Concentrations in leachate from the WLTs on soil-fly ash mixtures are different from those on fly ash alone and cannot be accurately estimated based on linear dilution calculations using concentrations from WLTs on fly ash alone. The concentration varies nonlinearly with fly ash content due to the variation in pH with fly ash content. Leachate concentrations are low when the pH of the leachate or the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil is high. Initial concentrations from CLTs are higher than concentrations from WLTs due to differences in solid-liquid ratio, pH, and solid-liquid contact. However, both exhibit similar trends with fly ash content, leachate pH, and soil properties. Scaling factors can be applied to WLT concentrations (50 for Ag and Cd, 10 for Cr and Se) to estimate initial concentrations for CLTs. Concentrations in leachate collected from the field sites were generally similar or slightly lower than concentrations measured in CLTs on the same materials. Thus, CLTs appear to provide a good indication of conditions that occur in the field provided that the test conditions mimic the field conditions. In addition, initial concentrations in the field can be conservatively estimated from WLT concentrations using the aforementioned scaling factors provided that the pH of the infiltrating water is near neutral.

  15. OTEC cold water pipe design for problems caused by vortex-excited oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, O. M.

    1980-03-14

    Vortex-excited oscillations of marine structures result in reduced fatigue life, large hydrodynamic forces and induced stresses, and sometimes lead to structural damage and to diestructive failures. The cold water pipe of an OTEC plant is nominally a bluff, flexible cylinder with a large aspect ratio (L/D = length/diameter), and is likely to be susceptible to resonant vortex-excited oscillations. The objective of this report is to survey recent results pertaining to the vortex-excited oscillations of structures in general and to consider the application of these findings to the design of the OTEC cold water pipe. Practical design calculations are given as examples throughout the various sections of the report. This report is limited in scope to the problems of vortex shedding from bluff, flexible structures in steady currents and the resulting vortex-excited oscillations. The effects of flow non-uniformities, surface roughness of the cylinder, and inclination to the incident flow are considered in addition to the case of a smooth cyliner in a uniform stream. Emphasis is placed upon design procedures, hydrodynamic coefficients applicable in practice, and the specification of structural response parameters relevant to the OTEC cold water pipe. There are important problems associated with in shedding of vortices from cylinders in waves and from the combined action of waves and currents, but these complex fluid/structure interactions are not considered in this report.

  16. Microsoft Word - SAND Rpt Experimental Confimation of Water Column Natural Resonance Migration in a BBDB Device final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Experimental Confirmation of Water Column Natural Resonance Migration in a BBDB Device Diana Bull, Budi Gunawan, & Brian Holmes Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  17. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the columns approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the columns approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much left on the table when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid/vapor traffic that produce increased contact area and lead to substantial increases in separation efficiency which translates to a 10% increase in energy efficiency on a BTU/bbl basis. The Flooding Predictor operates on the principle that between five to sixty minutes in advance of a flooding event, certain column variables experience an oscillation, a pre-flood pattern. The pattern recognition system of the Flooding Predictor utilizes the mathematical first derivative of certain column variables to identify the columns pre-flood pattern(s). This pattern is a very brief, highly repeatable, simultaneous movement among the derivative values of certain column variables. While all column variables experience negligible random noise generated from the natural frequency of the process, subtle pre-flood patterns are revealed among sub-sets of the derivative values of column variables as the column approaches its hydraulic limit. The sub-set of column variables that comprise the pre-flood pattern is identified empirically through in a two-step process. First, 2ndpoints proprietary off-line analysis tool is used to mine historical data for pre-flood patterns. Second, the column is flood-tested to fine-tune the pattern recognition for commissioning. Then the Flooding Predictor is implemented as closed-loop advanced control strategy on the plants distributed control system (DCS), thus automating control of the column at its hydraulic limit.

  18. Reference Model 6 (RM6): Oscillating Wave Energy Converter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Smith, Chris; Jenne, Dale Scott; Jacob, Paul; Copping, Andrea; Willits, Steve; Fontaine, Arnold; Brefort, Dorian; Gordon, Margaret Ellen; Copeland, Robert; Jepsen, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. In this report, a conceptual design for an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (WEC) device appropriate for the modeled reference resource site was identified, and a detailed backward bent duct buoy (BBDB) device design was developed using a combination of numerical modeling tools and scaled physical models. Our team used the methodology in SAND2013-9040 for the economic analysis that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays, up to 100 devices. The methodology was applied to identify key cost drivers and to estimate levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for this RM6 Oscillating Water Column device in dollars per kilowatt-hour (%24/kWh). Although many costs were difficult to estimate at this time due to the lack of operational experience, the main contribution of this work was to disseminate a detailed set of methodologies and models that allow for an initial cost analysis of this emerging technology. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office (WWPTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE). Sandia National Laboratories, the lead in this effort, collaborated with partners from National Laboratories, industry, and universities to design and test this reference model.

  19. Glass-silicon column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  20. Power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  1. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  2. Circulation in gas-slurry column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, N.; Kuhlman, J.; Celik, I.; Gross, R.; Nebiolo, E.; Wang, Yi-Zun.

    1990-08-15

    Circulation in bubble columns, such as those used in fischer-tropsch synthesis, detracts from their performance in that gas is carried on average more rapidly through the column, and the residence time distribution of the gas in the column is widened. Both of these factors influence mass-transfer operations in bubble columns. Circulation prediction and measurement has been undertaken using probes, one-dimensional models, laser Doppler velocimetry, and numerical modeling. Local void fraction was measured using resistance probes and a newly developed approach to determining air/water threshold voltage for the probe. A tall column of eight inch diameter was constructed of Plexiglas and the distributor plate was manufactured to distribute air evenly through the base of the column. Data were gathered throughout the volume at three different gas throughputs. Bubble velocities proved difficult to measure using twin probes with cross-correlation because of radial bubble movement. A series of three-dimensional mean and RMS bubble and liquid velocity measurements were also obtained for a turbulent flow in a laboratory model of a bubble column. These measurements have been made using a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV), to determine velocity distributions non-intrusively. Finally, the gas-liquid flow inside a vertically situated circular isothermal column reactor was simulated numerically. 74 refs., 170 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. An investigation of thermally driven acoustical oscillations in helium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerst, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    The phenomenon of thermal-acoustic oscillation is seen to arise spontaneously in gas columns subjected to steep temperature gradients, particularly in tubes connecting liquid helium reservoirs with the ambient environment. This if often the arrangement for installed cryogenic instrumentation and is accompanied by undesirably large heat transfer rates to the cold region. Experimental data are collected and matched to theoretical predictions of oscillatory behavior; these results are in good agreement with the analytical model and with previously collected data. The present experiment places the open ends of oscillating tubes of the various lengths and cross sections in communication with flowing helium in the subcooled, 2-phase, or superheated state while the other ends are maintained at some controlled, elevated temperature. Assorted cold end conditions are achieved through adjustments to the Fermilab Tevatron satellite test refrigerator to which the test cryostat is connected. The warm, closed ends of the tubes are maintained by isothermal baths of liquid nitrogen, ice water, and boiling water. The method is contrasted to previous arrangements whereby tubes are run from room temperature into or adjacent to a stagnant pool of liquid helium. Additionally, the effect of pulsations in the flowing helium stream is explored through operation of the refrigerator's wet and dry expanders during data collection. These data confirm the theory to which try were compared and support its use in the design of cryogenic sensing lines for avoidance of thermoacoustic oscillation.

  4. Neutrino Oscillation Search Neutrino Oscillation Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dataMC comparison over oscillation fit range, still retaining blindness to oscillation signal component Step 4: disclose full information on electron candidate events and...

  5. On the Modeling of Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Oscillations in Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aniel-Buchheit, Sylvie; Podowski, Michael Z.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development in progress of a complete space- and time-dependent model of the coupled neutron kinetic and reactor thermal-hydraulics. The neutron kinetics model is based on two-group diffusion equations with Doppler and void reactivity feedback effects. This model is coupled with the model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in parallel coolant channels. The modeling concepts considered for this purpose include one-dimensional drift flux and two-fluid models, as well a CFD model implemented in the NPHASE advanced computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) computer code. Two methods of solution for the overall model are proposed. One is based on direct numerical integration of the spatially-discretized governing equations. The other approach is based on a quasi-analytical modal approach to the neutronics model, in which a complete set of eigenvectors is found for step-wise temporal changes of the cross-sections of core materials (fuel and coolant/moderator). The issues investigated in the paper include details of model formulation, as well as the results of calculations for neutronically-coupled density-wave oscillations. (authors)

  6. Microfabricated packed gas chromatographic column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kottenstette, Richard; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-16

    A new class of miniaturized gas chromatographic columns has been invented. These chromatographic columns are formed using conventional micromachining techniques, and allow packed columns having lengths on the order of a meter to be fabricated with a footprint on the order of a square centimeter.

  7. Two-Column Aerosol Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Column Aerosol Project Tiny particles in the sky known as "aerosols" come in many forms-dust, soot, and sea salt, for example. Depending on the type of aerosol, it can either...

  8. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  9. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Woo K. (Centerville, OH)

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  10. ARM - Measurement - Ozone Column Abundance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Column Abundance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ozone Column Abundance The vertically integrated amount of ozone (commonly measured in Dobson Unit, 1 DU = 134 mmol/m^2) Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all

  11. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  12. Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Jenne, D. S.; Thresher, R.; Copping, A.; Geerlofs, S.; Hanna, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (OSWEC) reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. A conceptual design for a taut moored oscillating surge wave energy converter was developed. The design had an annual electrical power of 108 kilowatts (kW), rated power of 360 kW, and intended deployment at water depths between 50 m and 100 m. The study includes structural analysis, power output estimation, a hydraulic power conversion chain system, and mooring designs. The results were used to estimate device capital cost and annual operation and maintenance costs. The device performance and costs were used for the economic analysis, following the methodology presented in SAND2013-9040 that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays up to 100 devices. The levelized cost of energy estimated for the Reference Model 5 OSWEC, presented in this report, was for a single device and arrays of 10, 50, and 100 units, and it enabled the economic analysis to account for cost reductions associated with economies of scale. The baseline commercial levelized cost of energy estimate for the Reference Model 5 device in an array comprised of 10 units is $1.44/kilowatt-hour (kWh), and the value drops to approximately $0.69/kWh for an array of 100 units.

  13. FRACTIONATING COLUMN PRODUCT COLLECTOR CONTROL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paxson, G.D. Jr.

    1964-03-10

    Means for detecting minute fluid products from a chemical separation column and for advancing a collector tube rack in order to automatically separate and collect successive fractionated products are described. A charge is imposed on the forming drops at the column orifice to create an electric field as the drop falls in the vicinity of a sensing plate. The field is detected by an electrometer tube coupled to the plate causing an output signal to actuate rotation of a collector turntable rack, thereby positioning new collectors under the orifice. The invention provides reliable automatic collection independent of drop size, rate of fall, or chemical composition. (AEC)

  14. Low Energy Neutrino Oscillations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Energy Neutrino Oscillations Žarko Pavlović Los Alamos National Laboratory APS April Meeting, May 1 2011 Standard Model & Neutrino Oscillations ● 3 neutrinos ● Initially assumed massless ● Mixing matrix: ● Oscillation Probability:   e      =  U e1 U e2 U e3 U 1 U 2 U 3 U  1 U  2 U  3    1  2  3  Neutrino Oscillations ● Lot of experimental evidence ● L/E dependence ● Precise measurement of atmospheric and solar

  15. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  16. Damping of thermoacoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tward, E.; Mason, P.V.

    1982-01-01

    The design criteria for the damping mechanism required to suppress thermoacoustic oscillation is discussed. The theory is presented with formulas stated. Incident acoustic wave generation is illustrated with the pipes and damper positions indicated. Capillary and surge tank functions are described with illustrations and formulas relevant to the thermoacoustic oscillation process. Porous solid dampers were introduced which used glass wool. The problem of damping of the thermoacoustic oscillation appears to be solvable in many applications through the use of an orifice and surge tank. This device can be installed either as a termination in an oscillating pipe or in a branch. It is suggested that such a device be incorporated into cryogenic systems whenever thermoacoustic oscillations could cause a problem.

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a pressure differential is induced within the device as the wave passes driving a fluid pump to create mechanical energy Oscillating Water Column OscillatingWaterColumn.jpg...

  18. Method for packed column separations and purifications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holman, David A. (Richland, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA)

    2006-08-15

    The invention encompasses a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber. A mixture of a fluid and a matrix material are introduced through a column chamber inlet so that the matrix material is packed within a column chamber to form a packed column. The column chamber having the column chamber inlet or first port for receiving the mixture further has an outlet port and an actuator port. The outlet port is partially closed for capturing the matrix material and permitting the fluid to flow therepast by rotating relative one to the other of a rod placed in the actuator port. Further rotation relative one to the other of the rod and the column chamber opens the outlet and permits the matrix material and the fluid to flow therethrough thereby unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber.

  19. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  20. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  1. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  2. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  3. KDP Columns: Characterizing Deep Thunderstorm Updrafts Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are usually only detectable by non-attenuating profiling radars, or derivable by multi-Doppler radar networks. Here we objectively identify KDP columns using a simple, but...

  4. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF THREE-PHASE SLURRY-BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    1999-09-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding three-phase reactors from the point of view of kinetic theory. In a paper in press for publication in Chemical Engineering Science (Wu and Gidaspow, 1999) we have obtained a complete numerical solution of bubble column reactors. In view of the complexity of the simulation a better understanding of the processes using simplified analytical solutions is required. Such analytical solutions are presented in the attached paper, Large Scale Oscillations or Gravity Waves in Risers and Bubbling Beds. This paper presents analytical solutions for bubbling frequencies and standing wave flow patterns. The flow patterns in operating slurry bubble column reactors are not optimum. They involve upflow in the center and downflow at the walls. It may be possible to control flow patterns by proper redistribution of heat exchangers in slurry bubble column reactors. We also believe that the catalyst size in operating slurry bubble column reactors is not optimum. To obtain an optimum size we are following up on the observation of George Cody of Exxon who reported a maximum granular temperature (random particle kinetic energy) for a particle size of 90 microns. The attached paper, Turbulence of Particles in a CFB and Slurry Bubble Columns Using Kinetic Theory, supports George Cody's observations. However, our explanation for the existence of the maximum in granular temperature differs from that proposed by George Cody. Further computer simulations and experiments involving measurements of granular temperature are needed to obtain a sound theoretical explanation for the possible existence of an optimum catalyst size.

  5. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Regan, Brian C. (Los Angeles, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA)

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  6. Hydrogen production in the K-Basin ion exchange columns, modules and cartridge filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-21

    K-Basin uses ion exchange modules and ion exchange (IX) columns for removing radionuclides from the basin water. When the columns and modules are loaded, they are removed from service, drained and stored. After a few IX columns accumulate in storage, they are moved to a burial box. One of the burial box contains 33 columns and the other, six. The radionuclides act on the liquid left within and adhering to the beads to produce hydrogen. This report describes the generation rate, accumulation rate and significance of that accumulation. This summary also highlights those major areas of concern to the external (to Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC]) reviewers. Appendix H presents the comments made by the external reviewers and, on a separate sheet, the responses to those comments. The concerns regarding the details of the analytical approach, are addressed in Appendix H and in the appropriate section.

  7. Non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Patrick R.; Wheeler, David R.

    2007-09-25

    A non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column comprises a planar substrate having a plurality of through holes, a top lid and a bottom lid bonded to opposite surfaces of the planar substrate, and inlet and outlet ports for injection of a sample gas and elution of separated analytes. A plurality of such planar substrates can be aligned and stacked to provide a longer column length having a small footprint. Furthermore, two or more separate channels can enable multi-channel or multi-dimensional gas chromatography. The through holes preferably have a circular cross section and can be coated with a stationary phase material or packed with a porous packing material. Importantly, uniform stationary phase coatings can be obtained and band broadening can be minimized with the circular channels. A heating or cooling element can be disposed on at least one of the lids to enable temperature programming of the column.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSingle Column Model IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Single Column Model IOP 1999.03.31 - 1999.04.01 Lead Scientist : Judith Curry Summary AEROSONDE SUMMARY Before going into the field with the Aerosonde, we were operating under the following constraints and known concerns: 1) strict flight patterns imposed by the FAA, primarily owing to the lack of a strobe light and transponder on the Aerosonde 2) the

  9. Vortex Oscillation Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oscillation Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vortex Oscillation Technology Ltd Address: Volochaevskaya Street 40 b Flat 38 Place: Moscow Zip: 111033 Region: Russian...

  10. Small Column Ion Exchange at Savannah River Site Technology Readiness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment Report | Department of Energy Small Column Ion Exchange at Savannah River Site Technology Readiness Assessment Report Small Column Ion Exchange at Savannah River Site Technology Readiness Assessment Report PDF icon Small Column Ion Exchange at Savannah River Site Technology Readiness Assessment Report More Documents & Publications Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Compilation of TRA Summaries External Technical Review Report for Small Column Ion

  11. Systems for column-based separations, methods of forming packed columns, and methods of purifying sample components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  12. Systems For Column-Based Separations, Methods Of Forming Packed Columns, And Methods Of Purifying Sample Components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2006-02-21

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  13. Systems For Column-Based Separations, Methods Of Forming Packed Columns, And Methods Of Purifying Sample Components.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2004-08-24

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  14. Property:Water Column Location | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    using this property. M MHK Technologies14 MW OTECPOWER + unknown MHK TechnologiesOTEC + Tropical oceans with a 20 deg C temperature difference between seawater that is at...

  15. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  16. Nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators for ultrasensitive inertial detection

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators for ultrasensitive inertial detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators for ultrasensitive inertial detection A system for ultrasensitive mass and/or force detection of this invention includes a mechanical oscillator driven to oscillate in a nonlinear regime. The mechanical oscillator includes a piezoelectric base with at least one cantilever resonator etched into the

  17. Method to fabricate silicon chromatographic column comprising fluid ports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Adkins, Douglas R.

    2004-03-02

    A new method for fabricating a silicon chromatographic column comprising through-substrate fluid ports has been developed. This new method enables the fabrication of multi-layer interconnected stacks of silicon chromatographic columns.

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Comments? We...

  19. Cross flow cyclonic flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Ralph W. (Upper St. Clair, PA); Patton, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophillic tailings.

  20. External Technical Review Report for Small Column Ion Exchange Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at Savannah River Site | Department of Energy Report for Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site External Technical Review Report for Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download PDF icon External Technical Review Report for Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site PDF icon Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS More Documents & Publications

  1. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bacon, Larry D. (Albuquerque, NM); Ballard, William P. (Albuquerque, NM); Clark, M. Collins (Albuquerque, NM); Marder, Barry M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  2. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bacon, L.D.; Ballard, W.P.; Clark, M.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1987-05-19

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields are produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap. 11 figs.

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Campaign Links TCAP website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor TWST 2013.04.15, Scott, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Winter Aerosol Effects on Cloud Formation 2013.02.04, Cziczo, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): CU GMAX-DOAS Deployment 2012.07.15, Volkamer, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerosol Light Extinction Measurements

  4. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  5. Silicon crystal growing by oscillating crucible technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwuttke, G.H.; Kim, K.M.; Smetana, P.

    1983-08-03

    A process for growing silicon crystals from a molten melt comprising oscillating the container during crystal growth is disclosed.

  6. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-01

    This project focuses on a new technology that reduces NOx emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxygen-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace.

  7. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Don D. (Aiken, SC)

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  8. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.H.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1998-08-11

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time. 7 figs.

  9. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gemmen, Randall S. (Morgantown, WV); Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Yip, Mui-Tong Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Robey, Edward H. (Westover, WV); Cully, Scott R. (Morgantown, WV); Addis, Richard E. (Smithfield, PA)

    1998-01-01

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time.

  10. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehler, D.R.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Bivens, H.M.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1994-08-16

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a telemetered sensor beacon'' that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available. 21 figs.

  11. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehler, Dale R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Albuquerque, NM); Bivens, Hugh M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  12. Tests of Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meteorological Institute Jarvinen, Heikki Finnish Meteorological Institute Category: Modeling The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation (McICA) was recently introduced...

  13. Mini-columns for Conducting Breakthrough Experiments. Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Reimus, Paul William; Ware, Stuart Douglas

    2015-06-11

    Experiments with moderately and strongly sorbing radionuclides (i.e., U, Cs, Am) have shown that sorption between experimental solutions and traditional column materials must be accounted for to accurately determine stationary phase or porous media sorption properties (i.e., sorption site density, sorption site reaction rate coefficients, and partition coefficients or Kd values). This report details the materials and construction of mini-columns for use in breakthrough columns to allow for accurate measurement and modeling of sorption parameters. Material selection, construction techniques, wet packing of columns, tubing connections, and lessons learned are addressed.

  14. Anthropogenic NO2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of appropriate model and corresponding NO 2 column is performed by the minimum of root-mean-square discrepancy between calculated and measure optical depths determined for...

  15. Posters Single-Column Model for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Posters Single-Column Model for AtmosphericRadiation Measurement Sites: Model Development ... Using observational data obtained from the Oklahoma Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ...

  16. Oscillations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and secondary interaction cross sections from world data (including MB target at HARPCERN) Nuance event generator (D. Casper) with a few MiniBooNE mods Extensive simulation...

  17. Purification of water from cooling towers and other heat exchange systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan; Enid J. , Carlson; Bryan J. , Wingo; Robert M. , Robison; Thomas W.

    2012-08-07

    The amount of silica in cooling tower water is reduced by passing cooling tower water through a column of silica gel.

  18. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David; Rudeen, David Keith

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  19. Weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.R.; Ouden, G. den

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding and with the possibility to use this oscillation for in-process control of weld penetration. Welding experiments were carried out under different welding conditions. During welding the weld pool was triggered into oscillation by the normal welding pulses or by extra current pulses. The oscillation frequency was measured both during the pulse time and during the base time by analyzing the arc voltage variation using a Fast Fourier Transformation program. Optimal results are obtained when full penetration occurs during the pulse time and partial penetration during the base time. Under these conditions elliptical overlapping spot welds are formed. In the case of full penetration the weld pool oscillates in a low frequency mode (membrane oscillation), whereas in the case of partial penetration the weld pool oscillates in a high frequency mode (surface oscillation). Deviation from the optimal welding conditions occurs when high frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (underpenetration) or when low frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (overpenetration). In line with these results a penetration sensing system with feedback control was designed, based on the criterion that optimal weld penetration is achieved when two peaks are observed in the frequency distribution. The feasibility of this sensing system for orbital tube welding was confirmed by the results of experiments carried out under various welding conditions.

  20. ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS (SBCR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.H. Al-Dahhan; M.P. Dudukovic; L.S. Fan

    2001-07-25

    This report summarizes the accomplishment made during the second year of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Air Products and Chemicals. The technical difficulties that were encountered in implementing Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) in high pressure SBCR have been successfully resolved. New strategies for data acquisition and calibration procedure have been implemented. These have been performed as a part of other projects supported by Industrial Consortium and DOE via contract DE-2295PC95051 which are executed in parallel with this grant. CARPT and Computed Tomography (CT) experiments have been performed using air-water-glass beads in 6 inch high pressure stainless steel slurry bubble column reactor at selected conditions. Data processing of this work is in progress. The overall gas holdup and the hydrodynamic parameters are measured by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) in 2 inch slurry bubble column using Norpar 15 that mimic at room temperature the Fischer Tropsch wax at FT reaction conditions of high pressure and temperature. To improve the design and scale-up of bubble column, new correlations have been developed to predict the radial gas holdup and the time averaged axial liquid recirculation velocity profiles in bubble columns.

  1. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  2. Reinjection laser oscillator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLellan, Edward J.

    1984-01-01

    A uv preionized CO.sub.2 oscillator with integral four-pass amplifier capable of providing 1 to 5 GW laser pulses with pulse widths from 0.1 to 0.5 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM) is described. The apparatus is operated at any pressure from 1 atm to 10 atm without the necessity of complex high voltage electronics. The reinjection technique employed gives rise to a compact, efficient system that is particularly immune to alignment instabilities with a minimal amount of hardware and complexity.

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Spring 1994 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSpring 1994 Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring 1994 Single Column Model IOP 1994.04.01 - 1994.04.30

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Summer 1994 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSummer 1994 Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Summer 1994 Single Column Model IOP 1994.07.01 - 1994.07.31

  5. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-05-23

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

  6. A fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator --

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Part I. Design and fabrication (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES - Part I. Design and fabrication This content will become publicly available on June 24, 2016 Title: A fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator -- Part I. Design and fabrication Our paper reports the design and fabrication of a fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator (OCMO). This paper begins by describing the limits on oscillator frequency stability imposed by the thermal drift

  7. Nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators for ultrasensitive inertial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The mechanical oscillator includes a piezoelectric base with at least one cantilever resonator etched into the piezoelectric base. The cantilever resonator is preferably a ...

  8. Nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators for ultrasensitive inertial detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datskos, Panagiotis George; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2013-08-13

    A system for ultrasensitive mass and/or force detection of this invention includes a mechanical oscillator driven to oscillate in a nonlinear regime. The mechanical oscillator includes a piezoelectric base with at least one cantilever resonator etched into the piezoelectric base. The cantilever resonator is preferably a nonlinear resonator which is driven to oscillate with a frequency and an amplitude. The system of this invention detects an amplitude collapse of the cantilever resonator at a bifurcation frequency as the cantilever resonator stimulated over a frequency range. As mass and/or force is introduced to the cantilever resonator, the bifurcation frequency shifts along a frequency axis in proportion to the added mass.

  9. Aerosol specification in single-column CAM5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lebassi-Habtezion, B.; Caldwell, P.

    2014-11-17

    The ability to run a global climate model in single-column mode is very useful for testing model improvements because single-column models (SCMs) are inexpensive to run and easy to interpret. A major breakthrough in Version 5 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is the inclusion of prognostic aerosol. Unfortunately, this improvement was not coordinated with the SCM version of CAM5 and as a result CAM5-SCM initializes aerosols to zero. In this study we explore the impact of running CAM5-SCM with aerosol initialized to zero (hereafter named Default) and test three potential fixes. The first fix is to use CAM5's prescribedmore » aerosol capability, which specifies aerosols at monthly climatological values. The second method is to prescribe aerosols at observed values. The third approach is to fix droplet and ice crystal numbers at prescribed values. We test our fixes in four different cloud regimes to ensure representativeness: subtropical drizzling stratocumulus (based on the DYCOMS RF02 case study), mixed-phase Arctic stratocumulus (using the MPACE-B case study), tropical shallow convection (using the RICO case study), and summertime mid-latitude continental convection (using the ARM95 case study). Stratiform cloud cases (DYCOMS RF02 and MPACE-B) were found to have a strong dependence on aerosol concentration, while convective cases (RICO and ARM95) were relatively insensitive to aerosol specification. This is perhaps expected because convective schemes in CAM5 do not currently use aerosol information. Adequate liquid water content in the MPACE-B case was only maintained when ice crystal number concentration was specified because the Meyers et al. (1992) deposition/condensation ice nucleation scheme used by CAM5 greatly overpredicts ice nucleation rates, causing clouds to rapidly glaciate. Surprisingly, predicted droplet concentrations for the ARM95 region in both SCM and global runs were around 25 cm−3, which is much lower than observed. This finding suggests that CAM5 has problems capturing aerosol effects in this climate regime.« less

  10. Small-Column Cesium Ion Exchange Elution Testing of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Garrett N.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-10-21

    This report summarizes the work performed to evaluate multiple, cesium loading, and elution cycles for small columns containing SRF resin using a simple, high-level waste (HLW) simulant. Cesium ion exchange loading and elution curves were generated for a nominal 5 M Na, 2.4E-05 M Cs, 0.115 M Al loading solution traced with 134Cs followed by elution with variable HNO3 (0.02, 0.07, 0.15, 0.23, and 0.28 M) containing variable CsNO3 (5.0E-09, 5.0E-08, and 5.0E-07 M) and traced with 137Cs. The ion exchange system consisted of a pump, tubing, process solutions, and a single, small ({approx}15.7 mL) bed of SRF resin with a water-jacketed column for temperature-control. The columns were loaded with approximately 250 bed volumes (BVs) of feed solution at 45 C and at 1.5 to 12 BV per hour (0.15 to 1.2 cm/min). The columns were then eluted with 29+ BVs of HNO3 processed at 25 C and at 1.4 BV/h. The two independent tracers allowed analysis of the on-column cesium interaction between the loading and elution solutions. The objective of these tests was to improve the correlation between the spent resin cesium content and cesium leached out of the resin in subsequent loading cycles (cesium leakage) to help establish acid strength and purity requirements.

  11. DOE/SC0001389 Final technical report: Investigation of uranium attenuation and release at column and pore scales in response to advective geochemical gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, Kaye S.; Zhu, Wenyi; Barnett, Mark O.

    2013-05-13

    Experimental approach Column experiments were devised to investigate the role of changing fluid composition on mobility of uranium through a sequence of geologic media. Fluids and media were chosen to be relevant to the ground water plume emanating from the former S-3 ponds at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFC) site. Synthetic ground waters were pumped upwards at 0.05 mL/minute for 21 days through layers of quartz sand alternating with layers of uncontaminated soil, quartz sand mixed with illite, quartz sand coated with iron oxides, and another soil layer. Increases in pH or concentration of phosphate, bicarbonate, or acetate were imposed on the influent solutions after each 7 pore volumes while uranium (as uranyl) remained constant at 0.1mM. A control column maintained the original synthetic groundwater composition with 0.1mM U. Pore water solutions were extracted to assess U retention and release in relation to the advective ligand or pH gradients. Following the column experiments, subsamples from each layer were characterized using microbeam X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence mapping and compared to sediment core samples from the ORIFC, at SSRL Beam Line 2-3. Results U retention of 55 ?? 67 mg occurred in phosphate >pH >control >acetate >carbonate columns. The mass of U retained in the first-encountered quartz layer in all columns was highest and increased throughout the experiment. The rate of increase in acetate- and bicarbonate-bearing columns declined after ligand concentrations were raised. U also accumulated in the first soil layer; the pH-varied column retained most, followed by the increasing-bicarbonate column. The mass of U retained in the upper layers was far lower. Speciation of U, interpreted from microbeam XANES spectra and XRF maps, varied within and among the columns. Evidence of minor reduction to U(IV) was observed in the first-encountered quartz layer in the phosphate, bicarbonate, and pH columns while only U(VI) was observed in the control and acetate columns. In the soil layer, the acetate and bicarbonate columns both indicate minor reduction to U(IV), but U(VI) predominated in all columns. In the ORIFC soils, U was consistently present as U(VI); sorption appears to be the main mechanism of association for U present with Fe and/or Mn, while U occurring with P appears in discrete particles consistent with a U mineral phase. U in soil locations with no other elemental associations shown by XRF are likely uranium oxide phases.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Summer Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSummer Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Summer Single Column Model IOP 1997.06.18 - 1997.07.18 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive IOP Server Cloud and Radiation Products Derived from Satellite Data Colorado State's Single Column Modeling Home Page For data

  13. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF SOLID FLUIDIZATION IN A RESIN COLUMN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-24

    The objective of the present work is to model the resin particles within the column during fluidization and sedimentation processes using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The calculated results will help interpret experimental results, and they will assist in providing guidance on specific details of testing design and establishing a basic understanding of particles hydraulic characteristics within the column. The model is benchmarked against the literature data and the test data (2003) conducted at Savannah River Site (SRS). The paper presents the benchmarking results and the modeling predictions of the SRS resin column using the improved literature correlations applicable for liquid-solid granular flow.

  14. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  15. Pulse combustor with controllable oscillations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Welter, Michael J. (Columbiana, OH); Morris, Gary J. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01

    A pulse combustor having thermally induced pulse combustion in a continuously flowing system is described. The pulse combustor is fitted with at lease one elongated ceramic body which significantly increases the heat transfer area in the combustion chamber of the combustor. The ceramic body or bodies possess sufficient mass and heat capacity to ignite the fuel-air charge once the ceramic body or bodies are heated by conventional spark plug initiated combustion so as to provide repetitive ignition and combustion of sequentially introduced fuel-air charges without the assistance of the spark plug and the rapid quenching of the flame after each ignition in a controlled manner so as to provide a selective control over the oscillation frequency and amplitude. Additional control over the heat transfer in the combustion chamber is provided by employing heat exchange mechanisms for selectively heating or cooling the elongated ceramic body or bodies and/or the walls of the combustion chamber.

  16. Oscillation of Capacitance inside Nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Deen; Wu, Jianzhong; Jin, Zhehui

    2011-01-01

    materials for supercapacitors. Although great attention has been given to the anomalous increase of the capacitance as the pore size approaches the ionic dimensions, there remains a lack of full comprehension of the size dependence of the capacitance in nanopores. Here we predict from a classical density functional theory that the capacitance of an ionic-liquid electrolyte inside a nanopore oscillates with a decaying envelope as the pore size increases. The oscillatory behavior can be attributed to the interference of the overlapping electric double layers (EDLs); namely, the maxima in capacitance appear when superposition of the two EDLs is most constructive. The theoretical prediction agreeswell with the experiment when the pore size is less than twice the ionic diameter.Confirmation of the entire oscillatory spectruminvites future experiments with a precise control of the pore size from micro- to mesoscales.

  17. Stabilizing oscillating universes against quantum decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-07-07

    We investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. However, stability may be achieved for some specially fine-tuned non-vacuum states.

  18. Multipole expansion method for supernova neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Huaiyu; Shalgar, Shashank, E-mail: duan@unm.edu, E-mail: shashankshalgar@unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a multipole expansion method to calculate collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae using the neutrino bulb model. We show that it is much more efficient to solve multi-angle neutrino oscillations in multipole basis than in angle basis. The multipole expansion method also provides interesting insights into multi-angle calculations that were accomplished previously in angle basis.

  19. ARM - Measurement - Precipitable water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsPrecipitable water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Precipitable water Total amount of water vapor in a vertical column of air, often expressed as the depth of the layer of water that would be formed if all the water vapor were condensed to liquid water. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following

  20. MHK Technologies/Water Wings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Wings are an oscillating wave surge converter device that swing back and forth driving hydraulics which in turn drives a generator Technology Dimensions Device...

  1. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  2. A mobile computed tomographic unit for inspecting reinforced concrete columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumitra, T.; Srisatit, S.; Pattarasumunt, A.

    1994-12-31

    A mobile computed tomographic unit applicable in the inspection of reinforced concrete columns was designed, constructed and tested. A CT image reconstruction programme written in Quick Basic was first developed to be used on an IBM PC/AT microcomputer. It provided user friendly menus for data processing and displaying CT image. The prototype of a gamma-ray scanning system using a 1.11 GBq Cs-137 source and a NaI(T1) scintillation detector was also designed and constructed. The system was a microcomputer controlled, single-beam rotate-translate scanner used for collecting transmitted gamma-ray data in different angles. The CT unit was finally tested with a standard column and a column of an existing building. The cross sectional images of the columns could be clearly seen. The positions and sizes of the reinforced bars could be estimated.

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Summer Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Summer Single Column Model IOP 1999.07.12 - 1999.07.22 Lead Scientist : David...

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements 2012.07.01 -...

  5. METHOD TO TEST ISOTOPIC SEPARATION EFFICIENCY OF PALLADIUM PACKED COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heung, L; Gregory Staack, G; James Klein, J; William Jacobs, W

    2007-06-27

    The isotopic effect of palladium has been applied in different ways to separate hydrogen isotopes for many years. At Savannah River Site palladium deposited on kieselguhr (Pd/k) is used in a thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) to purify tritium for over ten years. The need to design columns for different throughputs and the desire to advance the performance of TCAP created the need to evaluate different column designs and packing materials for their separation efficiency. In this work, columns with variations in length, diameter and metal foam use, were tested using an isotope displacement method. A simple computer model was also developed to calculate the number of theoretical separation stages using the test results. The effects of column diameter, metal foam and gas flow rate were identified.

  6. Tests of isotopic separation efficiency of palladium packed columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heung, L. K.; Staack, G. C.; Klein, J. E.; Jacobs, W. D.

    2008-07-15

    The isotopic effect of palladium has been applied in different ways to separate hydrogen isotopes for many years. At Savannah River Site palladium deposited on kieselguhr (Pd/k) is used in a thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) to purify tritium for over ten years. The need to design columns for different throughputs and the desire to advance the performance of TCAP created the need to evaluate different column designs and packing materials for their separation efficiency. In this work, columns with variations in length, diameter and metal foam presence were tested using an isotope displacement method. A simple computer model was also developed to calculate the number of theoretical separation stages based on the test results. The effects of column diameter, metal foam presence and gas flow rate were identified. (authors)

  7. Generator for ionic gallium-68 based on column chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neirinckx, Rudi D. (Medfield, MA); Davis, Michael A. (Westwood, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable solution of gallium-68 fluorides, having an activity of 0.1 to 50 millicuries per milliliter of solution is provided. The solution is obtained from a generator comprising germanium-68 hexafluoride bound to a column of an anion exchange resin which forms gallium-68 in situ by eluting the column with an acid solution to form a solution containing .sup.68 Ga-fluorides. The solution then is neutralized prior to administration.

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Ensemble Single Column

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modelling (ESCM) in the Tropical Western Pacific Ensemble Single Column Modelling (ESCM) in the Tropical Western Pacific Hume, Timothy Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Jakob, Christian BMRC Single column models (SCMs) are useful tools for the evaluation of parameterisations of radiative and moist processes used in general circulation models. Most SCM studies to date have concentrated on regions where there is a sufficiently dense observational network to derive the required forcing

  9. Evaluating Single Column Models using an ensemble approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluating Single Column Models using an ensemble approach Hume, Timothy Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Jakob, Christian BMRC Category: Modeling Single Column Models are a valuable tool for evaluating and improving parameterizations for climate and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. Their drawback is that they can usually only be applied if sufficient data to derive their boundary conditions (the so-called model forcing) is available. We have developed an ensemble technique that

  10. TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION USING PALLADIUM AND INVERSE COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heung, L.; Sessions, H.; Xiao, S.

    2010-08-31

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) was further studied with a new configuration. Previous configuration used a palladium packed column and a plug flow reverser (PFR). This new configuration uses an inverse column to replace the PFR. The goal was to further improve performance. Both configurations were experimentally tested. The results showed that the new configuration increased the throughput by a factor of more than 2.

  11. Modelling aging effects on a thermal cycling absorption process column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laquerbe, C.; Contreras, S.; Demoment, J.

    2008-07-15

    Palladium coated on alumina is used in hydrogen separation systems operated at CEA/Valduc, and more particularly in Thermal Cycling Absorption Process columns. With such materials, tritium decay is known to induce aging effects which have direct side effects on hydrogen isotopes absorption isotherms. Furthermore in a TCAP column, aging occurs in an heterogeneous way. The possible impacts of these intrinsic material evolutions on the separation performances are investigated here through a numerical approach. (authors)

  12. Multiphase Carbon-14 Transport in a Near-Field-Scale Unsaturated Column of Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. T. Fox; Mitchell A. Plummer; Larry C. Hull; D. Craig Cooper

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory include activated metals that release radioactive carbon-14 (14C) as they corrode. To better understand 14C phase partitioning and transport in the SDA sediments, we conducted a series of transport experiments using 14C (radio-labeled sodium carbonate) and nonreactive gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and aqueous (bromide and tritiated water) tracers in a large (2.6-m high by 0.9-m diameter) column of sediments similar to those used as cover material at the SDA. We established steady-state unsaturated flow prior to injecting tracers into the column. Tracer migration was monitored using pore-water and pore-gas samples taken from co-located suction lysimeters and gas ports inserted at ~0.3-m intervals along the columns length. Measurements of 14C discharged from the sediment to the atmosphere (i.e., 14CO2 flux) indicate a positive correlation between CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the column and changes in 14CO2 flux. Though 14CO2 diffusion is expected to be independent of pCO2, changes of pCO2 affect pore water chemistry sufficiently to affect aqueous/gas phase 14C partitioning and consequently 14C2 flux. Pore-water and -gas 14C activity measurements provide an average aqueous/gas partitioning ratio, Kag, of 4.5 (0.3). This value is consistent with that calculated using standard carbonate equilibrium expressions with measured pH, suggesting the ability to estimate Kag from carbonate equilibrium. One year after the 14C injection, the column was cored and solid-phase 14C activity was measured. The average aqueous/solid partition coefficient, Kd, (1.6 L kg-1) was consistent with those derived from small-scale and short-term batch and column experiments using SDA sediments, suggesting that bench-scale measurements are a valid means of estimating aqueous/solid partitioning at the much larger spatial scale considered in these meso-scale experiments. However, limitations at the bench scale prevent observation of spatially- and temporally-varying parameters that affect contaminant transport in the natural environment. In addition to a temporally-variable 14CO2 flux, in response to changes of pCO2, we observed non-uniformities in Kag and Kd that were not observed in bench-scale studies. Our results suggest that 14C transport is effectively controlled by gas diffusion with minimal retardation by partitioning onto the solid phase, and little long-term retention. The implication for the SDA is that 14C released via corrosion of activated metals is primarily transported by gas-phase diffusion rather than by liquid-phase advection. Calculations show that, because the atmospheric boundary is so much closer than the aquifer boundary at the SDA, most of the 14C will diffuse upward to the atmosphere.

  13. Active shunt capacitance cancelling oscillator circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2003-09-23

    An oscillator circuit is disclosed which can be used to produce oscillation using a piezoelectric crystal, with a frequency of oscillation being largely independent of any shunt capacitance associated with the crystal (i.e. due to electrodes on the surfaces of the crystal and due to packaging and wiring for the crystal). The oscillator circuit is based on a tuned gain stage which operates the crystal at a frequency, f, near a series resonance frequency, f.sub.S. The oscillator circuit further includes a compensation circuit that supplies all the ac current flow through the shunt resistance associated with the crystal so that this ac current need not be supplied by the tuned gain stage. The compensation circuit uses a current mirror to provide the ac current flow based on the current flow through a reference capacitor that is equivalent to the shunt capacitance associated with the crystal. The oscillator circuit has applications for driving piezoelectric crystals for sensing of viscous, fluid or solid media by detecting a change in the frequency of oscillation of the crystal and a resonator loss which occur from contact of an exposed surface of the crystal by the viscous, fluid or solid media.

  14. Simple method for elimination of theromoacoustic oscillations in cryogenic tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbachev, S.P.; Korolev, A.V.; Sysoev, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    The authors show that thermoacoustic oscillations of gas in cryogenic tubes can be eliminated by changing their length. Geometric dimensions that do not produce oscillations are given.

  15. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas. Abstract not provided....

  16. Oscillating magnetocaloric effect of a multilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Paixão, L. S.; Reis, M. S.

    2014-12-08

    The oscillating magnetocaloric effect of a multilayer graphene in Bernal and rhombohedral stacking is investigated to extend the previous knowledge of the effect on a single layer graphene. We started from results of a tight-binding model and obtained analytical expressions for the thermodynamic potential and for the entropy change. The last exhibits the same dependence on field and temperature observed for other diamagnetic systems; it oscillates with the inverse magnetic field and presents a maximum value at a given temperature. The amplitude of the oscillating entropy change decreases with the number of layers and the stacking sequence rules the magnetocaloric properties of the system.

  17. Self-seeding ring optical parametric oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Arlee V. (Albuquerque, NM); Armstrong, Darrell J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-12-27

    An optical parametric oscillator apparatus utilizing self-seeding with an external nanosecond-duration pump source to generate a seed pulse resulting in increased conversion efficiency. An optical parametric oscillator with a ring configuration are combined with a pump that injection seeds the optical parametric oscillator with a nanosecond duration, mJ pulse in the reverse direction as the main pulse. A retroreflecting means outside the cavity injects the seed pulse back into the cavity in the direction of the main pulse to seed the main pulse, resulting in higher conversion efficiency.

  18. CFD analysis of laminar oscillating flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booten, C. W. Charles W.); Konecni, S.; Smith, B. L.; Martin, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical simulations of oscillating flow in a constricted duct and compares the results with experimental and theoretical data. The numerical simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX4.2. The numerical model simulates an experimental oscillating flow facility that was designed to test the properties and characteristics of oscillating flow in tapered ducts, also known as jet pumps. Jet pumps are useful devices in thermoacoustic machinery because they produce a secondary pressure that can counteract an unwanted effect called streaming, and significantly enhance engine efficiency. The simulations revealed that CFX could accurately model velocity, shear stress and pressure variations in laminar oscillating flow. The numerical results were compared to experimental data and theoretical predictions with varying success. The least accurate numerical results were obtained when laminar flow approached transition to turbulent flow.

  19. Oscillation damping means for magnetically levitated systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2009-01-20

    The present invention presents a novel system and method of damping rolling, pitching, or yawing motions, or longitudinal oscillations superposed on their normal forward or backward velocity of a moving levitated system.

  20. Backconversion-limited optical parametric oscillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, William J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Arlee V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-11-14

    A more efficient class of optical parametric oscillators is made possible by introducing means for reducing signal losses due to backconversion of signal photons in the nonlinear optical medium.

  1. MiniBooNE Oscillation Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ...rst oscillation result corresponds to 5:579 10 20 protons on target. The main ux of neutrinos is from pion and kaon decay to muon neutrinos but there is also an...

  2. Chaos control of parametric driven Duffing oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Leisheng; Mei, Jie; Li, Lijie, E-mail: L.Li@swansea.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-31

    Duffing resonators are typical dynamic systems, which can exhibit chaotic oscillations, subject to certain driving conditions. Chaotic oscillations of resonating systems with negative and positive spring constants are identified to investigate in this paper. Parametric driver imposed on these two systems affects nonlinear behaviours, which has been theoretically analyzed with regard to variation of driving parameters (frequency, amplitude). Systematic calculations have been performed for these two systems driven by parametric pumps to unveil the controllability of chaos.

  3. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-07

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ionmore » transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. As a result, the implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.« less

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1994 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsFall 1994 Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1994 Single Column Model IOP 1994.10.01 - 1994.10.31 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Data Plots from Colorado State University Data Plots from Livermore National Laboratory Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive. For data sets, see below. Abstract

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1995 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1995 Single Column Model IOP 1995.09.01 - 1995.10.31 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Data Plots from Colorado State University Data Plots from Livermore National Laboratory Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive. For data sets, see below. Abstract These seasonal SCM

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Spring 1995 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSpring 1995 Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring 1995 Single Column Model IOP 1995.04.01 - 1995.04.30 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Data Plots from Colorado State University Data Plots from Livermore National Laboratory Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive. For data sets, see below.

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSpring Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Single Column Model IOP 1999.03.01 - 1999.03.22 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive IOP Server Sonde Soundings from the IOP For data sets, see below. Abstract An SCM IOP was conducted at the SGP March 1-22, 1999.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Summer 1995 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSummer 1995 Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Summer 1995 Single Column Model IOP 1995.07.01 - 1995.07.31 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Data Plots from Colorado State University Data Plots from Livermore National Laboratory Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive. For data sets, see below.

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Winter 1994 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsWinter 1994 Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Winter 1994 Single Column Model IOP 1994.01.01 - 1994.01.31 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Data Plots from Colorado State University Data Plots from Livermore National Laboratory Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive. For data sets, see below.

  10. Instrument for the measurement and determination of chemical pulse column parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marchant, Norman J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1990-01-01

    An instrument for monitoring and measuring pneumatic driving force pulse parameters applied to chemical separation pulse columns obtains real time pulse frequency and root mean square amplitude values, calculates column inch values and compares these values against preset limits to alert column operators to the variations of pulse column operational parameters beyond desired limits.

  11. Energy dissipation in oscillating flow through straight and coiled pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, J.R.; Swift, G.W.

    1996-10-01

    The energy dissipation is reported for oscillating flow in U-shaped pipes with 180{degree}, 540{degree}, and 900{degree} curves at the base of the U. Analysis permits separation of the dissipation in the straight and curved portions of the pipe. Using water, water/glycerine mixtures, liquid nitrogen, and helium gas, the dissipation was measured for fluid flow regimes (Reynolds number, quality factor, and pipe curvature) which have not previously been reported. Measured loss in the straight portion is compared to numerical solutions using a turbulent quasisteady representation of the wall shear stress. Measured loss in the curved portion is compared to simple theory. The results are applicable to thermoacoustic devices. {copyright} {ital 1996 Acoustical Society of America.}

  12. Ultrasonic effect on the bubble nucleation and heat transfer of oscillating nanofluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Nannan; Fu, Benwei; Ma, H. B.

    2014-06-30

    Ultrasonic sound effect on bubble nucleation, oscillating motion activated by bubble formation, and its heat transfer enhancement of nanofluid was experimentally investigated. Nanofluid consists of distilled water and dysprosium (III) oxide (Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles with an average size of 98?nm and a mass ratio of 0.5%. Visualization results demonstrate that when the nanoparticles are added in the fluid influenced by the ultrasonic sound, bubble nucleation can be significantly enhanced. The oscillating motion initiated by the bubble formation of nanofluid under the influence of ultrasonic sound can significantly enhance heat transfer of nanofluid in an interconnected capillary loop.

  13. Self-oscillation in spin torque oscillator stabilized by field-like torque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Tsunegi, Sumito; Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2014-04-14

    The effect of the field-like torque on the self-oscillation of the magnetization in spin torque oscillator with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer was studied theoretically. A stable self-oscillation at zero field is excited for negative β while the magnetization dynamics stops for β = 0 or β > 0, where β is the ratio between the spin torque and the field-like torque. The reason why only the negative β induces the self-oscillation was explained from the view point of the energy balance between the spin torque and the damping. The oscillation power and frequency for various β were also studied by numerical simulation.

  14. Thermal Analysis for Ion-Exchange Column System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Si Y.; King, William D.

    2012-12-20

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium either in a column configuration or distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the design and operation of a waste treatment process focused on treating dissolved, high-sodium salt waste solutions for the removal of specific radionuclides. The ion exchange column will be installed inside a high level waste storage tank at the Savannah River Site. After cesium loading, the ion exchange media may be transferred to the waste tank floor for interim storage. Models were used to predict temperature profiles in these areas of the system where the cesium-loaded media is expected to lead to localized regions of elevated temperature due to radiolytic decay. Normal operating conditions and accident scenarios (including loss of solution flow, inadvertent drainage, and loss of active cooling) were evaluated for the ion exchange column using bounding conditions to establish the design safety basis. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. In-tank modeling results revealed that an idealized hemispherical mound shape leads to the highest tank floor temperatures. In contrast, even large volumes of CST distributed in a flat layer with a cylindrical shape do not result in significant floor heating.

  15. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himmel, Alexander I.; /Caltech

    2011-05-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |{Delta}{bar m}{sub atm}{sup 2}| = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst)) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}) = 0.860{sub -0.12}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  16. THERMAL OSCILLATIONS IN LIQUID HELIUM TARGETS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANG,L.; JIA,L.X.

    2001-07-16

    A liquid helium target for the high-energy physics was built and installed in the proton beam line at the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. The target flask has a liquid volume of 8.25 liters and is made of thin Mylar film. A G-M/J-T cryocooler of five-watts at 4.2K was used to produce liquid helium and refrigerate the target. A thermosyphon circuit for the target was connected to the J-T circuit by a liquid/gas separator. Because of the large heat load to the target and its long transfer lines, thermal oscillations were observed during the system tests. To eliminate the oscillation, a series of tests and analyses were carried out. This paper describes the phenomena and provides the understanding of the thermal oscillations in the target system.

  17. METHOD OF OPERATING A HEAVY WATER MODERATED REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, H.C.

    1962-08-14

    A method of removing fission products from the heavy water used in a slurry type nuclear reactor is described. According to the process the slurry is steam distilled with carbon tetrachloride so that at least a part of the heavy water and carbon tetrachloride are vaporized; the heavy water and carbon tetrachloride are separated; the carbon tetrachloride is returned to the steam distillation column at different points in the column to aid in depositing the slurry particles at the bottom of the column; and the heavy water portion of the condensate is purified. (AEC)

  18. Phenomena of oscillations in atmospheric pressure direct current glow discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fu-cheng; Yan, Wen; Wang, De-zhen

    2013-12-15

    Self-sustained oscillations in a dc glow discharge with a semiconductor layer at atmospheric pressure were investigated by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the dc glow discharge initially becomes unstable in the subnormal glow region and gives rise to oscillations of plasma parameters. A variety of oscillations with one or more frequencies have been observed under different conditions. The discharge oscillates between the glow discharge mode and the Townsend discharge mode in the oscillations with large amplitude while operates in the subnormal glow discharge mode all the while in the oscillations with small amplitude. Fourier Transform spectra of oscillations reveal the transition mechanism between different oscillations. The effects of semiconductor conductivity on the oscillation frequency of the dominant mode, gas voltage, as well as the discharge current have also been analyzed.

  19. Neutrino oscillations in a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendona, J. T.; Haas, F.

    2013-07-15

    A new model for the joint neutrino flavor and plasma oscillations is introduced, in terms of the dynamics of the neutrino flavor polarization vector in a plasma background. Fundamental solutions are found for both time-invariant and time-dependent media, considering slow and fast variations of the electron plasma density. The model is shown to be described by a generalized Hamiltonian formalism. In the case of a broad spectrum of electron plasma waves, a statistical approach indicates the shift of both equilibrium value and frequency oscillation of flavor coherence, due to the existence of a turbulent plasma background.

  20. MHK Technologies/OE Buoy OE 50 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 78: Open Water System Testing & Demonstration & Operation Technology Description The OEBuoy device...

  1. Sandia Energy - Joint Sandia-DOE-HMRC Testing of a Floating Oscillatin...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter Device Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Partnership News News & Events Joint Sandia-DOE-HMRC Testing of a Floating...

  2. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lopez, Omar Daniel; Antonio, Dario

    2014-09-16

    An illustrative system includes an amplifier operably connected to a phase shifter. The amplifier is configured to amplify a voltage from an oscillator. The phase shifter is operably connected to a driving amplitude control, wherein the phase shifter is configured to phase shift the amplified voltage and is configured to set an amplitude of the phase shifted voltage. The oscillator is operably connected to the driving amplitude control. The phase shifted voltage drives the oscillator. The oscillator is at an internal resonance condition, based at least on the amplitude of the phase shifted voltage, that stabilizes frequency oscillations in the oscillator.

  3. Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-05-04

    The Cloud Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool (SEET) is a user driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) that estimates cloud supercooled liquid water (SLW) content in terms of vertical column and total mass from Moderate resolution Imaging Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spatially derived cloud products and realistic vertical cloud parameterizations that are user defined. It also contains functions for post-processing of the resulting data in tabular and graphical form.

  4. Organized Oscillations of Initially-Turbulent Flow Past a Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2002-09-17

    Flow past an open cavity is known to give rise to self-sustained oscillations in a wide variety of configurations, including slotted-wall, wind and water tunnels, slotted flumes, bellows-type pipe geometries, high-head gates and gate slots, aircraft components and internal piping systems. These cavity-type oscillations are the origin of coherent and broadband sources of noise and, if the structure is sufficiently flexible, flow-induced vibration as well. Moreover, depending upon the state of the cavity oscillation, substantial alterations of the mean drag may be induced. In the following, the state of knowledge of flow past cavities, based primarily on laminar inflow conditions, is described within a framework based on the flow physics. Then, the major unresolved issues for this class of flows will be delineated. Self-excited cavity oscillations have generic features, which are assessed in detail in the reviews of Rockwell and Naudascher, Rockwell, Howe and Rockwell. These features, which are illustrated in the schematic of Figure 1, are: (i) interaction of a vorticity concentration(s) with the downstream corner, (ii) upstream influence from this corner interaction to the sensitive region of the shear layer formed from the upstream corner of the cavity; (iii) conversion of the upstream influence arriving at this location to a fluctuation in the separating shear layer; and (iv) amplification of this fluctuation in the shear layer as it develops in the streamwise direction. In view of the fact that inflow shear-layer in the present investigation is fully turbulent, item (iv) is of particular interest. It is generally recognized, at least for laminar conditions at separation from the leading-corner of the cavity, that the disturbance growth in the shear layer can be described using concepts of linearized, inviscid stability theory, as shown by Rockwell, Sarohia, and Knisely and Rockwell. As demonstrated by Knisely and Rockwell, on the basis of experiments interpreted with the aid of linearized theory, not only the fundamental component of the shear layer instability may be present, but a number of additional, primarily lower frequency components can exist as well. In fact, the magnitude of these components can be of the same order as the fundamental component. These issues have not been addressed for the case of a fully-turbulent in-flow and its separation from the leading corner of the cavity.

  5. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burkholder, Harvey R. (Ames, IA); Fanslow, Glenn E. (Ames, IA)

    1983-01-01

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed.

  6. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burkholder, H.R.; Fanslow, G.E.

    1983-12-20

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed. 8 figs.

  7. Bubble column apparatus for separating wax from catalyst slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neathery, James K.; Davis, Burtron H.

    2004-07-13

    Novel methods and devices for production of liquid hydrocarbon products from gaseous reactants are disclosed. In one aspect, a method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon, typically a wax, from a catalyst containing slurry is provided, comprising passing the slurry through at least one downcomer extending from an overhead separation chamber and discharging into the bottom of a slurry bubble column reactor. The downcomer includes a cross-flow filtration element for separating a substantially particle-free liquid hydrocarbon for downstream processing. In another aspect, a method for promoting plug-flow movement in a recirculating slurry bubble column reactor is provided, comprising discharging the recirculating slurry into the reactor through at least one downcomer which terminates near the bottom of the reactor. Devices for accomplishing the above methods are also provided.

  8. Oscillation control system for electric motor drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slicker, James M. (Union Lake, MI); Sereshteh, Ahmad (Union Lake, MI)

    1988-01-01

    A feedback system for controlling mechanical oscillations in the torsionally complaint drive train of an electric or other vehicle. Motor speed is converted in a processor to estimate state signals in which a plant model which are used to electronically modify thetorque commands applied to the motor.

  9. ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Long, Chuck

    2014-06-13

    Results of the ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaign are contributing significantly to concurrent national and international research efforts addressing questions about how the MJO initiates and changes as it passes phenomenon differs in observations versus models.

  10. Analysis of sawtooth relaxation oscillations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamazaki, K.; McGuire, K.; Okabayashi, M.

    1982-07-01

    Sawtooth relaxation oscillations are analyzed using the Kadomtsev's disruption model and a thermal relaxation model. The sawtooth period is found to be very sensitive to the thermal conduction loss. Qualitative agreement between these calculations and the sawtooth period observed in several tokamaks is demonstrated.

  11. Neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balantekin, A. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-05-02

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  12. Oscillation control system for electric motor drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slicker, J.M.; Sereshteh, A.

    1988-08-30

    A feedback system for controlling mechanical oscillations in the torsionally complaint drive train of an electric or other vehicle. Motor speed is converted in a processor to estimate state signals in which a plant model which are used to electronically modify the torque commands applied to the motor. 5 figs.

  13. ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Chuck

    2014-03-29

    Results of the ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaign are contributing significantly to concurrent national and international research efforts addressing questions about how the MJO initiates and changes as it passes phenomenon differs in observations versus models.

  14. Phenomenology of n - n oscillations revisited

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gardner, S.; Jafari, E.

    2015-05-22

    We revisit the phenomenology of n-n oscillations in the presence of external magnetic fields, highlighting the role of spin. We show, contrary to long-held belief, that the n-n transition rate need not be suppressed, opening new opportunities for its empirical study.

  15. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Residual Fuel Oil(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Distillate and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Residual Fuel Oil(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food

  16. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts)

  17. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and

  18. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","

  19. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  20. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","

  1. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS","

  3. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","

  4. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  5. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS","

  6. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel

  7. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural

  8. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS","

  9. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","

  10. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural

  11. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel

  12. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural

  13. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS","

  14. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," ","

  15. Effect of Aerosol Humidification on the Column Aerosol Optical Thickness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Effect of Aerosol Humidification on the Column Aerosol Optical Thickness over the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Li, Zhanqing University of Maryland Jeong, Myeong-Jae University of Maryland Category: Aerosols This study investigates the aerosol humidification effect (AHE) using seventy profiles of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients at high (~85%) and low (~40%) relative humidity (RH) levels obtained over the Southern Great Plains (SGP)

  16. In-place stabilization of pond ash deposits by hydrated lime columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chand, S.K.; Subbarao, C.

    2007-12-15

    Abandoned coal ash ponds cover up vast stretches of precious land and cause environmental problems. Application of suitable in situ stabilization methods may bring about improvement in the geotechnical properties of the ash deposit as a whole, converting it to a usable site. In this study, a technique of in-place stabilization by hydrated lime columns was applied to large-scale laboratory models of ash ponds. Samples collected from different radial distances and different depths of the ash deposit were tested to study the improvements in the water content, dry density, particle size distribution, unconfined compressive strength, pH, hydraulic conductivity, and leachate characteristics over a period of one year. The in-place stabilization by lime column technique has been found effective in increasing the unconfined compressive strength and reducing hydraulic conductivity of pond ash deposits in addition to modifying other geotechnical parameters. The method has also proved to be useful in reducing the contamination potential of the ash leachates, thus mitigating the adverse environmental effects of ash deposits.

  17. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA)

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  18. Column Sorption Uptake and Regeneration Study; Rare Earth Element Sorbent Uptake and Sorbent Stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Lanyk

    2015-12-18

    Study of rare earth element (REE) uptake from geothermal brine simulant by column loading, metal recovery through stripping, and regeneration of column for re-loading. Simulated brine testing.

  19. Self-protecting transistor oscillator for treating animal tissues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A transistor oscillator circuit wherein the load current applied to animal tissue treatment electrodes is fed back to the transistor. Removal of load is sensed to automatically remove feedback and stop oscillations. A thermistor on one treatment electrode senses temperature, and by means of a control circuit controls oscillator transistor current.

  20. Frequency Stabilization in Nonlinear MEMS and NEMS Oscillators | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Frequency Stabilization in Nonlinear MEMS and NEMS Oscillators Technology available for licensing: a method to create micro- and nanoscale mechanical oscillators with excellent frequency stability. Excellent frequency stability; provides a strategy for optimizing and engineering micro- and nanoscale devices Easy to fabricate at reduced cost PDF icon MEMS_NEMS_oscillators

  1. A common-view disciplined oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, Michael A.; Dahlen, Aaron P.

    2010-05-15

    This paper describes a common-view disciplined oscillator (CVDO) that locks to a reference time scale through the use of common-view global positioning system (GPS) satellite measurements. The CVDO employs a proportional-integral-derivative controller that obtains near real-time common-view GPS measurements from the internet and provides steering corrections to a local oscillator. A CVDO can be locked to any time scale that makes real-time common-view data available and can serve as a high-accuracy, self-calibrating frequency and time standard. Measurement results are presented where a CVDO is locked to UTC(NIST), the coordinated universal time scale maintained at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado.

  2. Beam splitter coupled CDSE optical parametric oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levinos, Nicholas J. (Los Alamos, NM); Arnold, George P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    An optical parametric oscillator is disclosed in which the resonant radiation is separated from the pump and output radiation so that it can be manipulated without interfering with them. Thus, for example, very narrow band output may readily be achieved by passing the resonant radiation through a line narrowing device which does not in itself interfere with either the pump radiation or the output radiation.

  3. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Darrell J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Arlee V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  4. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Combustible NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 183 0 105 38 Q 0 W 8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 36 0 Q 13 W 0 0 6 311221 Wet Corn Milling W 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 31131 Sugar

  5. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,240 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 148 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17

  6. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Combustible NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 592 W Q Q Q 0 0 345 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 85 0 W 15 Q 0 0 57 311221 Wet Corn Milling 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 31131 Sugar

  7. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,413 10,373 4,039 64 W 1,496 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 489 268 30 0 137 311221 Wet Corn

  8. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 67 21 49 W 19 10 W W W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 35 7 29 W 7 3 0 W W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 18 4 17 0 4 W 0 W

  9. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 2,920 325 1,945 171 174 25 W 0 0 15 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 269 36 152 Q Q W W 0 0 W

  10. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Natural Gas(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Electricity Distillate Residual and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 11,395 1,830 6,388 484 499 245 Q 555 0 203 3112

  11. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Residual Fuel Oil(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 326 178 23 0 150 Q 0 Q 0 W 3112 Grain and

  12. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Receipts(d) Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 14,109 708 8,259 384 162 0 Q 105 0 84 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 27 472 3 Q 0 W W 0 W 311221 Wet

  13. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Residual and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,462 276 900 Q 217 8 0 25 0 16 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 174 10 131 W 4 W 0 W 0 W 311221

  14. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Coal(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 64 19 54 0 17 6 W W W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 30 13 24 0 12 W 0 W W 311221 Wet

  15. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming LPG(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 4,039 600 2,860 356 221 Q W 0 0 16 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling

  16. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Natural Gas(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Natural Gas(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 10,373 1,667

  17. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry with Electricity Receipts(d Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 13,265 765 11,829 482 292 Q Q 51 Q Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed

  18. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Distillate Fuel Oil(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 2,416 221 2,115 82 160 Q 0 Q 0 30 3112 Grain and

  19. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row"

  20. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and

  1. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural

  3. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural

  4. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per

  5. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic

  6. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic

  7. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS","

  8. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural

  9. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," "

  10. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor","

  11. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  12. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  13. Oscillating side-branch enhancements of thermoacoustic heat exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-13

    A regenerator-based engine or refrigerator has a regenerator with two ends at two different temperatures, through which a gas oscillates at a first oscillating volumetric flow rate in the direction between the two ends and in which the pressure of the gas oscillates, and first and second heat exchangers, each of which is at one of the two different temperatures. A dead-end side branch into which the gas oscillates has compliance and is connected adjacent to one of the ends of the regenerator to form a second oscillating gas flow rate additive with the first oscillating volumetric flow rate, the compliance having a volume effective to provide a selected total oscillating gas volumetric flow rate through the first heat exchanger. This configuration enables the first heat exchanger to be configured and located to better enhance the performance of the heat exchanger rather than being confined to the location and configuration of the regenerator.

  14. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

    2011-07-27

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

  15. Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Tonya M.; Stewart, Brian W.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J.; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Cardone, Carol R.; Rohar, Paul C.

    2013-05-01

    The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

  16. Zero field high frequency oscillations in dual free layer spin torque oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braganca, P. M. Pi, K.; Zakai, R.; Childress, J. R.; Gurney, B. A.

    2013-12-02

    We observe microwave oscillations in relatively simple spin valve spin torque oscillators consisting of two in-plane free layers without spin polarizing layers. These devices exhibit two distinct modes which can reach frequencies >25?GHz in the absence of an applied magnetic field. Macrospin simulations identify these two modes as optical and acoustic modes excited by the coupling of the two layers through dipole field and spin torque effects. These results demonstrate the potential of this system as a large output power, ultrahigh frequency signal generator that can operate without magnetic field.

  17. Large amplitude oscillation of magnetization in spin-torque oscillator stabilized by field-like torque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Tsunegi, Sumito

    2015-05-07

    Oscillation frequency of spin torque oscillator with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and an in-plane magnetized pinned layer is theoretically investigated by taking into account the field-like torque. It is shown that the field-like torque plays an important role in finding the balance between the energy supplied by the spin torque and the dissipation due to the damping, which results in a steady precession. The validity of the developed theory is confirmed by performing numerical simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  18. Light water detritiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Aleksee, I.A.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Vasyanina, T.V.

    2015-03-15

    Hundreds of thousands of tons of tritiated light water have been accumulating from the enterprises of nuclear fuel cycles around the world. The Dual-Temperature Water-Hydrogen (DTWH) process looks like the only practical alternative to Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE). In DTWH power-consuming lower reflux device (electrolytic cell) is replaced by a so-called 'hot tower' (LPCE column operating at conditions which ensure relatively small value of elementary separation factor α(hot)). In the upper, cold tower, the tritium transfers from hydrogen to water while in the lower, hot tower - in the opposite direction - from water to hydrogen. The DTWH process is much more complicated compared to CECE; it must be thoroughly computed and strictly controlled by an automatic control system. The use of a simulation code for DTWH is absolutely important. The simulation code EVIO-5 deals with 3 flows inside a column (hydrogen gas, water vapour and liquid water) and 2 simultaneous isotope exchange sub-processes (counter-current phase exchange and co-current catalytic exchange). EVIO-5 takes into account the strong dependence of process performance on given conditions (temperature and pressure). It calculates steady-state isotope concentration profiles considering a full set of reversible exchange reactions between different isotope modifications of water and hydrogen (12 molecular species). So the code can be used for simulation of LPCE column operation for detritiation of hydrogen and water feed, which contains H and D not only at low concentrations but above 10 at.% also. EVIO-5 code is used to model a Tritium Removal Facility with a throughput capacity of about 400 m{sup 3}/day. Simulation results show that a huge amount of wet-proofed catalyst is required (about 6000 m{sup 3}), mainly (90%) in the first stage. One reason for these large expenses (apart from a big scale of the problem itself) is the relatively high tritium separation factor in the hot tower. The introduction of some quantity of deuterium into the gaseous flow before the hot tower lowers the tritium separation factor in that column. One possible variant of deuterium introduction to the hot tower of the first stage was modelled. The decontamination capacity increases by a 2.5 factor.

  19. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized by a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.

  20. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fortier, Nancy E.; Fritz, James S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present.

  1. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fortier, N.E.; Fritz, J.S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present. 1 fig.

  2. Engineering Development of Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puneet Gupta

    2002-07-31

    This report summarizes the procedures used and results obtained in determining radial gas holdup profiles, via gamma ray scanning, and in assessing liquid and gas mixing parameters, via radioactive liquid and gas tracers, during Fischer Tropsch synthesis. The objectives of the study were (i) to develop a procedure for detection of gas holdup radial profiles in operating reactors and (ii) to test the ability of the developed, previously described, engineering models to predict the observed liquid and gas mixing patterns. It was shown that the current scanning procedures were not precise enough to obtain an accurate estimate of the gas radial holdup profile and an improved protocol for future use was developed. The previously developed physically based model for liquid mixing was adapted to account for liquid withdrawal from the mid section of the column. The ability of our engineering mixing models for liquid and gas phase to predict both liquid and gas phase tracer response was established and illustrated.

  3. On the moment of inertia of a quantum harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamzin, A. A. Sitdikov, A. S.; Nikitin, A. S.; Roganov, D. A.

    2013-04-15

    An original method for calculating the moment of inertia of the collective rotation of a nucleus on the basis of the cranking model with the harmonic-oscillator Hamiltonian at arbitrary frequencies of rotation and finite temperature is proposed. In the adiabatic limit, an oscillating chemical-potential dependence of the moment of inertia is obtained by means of analytic calculations. The oscillations of the moment of inertia become more pronounced as deformations approach the spherical limit and decrease exponentially with increasing temperature.

  4. Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Transfer Losses | Department of Energy Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat Transfer Losses Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat Transfer Losses This research discusses how reducing heat-transfer losses from pressure oscillation can increase low-temperature combustion engine efficiency. PDF icon p-22_splitter.pdf More Documents & Publications Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI

  5. Shear Behavior of Bridge Columns with Various Fiber Concrete

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and damage detection. 31 Water-proof coating Electric wires Piezoceramic patch ... density, the physical and chemical parameters of ingredients, and the resulting ...

  6. Quantum Oscillations from Nodal Bilayer Magnetic Breakdown in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Temperature Superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Oscillations from Nodal Bilayer Magnetic Breakdown in the Underdoped High Temperature ...

  7. Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    oscillation can increase low-temperature combustion engine efficiency. PDF icon p-22splitter.pdf More Documents & Publications Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston ...

  8. MHK Technologies/Yongsoo Wave Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description Oscillating water column type with turbines and generators Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 5 Device...

  9. Effect of power oscillations on suppression pool heating during ATWS (Anticipated Transients Without Scram) conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Nine selected Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) have been simulated on the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA), to determine how power and flow oscillations, similar to those that did or could have occurred at the LaSalle-2 boiling Water Reactor (BWR), could affect the rate of Pressure Suppression Pool heating. It has been determined that the pool can reach its temperature limit of 80{degree}C in 4.3 min. after Turbine Trip without Bypass, if the feedwater pumps are not tripped. The pool will not reach its limit, if Boron is injected, even when oscillations are encountered. Simultaneous turbine and recirculation pump trips, introduced under stable conditions, can lead to instability. 2 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Method for making a non-extractable stationary phase of polymer within a capillary column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springston, Stephen R. (Middle Island, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A method for coating interior capillary column surfaces, or packing material of a packed column, used for gas chromatography, with a stationary polymer phase that is cross-linked by exposing it to a low-temperature plasma that is uniformly distributed over the column or packing material for a predetermined period of time to effect the desired degree of cross-linking of the coating.

  11. Repetitive Regeneration of Media #1 in a Dynamic Column Extraction using Brine #1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Garland

    2015-10-14

    This data is from a regeneration study from a dynamic column extraction experiment where we ran a solution of REE's through a column of media #1 then stripped the REE's off the media using 2M HNO3 solution. We then re-equilibrated the media and repeated the process of running a REE solution through the column and stripping the REE's off the media and comparing the two runs.

  12. Method for making a non-extractable stationary phase of polymer within a capillary column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springston, S.R.

    1990-10-30

    A method is described for coating interior capillary column surfaces, or packing material of a packed column, used for gas chromatography, with a stationary polymer phase that is cross-linked by exposing it to a low-temperature plasma that is uniformly distributed over the column or packing material for a predetermined period of time to effect the desired degree of cross-linking of the coating. 7 figs.

  13. Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system being developed for deployment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a supplementary salt waste processing technology that, if implemented, will augment the baseline Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) capability. An opportunity exists to shorten the SRS radioactive waste system lifecycle by 6 years, and significantly

  14. Experimental Evaluation of Beam to Diamond Box Column Connection with Through Plate in Moment Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keshavarzi, Farhad; Torabian, Shahabeddin; Imanpour, Ali; Mirghaderi, Rasoul

    2008-07-08

    Moment resisting frames with built up section have very enhanced features due to high bending stiffness and strength characteristics in two principal axes and access to column faces for beam to column easy connections. But due to proper transfer of beam stresses to column faces there were always some specific controvertibly issues that how to make the load transfer through and in plane manner in order to mobilize the forces in column faces. Using diamond column instead of box column provide possibility to mobilize the load transfer mechanism in column faces. This section as a column has considerable benefit such as high plastic to elastic section modulus ratio which is an effective factor for force controlled components. Typical connection has no chance to be applied with diamond column.This paper elucidates the seismic behavior of through-plates moment connections to diamond box columns for use in steel moment resisting frames. This connection has a lot of economical benefits such as no need to horizontal continuity plates and satisfying the weak beam--strong column criteria in the connection region. They might serve as panel zone plates as well. According to high shear demand in panel zone of beam to column joint one should use the doublers plates in order to decrease the shear strength demand in this sensitive part of structure but these plates have no possibility to mobilize the load transfer mechanism in column web and transfer them to column flanges. In this type of connection, column faces have effective role in order to decrease the demands on through plate and they are impressive factors for improving the performance of the connection.Experimental analysis was conducted to elucidate the seismic behavior of this connection. The results of Experimental analysis established the effectiveness of the through plate in mitigating local stress concentrations and forming the plastic hinge zone in the beam away from the beam to column interface. The moment-rotation graphs form sub-assemblage show a desirable seismic performance of this connection.

  15. DUST EXTINCTION BIAS IN THE COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: HIGH COLUMN DENSITY, LOW-REDSHIFT GRBs ARE MORE HEAVILY OBSCURED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Darach [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Jakobsson, Pall, E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: pja@raunvis.hi.is [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 5, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2012-08-01

    The afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have more soft-X-ray absorption than expected from the foreground gas column in the Galaxy. While the redshift of the absorption can in general not be constrained from current X-ray observations, it has been assumed that the absorption is due to metals in the host galaxy of the GRB. The large sample of X-ray afterglows and redshifts now available allows the construction of statistically meaningful distributions of the metal column densities. We construct such a sample and show, as found in previous studies, that the typical absorbing column density (N{sub H{sub X}}) increases substantially with redshift, with few high column density objects found at low-to-moderate redshifts. We show, however, that when highly extinguished bursts are included in the sample, using redshifts from their host galaxies, high column density sources are also found at low-to-moderate redshift. We infer from individual objects in the sample and from observations of blazars that the increase in column density with redshift is unlikely to be related to metals in the intergalactic medium or intervening absorbers. Instead we show that the origin of the apparent increase with redshift is primarily due to dust extinction bias: GRBs with high X-ray absorption column densities found at z {approx}< 4 typically have very high dust extinction column densities, while those found at the highest redshifts do not. It is unclear how such a strongly evolving N{sub H{sub X}}/A{sub V} ratio would arise, and based on current data, remains a puzzle.

  16. Analysis of a free oscillation atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kafle, Rudra P.; Zozulya, Alex A.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2011-09-15

    We analyze a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-based free oscillation atom Michelson interferometer in a weakly confining harmonic magnetic trap. A BEC at the center of the trap is split into two harmonics by a laser standing wave. The harmonics move in opposite directions with equal speeds and turn back under the influence of the trapping potential at their classical turning points. The harmonics are allowed to pass through each other and a recombination pulse is applied when they overlap at the end of a cycle after they return for the second time. We derive an expression for the contrast of the interferometric fringes and obtain the fundamental limit of performance of the interferometer in the parameter space.

  17. Oscillation and chaos in pitting corrosion of steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, M.A.; Rodriguez, F.J.; Garcia, E.; Boerio, F.J.

    1999-11-01

    The potential and current oscillations during pitting corrosion of steel in NaCl solution were studied. Detailed analysis using numerical diagnostics developed to characterize complex time series clearly shows that the irregularity in these time series corresponds to deterministic chaos, rather than to random noise. The chaotic oscillations were characterized by power spectral densities, phase space and Lyapunov exponents.

  18. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  19. The Two-Column Aerosol Project Definitions TCAP Educational

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about 2 centimeters of water in the bottom of the jar. Hold the black paper upright or prop it up against some books behind the jar. 3. Turn the lid of the jar upside down and...

  20. Detection of forced oscillations in power systems with multichannel methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follum, James D.

    2015-09-30

    The increasing availability of high fidelity, geographically dispersed measurements in power systems improves the ability of researchers and engineers to study dynamic behaviors in the grid. One such behavior that is garnering increased attention is the presence of forced oscillations. Power system engineers are interested in forced oscillations because they are often symptomatic of the malfunction or misoperation of equipment. Though the resulting oscillation is not always large in amplitude, the root cause may be serious. In this report, multi-channel forced oscillation detection methods are developed. These methods leverage previously developed detection approaches based on the periodogram and spectral-coherence. Making use of geographically distributed channels of data is shown to improved detection performance and shorten the delay before an oscillation can be detected in the online environment. Results from simulated and measured power system data are presented.

  1. Triple inverter pierce oscillator circuit suitable for CMOS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf; Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-27

    An oscillator circuit is disclosed which can be formed using discrete field-effect transistors (FETs), or as a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit. The oscillator circuit utilizes a Pierce oscillator design with three inverter stages connected in series. A feedback resistor provided in a feedback loop about a second inverter stage provides an almost ideal inverting transconductance thereby allowing high-Q operation at the resonator-controlled frequency while suppressing a parasitic oscillation frequency that is inherent in a Pierce configuration using a "standard" triple inverter for the sustaining amplifier. The oscillator circuit, which operates in a range of 10 50 MHz, has applications for use as a clock in a microprocessor and can also be used for sensor applications.

  2. Oscillator circuit for use with high loss quartz resonator sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Otto (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a Lever oscillator for use in high resistance resonator applications, especially for use with quartz resonator sensors. The oscillator is designed to operate over a wide dynamic range of resonator resistance due to damping of the resonator in mediums such as liquids. An oscillator design is presented that allows both frequency and loss (R.sub.m) of the resonator to be determined over a wide dynamic range of resonator loss. The Lever oscillator uses negative feedback in a differential amplifier configuration to actively and variably divide (or leverage) the resonator impedance such that the oscillator can maintain the phase and gain of the loop over a wide range of resonator resistance.

  3. Dynamic Column Extraction for Europium on Media #1 at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Garland

    2015-04-07

    This is a dataset for a 200ppm europium solution sent through a column with 12g of media #1 at pH of 3.2. This column experiment was run at ambient temperature at a flow rate of 2mL/min.

  4. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldn, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Moseev, Dmitry; Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Alpers, Andreas E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin

    2015-01-26

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.

  5. Aerosol specification in single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lebassi-Habtezion, B.; Caldwell, P. M.

    2015-03-27

    Single-column model (SCM) capability is an important tool for general circulation model development. In this study, the SCM mode of version 5 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is shown to handle aerosol initialization and advection improperly, resulting in aerosol, cloud-droplet, and ice crystal concentrations which are typically much lower than observed or simulated by CAM5 in global mode. This deficiency has a major impact on stratiform cloud simulations but has little impact on convective case studies because aerosol is currently not used by CAM5 convective schemes and convective cases are typically longer in duration (so initialization is less important).more » By imposing fixed aerosol or cloud-droplet and crystal number concentrations, the aerosol issues described above can be avoided. Sensitivity studies using these idealizations suggest that the Meyers et al. (1992) ice nucleation scheme prevents mixed-phase cloud from existing by producing too many ice crystals. Microphysics is shown to strongly deplete cloud water in stratiform cases, indicating problems with sequential splitting in CAM5 and the need for careful interpretation of output from sequentially split climate models. Droplet concentration in the general circulation model (GCM) version of CAM5 is also shown to be far too low (~ 25 cm−3) at the southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site.« less

  6. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber.

  7. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zapata, L.E.

    1994-08-02

    A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber. 16 figs.

  8. Superpenumbral fibrils powered by sunspot oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Park, Hyungmin; Maurya, Ram Ajor; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Yurchysyn, Vasyl

    2014-07-10

    It is still a mystery how the solar chromosphere can stand high above the photosphere. The dominant portion of this layer must be dynamically supported, as is evident by the common occurrence of jets such as spicules and mottles in quiet regions, and fibrils and surges in active regions. Hence, revealing the driving mechanism of these chromospheric jets is crucial for our understanding of how the chromosphere itself exists. Here, we report our observational finding that fibrils in the superpenumbra of a sunspot are powered by sunspot oscillations. We find patterns of outward propagation that apparently originate from inside the sunspot, propagate like running penumbral waves, and develop into the fibrils. Redshift ridges seen in the time-distance plots of velocity often merge, forming a fork-like pattern. The predominant period of these shock waves increases, often jumping with distance, from 3 minutes to 10 minutes. This short-to-long period transition seems to result from the selective suppression of shocks by the falling material of their preceding shocks. Based on our results, we propose that the fibrils are driven by slow shock waves with long periods that are produced by the merging of shock waves with shorter periods propagating along the magnetic canopy.

  9. Carbon nanotube oscillator surface profiling device and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popescu, Adrian (Tampa, FL); Woods, Lilia M. (Tampa, FL); Bondarev, Igor V. (Fuquay Varina, NC)

    2011-11-15

    The proposed device is based on a carbon nanotube oscillator consisting of a finite length outer stationary nanotube and a finite length inner oscillating nanotube. Its main function is to measure changes in the characteristics of the motion of the carbon nanotube oscillating near a sample surface, and profile the roughness of this surface. The device operates in a non-contact mode, thus it can be virtually non-wear and non-fatigued system. It is an alternative to the existing atomic force microscope (AFM) tips used to scan surfaces to determine their roughness.

  10. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle θ23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  11. Nanoconstriction-based spin-Hall nano-oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demidov, V. E.; Urazhdin, S.; Zholud, A.; Sadovnikov, A. V.; Demokritov, S. O.

    2014-10-27

    We experimentally demonstrate magnetic nano-oscillators driven by pure spin current produced by the spin Hall effect in a bow tie-shaped nanoconstriction. These devices exhibit single-mode auto-oscillation and generate highly-coherent electronic microwave signals with a significant power and the spectral linewidth as low as 6.2 MHz at room temperature. The proposed simple and flexible device geometry is amenable to straightforward implementation of advanced spintronic structures such as chains of mutually coupled spin-Hall nano-oscillators.

  12. Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 Using polarized and unpolarized neutron scattering we show that interstitial Fe in superconducting Fe$$_{1+y}$$Te$$_{1-x}$$Se$_x$ induces a magnetic Friedel-like oscillation that diffracts at $${\bf

  13. Novel bias-field-free spin transfer oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windbacher, Thomas Makarov, Alexander; Mahmoudi, Hiwa; Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2014-05-07

    Two versions of magnetic field free spin torque oscillators with in- and out-of-plane spin polarizers are proposed. The field free spin torque oscillators comprise two spin valve stacks with a common free magnetic layer featuring an out-of-plane anisotropy. Their operation frequencies are controlled by the dimensions of the free layer and can also be tuned by the applied currents. Large and stable magnetization precessional motion of the whole shared free layer for both oscillators are obtained. The structure with in-plane polarizers allows more efficient microwave power extraction of the large in-plane magnetization precession of the free layer.

  14. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle ?23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  15. MHK Technologies/Nesheim Oscillating Device | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    buoyancy The lower end of the column is connected to an anchor on the seafloor The design of the device enables both vertical and pivotal movement between the floater and...

  16. ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.

    2011-08-03

    SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

  17. EVIDENCE OF CONTRIBUTION OF INTERVENING CLOUDS TO GAMMA-RAY BURST'S X-RAY COLUMN DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.

    2013-10-20

    The origin of excess of X-ray column density with respect to optical extinction in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still a puzzle. A proposed explanation of the excess is the photoelectric absorption due to the intervening clouds along a GRB's line of sight. Here, we test this scenario by using the intervening Mg II absorption as a tracer of the neutral hydrogen column density of the intervening clouds. We identify a connection between the large X-ray column density (and large column density ratio of log (N{sub H,X}/N{sub H{sub I}})?0.5) and large neutral hydrogen column density probed by the Mg II doublet ratio (DR). In addition, GRBs with large X-ray column density (and large ratio of log (N{sub H,X}/N{sub H{sub I}})>0) tend to have multiple saturated intervening absorbers with DR < 1.2. These results therefore indicate an additional contribution from the intervening system to the observed X-ray column density in some GRBs, although the contribution from the host galaxy alone cannot be excluded based on this study.

  18. Plant-Scale Concentration Column Designs for SHINE Target Solution Utilizing AG 1 Anion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepinski, Dominique C.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2015-09-30

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE) in their efforts to develop SHINE, an accelerator-driven process that will utilize a uranyl-sulfate solution for the production of fission product Mo-99. An integral part of the process is the development of a column for the separation and recovery of Mo-99, followed by a concentration column to reduce the product volume from 15-25 L to <1 L. Argonne has collected data from batch studies and breakthrough column experiments to utilize the VERSE (Versatile Reaction Separation) simulation program (Purdue University) to design plant-scale product recovery and concentration processes.

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Ground-Based

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation and Aerosol Validation Using the NOAA Mobile SURFRAD Station govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Ground-Based Radiation and Aerosol Validation Using the NOAA Mobile SURFRAD Station ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Ground-Based Radiation and Aerosol Validation

  20. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  1. Influence of the gas-flow Reynolds number on a plasma column in a glass tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Dong Jun; Uhm, Han S.; Cho, Guangsup [Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, 20 Kwangwon-Ro, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, 20 Kwangwon-Ro, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric-plasma generation inside a glass tube is influenced by gas stream behavior as described by the Reynolds number (Rn). In experiments with He, Ne, and Ar, the plasma column length increases with an increase in the gas flow rate under laminar flow characterized by Rn < 2000. The length of the plasma column decreases as the flow rate increases in the transition region of 2000 < Rn < 4000. For a turbulent flow beyond Rn > 4000, the length of the plasma column is short in front of the electrode, eventually leading to a shutdown.

  2. Neutron-Antineutron Oscillations: Theoretical Status and Experimental Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, D. G.; Snow, W. M.; Babu, K.; Banerjee, S.; Baxter, D. V.; Berezhiani, Z.; Bergevin, M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Brooijmans, G.; Castellanos, L.; et al.,

    2014-10-04

    This paper summarizes the relevant theoretical developments, outlines some ideas to improve experimental searches for free neutron-antineutron oscillations, and suggests avenues for future improvement in the experimental sensitivity.

  3. Internal Josephson oscillations for distinct momenta Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Lih-King [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, 3584 CE Utrecht (Netherlands); Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS UMR 8502, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Troppenz, T.; Morais Smith, C. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, 3584 CE Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    The internal Josephson oscillations between an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and a molecular one are studied for atoms in a square optical lattice subjected to a staggered gauge field. The system is described by a Bose-Hubbard model with complex and anisotropic hopping parameters that are different for each species, i.e., atoms and molecules. When the flux per plaquette for each species is small, the system oscillates between two conventional zero-momentum condensates. However, there is a regime of parameters in which Josephson oscillations between a vortex-carrying atomic condensate (finite momentum BEC) and a conventional zero-momentum molecular condensate may be realized. The experimental observation of the oscillations between these qualitatively distinct BEC's is possible with state-of-the-art Ramsey interference techniques.

  4. Feedback Control of Azimuthal Oscillations in ExB Devices --...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feedback Control of Azimuthal Oscillations in ExB Devices --- Inventor(s) Martin E. Griswold, C. Leland Ellison, Yevgeny Raitses and Nathaniel J. Fisch Disclosed is a new device...

  5. MHK Technologies/Vortex Oscillation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    moving bonding this force can set the body or its separate parts into oscillation e g elastic slat If the system of mechanical energy output is organized correctly this device can...

  6. Magnetization reversal driven by a spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sbiaa, R.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetization reversal of a magnetic free layer under spin transfer torque (STT) effect from a magnetic hard layer with a fixed magnetization direction and an oscillating layer is investigated. By including STT from the oscillating layer with in-plane anisotropy and orthogonal polarizer, magnetization-time dependence of free layer is determined. The results show that the frequency and amplitude of oscillations can be varied by adjusting the current density and magnetic properties. For an optimal oscillation frequency (f{sub opt}), a reduction of the switching time (t{sub 0}) of the free layer is observed. Both f{sub opt} and t{sub 0} increase with the anisotropy field of the free layer.

  7. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2010-11-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed (a primary heat transfer mechanism), inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The calculation results showed that for a wet CST column with active cooling through one central and four outer tubes and 35 C ambient external air, the peak temperature for the fully-loaded column is about 63 C under the loss of fluid flow accident, which is well below the supernate boiling point. The peak temperature for the naturally-cooled (no active, engineered cooling) wet column is 156 C under fully-loaded conditions, exceeding the 130 C boiling point. Under these conditions, supernate boiling would maintain the column temperature near 130 C until all supernate was vaporized. Without active engineered cooling and assuming a dry column suspended in unventilated air at 35 C, the fully-loaded column is expected to rise to a maximum of about 258 C due to the combined loss-of coolant and column drainage accidents. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. Results for the in-tank modeling calculations clearly indicate that when realistic heat transfer boundary conditions are imposed on the bottom surface of the tank wall, as much as 450 gallons of ground CST (a volume equivalent to two ion exchange processing cycles) in an ideal hemispherical shape (the most conservative geometry) can be placed in the tank without exceeding the 100 C wall temperature limit. Furthermore, in the case of an evenly-distributed flat layer, the tank wall reaches the temperature limit after the ground CST material reaches a height of approximately 8 inches.

  8. Influence of flavor oscillations on neutrino beam instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendona, J. T.; Haas, F.; Bret, A.

    2014-09-15

    We consider the collective neutrino plasma interactions and study the electron plasma instabilities produced by a nearly mono-energetic neutrino beam in a plasma. We describe the mutual interaction between neutrino flavor oscillations and electron plasma waves. We show that the neutrino flavor oscillations are not only perturbed by electron plasmas waves but also contribute to the dispersion relation and the growth rates of neutrino beam instabilities.

  9. Josephson oscillations in a series array Josephson voltage standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, H.G.; Krech, W.; Mikolajczak, B.

    1989-06-01

    Josephson oscillations in a large series array of Josephson junctions designed as a superconducting microwave transmission line are studied. For descriptions of the Josephson junctions both the Stewart--McCumber model and the Werthamer model are used. The attenuation of the Josephson oscillations in the considered array is composed of two terms rising from the stripline and from the Josephson junctions. The latter one is of increasing significance for lower than usually applied drive frequencies.

  10. Quantum Oscillations from Nodal Bilayer Magnetic Breakdown in the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Underdoped High Temperature Superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Quantum Oscillations from Nodal Bilayer Magnetic Breakdown in the Underdoped High Temperature Superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Oscillations from Nodal Bilayer Magnetic Breakdown in the Underdoped High Temperature Superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x Authors: Sebastian, Suchitra E. ; Harrison, N. ; Liang, Ruixing ; Bonn, D. A. ; Hardy, W. N. ; Mielke, C. H. ;

  11. Longitudinal magnetohydrodynamics oscillations in dissipative, cooling coronal loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Ghafri, K. S.; Ruderman, M. S.; Williamson, A.; Erdlyi, R., E-mail: app08ksa@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: m.s.ruderman@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: app09aw@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the effect of cooling on standing slow magnetosonic waves in coronal magnetic loops. The damping mechanism taken into account is thermal conduction that is a viable candidate for dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves in coronal loops. In contrast to earlier studies, here we assume that the characteristic damping time due to thermal conduction is not small, but arbitrary, and can be of the order of the oscillation period, i.e., a temporally varying plasma is considered. The approximation of low-beta plasma enables us to neglect the magnetic field perturbation when studying longitudinal waves and consider, instead, a one-dimensional motion that allows a reliable first insight into the problem. The background plasma temperature is assumed to be decaying exponentially with time, with the characteristic cooling timescale much larger than the oscillation period. This assumption enables us to use the WKB method to study the evolution of the oscillation amplitude analytically. Using this method we obtain the equation governing the oscillation amplitude. The analytical expressions determining the wave properties are evaluated numerically to investigate the evolution of the oscillation frequency and amplitude with time. The results show that the oscillation period increases with time due to the effect of plasma cooling. The plasma cooling also amplifies the amplitude of oscillations in relatively cool coronal loops, whereas, for very hot coronal loop oscillations the damping rate is enhanced by the cooling. We find that the critical point for which the amplification becomes dominant over the damping is in the region of 4 MK. These theoretical results may serve as impetus for developing the tools of solar magneto-seismology in dynamic plasmas.

  12. Aharonov-Bohm Oscillations in Singly Connected Disordered Conductors

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Aharonov-Bohm Oscillations in Singly Connected Disordered Conductors Title: Aharonov-Bohm Oscillations in Singly Connected Disordered Conductors Authors: Aleiner, I. L. ; Andreev, A. V. ; Vinokur, V. Publication Date: 2015-02-20 OSTI Identifier: 1180870 Grant/Contract Number: FG02-07ER46452 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007

  13. Surface plasmon oscillations on a quantum plasma half-space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-01-15

    We investigate the propagation of surface electrostatic oscillations on a quantum plasma half-space, taking into account the quantum effects. We derive the quantum surface wave frequencies of the system, by means the quantum hydrodynamic theory in conjunction with the Poisson equation and applying the appropriate additional quantum boundary conditions. Numerical results show in the presence of the slow nonlocal variations, plasmon wave energies of the system are significantly modified and plasmonic oscillations with blue-shifted frequencies emerge.

  14. Aharonov-Bohm Oscillations in Singly Connected Disordered Conductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Aharonov-Bohm Oscillations in Singly Connected Disordered Conductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aharonov-Bohm Oscillations in Singly Connected Disordered Conductors Authors: Aleiner, I. L. ; Andreev, A. V. ; Vinokur, V. Publication Date: 2015-02-20 OSTI Identifier: 1180870 Grant/Contract Number: FG02-07ER46452 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 114;

  15. Resonant flavor oscillations in electroweak baryogenesis (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Resonant flavor oscillations in electroweak baryogenesis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Resonant flavor oscillations in electroweak baryogenesis Authors: Cirigliano, Vincenzo ; Lee, Christopher ; Tulin, Sean Publication Date: 2011-09-09 OSTI Identifier: 1100738 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998 Publisher: American Physical Society

  16. Short-period pulsar oscillations following a glitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Eysden, C. A.

    2014-07-10

    Following a glitch, the crust and magnetized plasma in the outer core of a neutron star are believed to rapidly establish a state of co-rotation within a few seconds by process analogous to classical Ekman pumping. However, in ideal magnetohydrodynamics, a final state of co-rotation is inconsistent with conservation of energy of the system. We demonstrate that, after the Ekman-like spin up is completed, magneto-inertial waves continue to propagate throughout the star, exciting torsional oscillations in the crust and plasma. The crust oscillation is irregular and quasi-periodic, with a dominant frequency of the order of seconds. Crust oscillations commence after an Alfvn crossing time, approximately half a minute at the magnetic pole, and are subsequently damped by the electron viscosity over approximately an hour. In rapidly rotating stars, the magneto-inertial spectrum in the core approaches a continuum, and crust oscillations are damped by resonant absorption analogous to quasi-periodic oscillations in magnetars. The oscillations predicted are unlikely to be observed in timing data from existing radio telescopes, but may be visible to next generation telescope arrays.

  17. LARGE-AMPLITUDE LONGITUDINAL OSCILLATIONS IN A SOLAR FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luna, M.

    2012-05-01

    We have developed the first self-consistent model for the observed large-amplitude oscillations along filament axes that explains the restoring force and damping mechanism. We have investigated the oscillations of multiple threads formed in long, dipped flux tubes through the thermal nonequilibrium process, and found that the oscillation properties predicted by our simulations agree with the observed behavior. We then constructed a model for the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations that demonstrates that the restoring force is the projected gravity in the tube where the threads oscillate. Although the period is independent of the tube length and the constantly growing mass, the motions are strongly damped by the steady accretion of mass onto the threads by thermal nonequilibrium. The observations and our model suggest that a nearby impulsive event drives the existing prominence threads along their supporting tubes, away from the heating deposition site, without destroying them. The subsequent oscillations occur because the displaced threads reside in magnetic concavities with large radii of curvature. Our model yields a powerful seismological method for constraining the coronal magnetic field and radius of curvature of dips. Furthermore, these results indicate that the magnetic structure is most consistent with the sheared-arcade model for filament channels.

  18. Design of slurry bubble column reactors: novel technique for optimum catalyst size selection contractual origin of the invention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gamwo, Isaac K.; Gidaspow, Dimitri; Jung, Jonghwun

    2009-11-17

    A method for determining optimum catalyst particle size for a gas-solid, liquid-solid, or gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed reactor such as a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) for converting synthesis gas into liquid fuels considers the complete granular temperature balance based on the kinetic theory of granular flow, the effect of a volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the liquid and the gas, and the water gas shift reaction. The granular temperature of the catalyst particles representing the kinetic energy of the catalyst particles is measured and the volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the gas and liquid phases is calculated using the granular temperature. Catalyst particle size is varied from 20 .mu.m to 120 .mu.m and a maximum mass transfer coefficient corresponding to optimum liquid hydrocarbon fuel production is determined. Optimum catalyst particle size for maximum methanol production in a SBCR was determined to be in the range of 60-70 .mu.m.

  19. Development and design of a multi-column experimental setup for Kr/Xe separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garn, Troy G.; Greenhalgh, Mitchell; Watson, Tony

    2014-12-01

    As a precursor to FY-15 Kr/Xe separation testing, design modifications to an existing experimental setup are warranted. The modifications would allow for multi-column testing to facilitate a Xe separation followed by a Kr separation using engineered form sorbents prepared using an INL patented process. A new cooling apparatus capable of achieving test temperatures to -40 C and able to house a newly designed Xe column was acquired. Modifications to the existing setup are being installed to allow for multi-column testing and gas constituent analyses using evacuated sample bombs. The new modifications will allow for independent temperature control for each column enabling a plethora of test conditions to be implemented. Sample analyses will be used to evaluate the Xe/Kr selectivity of the AgZ-PAN sorbent and determine the Kr purity of the effluent stream following Kr capture using the HZ-PAN sorbent.

  20. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Reasons that Made Electricity Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Million kWh. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Electricity Consumed Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry as a Fuel Electricity Fuel Use Another Fuel the Products

  1. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Reasons that Made Natural Gas Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Billion cubic feet. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Natural Gas Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed as a FueNatural Gas Fuel Use Another Fuel the

  2. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Million short tons. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Coal Consumed Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry as a Fuel Coal Fuel Use Another Fuel the Products Fuel

  3. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Million barrels. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS LPG Consumed Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry as a Fuel LPG Fuel Use Another Fuel the Products Fuel

  4. Amazon Column CO2 and CO Observations to Elucidate Tropical Ecosystem

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Processes (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Amazon Column CO2 and CO Observations to Elucidate Tropical Ecosystem Processes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Amazon Column CO2 and CO Observations to Elucidate Tropical Ecosystem Processes Authors: Dubey, Manvendra Krishna [1] ; Parker, Harrison Alexander [1] ; Myers, Katherine Elizabeth [1] ; Wennberg, P [2] ; Wunch, D [2] ; Allen, N [3] ; Blavier, J-F [4] ; Keppel-Aleks, G [5] ; O'Dell, C [6] ; Miller, J [7] ; Michalak, A

  5. One ARM, Two Columns and a Whole Lot of Aerosols | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARM, Two Columns and a Whole Lot of Aerosols One ARM, Two Columns and a Whole Lot of Aerosols July 25, 2012 - 5:49pm Addthis This observatory is part of an air particles research initiative at Cape Cod National Seashore in Massachusetts, and includes dozens of sophisticated instruments that take continuous ground-based measurements of clouds, aerosols, and other atmospheric properties. | Photo courtesy of the ARM Climate Research Facility. This observatory is part of an air particles research

  6. Dr. Googin and the Y-12 COLEX Process - Recalling the Y-12 COLEX (column exchange) process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Y-12 COLEX Process - Recalling the Y-12 COLEX (column exchange) process In 1952, the COLEX (column exchange) process was actually the brainchild of Forrest Waldrop who had the original idea of converting the horizontal ELEX (electrical exchange) process approach to a vertical one. With the dogged determination and innovative solutions of Waldrop and Dr. John Googin during the laboratory and pilot phases, the COLEX approach ultimately turned out to be the process of choice for producing

  7. Transport of Carbon-14 in a Large, Unsaturated Soil Column (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Transport of Carbon-14 in a Large, Unsaturated Soil Column Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transport of Carbon-14 in a Large, Unsaturated Soil Column Wastes buried at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) include activated metals that release radioactive 14C as they corrode. To test and refine transport predictions that describe releases to the environment with time, we

  8. Small Column Ion Exchange at Savannah River Site Technology Readiness Assessment Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Technology Innovation and Development Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 2011 U.S. DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development November 11, 2011 Small Column Ion Exchange Program Technology Readiness Assessment Page 2 of 112 This page intentionally left blank November 11, 2011 U.S. DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development Small

  9. ARM - PI Product - Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsLarge Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM

  10. THE DECAYING LONG-PERIOD OSCILLATION OF A STELLAR MEGAFLARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anfinogentov, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Mathioudakis, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Kowalski, A. F.

    2013-08-20

    We analyze and interpret the oscillatory signal in the decay phase of the U-band light curve of a stellar megaflare observed on 2009 January 16 on the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. The oscillation is well approximated by an exponentially decaying harmonic function. The period of the oscillation is found to be 32 minutes, the decay time about 46 minutes, and the relative amplitude 15%. As this observational signature is typical of the longitudinal oscillations observed in solar flares at extreme ultraviolet and radio wavelengths, associated with standing slow magnetoacoustic waves, we suggest that this megaflare may be of a similar nature. In this scenario, macroscopic variations of the plasma parameters in the oscillations modulate the ejection of non-thermal electrons. The phase speed of the longitudinal (slow magnetoacoustic) waves in the flaring loop or arcade, the tube speed, of about 230 km s{sup -1} would require a loop length of about 200 Mm. Other mechanisms, such as standing kink oscillations, are also considered.

  11. Current sheet oscillations in the magnetic filament approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erkaev, N. V.; Semenov, V. S.; Biernat, H. K.

    2012-06-15

    Magnetic filament approach is applied for modeling of nonlinear 'kink'-like flapping oscillations of thin magnetic flux tubes in the Earth's magnetotail current sheet. A discrete approximation for the magnetic flux tube was derived on a basis of the Hamiltonian formulation of the problem. The obtained system of ordinary differential equations was integrated by method of Rosenbrock, which is suitable for stiff equations. The two-dimensional exact Kan's solution of the Vlasov equations was used to set the background equilibrium conditions for magnetic field and plasma. Boundary conditions for the magnetic filament were found to be dependent on the ratio of the ionospheric conductivity and the Alfven conductivity of the magnetic tube. It was shown that an enhancement of this ratio leads to the corresponding increase of the frequency of the flapping oscillations. For some special case of boundary conditions, when the magnetic perturbations vanish at the boundaries, the calculated frequency of the 'kink'-like flapping oscillations is rather close to that predicted by the 'double gradient' analytical model. For others cases, the obtained frequency of the flapping oscillations is somewhat larger than that from the 'double gradient' theory. The frequency of the nonlinear flapping oscillations was found to be a decreasing function of the amplitude.

  12. Solar filament material oscillations and drainage before eruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan; Yang, Bo

    2014-08-01

    Both large-amplitude longitudinal (LAL) oscillations and material drainage in a solar filament are associated with the flow of material along the filament axis, often followed by an eruption. However, the relationship between these two motions and a subsequent eruption event is poorly understood. We analyze a filament eruption using EUV imaging data captured by the Atmospheric Imaging Array on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the H? images from the Global Oscillation Network Group. Hours before the eruption, the filament was activated, with one of its legs undergoing a slow rising motion. The asymmetric activation inclined the filament relative to the solar surface. After the active phase, LAL oscillations were observed in the inclined filament. The oscillation period increased slightly over time, which may suggest that the magnetic fields supporting the filament evolve to be flatter during the slow rising phase. After the oscillations, a significant amount of filament material was drained toward one filament endpoint, followed immediately by the violent eruption of the filament. The material drainage may further support the change in magnetic topology prior to the eruption. Moreover, we suggest that the filament material drainage could play a role in the transition from a slow to a fast rise of the erupting filament.

  13. SAND2014-2100C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PNEUMATIC PERFORMANCE OF A NON-AXISYMMETRIC FLOATING OSCILLATING WATER COLUMN WAVE ENERGY CONVERSION DEVICE IN RANDOM WAVES by Diana Bull Water Power Department, Sandia National Laboratories E-mail: dlbull@sandia.gov ABSTRACT A stochastic approach is used to gain a sophisticated understanding of a non- axisymmetric floating oscillating water column's response to random waves. A linear, frequency- domain performance model that links the oscillating structure to air-pressure fluctuations with a

  14. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-12-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  15. Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1995-03-14

    An apparatus is disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal, and minerals so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  16. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1998-09-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  17. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  18. Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal, and minerals so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  19. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  20. Factorization method and new potentials from the inverted oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, David Fernndez C, David J.

    2013-06-15

    In this article we will apply the first- and second-order supersymmetric quantum mechanics to obtain new exactly-solvable real potentials departing from the inverted oscillator potential. This system has some special properties; in particular, only very specific second-order transformations produce non-singular real potentials. It will be shown that these transformations turn out to be the so-called complex ones. Moreover, we will study the factorization method applied to the inverted oscillator and the algebraic structure of the new Hamiltonians. -- Highlights: We apply supersymmetric quantum mechanics to the inverted oscillator potential. The complex second-order transformations allow us to build new non-singular potentials. The algebraic structure of the initial and final potentials is analyzed. The initial potential is described by a complex-deformed HeisenbergWeyl algebra. The final potentials are described by polynomial Heisenberg algebras.

  1. Observation of Stueckelberg oscillations in dipole-dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditzhuijzen, C. S. E. van; Tauschinsky, Atreju; Van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.

    2009-12-15

    We have observed Stueckelberg oscillations in the dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg atoms with an externally applied radio-frequency field. The oscillating rf field brings the interaction between cold Rydberg atoms in two separated volumes into resonance. We observe multiphoton transitions when varying the amplitude of the rf field and the static electric field offset. The angular momentum states we use show a quadratic Stark shift, which leads to a fundamentally different behavior than linearly shifting states. Both cases are studied theoretically using the Floquet approach and are compared. The amplitude of the sidebands, related to the interaction strength, is given by the Bessel function in the linearly shifting case and by the generalized Bessel function in the quadratically shifting case. The oscillatory behavior of both functions corresponds to Stueckelberg oscillations, an interference effect described by the semiclassical Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg model. The measurements prove coherent dipole-dipole interaction during at least 0.6 mus.

  2. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreementmore » with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.« less

  3. Circulating heat exchangers for oscillating wave engines and refrigerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2003-10-28

    An oscillating-wave engine or refrigerator having a regenerator or a stack in which oscillating flow of a working gas occurs in a direction defined by an axis of a trunk of the engine or refrigerator, incorporates an improved heat exchanger. First and second connections branch from the trunk at locations along the axis in selected proximity to one end of the regenerator or stack, where the trunk extends in two directions from the locations of the connections. A circulating heat exchanger loop is connected to the first and second connections. At least one fluidic diode within the circulating heat exchanger loop produces a superimposed steady flow component and oscillating flow component of the working gas within the circulating heat exchanger loop. A local process fluid is in thermal contact with an outside portion of the circulating heat exchanger loop.

  4. MiniBooNE/LSND Neutrino Oscillation Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE/LSND Neutrino Oscillation Results 1 M. Sorel (IFIC - CSIC & U. Valencia) Workshop on Beyond Three Family Neutrino Oscillations May 3-4, 2011, LNGS (Italy) 1. LSND ν̅ μ →ν̅ e (1993-2001) 2. MiniBooNE ν μ →ν e (2001-2007) 3. MiniBooNE ν̅ μ →ν̅ e (2006-2010) 5. Light sterile neutrino oscillations: where we stand (2011) Outline of this talk 2 4. MiniBooNE ν μ →ν μ and ν̅ μ →ν̅ μ (2001-2011) 3 LSND ν̅ μ →ν̅ e The LSND Experiment 4 Stopped pion

  5. Photoluminescence emission at room temperature in zinc oxide nano-columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, L.S.R.; Deus, R.C.; Foschini, C.R.; Simes, A.Z.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: ZnO nanoparticles were obtained by microwave-hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction reveals a hexagonal structure. Photoluminescence emission evidenced two absorption peaks, at around 480 nm and 590 nm wavelengths. - Abstract: Hydrothermal microwave method (HTMW) was used to synthesize crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-columns at the temperature of 120 C with a soaking time of 8 min. ZnO nano-columns were characterized by using X-ray analyses (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analyses (TG-DTA), field emission gun and transmission electron microscopy (FEG-SEM and TEM) and photoluminescence properties (PL). XRD results indicated that the ZnO nano-columns are free of any impurity phase and crystallize in the hexagonal structure. Typical FT-IR spectra for ZnO nano-columns presented well defined bands, indicating a substantial short-range order in the system. PL spectra consist of a broad band at 590 nm and narrow band at 480 nm corresponding to a near-band edge emission related to the recombination of excitons and level emission related to structural defects. These results show that the HTMW synthesis route is rapid, cost effective, and could be used as an alternative to obtain ZnO nano-columns in the temperature of 120 C for 8 min.

  6. Driven Morse oscillator: Classical chaos, quantum theory, and photodissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goggin, M.E.; Milonni, P.W.

    1988-02-01

    We compare the classical and quantum theories of a Morse oscillator driven by a sinusoidal field, focusing attention on multiple-photon excitation and dissociation. In both the classical and quantum theories the threshold field strength for dissociation may be estimated fairly accurately on the basis of classical resonance overlap, and the classical and quantum results for the threshold are in good agreement except near higher-order classical resonances and quantum multiphoton resonances. We discuss the possibility of ''quantum chaos'' in such driven molecular systems and use the Morse oscillator to test the manifestations of classical resonance overlap suggested semiclassically.

  7. Oscillating and static universes from a single barotropic fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehayias, John; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2015-12-09

    We consider cosmological solutions to general relativity with a single barotropic fluid, where the pressure is a general function of the density, p=f(ρ). We derive conditions for static and oscillating solutions and provide examples, extending earlier work to these simpler and more general single-fluid cosmologies. Generically we expect such solutions to suffer from instabilities, through effects such as quantum fluctuations or tunneling to zero size. We also find a classical instability (“no-go” theorem) for oscillating solutions of a single barotropic perfect fluid due to a necessarily negative squared sound speed.

  8. Matter effects in active-sterile solar neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giunti, C.; Li, Y. F.

    2009-12-01

    The matter effects for solar neutrino oscillations are studied in a general scheme with an arbitrary number of sterile neutrinos, without any constraint on the mixing, assuming only a realistic hierarchy of neutrino squared-mass differences in which the smallest squared-mass difference is effective in solar neutrino oscillations. The validity of the analytic results are illustrated with a numerical solution of the evolution equation in three examples of the possible mixing matrix in the simplest case of four-neutrino mixing.

  9. Nonlinear lower hybrid oscillations in a cold viscous plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2011-12-15

    An analytical description of nonlinear lower hybrid oscillations in a cold quasi-neutral plasma in the presence of viscosity is presented in one spatial dimension by using Lagrangian variables. By treating viscosity coefficients of the electron and ion fluids as inversely proportional to their respective densities, an exact solution is obtained. It is found that the damping rate of such oscillations is directly proportional to the effective viscosity coefficients of electron and ion fluids. A possible implication of such solutions is briefly outlined.

  10. Mysterious dipole synchrotron oscillations during and after adiabatic capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    Strong synchrotron oscillations were observed during and after the 2.5-MHz rf adiabatic capture of a debunched booster batch in the Main Injector. Analysis shows two possible sources for the synchrotron oscillations. One is the frequency drift of the 2.5-MHz rf after the turning off of the 53-MHz rf voltage, thus resulting in an energy mismatch with the debunched beam. The second source is the energy mismatch of the injected booster beam with the frequency of the 53-MHz rf. We have been able to rule out the first possibility.

  11. Spin-dependent terahertz oscillator based on hybrid graphene superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daz, E.; Miralles, K.; Domnguez-Adame, F. [GISC, Departamento Fsica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gaul, C., E-mail: cgaul@pks.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    We theoretically study the occurrence of Bloch oscillations in biased hybrid graphene systems with spin-dependent superlattices. The spin-dependent potential is realized by a set of ferromagnetic insulator strips deposited on top of a gapped graphene nanoribbon, which induce a proximity exchange splitting of the electronic states in the graphene monolayer. We numerically solve the Dirac equation and study Bloch oscillations in the lowest conduction band of the spin-dependent superlattice. While the Bloch frequency is the same for both spins, we find the Bloch amplitude to be spin dependent. This difference results in a spin-polarized ac electric current in the THz range.

  12. Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation Authors: Dakovski, Georgi L. ; Lee, Wei-Sheng ; Hawthorn, David G. ; Garner,

  13. NERSC, PDSF, Neutrino Oscillations and the 2015 Physics Nobel Prize

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Oscillations and the 2015 Physics Nobel Prize NERSC, PDSF, Neutrino Oscillations and the 2015 Physics Nobel Prize October 8, 2015 by Richard Gerber Perhaps the most rewarding aspect of working at NERSC is sharing in the scientific enterprise, working day-to-day with the best scientists in the world seeking to answer the most interesting questions ever posed. How does the nanoworld work? Where did our universe come from and where is it going? How are we affecting our environment and what

  14. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  15. QUASI-BIENNIAL OSCILLATIONS IN THE SOLAR TACHOCLINE CAUSED BY MAGNETIC ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Carbonell, Marc; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.e E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.e

    2010-11-20

    Quasi-biennial oscillations (QBOs) are frequently observed in solar activity indices. However, no clear physical mechanism for the observed variations has been suggested so far. Here, we study the stability of magnetic Rossby waves in the solar tachocline using the shallow water magnetohydrodynamic approximation. Our analysis shows that the combination of typical differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field with a strength of {>=}10{sup 5} G triggers the instability of the m = 1 magnetic Rossby wave harmonic with a period of {approx}2 years. This harmonic is antisymmetric with respect to the equator and its period (and growth rate) depends on the differential rotation parameters and magnetic field strength. The oscillations may cause a periodic magnetic flux emergence at the solar surface and consequently may lead to the observed QBO in solar activity features. The period of QBOs may change throughout a cycle, and from cycle to cycle, due to variations of the mean magnetic field and differential rotation in the tachocline.

  16. Tunneling control using classical non-linear oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    A quantum particle is placed in symmetric double well potential which is coupled to a classical non-linear oscillator via a coupling function. With different spatial symmetry of the coupling and under various controlling fashions, the tunneling of the quantum particle can be enhanced or suppressed, or totally destroyed.

  17. Synchronization in Complex Oscillator Networks and Smart Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorfler, Florian; Chertkov, Michael; Bullo, Francesco

    2012-07-24

    The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a fascinating topic in various scientific disciplines. A coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous oscillators and a graph describing the interaction among them. It is known that a strongly coupled and sufficiently homogeneous network synchronizes, but the exact threshold from incoherence to synchrony is unknown. Here we present a novel, concise, and closed-form condition for synchronization of the fully nonlinear, non-equilibrium, and dynamic network. Our synchronization condition can be stated elegantly in terms of the network topology and parameters, or equivalently in terms of an intuitive, linear, and static auxiliary system. Our results significantly improve upon the existing conditions advocated thus far, they are provably exact for various interesting network topologies and parameters, they are statistically correct for almost all networks, and they can be applied equally to synchronization phenomena arising in physics and biology as well as in engineered oscillator networks such as electric power networks. We illustrate the validity, the accuracy, and the practical applicability of our results in complex networks scenarios and in smart grid applications.

  18. Injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucht, Robert P. (West Lafayette, IN); Kulatilaka, Waruna D. (West Lafayette, IN); Anderson, Thomas N. (Seguin, TX); Bougher, Thomas L. (Dublin, OH)

    2007-10-09

    Optical parametric oscillators (OPO) and systems are provided. The OPO has a non-linear optical material located between two optical elements where the product of the reflection coefficients of the optical elements are higher at the output wavelength than at either the pump or idler wavelength. The OPO output may be amplified using an additional optical parametric amplifier (OPA) stage.

  19. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  20. Axisymmetric oscillation modes of a double droplet system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramalingam, Santhosh K.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2010-11-15

    A double droplet system (DDS) consists of a sessile and a pendant drop that are coupled through a liquid filled cylindrical hole in a plate of thickness d. For a small hole radius R, equilibrium shapes of both drops are sections of spheres. While DDSs have a number of applications in microfluidics, a DDS oscillating about its equilibrium state can be used as a fast focusing liquid lens. Here, a DDS consisting of an isothermal, incompressible Newtonian fluid of constant density p and constant viscosity u that is surrounded by a gas is excited by oscillating in time (a) the pressure in the gas surrounding either drop (pressure excitation), (b) the plate perpendicular to its plane (axial excitation), and (c) the hole radius (radial excitation). In contrast to previous works that assumed transient drop shapes are spherical, they are determined here by simulation and used to identify the natural modes of axisymmetric oscillations from resonances observed during frequency sweeps with DDSs for which the combined volume V of the two drops is less than (4/3)?R3. Pressure and axial excitations are found to have identical responses but axial and radial excitations are shown to excite different modes. These modes are compared to those exhibited by single pendant (sessile) drop systems. In particular, while a single pendant (sessile) drop has one additional oscillation mode compared to a free drop, a DDS is found to exhibit roughly twice as many oscillation modes as a pendant (sessile) drop. The effects of dimensionless volume V/R3, dimensionless plate thickness d/R, and Ohnesorge number Oh =?/??R? , where ? is the surface tension of the DDS-gas interface, on the resonance frequencies are also investigated.

  1. Axisymmetric oscillation modes of a double droplet system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramalingam, Santhosh K.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2010-11-15

    A double droplet system (DDS) consists of a sessile and a pendant drop that are coupled through a liquid filled cylindrical hole in a plate of thickness d. For a small hole radius R, equilibrium shapes of both drops are sections of spheres. While DDSs have a number of applications in microfluidics, a DDS oscillating about its equilibrium state can be used as a fast focusing liquid lens. Here, a DDS consisting of an isothermal, incompressible Newtonian fluid of constant density p and constant viscosity u that is surrounded by a gas is excited by oscillating in time (a) themore » pressure in the gas surrounding either drop (pressure excitation), (b) the plate perpendicular to its plane (axial excitation), and (c) the hole radius (radial excitation). In contrast to previous works that assumed transient drop shapes are spherical, they are determined here by simulation and used to identify the natural modes of axisymmetric oscillations from resonances observed during frequency sweeps with DDSs for which the combined volume V of the two drops is less than (4/3)πR3. Pressure and axial excitations are found to have identical responses but axial and radial excitations are shown to excite different modes. These modes are compared to those exhibited by single pendant (sessile) drop systems. Specifically, while a single pendant (sessile) drop has one additional oscillation mode compared to a free drop, a DDS is found to exhibit roughly twice as many oscillation modes as a pendant (sessile) drop. The effects of dimensionless volume V/R3, dimensionless plate thickness d/R, and Ohnesorge number Oh =μ/√ρRσ , where σ is the surface tension of the DDS-gas interface, on the resonance frequencies are also investigated.« less

  2. Initial Results in Using a Self-Coherence Method for Detecting Sustained Oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a self-coherence method for detecting sustained oscillations using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. Sustained oscillations decrease system performance and introduce potential reliability issues. Timely detection of the oscillations at an early stage provides the opportunity for taking remedial reaction. Using high-speed time-synchronized PMU data, this paper details a self-coherence method for detecting sustained oscillation, even when the oscillation amplitude is lower than ambient noise. Simulation and field measurement data are used to evaluate the proposed methods performance. It is shown that the proposed method can detect sustained oscillations and estimate oscillation frequencies with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Comparison with a power spectral density method also shows that the proposed self-coherence method performs better. Index Termscoherence, power spectral density, phasor measurement unit (PMU), oscillations, power system dynamics

  3. Porous polymer monolithic columns with gold nanoparticles as an intermediate ligand for the separation of proteins in reverse phase-ion exchange mixed mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terborg, Lydia; Masini, Jorge C.; Lin, Michelle; Lipponen, Katriina; Riekolla, Marja -Liisa; Svec, Frantisek

    2014-11-04

    A new approach has been developed for the preparation of mixed-mode stationary phases to separate proteins. The pore surface of monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) capillary columns was functionalized with thiols and coated with gold nanoparticles. The final mixed mode surface chemistry was formed by attaching, in a single step, alkanethiols, mercaptoalkanoic acids, and their mixtures on the free surface of attached gold nanoparticles. Use of these mixtures allowed fine tuning of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amount of attached gold nanoparticles according to thermal gravimetric analysis was 44.8 wt.%. This value together with results of frontal elution enabled calculation of surface coverage with the alkanethiol and mercaptoalkanoic acid ligands. Interestingly, alkanethiols coverage in a range of 4.464.51 molecules/nm2 significantly exceeded that of mercaptoalkanoic acids with 2.392.45 molecules/nm2. The mixed mode character of these monolithic stationary phases was for the first time demonstrated in the separations of proteins that could be achieved in the same column using gradient elution conditions typical of reverse phase (using gradient of acetonitrile in water) and ion exchange chromatographic modes (applying gradient of salt in water), respectively.

  4. Porous polymer monolithic columns with gold nanoparticles as an intermediate ligand for the separation of proteins in reverse phase-ion exchange mixed mode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terborg, Lydia; Masini, Jorge C.; Lin, Michelle; Lipponen, Katriina; Riekolla, Marja -Liisa; Svec, Frantisek

    2014-11-04

    A new approach has been developed for the preparation of mixed-mode stationary phases to separate proteins. The pore surface of monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) capillary columns was functionalized with thiols and coated with gold nanoparticles. The final mixed mode surface chemistry was formed by attaching, in a single step, alkanethiols, mercaptoalkanoic acids, and their mixtures on the free surface of attached gold nanoparticles. Use of these mixtures allowed fine tuning of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amount of attached gold nanoparticles according to thermal gravimetric analysis was 44.8 wt.%. This value together with results of frontal elution enabled calculation of surfacemore »coverage with the alkanethiol and mercaptoalkanoic acid ligands. Interestingly, alkanethiols coverage in a range of 4.46–4.51 molecules/nm2 significantly exceeded that of mercaptoalkanoic acids with 2.39–2.45 molecules/nm2. The mixed mode character of these monolithic stationary phases was for the first time demonstrated in the separations of proteins that could be achieved in the same column using gradient elution conditions typical of reverse phase (using gradient of acetonitrile in water) and ion exchange chromatographic modes (applying gradient of salt in water), respectively.« less

  5. Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Allen, A.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2014-07-01

    This work compares and contrasts strategies for providing oscillation damping services from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants.

  6. RESULTS OF THE MiniBooNE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION SEARCH E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RESULTS OF THE MiniBooNE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION SEARCH E. D. Zimmerman University of Colorado American Physical Society Meeting Jacksonville, April 16, 2007 Results of the MiniBooNE Neutrino Oscillation Search * Introduction to MiniBooNE * The oscillation analysis * The initial results and their implications * The next steps MiniBooNE: E898 at Fermilab * Purpose is to test LSND with: * Higher energy * Different beam * Different oscillation signature * Different systematics * L=500 meters, E=0.5-1

  7. Morgan Wascko Imperial College London MiniBooNE's First Neutrino Oscillation Result

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wascko Imperial College London MiniBooNE's First Neutrino Oscillation Result Morgan Wascko CalTech Physics Research Conference 26 April, 2007 Outline * A short course in the physics of ν oscillations * What are neutrinos? Oscillations? * ν oscillation landscape * MiniBooNE * Experiment description * MiniBooNE's First Results * Neutrino Physics Big Picture * Next Steps for the Field * What has MiniBooNE told us? 2 Morgan Wascko CalTech Physics Research Conference 26 April, 2007 * Particle

  8. A New Kind of Column Materials for Gas Chromatographic Hydrogen Isotope Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, M.; Shima, H.; Akamaru, S.; Abe, T.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K.

    2005-07-15

    A new kind of materials that can be applied to a gas chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation system was developed to reduce the amount of Pd-Pt alloy required for making the column and to improve the separation efficiency. Pd and Pt were deposited on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder by using a barrel sputtering system. Prepared sample powder was characterized from surface morphology, element distributions on the surface, composition and crystallinity. The characterization showed that a uniform layer of Pd-Pt alloy with expected composition was formed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The crystallinity, however, was poor, but improved after annealing at 1073 K for 2 hours. The hydrogen absorbing behavior was also improved by the annealing. A separation column was prepared from the annealed powder and was subjected to experiments on hydrogen isotope separation. The column of annealed powder gave considerably good separation efficiency around room temperature, in spite that only 0.35 g of Pd-Pt was used for the column. The amount of Pd-Pt alloy used here should be compared to previous results, where 1.5 g of Pd-Pt powder was required for high separation efficiency. The new material was quite effective to reduce the amount of Pd-Pt alloy without compromising the separation efficiency and can give further improvement.

  9. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1985-12-04

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtained in the prior art.

  10. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rutherford, William M.

    1988-05-24

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtainable in the prior art.

  11. Nonlinear process model based control of a propylene sidestream draw column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggs, J.B. )

    1990-11-01

    While sidestream draw columns offer the incentives of reduced capital and operating expenses, they also pose more challenging control problems than ordinary distillation columns. This paper describes the application of nonlinear process model based control (PMBC) for composition control of all product streams for a simulation of a distillation column with a liquid sidestream draw. A tray-to-tray simulator of an industrial propylene/propane column that considers 5-min composition analyzer dead time was used to test the nonlinear PMBC controller for setpoint changes, a feed flow rate change, and feed composition changes. The nonlinear PMBC controller used an approximate model based upon the Smoker equation directly to make control decisions. The nonlinear PMBC controller exhibits excellent control performance for all test cases with a maximum relative deviation of the impurity from setpoint of about 10% for the two product streams. The nonlinear PMBC controller provides significantly improved control performance over a conventional single loop control scheme that is currently in industrial use.

  12. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    2008-01-15

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  13. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  14. Simultaneous transverse oscillations of a prominence and a filament and longitudinal oscillation of another filament induced by a single shock wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Ying D.; Chen, P. F.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2014-11-10

    We present the first stereoscopic and Doppler observations of simultaneous transverse oscillations of a prominence and a filament and longitudinal oscillation of another filament launched by a single shock wave. Using H? Doppler observations, we derive the three-dimensional oscillation velocities at different heights along the prominence axis. The results indicate that the prominence has a larger oscillation amplitude and damping time at higher altitude, but the periods at different heights are the same (i.e., 13.5 minutes). This suggests that the prominence oscillates like a linear vertical rigid body with one end anchored on the Sun. One of the filaments shows weak transverse oscillation after the passing of the shock, which is possibly due to the low altitude of the filament and the weakening (due to reflection) of the shock wave before the interaction. Large-amplitude longitudinal oscillation is observed in the other filament after the passing of the shock wave. The velocity amplitude and period are about 26.8 km s{sup 1} and 80.3 minutes, respectively. We propose that the orientation of a filament or prominence relative to the normal vector of the incoming shock should be an important factor for launching transverse or longitudinal filament oscillations. In addition, the restoring forces of the transverse prominence are most likely due to the coupling of gravity and magnetic tension of the supporting magnetic field, while that for the longitudinal filament oscillation is probably the resultant force of gravity and magnetic pressure.

  15. Oscillating magnetocaloric effect in size-quantized diamagnetic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.

    2014-03-21

    We investigate the oscillating magnetocaloric effect on a size-quantized diamagnetic film in a transverse magnetic field. We obtain the analytical expression for the thermodynamic potential in case of the arbitrary spectrum of carriers. The entropy change is shown to be the oscillating function of the magnetic field and the film thickness. The nature of this effect is the same as for the de Haas–van Alphen effect. The magnetic part of entropy has a maximal value at some temperature. Such behavior of the entropy is not observed in magneto-ordered materials. We discuss the nature of unusual behavior of the magnetic entropy. We compare our results with the data obtained for 2D and 3D cases.

  16. Measurement of b_s oscillations at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salamanna, G.; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2006-09-01

    The first precise measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} - {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} with the CDFII experiment is summarized in this talk. The measurement is performed with 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron hadron collider. They find a signal consistent with flavor oscillations; the probability that such a signal is originated by random fluctuations is 0.2%. They measure {Delta}m{sub s} = 17.31{sub -0.18}{sup +0.33}(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.)ps{sup -1}. After a brief theoretical overview, the author describes the experimental technique and shows the results of the CDF analysis and the |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| value we infer from this measurement.

  17. Transverse Centroid Oscillations in Solenoidially Focused Beam Transport Lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, S M; Wootton, C J; Lee, E P

    2008-08-01

    Linear equations of motion are derived that describe small-amplitude centroid oscillations induced by displacement and rotational misalignments of the focusing solenoids in the transport lattice, dipole steering elements, and initial centroid offset errors. These equations are analyzed in a local rotating Larmor frame to derive complex-variable 'alignment functions' and 'bending functions' that efficiently describe the characteristics of the centroid oscillations induced by mechanical misalignments of the solenoids and dipole steering elements. The alignment and bending functions depend only on properties of the ideal lattice in the absence of errors and steering and have associated expansion amplitudes set by the misalignments and steering fields. Applications of this formulation are presented for statistical analysis of centroid deviations, calculation of actual lattice misalignments from centroid measurements, and optimal beam steering.

  18. Transverse centroid oscillations in solenoidially focused beam transport lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, Steven M.; Wootton, Christopher J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2008-08-01

    Linear equations of motion are derived that describe small-amplitude centroid oscillations induced by displacement and rotational misalignments of the focusing solenoids in the transport lattice, dipole steering elements, and initial centroid offset errors. These equations are analyzed in a local rotating Larmor frame to derive complex-variable"alignment functions" and"bending functions" that efficiently describe the characteristics of the centroid oscillations induced by mechanical misalignments of the solenoids and dipole steering elements. The alignment and bending functions depend only on properties of the ideal lattice in the absence of errors and steering and have associated expansion amplitudes set by the misalignments and steering fields. Applications of this formulation are presented for statistical analysis of centroid deviations, calculation of actual lattice misalignments from centroid measurements, and optimal beam steering.

  19. Reply to "Comment on `Axion Induced Oscillating Electric Dipole Moments' "

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-10-19

    A recent paper of Flambaum, Roberts and Stadnik, [1], claims there is no induced oscillating electric dipole moment (OEDM), eg, for the electron, arising from the oscillating cosmic axion background via the anomaly. This claim is based upon the assumption that electric dipoles always be defined by their coupling to static (constant in time) electric fields. The relevant Feynman diagram, as computed by [1], then becomes a total divergence, and vanishes in momentum space. However, an OEDM does arise from the anomaly, coupled to time dependent electric fields. It shares the decoupling properties with the anomaly. The full action, in an arbitrary gauge, was computed in [2], [3]. It is nonvanishing with a time dependent outgoing photon, and yields physics, eg, electric dipole radiation of an electron immersed in a cosmic axion field.

  20. Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepri, Stefano; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2014-12-01

    We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: The same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analyzed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a chaotic diode, where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

  1. Simple and compact expressions for neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2015-05-07

    We reformulate perturbation theory for neutrino oscillations in matter with an expansion parameter related to the ratio of the solar to the atmospheric ?m2 scales. Unlike previous works, use a renormalized basis in which certain first-order effects are taken into account in the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. Using this perturbation theory we derive extremely compact expressions for the neutrino oscillations probabilities in matter. We find, for example, that the ?e disappearance probability at this order is of a simple two flavor form with an appropriately identified mixing angle and ?m2. Furthermore, despite exceptional simplicity in their forms they accommodate all order effects ?13 and the matter potential.

  2. Four stroke concentric oscillating rotary vane internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seno, C.L.

    1992-02-11

    This patent describes a four stroke concentric oscillating rotary vane internal combustion engine made up of a pair of cranking mechanisms, a pair of forced porting mechanisms, an output shaft mechanism, a stator, a rotor, four arcuate combustion chambers and longitudinal and transverse grooves for lubrication and dynamic sealing. It comprises the pair of cranking mechanisms control the oscillating rotary motion of the rotor, each cranking mechanism comprising: one end; the pair of forced porting mechanisms control the forced porting of air into and combustion by-products from the combustion chambers, each forced porting mechanism: products from the combustion chambers; the output shaft mechanism orchestrating and coordinating the synchronized iterative operations of the cranking.

  3. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wahl, III, Edward F.; Boucher, Frederic B.

    1981-01-01

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  4. Combustor oscillation attenuation via the control of fuel-supply line dynamics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Gemmen, Randall S. (Morgantown, WV)

    1998-01-01

    Combustion oscillation control in combustion systems using hydrocarbon fuels is provided by acoustically tuning a fuel-delivery line to a desired phase of the combustion oscillations for providing a pulse of a fuel-rich region at the oscillating flame front at each time when the oscillation produced pressure in the combustion chamber is in a low pressure phase. The additional heat release produced by burning such fuel-rich regions during low combustion chamber pressure effectively attenuates the combustion oscillations to a selected value.

  5. Four cavity efficiency enhanced magnetically insulated line oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemke, R.W.; Clark, M.C.; Calico, S.E.

    1998-04-21

    A four cavity, efficient magnetically insulated line oscillator (C4-E MILO) having seven vanes and six cavities formed within a tube-like structure surrounding a cathode is disclosed. The C4-E MILO has a primary slow wave structure which is comprised of four vanes and the four cavities located near a microwave exit end of the tube-like structure. The primary slow wave structure is the four cavity portion of the magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO). An RF choke is provided which is comprised of three of the vanes and two of the cavities. The RF choke is located near a pulsed power source portion of the tube-like structure surrounding the cathode. The RF choke increases feedback in the primary slow wave structure, prevents microwaves generated in the primary slow wave structure from propagating towards the pulsed power source and modifies downstream electron current so as to enhance microwave power generation. A beam dump/extractor is located at the exit end of the oscillator tube for extracting microwave power from the oscillator, and in conjunction with an RF extractor vane, which comprises the fourth vane of the primary slow wave structure (nearest the exit) having a larger gap radius than the other vanes of the primary SWS, comprises an RF extractor. Uninsulated electron flow is returned downstream towards the exit along an anode/beam dump region located between the beam dump/extractor and the exit where the RF is radiated at said RF extractor vane located near the exit and the uninsulated electron flow is disposed at the beam dump/extractor. 34 figs.

  6. Four cavity efficiency enhanced magnetically insulated line oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemke, Raymond W.; Clark, Miles C.; Calico, Steve E.

    1998-04-21

    A four cavity, efficient magnetically insulated line oscillator (C4-E MILO) having seven vanes and six cavities formed within a tube-like structure surrounding a cathode. The C4-E MILO has a primary slow wave structure which is comprised of four vanes and the four cavities located near a microwave exit end of the tube-like structure. The primary slow wave structure is the four cavity (C4) portion of the magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO). An RF choke is provided which is comprised of three of the vanes and two of the cavities. The RF choke is located near a pulsed power source portion of the tube-like structure surrounding the cathode. The RF choke increases feedback in the primary slow wave structure, prevents microwaves generated in the primary slow wave structure from propagating towards the pulsed power source and modifies downstream electron current so as to enhance microwave power generation. A beam dump/extractor is located at the exit end of the oscillator tube for extracting microwave power from the oscillator, and in conjunction with an RF extractor vane, which comprises the fourth vane of the primary slow wave structure (nearest the exit) having a larger gap radius than the other vanes of the primary SWS, comprises an RF extractor. Uninsulated electron flow is returned downstream towards the exit along an anode/beam dump region located between the beam dump/extractor and the exit where the RF is radiated at said RF extractor vane located near the exit and the uninsulated electron flow is disposed at the beam dump/extractor.

  7. Semiclassical chaos in an x sup 4 anharmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.T. (Physics Dept., Univ. of the Philippines, Manila (PH))

    1992-04-10

    This paper reports on the Zaslavskii criterion for quantum chaos to a quartic anharmonic oscillator with dissipation and an external force term in the semiclassical approximation. The semiclassical equilibrium states and integral invariants are related to quantum states in terms of the ratio of h to the semiclassical action. Semiclassical chaos is found to occur with the destruction of integral invariants and equilibrium states but the quantum states are not destroyed.

  8. Using Coupled Harmonic Oscillators to Model Some Greenhouse Gas Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Go, Clark Kendrick C.; Maquiling, Joel T.

    2010-07-28

    Common greenhouse gas molecules SF{sub 6}, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} are modeled as harmonic oscillators whose potential and kinetic energies are derived. Using the Euler-Lagrange equation, their equations of motion are derived and their phase portraits are plotted. The authors use these data to attempt to explain the lifespan of these gases in the atmosphere.

  9. Arthur B. McDonald and Oscillating Neutrinos

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Arthur B. McDonald and Oscillating Neutrinos Resources with Additional Information Arthur B. McDonald Courtesy of Queen's University 'Queen's University professor emeritus Arthur McDonald is the co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics. ... Dr. McDonald won the award, along with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, "for their key contributions to the experiments which demonstrated that neutrinos change identities."... The findings solved a puzzle that physicists had wrestled

  10. Method of Focussing Waves by Inhomogeneous Oscillations of the underlying

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medium | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Method of Focussing Waves by Inhomogeneous Oscillations of the underlying Medium Disclosed is a nw method of refracting electromagnetic and other waves in a dispersive medium by modulating parameters of this medium by other waves. Possible uses include developing adaptive lenses of a new type for focusing and/or regracting electromagnetic radiation or wother waves. No.: M-868 Inventor(s): Nathaniel J Fisch

  11. Quantum driven dissipative parametric oscillator in a blackbody radiation field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pachn, Leonardo A.; Department of Chemistry and Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, Chemical Physics Theory Group, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 ; Brumer, Paul

    2014-01-15

    We consider the general open system problem of a charged quantum oscillator confined in a harmonic trap, whose frequency can be arbitrarily modulated in time, that interacts with both an incoherent quantized (blackbody) radiation field and with an arbitrary coherent laser field. We assume that the oscillator is initially in thermodynamic equilibrium with its environment, a non-factorized initial density matrix of the system and the environment, and that at t = 0 the modulation of the frequency, the coupling to the incoherent and the coherent radiation are switched on. The subsequent dynamics, induced by the presence of the blackbody radiation, the laser field, and the frequency modulation, is studied in the framework of the influence functional approach. This approach allows incorporating, in analytic closed formulae, the non-Markovian character of the oscillator-environment interaction at any temperature as well the non-Markovian character of the blackbody radiation and its zero-point fluctuations. Expressions for the time evolution of the covariance matrix elements of the quantum fluctuations and the reduced density-operator are obtained.

  12. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A QUIESCENT PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillier, A.; Morton, R. J.; Erdlyi, R.

    2013-12-20

    The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed for seeing-free observations at high-resolution and high-cadence making it well suited to study the dynamics of quiescent prominences. In recent years it has become clear that quiescent prominences support small-amplitude transverse oscillations, however, sample sizes are usually too small for general conclusions to be drawn. We remedy this by providing a statistical study of transverse oscillations in vertical prominence threads. Over a 4 hr period of observations it was possible to measure the properties of 3436 waves, finding periods from 50 to 6000s with typical velocity amplitudes ranging between 0.2 and 23km s{sup 1}. The large number of observed waves allows the determination of the frequency dependence of the wave properties and derivation of the velocity power spectrum for the transverse waves. For frequencies less than 7mHz, the frequency dependence of the velocity power is consistent with the velocity power spectra generated from observations of the horizontal motions of magnetic elements in the photosphere, suggesting that the prominence transverse waves are driven by photospheric motions. However, at higher frequencies the two distributions significantly diverge, with relatively more power found at higher frequencies in the prominence oscillations. These results highlight that waves over a large frequency range are ubiquitous in prominences, and that a significant amount of the wave energy is found at higher frequency.

  13. Water in protoplanetary disks: Deuteration and turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Nomura, Hideko; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-12-10

    We investigate water and deuterated water chemistry in turbulent protoplanetary disks. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking turbulent mixing in a vertical direction. Water near the midplane is transported to the disk atmosphere by turbulence and is destroyed by photoreactions to produce atomic oxygen, while the atomic oxygen is transported to the midplane and reforms water and/or other molecules. We find that this cycle significantly decreases column densities of water ice at r ? 30 AU, where dust temperatures are too high to reform water ice effectively. The radial extent of such region depends on the desorption energy of atomic hydrogen. Our model indicates that water ice could be deficient even outside the sublimation radius. Outside this radius, the cycle decreases the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio of water ice from ?2 10{sup 2}, which is set by the collapsing core model, to 10{sup 4}-10{sup 2} in 10{sup 6} yr, without significantly decreasing the water ice column density. The resultant D/H ratios depend on the strength of mixing and the radial distance from the central star. Our finding suggests that the D/H ratio of cometary water (?10{sup 4}) could be established (i.e., cometary water could be formed) in the solar nebula, even if the D/H ratio of water ice delivered to the disk was very high (?10{sup 2}).

  14. Water Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Security Home/Water Security - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper Competition Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, Energy-Water Nexus, Global, Global,

  15. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Stationary Phases in Microfabricated Gas-Chromatography Columns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Read, Douglas; Sillerud, Colin Halliday

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to integrate Sandia's microfabricated gas-chromatography ( GC) columns with a stationary phase material that is capable of retaining high-volatility chemicals and permanent gases. The successful integration of such a material with GCs would dramatically expand the repertoire of detectable compounds for Sandia's various microanalysis systems. One such promising class of candidate materials is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this report we detail our methods for controlled deposition of HKUST-1 MOF stationary phases within GC columns. We demonstrate: the chromatographic separation of natural gas; a method for determining MOF film thickness from chromatography alone; and the first-reported GC x GC separation of natural gas -- in general -- let alone for two disparate MOF stationary phases. In addition we determine the fundamental thermodynamic constant for mass sorption, the partition coefficient, for HKUST-1 and several light hydrocarbons and select toxic industrial chemicals.

  16. Safety Evaluation for Packaging for onsite Transfer of plutonium recycle test reactor ion exchange columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.J.

    1995-09-11

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to authorize the use of three U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 7A, Type A metal boxes (Capital Industries Part No. S 0600-0600-1080- 0104) to package 12 Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange columns as low-level waste (LLW). The packages will be transferred from the 309 Building in the 300 Area to low level waste burial in the 200 West Area. Revision 1 of WHC-SD-TP-SEP-035 (per ECN No. 621467) documents that the boxes containing ion exchange columns and grout will maintain the payload under normal conditions of transport if transferred without the box lids

  17. Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation Period Workshop at Annual Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Science Team Meeting D. A. Randall Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado R. T. Cederwall Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California * Study previous observation simulation system experiments (OSSEs) (i.e., Bill Frank, Pennsylvania State University [PSU]) and conduct OSSEs as necessary to evaluate

  18. Processes and catalysts for conducting fischer-tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Alan H. (Marshall Township, Allegheny County, PA); Oukaci, Rachid (Allison Park, PA); Goodwin, James G. (Cranberry Township, PA)

    1999-01-01

    Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided.

  19. Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, A.H.; Oukaci, R.; Goodwin, J.G.

    1999-08-17

    Processes and catalysts are disclosed for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided. 1 fig.

  20. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Percent of Establishments by Levels of Price Difference that Would Cause Fuel Switching from Coal to a Less Expensive Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference; Unit: Establishment Counts. Would Switch Would Not Estimate to More NAICS Establishments Switch Due 1 to 10 11 to 25 26 to 50 Over 50 Cannot Expensive Code(a) Subsector and Industry Able to Switch(b) to Price Percent Percent Percent Percent Be Provided Substitute Total United States

  1. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential; Unit: Physical Units. Actual Minimum Maximum Energy Sources Consumption Consumption(a) Consumption(b) Total United States Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthour 745,247 727,194 770,790 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 5,064 4,331 5,298 Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 22 20 82 Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 13 9 46 Coal (thousand short

  2. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources

  3. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping

  4. Experimental Ion Exchange Column With SuperLig 639 And Simulant Formulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, Megan; Nash, C.

    2013-08-26

    SuperLig639 ion exchange resin was tested as a retrieval mechanism for pertechnetate, through decontamination of a perrhenate spiked 5M Simple Average Na{sup +} Mass Based Simulant. Testing included batch contacts and a three-column ion exchange campaign. A decontamination of perrhenate exceeding 99% from the liquid feed was demonstrated. Analysis of the first formulation of a SBS/WESP simulant found unexpectedly low concentrations of soluble aluminum. Follow-on work will complete the formulation.

  5. " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS","

  6. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources"

  7. " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2010; " " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;" " Unit: Physical Units." ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum" "Energy Sources","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)" ,"Total United States" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",745247,727194,770790

  8. Hydrodynamics of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in slurry bubble column reactors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukur, D.B.; Daly, J.G.; Patel, S.A.; Raphael, M.L.; Tatterson, G.B.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes studies on hydrodynamics of bubble columns for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These studies were carried out in columns of 0.051 m and 0.229 m in diameter and 3 m tall to determine effects of operating conditions (temperature and gas flow rate), distributor type (sintered metal plate and single and multi-hole perforated plates) and liquid media (paraffin and reactor waxes) on gas hold-up and bubble size distribution. In experiments with the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) derived paraffin wax (FT-300) for temperatures between 230 and 280/sup 0/C there is a range of gas velocities (transition region) where two values of gas hold-up (i.e., two flow regimes) are possible. Higher hold-ups were accompanied by the presence of foam (''foamy'' regime) whereas lower values were obtained in the absence of foam (''slug flow'' in the 0.051 m column, or ''churn-turbulent'' flow regime in the 0.229 m column). This type of behavior has been observed for the first time in a system with molten paraffin wax as the liquid medium. Several factors which have significant effect on foaming characteristics of this system were identified. Reactor waxes have much smaller tendency to foam and produce lower hold-ups due to the presence of larger bubbles. Finally, new correlations for prediction of the gas hold-up and the specific gas-liquid interfacial area were developed on the basis of results obtained in the present study. 49 refs., 99 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. High resolution capillary column development for selective separations in gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Przybyciel, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of techniques for the preparation of high resolution capillary columns for gas chromatography is presented. Surface roughing, surface deactivation, stationary phase coating, and stationary phase crosslinking are discussed. Criteria for the selection of GC stationary phases and procedures for column evaluation are presented. A method is proposed for the isolation and determination of crude oil contamination in tropical plants and sediments. The method uses Florisil (TM) chromatography for the simultaneous clean-up and fractionation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Crosslinked SE-54 fused silica capillary columns prepared in our laboratory were employed for all GC separations. Mass spectrometry was used to help locate and identify specific oil components despite the intense background of the chromatogram. Crude oil components were identified in extracts of mangrove plant samples collected from the Peck Slip oil spill site at Media Munda, Puerto Rico. Crude oil components were also identified in sediment samples from controlled oil spill of Prudhoe Bay oil at Laguna de Chiriqui, Panama.

  10. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  11. State-of-the-art and recent developments of high-power gyrotron oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thumm, Manfred [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, ITP, P.O. Box 3640, D-76012 Karlsruhe (Germany); Universitaet Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik und Elektronik, Kaiserstrasse 12, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1999-05-07

    Gyrotron oscillators (gyromonotrons) are mainly used as high-power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. High unit power and high efficiency single-mode CW gyrotrons with conventional cylindrical (1 MW) and advanced coaxial (2 MW) cavities are worldwide under development. 118 GHz, 140 GHz and 170 GHz conventional cavity gyrotrons with output power P{sub out}{approx_equal}0.5 MW, pulse length {tau}{approx_equal}5.0 s and efficiency {eta}{approx_equal}35% are commercially available. Advanced internal quasi-optical mode converters generate linearly polarized output wave beams from the high-order cavity modes (e.g., TE{sub 22,6}) with efficiencies of 90-95% and separate the millimeter-wave beam from the electron beam, thus allowing the use of large CW-relevant depressed collectors for energy recovery. Overall efficiencies between 50 and 60% have been already achieved at JAERI, FZK, and GYCOM employing single-stage depressed collectors (SDC). First successful experiments at FZK employing a broadband Brewster window gave up to 1.5 MW output power at around 50% efficiency (SDC) for all operating mode series in the frequency range from 114 to 166 GHz (frequency tuning in 3.7 GHz steps by variation of the magnetic field strength in the cavity). Gyrotrons with advanced coaxial cavities designed for operation in the TE{sub 28,16} and TE{sub 31,17} modes at 140 and 165 GHz, respectively, are under development and test at IAP Nizhny Novgorod and FZK Karlsruhe. A maximum output power of 1.7 MW has been measured at 165 GHz with an efficiency of 35.2% (SDC, FZK). Cryogenically edge-cooled single-disk sapphire (T=77 K) and Au-doped silicon (T=230 K) windows as well as CVD-diamond windows with water edge-cooling at room temperature are under investigation in order to solve the window problem. Commercial CVD-diamond disks will easily allow the transmission of 2 MW power level at 170 GHz, CW. Bonding and brazing techniques are available. Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in materials processing. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with the following parameters: ISM frequency f{>=}24 GHz, P{sub out}=10-50 kW, CW, {eta}=30%. The present paper reviews recent developments and the state-of-the-art of high-power gyrotron oscillators for fusion plasma and industrial applications.

  12. Observation of multi-scale oscillation of laminar lifted flames with low-frequency AC electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, S.K.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, M.K.; Won, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea); Chung, S.H. [Clean Combustion Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-01-15

    The oscillation behavior of laminar lifted flames under the influence of low-frequency AC has been investigated experimentally in coflow jets. Various oscillation modes were existed depending on jet velocity and the voltage and frequency of AC, especially when the AC frequency was typically smaller than 30 Hz. Three different oscillation modes were observed: (1) large-scale oscillation with the oscillation frequency of about 0.1 Hz, which was independent of the applied AC frequency, (2) small-scale oscillation synchronized to the applied AC frequency, and (3) doubly-periodic oscillation with small-scale oscillation embedded in large-scale oscillation. As the AC frequency decreased from 30 Hz, the oscillation modes were in the order of the large-scale oscillation, doubly-periodic oscillation, and small-scale oscillation. The onset of the oscillation for the AC frequency smaller than 30 Hz was in close agreement with the delay time scale for the ionic wind effect to occur, that is, the collision response time. Frequency-doubling behavior for the small-scale oscillation has also been observed. Possible mechanisms for the large-scale oscillation and the frequency-doubling behavior have been discussed, although the detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms will be a future study. (author)

  13. ERK Oscillation-Dependent Gene Expression Patterns and Deregulation by Stress-Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Cummings, Brian S.; Shankaran, Harish; Scholpa, Natalie E.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2014-09-15

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether ERK oscillations regulate a unique subset of genes in human keratinocytes and subsequently, whether the p38 stress response inhibits ERK oscillations. A DNA microarray identified many genes that were unique to ERK oscillations, and network reconstruction predicted an important role for the mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) node in mediating ERK oscillation-dependent gene expression. Increased ERK-dependent phosphorylation of MED1 was observed in oscillating cells compared to non-oscillating counterparts as validation. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) increased ERK oscillation amplitudes and MED1 and phospho-MED1 protein levels. Bromate is a probable human carcinogen that activates p38. Bromate inhibited ERK oscillations in human keratinocytes and JB6 cells and induced an increase in phospho-p38 and decrease in phospho-MED1 protein levels. Treatment of normal rat kidney cells and primary salivary gland epithelial cells with bromate decreased phospho-MED1 levels in a reversible fashion upon treatment with p38 inhibitors (SB202190; SB203580). Our results indicate that oscillatory behavior in the ERK pathway alters homeostatic gene regulation patterns and that the cellular response to perturbation may manifest differently in oscillating vs non-oscillating cells.

  14. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface water, storm water and springs. April 12, 2012 Quarterly Groundwater monitoring attended by LANL managers and the Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board LANL scientists brief the Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board during quarterly groundwater monitoring of the well network around Area G. Contact

  15. Water Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Water Security Home/Tag:Water Security - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper Competition Analysis,

  16. Water Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, FL * Kate McMordie Stoughton - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory * kate.mcmordie@pnnl.gov * Francis Wheeler - Water Savers, LLC * fwheeler@watersaversllc.com Topics * Performance contracting analysis * Water industry terms * Federal reduction goals * Water balance * Water efficiency

  17. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Steve A. (Tracy, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous tream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  18. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwan, Thomas J. T. (Los Alamos, NM); Mostrom, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator (RBTO) provides a compact high power microwave generator. The RBTO includes a coaxial vacuum transmission line having an outer conductor and an inner conductor. The inner conductor defines an annular cavity with dimensions effective to support an electromagnetic field in a TEM.sub.00m mode. A radial field emission cathode is formed on the outer conductor for providing an electron beam directed toward the annular cavity electrode. Microwave energy is then extracted from the annular cavity electrode.

  19. Experimental Observation of Quantum Oscillation of Surface Chemical Reactivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, X.; Jiang, P.; Qi, Y.; Jia, J.; Yang, Y.; Duan, W.; Li, W. X.; Bao, X.; Zhang, S. B.

    2007-05-29

    Here we present direct observation of a quantum reactivity with respect to the amounts of O2 adsorbed and the rates of surface oxidation as a function of film thickness on ultrathin (2-6 nm) Pb mesas by scanning tunneling microscopy. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements on the electronic structures reveal a quantum oscillation that originates from quantum well states of the mesas, as a generalization of the Fabry-P{acute e}rot modes of confined electron waves. We expect the quantum reactivity to be a general phenomenon for most ultrathin metal films with broad implications, such as nanostructure tuning of surface reactivities and rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  20. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, S.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1984-06-13

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous stream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  1. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barker, Clark R. (Rolla, MO)

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  2. Method and apparatus for detecting timing errors in a system oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gliebe, Ronald J. (Library, PA); Kramer, William R. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A method of detecting timing errors in a system oscillator for an electronic device, such as a power supply, includes the step of comparing a system oscillator signal with a delayed generated signal and generating a signal representative of the timing error when the system oscillator signal is not identical to the delayed signal. An LED indicates to an operator that a timing error has occurred. A hardware circuit implements the above-identified method.

  3. Kondo Breakdown and Quantum Oscillations in SmB 6 (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Kondo Breakdown and Quantum Oscillations in SmB 6 This content will become publicly available on January 28, 2017 Title: Kondo Breakdown and ...

  4. Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a muon collider in the 10sup 34cmsup 2s range ... INHIBITION; INSTABILITY; INTERACTIONS; LUMINOSITY; MEETINGS; MUONS; OSCILLATIONS; ...

  5. Heavy Oil Process Monitor: Automated On-Column Asphaltene Precipitation and Re-Dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2007-03-31

    An automated separation technique was developed that provides a new approach to measuring the distribution profiles of the most polar, or asphaltenic components of an oil, using a continuous flow system to precipitate and re-dissolve asphaltenes from the oil. Methods of analysis based on this new technique were explored. One method based on the new technique involves precipitation of a portion of residua sample in heptane on a polytetrafluoroethylene-packed (PTFE) column. The precipitated material is re-dissolved in three steps using solvents of increasing polarity: cyclohexane, toluene, and methylene chloride. The amount of asphaltenes that dissolve in cyclohexane is a useful diagnostic of the thermal history of oil, and its proximity to coke formation. For example, about 40 % (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolves in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. The automated procedure takes one hour. Another method uses a single solvent, methylene chloride, to re-dissolve the material that precipitates on heptane on the PTFE-packed column. The area of this second peak can be used to calculate a value which correlates with gravimetric asphaltene content. Currently the gravimetric procedure to determine asphaltenes takes about 24 hours. The automated procedure takes 30 minutes. Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric methods. Methods based on the new on-column precipitation and re-dissolution technique provide significantly more detail about the polar constituent's oils than the gravimetric determination of asphaltenes.

  6. Reusing Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into...

  7. Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat

  8. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  9. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel --

  10. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,109 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,149 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 144 311221

  11. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,475 11,399 2,947 67 15

  12. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    .4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 151 2,494 10,376 4,061 64 7

  13. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 10.17 Percent of Establishments by Levels of Price Difference that Would Cause Fuel Switching from LPG to a Less Expensive Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference; Unit: Establishment Counts. Would Switch Would Not Estimate to More NAICS Establishments Switch Due 1 to 10 11 to 25 26 to 50 Over 50 Cannot Expensive Code(a) Subsector and Industry Able to Switch(b) to Price Percent Percent Percent Percent

  14. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297

  15. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use(e) Don't Know Total United

  16. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21

  17. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547

  18. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  19. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17

  20. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential; Unit: Physical Units. Actual Minimum Maximum Energy Sources Consumption Consumption(a) Consumption(b) Total United States Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthour 854,102 826,077 889,281 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 5,357 4,442 5,649 Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 22,139 19,251 101,340 Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 39,925

  1. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

  2. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 879.8 5.0 2.2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,416.6 17.5 5.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 21,552.1 43.6

  3. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 871.7 4.3 1.8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,239.5 10.5 3.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 28,965.0 27.1

  4. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 4,563 4,249 * 313 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,845 2,819 0 27 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,396 2,370 0 27 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 951 951 0 * 3114 Fruit

  5. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4

  6. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    August 2009 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0

  7. " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  8. " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ","Any "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Combustible",,,,,,,,"RSE"

  9. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",,"

  10. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",,"

  11. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per

  12. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per

  13. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million

  14. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " "Next MECS will be fielded in 2015" "Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments"

  15. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",,"

  16. DOE/SC-ARM-11-017 The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan CM Berkowitz Principal Investigator LK Berg RA Zaveri DJ Cziczo A Zelenyuk CJ Flynn RA Ferrare EI Kassianov CA Hostetler JD Fast B Cairns PJ Rasch PB Russell JE Shilling B Ervens July 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility

  17. Global Collaboration in Clean Fossil Energy A Column from the Deputy Assistant Secretary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6, Second Quarter, 2012 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 Global Collaboration in Clean Fossil Energy A Column from the Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Affairs 3 Exchanging CO 2 for Methane An Update on Methane Hydrate Testing on Alaska's North Slope 4 McConnell Confirmed Charles McConnell Sworn in As 12th Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy in April 5 Hydrogen-Based Fuel Cells New Catalyst Technology Reduces Diesel Engine Idling 7 Petroleum Reserves

  18. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KamLAND,; O'Donnell, Thomas

    2011-12-12

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters #1;{Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 21}, θ{sub 12} and constraints on θ{sub 13} based on a study of reactor antineutrinos at a baseline of ∼ 180 km with the KamLAND detector. The data presented here was collected between April 2002 and November 2009, and amounts to a total exposure of 2.64 ? 0.07 ? 10{sup 32} proton-years. For this exposure we expect 2140 ? 74(syst) antineutrino candidates from reactors, assuming standard model neutrino behavior, and 350?88(syst) candidates from background. The number observed is 1614. The ratio of background-subtracted candidates observed to expected is (N{sub Obs} − N{sub Bkg})/N{sub Exp} = 0.59 ? 0.02(stat) ? 0.045(syst) which confirms reactor neutrino disappearance at greater than 5σ significance. Interpreting this deficit as being due to neutrino oscillation, the best-fit oscillation parameters from a three-flavor analysis are #1;{Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 21} = 7.60{sup +0.20}{sub −0.19}?10{sup −5}eV{sup 2}, θ{sub 12} = 32.5 ? 2.9 degrees and sin{sup 2} θ{sub 13} = 0.025{sup +0.035}{sub −0.035}, the 95% confidence-level upper limit on sin{sup 2} θ{sub 13} is sin{sup 2} θ{sub 13} < 0.083. Assuming CPT invariance, a combined analysis of KamLAND and solar neutrino data yields best-fit values: #1;{Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 21} = 7.60{sup +0.20}{sub −0.20} ? 10{sup −5}eV{sup 2}, θ{sub 12} = 33.5{sup +1.0}{sub −1.1} degrees, and sin{sup 2} θ{sub 13} = 0.013 ? 0.028 or sin{sup 2} θ{sub 13} < 0.06 at the 95% confidence level.

  19. Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Weimin; Criddle, Craig S.

    2015-11-16

    We (the Stanford research team) were invited as external collaborators to contribute expertise in environmental engineering and field research at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN, for projects carried out at the Argonne National Laboratory and funded by US DOE. Specifically, we assisted in the design of batch and column reactors using ORNL IFRC materials to ensure the experiments were relevant to field conditions. During the funded research period, we characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments in batch microcosm and column experiments conducted at ANL, and we communicated with ANL team members through email and conference calls and face-to-face meetings at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings. Microcosm test results demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) when amended with ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but unknown U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. Due to budget reductions at ANL, Stanford contributions ended in 2011.

  20. Multiplexed Oversampling Digitizer in 65 nm CMOS for Column-Parallel CCD Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, Carl; Walder, Jean-Pierre; von der Lippe, Henrik

    2012-04-10

    A digitizer designed to read out column-parallel charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used for high-speed X-ray imaging is presented. The digitizer is included as part of the High-Speed Image Preprocessor with Oversampling (HIPPO) integrated circuit. The digitizer module comprises a multiplexed, oversampling, 12-bit, 80 MS/s pipelined Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) and a bank of four fast-settling sample-and-hold amplifiers to instrument four analog channels. The ADC multiplexes and oversamples to reduce its area to allow integration that is pitch-matched to the columns of the CCD. Novel design techniques are used to enable oversampling and multiplexing with a reduced power penalty. The ADC exhibits 188 ?V-rms noise which is less than 1 LSB at a 12-bit level. The prototype is implemented in a commercially available 65 nm CMOS process. The digitizer will lead to a proof-of-principle 2D 10 Gigapixel/s X-ray detector.

  1. PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

    2012-07-26

    Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

  2. PULSE COLUMN DESIGN By Lawrence E. Burkhart R.W. Fahien

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EXPERIMENTAL RESUITS 63 Hold-up Studies 63 The isoaiiyl alcohol-water system 63 The methyl isobutyl ketone-water system 72 Discussion of Hold-up Data 78 Extraction Studies 80 ...

  3. Excitation of thermoacoustic oscillations by small premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coats, C.M.; Chang, Z.; Williams, P.D.

    2010-06-15

    Experiments have been carried out in which very small lean premixed flames closely representative of those formed by modern multiport domestic gas burners have been subjected to controlled acoustic perturbation. PLIF from CH has been used to visualise the flame response and the heat-release-rate fluctuations have been evaluated directly from the flame images. It is shown that small laminar flames can amplify the effects of acoustic velocity fluctuations by mechanisms that do not involve resonant heat loss to the burner and that the fluctuations in flame-front area are not adequately characterised by a Strouhal number alone. The measured transfer function is compared with the predictions of various analytical formulations and a new model of the flame oscillation is proposed which applies specifically to situations in which the design of the burner renders the flame base immobile. (author)

  4. Study of the Open Loop and Closed Loop Oscillator Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imel, George R.; Baker, Benjamin; Riley, Tony; Langbehn, Adam; Aryal, Harishchandra; Benzerga, M. Lamine

    2015-04-11

    This report presents the progress and completion of a five-year study undertaken at Idaho State University of the measurement of very small worth reactivity samples comparing open and closed loop oscillator techniques.The study conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of the two techniques with regard to uncertainties in reactivity values, i.e., limited by reactor noise. As those results are thoroughly documented in recent publications, in this report we will concentrate on the support work that was necessary. For example, we describe in some detail the construction and calibration of a pilot rod for the closed loop system. We discuss the campaign to measure the required reactor parameters necessary for inverse-kinetics. Finally, we briefly discuss the transfer of the open loop technique to other reactor systems.

  5. Non-synchronous control of self-oscillating resonant converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaser, John Stanley (Niskayuna, NY); Zane, Regan Andrew (Scotia, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A self-oscillating switching power converter has a controllable reactance including an active device connected to a reactive element, wherein the effective reactance of the reactance and the active device is controlled such that the control waveform for the active device is binary digital and is not synchronized with the switching converter output frequency. The active device is turned completely on and off at a frequency that is substantially greater than the maximum frequency imposed on the output terminals of the active device. The effect is to vary the average resistance across the active device output terminals, and thus the effective output reactance, thereby providing converter output control, while maintaining the response speed of the converter.

  6. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Sixth technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidaspow, D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert the gas-solid-liquid fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phases. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. This report presents measurements of granular temperature of Air Products catalyst. The report is in the form of a preliminary paper, entitled ``Dynamics of Liquid-Solid Fluidized Beds with Small Catalyst Particles.`` The principal results are as follows: (1) For the liquid-solid system the granular temperature is much smaller than for a corresponding gas-solid system. This may be due to the larger viscosity of the liquid in comparison to air. (2) The collisional viscosity of the catalyst is correspondingly much smaller than that of catalyst particles in the air. (3) The dominant frequency of density oscillations is near two Hertz, as expected for a gas-solid fluidized bed. There exists a link between this low frequency and the high frequency of catalyst particle oscillations. The Air Products fluidized bed reactor is designed to produce methanol and synthetic fuels from synthesis gas.

  7. WasteWater Treatment And Heavy Metals Removal In The A-01 Constructed Wetland 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANNA, KNOX

    2004-08-01

    The A-01 wetland treatment system (WTS) was designed to remove metals from the effluent at the A-01 NPDES outfall. The purpose of research conducted during 2003 was to evaluate (1) the ability of the A-01 wetland treatment system to remediate waste water, (2) retention of the removed contaminants in wetland sediment, and (3) the potential remobilization of these contaminants from the sediment into the water column. Surface water and sediment samples were collected and analyzed in this study.

  8. Even-odd oscillation and valley polarization of transmission between multilayer graphenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakanishi, Takeshi; Ando, Tsuneya

    2013-12-04

    Electron transmission through a boundary between multi-layer graphenes with Bernal stacking consisting of different number of layers is studied. A valley polarization in transmission probability appears as in monolayer and bilayer systems, exhibits considerable oscillation depending of even or odd layer numbers, and its amplitude gradually decreases with the layer number. The total transmission shows oscillation with much smaller amplitude.

  9. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Ly? photons, since the Ly? line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ?300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  10. Integration of a Self-Coherence Algorithm into DISAT for Forced Oscillation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follum, James D.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2015-03-03

    With the increasing number of phasor measurement units on the power system, behaviors typically not observable on the power system are becoming more apparent. Oscillatory behavior on the power system, notably forced oscillations, are one such behavior. However, the large amounts of data coming from the PMUs makes manually detecting and locating these oscillations difficult. To automate portions of the process, an oscillation detection routine was coded into the Data Integrity and Situational Awareness Tool (DISAT) framework. Integration into the DISAT framework allows forced oscillations to be detected and information about the event provided to operational engineers. The oscillation detection algorithm integrates with the data handling and atypical data detecting capabilities of DISAT, building off of a standard library of functions. This report details that integration with information on the algorithm, some implementation issues, and some sample results from the western United States power grid.

  11. Sheath oscillation characteristics and effect on near-wall conduction in a krypton Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Fengkui Kong, Lingyi; Li, Chenliang; Yang, Haiwei; Li, Wei

    2014-11-15

    Despite its affordability, the krypton Hall-effect thruster in applications always had problems in regard to performance. The reason for this degradation is studied from the perspective of the near-wall conductivity of electrons. Using the particle-in-cell method, the sheath oscillation characteristics and its effect on near-wall conduction are compared in the krypton and xenon Hall-effect thrusters both with wall material composed of BNSiO{sub 2}. Comparing these two thrusters, the sheath in the krypton-plasma thruster will oscillate at low electron temperatures. The near-wall conduction current is only produced by collisions between electrons and wall, thereby causing a deficiency in the channel current. The sheath displays spatial oscillations only at high electron temperature; electrons are then reflected to produce the non-oscillation conduction current needed for the krypton-plasma thruster. However, it is accompanied with intensified oscillations.

  12. Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Power - NearyFig1 Permalink Gallery University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential bed erosion effects Energy, Modeling & Analysis, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Water Power University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential bed erosion effects Sandia Labs Water Power Technologies Department promotes open-source marine hydrokinetic research by disseminating information on MHK technology designs

  13. Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power/Energy Conversion Efficiency/Water Power - Water PowerTara Camacho-Lopez2016-02-16T18:27:48+00:00 Enabling a successful water power industry. Hydropower Optimization Developing tools for optimizing the U.S. hydropower fleet's performance with minimal environmental impact. Technology Development Improving the power performance and reliability of marine hydrokinetic technologies. Market Acceleration & Deployment Addressing barriers to development, deployment, and evaluation of

  14. Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ...

  15. Reusing Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment

  16. A BLAS-3 version of the QR factorization with column pivoting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana-Orti, G.; Sun, X.; Bischof, C.H.

    1998-09-01

    The QR factorization with column pivoting (QRP), originally suggested by Golub is a popular approach to computing rank-revealing factorizations. Using Level 1 BLAS, it was implemented in LINPACK, and, using Level 2 BLAS, in LAPACK. While the Level 2 BLAS version delivers superior performance in general, it may result in worse performance for large matrix sizes due to cache effects. The authors introduce a modification of the QRP algorithm which allows the use of Level 3 BLAs kernels while maintaining the numerical behavior of the LINPACK and LAPACK implementations. Experimental comparisons of this approach with the LINPACK and LAPACK implementations on IBM RS/6000, SGI R8000, and DEC AXP platforms show considerable performance improvements.

  17. Method for enhancing selectivity and recovery in the fractional flotation of particles in a flotation column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klunder, Edgar B. (Bethel Park, PA)

    2011-08-09

    The method relates to particle separation from a feed stream. The feed stream is injected directly into the froth zone of a vertical flotation column in the presence of a counter-current reflux stream. A froth breaker generates a reflux stream and a concentrate stream, and the reflux stream is injected into the froth zone to mix with the interstitial liquid between bubbles in the froth zone. Counter-current flow between the plurality of bubbles and the interstitial liquid facilitates the attachment of higher hydrophobicity particles to bubble surfaces as lower hydrophobicity particles detach. The height of the feed stream injection and the reflux ratio may be varied in order to optimize the concentrate or tailing stream recoveries desired based on existing operating conditions.

  18. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590

  19. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use(f) Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 13,271 1,849 10,454 968

  20. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet

  1. Two-dimensional positive column structure in a discharge tube with radius discontinuity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobnin, A. V. Usachev, A. D.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    The low-pressure (40 and 90?Pa) low-current (4 and 10?mA) direct current discharge in a tube with a sharp change of its radius is studied both numerically and experimentally. A fully self-consistent hybrid numerical model of a two-dimensional non-uniform positive column in neon is developed using a nonlocal approach. The model combines kinetic simulation of the electrons (under two-terms approach) and fluid description of the neon ions and permits to calculate the distribution of all plasma parameters in the direct current discharges in the cameras with cylindrical geometry and radius discontinuity. The simulation results are compared with the measured 585.3?nm neon spectral line absolute intensities and excited 1s{sub 3} metastable neon atom number densities. Non-local electron kinetics in the transition region and formation of standing strata are discussed.

  2. Direct extraction of coherent mode properties from imaging measurements in a linear plasma column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Light, A. D.; Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Department of Physics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 ; Thakur, S. C.; Brandt, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093

    2013-08-15

    Spectral properties of coherent waves in an argon plasma column are examined using fluctuation data from fast imaging. Visible light from ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using a high-speed digital camera. A cross-spectral phase technique allows direct visualization of dominant phase structures as a function of frequency, as well as identification of azimuthal asymmetries present in the system. Experimental dispersion estimates are constructed from imaging data alone. Drift-like waves are identified by comparison with theoretical dispersion curves, and a tentative match of a low-frequency spectral feature to Kelvin-Helmholtz-driven waves is presented. Imaging measurements are consistent with previous results, and provide non-invasive, single-shot measurements across the entire plasma cross-section. Implications of the measured spectral properties for imaging measurements of mode dynamics are explored.

  3. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  4. Effect of irradiation on bone remodelling and the structural integrity of the vertebral column. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, K.N.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of therapeutic levels of radiation on the axial properties of the primate vertebral column were studied. Seven male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were irradiated with a single does of 1300 cGy to the specific lumbar vertebrae of L2, L3, and L4. Three additional animals served as controls. Radiographs were taken before the radiation treatment and just prior to sacrifice to determine density changes in the bone. The animal subjects were sacrificed 105 days following the radiation exposure. Biomechanical testing was completed on lumbar levels 2 and 3 to identify changes in strength characteristics following radiation treatment. Histomorphometric analysis of lumbar vertebrae level 4 was completed to identify volume and surface density changes as well as cellular changes. Tetracycline, dicarbomethylaminomethyl fluorescein (DCAF), and xylenol orange were used as bone labeling agents to aid in the histomorphometry and to obtain dynamic parameter changes.

  5. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVE SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE 105 K EAST ION EXCHANGE COLUMN MONOLITH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOCHEN, R.M.

    2007-08-02

    The 105-K East (KE) Basin Ion Exchange Column (IXC) cells, lead caves, and the surrounding vault are to be removed as necessary components in implementing ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (Ecology et al. 2003) milestone M-034-32 (Complete Removal of the K East Basin Structure). The IXCs consist of six units located in the KE Basin, three in operating positions in cells and three stored in a lead cave. Methods to remove the IXCs from the KE Basin were evaluated in KBC-28343, ''Disposal of K East Basin Ion Exchange Column Evaluation''. The method selected for removal was grouting the six IXCs into a single monolith for disposal at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Grout will be added to the IXC cells, IXC lead caves containing spent IXCs, and in the spaces between the lead cave walls and metal skin, to immobilize the contaminants, provide self-shielding, minimize void space, and provide a structurally stable waste form. The waste to be offered for disposal is the encapsulated monolith defined by the exterior surfaces of the vault and the lower surface of the underlying slab. This document presents summary of the data quality objective (DQO) process establishing the decisions and data required to support decision-making activities for the disposition of the IXC monolith. The DQO process is completed in accordance with the seven-step planning process described in EPA QA/G-4, ''Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process'', which is used to clarify and study objectives; define the appropriate type, quantity, and quality of data; and support defensible decision-making. The DQO process involves the following steps: (1) state the problem; (2) identify the decision; (3) identify the inputs to the decision; (4) define the boundaries of the study; (5) develop a decision rule (DR); (6) specify tolerable limits on decision errors; and (7) optimize the design for obtaining data.

  6. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Seventh technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidaspow, D.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phase. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. A hydrodynamic model for multiphase flows, based on the principles of mass, momentum and energy conservation for each phase, was developed and applied to model gas-liquid, gas-liquid-solid fluidization and gas-solid-solid separation. To simulate the industrial slurry bubble column reactors, a computer program based on the hydrodynamic model was written with modules for chemical reactions (e.g. the synthesis of methanol), phase changes and heat exchangers. In the simulations of gas-liquid two phases flow system, the gas hold-ups, computed with a variety of operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas and liquid velocities, agree well with the measurements obtained at Air Products` pilot plant. The hydrodynamic model has more flexible features than the previous empirical correlations in predicting the gas hold-up of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems. In the simulations of gas-liquid-solid bubble column reactors with and without slurry circulation, the code computes volume fractions, temperatures and velocity distributions for the gas, the liquid and the solid phases, as well as concentration distributions for the species (CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}0H, ... ), after startup from a certain initial state. A kinetic theory approach is used to compute a solid viscosity due to particle collisions. Solid motion and gas-liquid-solid mixing are observed on a color PCSHOW movie made from computed time series data. The steady state and time average catalyst concentration profiles, the slurry height and the rates of methanol production agree well with the measurements obtained at an Air Products` pilot plant.

  7. Water Wars

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-11

    Sandia National Laboratories and Intel Corporation are cooperating on a project aimed at developing serious games to assist in resource planners in conducting open and participatory projects. Water Wars serves as a prototype game focused on water issues. Water Wars is a multi-player, online role-playing "serious game" combining large-scale simulation (e.g. SimCity), with strategy and interpersonal interaction (e.g. Diplomacy). The game is about water use set in present-day New Mexico. Players enact various stakeholder rolesmore » and compete for water while simultaneously cooperating to prevent environmental collapse. The gamespace utilizes immersive 3D graphics to bring the problem alive. The game integrates Intel's OpenSim visualization engine with Sandia developed agent-based and system dynamics models.« less

  8. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel. Large increases in Reynolds stress occur due to onset of the small-scale concentrations of vorticity immediately downstream of separation; substantial increases at locations further downstream arise from development of the large-scale vorticity concentrations.

  9. The impact of equivalence ratio oscillations on combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat Altay, H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2009-11-15

    The combustion dynamics of propane-air flames are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, atmospheric inlet temperature, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We modify the location of the fuel injector to examine the impact of equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame on the combustion dynamics. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat-release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When the fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame is steady and the combustion dynamics are controlled only by flame-vortex interactions. In this case, different dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. When the fuel is injected close to the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame exhibits oscillations. In the presence of equivalence ratio oscillations, the measured sound pressure level is significant across the entire range of lean mean equivalence ratios even if the equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame are out-of-phase with the pressure oscillations. The combustion dynamics are governed primarily by the flame-vortex interactions, while the equivalence ratio oscillations have secondary effects. The equivalence ratio oscillations could generate variations in the combustion dynamics in each cycle under some operating conditions, destabilize the flame at the entire range of the lean equivalence ratios, and increase the value of the mean equivalence ratio at the lean blowout limit. (author)

  10. A fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator -- Part I. Design and fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Baker, Michael S.; Clews, Peggy J.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2015-06-24

    Our paper reports the design and fabrication of a fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator (OCMO). This paper begins by describing the limits on oscillator frequency stability imposed by the thermal drift and electronic properties (Q, resistance) of both the resonant tank circuit and feedback electronics required to form an electronic oscillator. An OCMO is presented that takes advantage of high thermal isolation and monolithic integration of both micromechanical resonators and electronic circuitry to thermally stabilize or ovenize all the components that comprise an oscillator. This was achieved by developing a processing technique where both silicon-on-insulator complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry and piezoelectric aluminum nitride, AlN, micromechanical resonators are placed on a suspended platform within a standard CMOS integrated circuit. Operation at microscale sizes achieves high thermal resistances (~10 C/mW), and hence thermal stabilization of the oscillators at very low-power levels when compared with the state-of-the-art ovenized crystal oscillators, OCXO. This constant resistance feedback circuit is presented that incorporates on platform resistive heaters and temperature sensors to both measure and stabilize the platform temperature. Moreover, the limits on temperature stability of the OCMO platform and oscillator frequency imposed by the gain of the constant resistance feedback loop, placement of the heater and temperature sensing resistors, as well as platform radiative and convective heat losses are investigated.

  11. Mechanism behind self-sustained oscillations in direct current glow discharges and dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Sung Nae

    2013-04-15

    An alternative explanation to the mechanism behind self-sustained oscillations of ions in direct current (DC) glow discharges is provided. Such description is distinguished from the one provided by the fluid models, where oscillations are attributed to the positive feedback mechanism associated with photoionization of particles and photoemission of electrons from the cathode. Here, oscillations arise as consequence of interaction between an ion and the surface charges induced by it at the bounding electrodes. Such mechanism provides an elegant explanation to why self-sustained oscillations occur only in the negative resistance region of the voltage-current characteristic curve in the DC glow discharges. Furthermore, this alternative description provides an elegant explanation to the formation of plasma fireballs in the laboratory plasma. It has been found that oscillation frequencies increase with ion's surface charge density, but at the rate which is significantly slower than it does with the electric field. The presented mechanism also describes self-sustained oscillations of ions in dusty plasmas, which demonstrates that self-sustained oscillations in dusty plasmas and DC glow discharges involve common physical processes.

  12. A fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillatorPart I. Design and fabrication

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Baker, Michael S.; Clews, Peggy J.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2015-06-24

    Our paper reports the design and fabrication of a fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator (OCMO). This paper begins by describing the limits on oscillator frequency stability imposed by the thermal drift and electronic properties (Q, resistance) of both the resonant tank circuit and feedback electronics required to form an electronic oscillator. An OCMO is presented that takes advantage of high thermal isolation and monolithic integration of both micromechanical resonators and electronic circuitry to thermally stabilize or ovenize all the components that comprise an oscillator. This was achieved by developing a processing technique where both silicon-on-insulator complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuitrymoreand piezoelectric aluminum nitride, AlN, micromechanical resonators are placed on a suspended platform within a standard CMOS integrated circuit. Operation at microscale sizes achieves high thermal resistances (~10 C/mW), and hence thermal stabilization of the oscillators at very low-power levels when compared with the state-of-the-art ovenized crystal oscillators, OCXO. This constant resistance feedback circuit is presented that incorporates on platform resistive heaters and temperature sensors to both measure and stabilize the platform temperature. Moreover, the limits on temperature stability of the OCMO platform and oscillator frequency imposed by the gain of the constant resistance feedback loop, placement of the heater and temperature sensing resistors, as well as platform radiative and convective heat losses are investigated.less

  13. MHK Technologies/Oscillating Cascade Power System OCPS | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    current A 60 overall water to wire efficiency was demonstrated at the proof of concept test and 65 or better overall efficiency is projected using the new engineering advances...

  14. Oscillators in a (2+1)-dimensional noncommutative space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, F.

    2014-03-15

    We study the Harmonic and Dirac Oscillator problem extended to a three-dimensional noncommutative space where the noncommutativity is induced by the shift of the dynamical variables with generators of SL(2,R) in a unitary irreducible representation considered in Falomir et al. [Phys. Rev. D 86, 105035 (2012)]. This redefinition is interpreted in the framework of the Levi's decomposition of the deformed algebra satisfied by the noncommutative variables. The Hilbert space gets the structure of a direct product with the representation space as a factor, where there exist operators which realize the algebra of Lorentz transformations. The spectrum of these models are considered in perturbation theory, both for small and large noncommutativity parameters, finding no constraints between coordinates and momenta noncommutativity parameters. Since the representation space of the unitary irreducible representations SL(2,R) can be realized in terms of spaces of square-integrable functions, we conclude that these models are equivalent to quantum mechanical models of particles living in a space with an additional compact dimension.

  15. Axion Induced Oscillating Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-07-24

    The axion electromagnetic anomaly induces an oscillating electric dipole for the electron of frequency ma and strength ~ 10-32 e-cm, two orders of magnitude above the nucleon, and within four orders of magnitude of the present standard model constant limit. We give a detailed study of this phenomenon via the interaction of the cosmic axion, through the electromagnetic anomaly, with particular emphasis on the decoupling limit of the axion, δta(t) ∝ ma → 0. The general form of the action involves a local contact interaction and a nonlocal contribution that enforces the decoupling limit. We derive the effective action in the Pauli-Schroedinger non-relativistic formalism, and in Georgi’s heavy quark formalism adapted to the “heavy electron” (heavy compared to ma). We compute the electric dipole radiation emitted by stationary electrons, and we discuss a number of experimental configurations that may yield detectable signals. Phased array radiators with N2 unit cell magnetic elements may have advantages over resonant cavities that exploit large Q, since we can design toward N2 >> Q.

  16. Neutrinoless double beta decay and future neutrino oscillation precision experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choubey, Sandhya [Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Rodejohann, Werner [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    We discuss to what extent future precision measurements of neutrino mixing observables will influence the information we can draw from a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay. Whereas the {delta}m{sup 2} corresponding to solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations are expected to be known with good precision, the parameter {theta}{sub 12} will govern a large part of the uncertainty. We focus, in particular, on the possibility of distinguishing the neutrino mass hierarchies and on setting a limit on the neutrino mass. We give the largest allowed values of the neutrino masses which allow to distinguish the normal from the inverted hierarchy. All aspects are discussed as a function of the uncertainty stemming from the involved nuclear matrix elements. The implications of a vanishing, or extremely small, effective mass are also investigated. By giving a large list of possible neutrino mass matrices and their predictions for the observables, we finally explore how a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay can help to identify the neutrino mass matrix if more precise values of the relevant parameters are known.

  17. Axion Induced Oscillating Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-08-17

    The axion electromagnetic anomaly induces an oscillating electric dipole for the electron of frequency ma and strength ~ 10-32 e-cm, two orders of magnitude above the nucleon, and within four orders of magnitude of the present standard model constant limit. We give a detailed study of this phenomenon via the interaction of the cosmic axion, through the electromagnetic anomaly, with particular emphasis on the decoupling limit of the axion, ?ta(t) ? ma ? 0. The general form of the action involves a local contact interaction and a nonlocal contribution that enforces the decoupling limit. We derive the effective action in the Pauli-Schroedinger non-relativistic formalism, and in Georgis heavy quark formalism adapted to the heavy electron (heavy compared to ma). We compute the electric dipole radiation emitted by stationary electrons, and we discuss a number of experimental configurations that may yield detectable signals. Phased array radiators with N2 unit cell magnetic elements may have advantages over resonant cavities that exploit large Q, since we can design toward N2 >> Q.

  18. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-05-27

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequencymore » demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures.« less

  19. Axion Induced Oscillating Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-07-24

    The axion electromagnetic anomaly induces an oscillating electric dipole for the electron of frequency ma and strength ~ 10-32 e-cm, two orders of magnitude above the nucleon, and within four orders of magnitude of the present standard model constant limit. We give a detailed study of this phenomenon via the interaction of the cosmic axion, through the electromagnetic anomaly, with particular emphasis on the decoupling limit of the axion, δta(t) ∝ ma → 0. The general form of the action involves a local contact interaction and a nonlocal contribution that enforces the decoupling limit. We derive the effective action inmore » the Pauli-Schroedinger non-relativistic formalism, and in Georgi’s heavy quark formalism adapted to the “heavy electron” (heavy compared to ma). We compute the electric dipole radiation emitted by stationary electrons, and we discuss a number of experimental configurations that may yield detectable signals. Phased array radiators with N2 unit cell magnetic elements may have advantages over resonant cavities that exploit large Q, since we can design toward N2 >> Q.« less

  20. Asymmetric modes decomposition in an overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Dian; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Jin, Zhenxing; Ju, Jinchuan

    2014-09-15

    Most of the investigated overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs) are azimuthally symmetric; thus, they are designed through two dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. However, 2-D PIC simulations cannot reveal the effect of asymmetric modes on beam-wave interaction. In order to investigate whether asymmetric mode competition needs to be considered in the design of overmoded RBWOs, a numerical method of determining the composition of both symmetric and asymmetric modes in three dimensional (3-D) PIC simulations is introduced in this paper. The 2-D and 3-D PIC simulation results of an X-band overmoded RBWO are analyzed. Our analysis indicates that the 2-D and 3-D PIC simulation results of our device are quite different due to asymmetric mode competition. In fact, asymmetric surface waves, especially EH{sub 11} mode, can lead to serious mode competition when electron beam propagates near the surface of slow wave structures (SWSs). Therefore, additional method of suppressing asymmetric mode competition, such as adjusting the reflections at both ends of SWSs to decrease the Q-factor of asymmetric modes, needs to be utilized in the design of overmoded RBWOs. Besides, 3-D PIC simulation and modes decomposition are essential for designing overmoded RBWOs.

  1. Method to improve optical parametric oscillator beam quality

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Arlee V.; Alford, William J.; Bowers, Mark S.

    2003-11-11

    A method to improving optical parametric oscillator (OPO) beam quality having an optical pump, which generates a pump beam at a pump frequency greater than a desired signal frequency, a nonlinear optical medium oriented so that a signal wave at the desired signal frequency and a corresponding idler wave are produced when the pump beam (wave) propagates through the nonlinear optical medium, resulting in beam walk off of the signal and idler waves, and an optical cavity which directs the signal wave to repeatedly pass through the nonlinear optical medium, said optical cavity comprising an equivalently even number of non-planar mirrors that produce image rotation on each pass through the nonlinear optical medium. Utilizing beam walk off where the signal wave and said idler wave have nonparallel Poynting vectors in the nonlinear medium and image rotation, a correlation zone of distance equal to approximately .rho.L.sub.crystal is created which, through multiple passes through the nonlinear medium, improves the beam quality of the OPO output.

  2. Wind/PV Generation for Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping in the Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R; Hadley, Stanton W; Liu, Yilu

    2013-12-01

    This report presents the control of renewable energy sources, including the variable-speed wind generators and solar photovoltaic (PV) generators, for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI). In this report, based on the user-defined wind/PV generator electrical control model and the 16,000-bus Eastern Interconnection dynamic model, the additional controllers for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are developed and incorporated and the potential contributions of renewable energy sources to the EI system frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are evaluated.

  3. Measurement of rapidly varying electric fields through parity oscillations in the Rydberg states of hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer-Ray, N.E.; Zare, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Oscillations are shown to exist in the inversion symmetry of the electronic wave function of a hydrogenic atom coherently excited to a Rydberg state by a short pulse of laser radiation in a uniform electric field. The dependence of these oscillations on field strength is shown to scale as {ital n}{sup 2} where {ital n} is the principal quantum number. The possibility of using these oscillations to measure electric signals on picosecond timescales (terahertz frequencies) is suggested. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. drinking water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drinking water - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  5. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  6. High Level Waste System Impacts from Small Column Ion Exchange Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, D. J.; Hamm, L. L.; Aleman, S. E.; Peeler, D. K.; Herman, C. C.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-08-18

    The objective of this task is to identify potential waste streams that could be treated with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) and perform an initial assessment of the impact of doing so on the High-Level Waste (HLW) system. Design of the SCIX system has been performed as a backup technology for decontamination of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX consists of three modules which can be placed in risers inside underground HLW storage tanks. The pump and filter module and the ion exchange module are used to filter and decontaminate the aqueous tank wastes for disposition in Saltstone. The ion exchange module contains Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST in its engineered granular form is referred to as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911), and is selective for removal of cesium ions. After the IE-911 is loaded with Cs-137, it is removed and the column is refilled with a fresh batch. The grinder module is used to size-reduce the cesium-loaded IE-911 to make it compatible with the sludge vitrification system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). If installed at the SRS, this SCIX would need to operate within the current constraints of the larger HLW storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal system. Although the equipment has been physically designed to comply with system requirements, there is also a need to identify which waste streams could be treated, how it could be implemented in the tank farms, and when this system could be incorporated into the HLW flowsheet and planning. This document summarizes a preliminary examination of the tentative HLW retrieval plans, facility schedules, decontamination factor targets, and vitrified waste form compatibility, with recommendations for a more detailed study later. The examination was based upon four batches of salt solution from the currently planned disposition pathway to treatment in the SCIX. Because of differences in capabilities between the SRS baseline and SCIX, these four batches were combined into three batches for a total of about 3.2 million gallons of liquid waste. The chemical and radiological composition of these batches was estimated from the SpaceMan Plus{trademark} model using the same data set and assumptions as the baseline plans.

  7. Separative analyses of a chromatographic column packed with a core-shell adsorbent for lithium isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, T.; Sugura, K.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.

    2015-03-15

    Lithium-6 is used as a blanket material for sufficient tritium production in DT fueled fusion reactors. A core-shell type adsorbent was proposed for lithium isotope separation by chromatography. The mass transfer model in a chromatographic column consisted of 4 steps, such as convection and dispersion in the column, transfer through liquid films, intra-particle diffusion and and adsorption or desorption at the local adsorption sites. A model was developed and concentration profiles and time variation in the column were numerically simulated. It became clear that core-shell type adsorbents with thin porous shell were saturated rapidly relatively to fully porous one and established a sharp edge of adsorption band. This is very important feature because lithium isotope separation requires long-distance development of adsorption band. The values of HETP (Height Equivalent of a Theoretical Plate) for core-shell adsorbent packed column were estimated by statistical moments of the step response curve. The value of HETP decreased with the thickness of the porous shell. A core-shell type adsorbent is, then, useful for lithium isotope separation. (authors)

  8. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-05-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  9. System for adjusting frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bartholomew, David B.

    2006-11-14

    A system for setting and adjusting a frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator in a network is disclosed. The system comprises an accumulator module configured to receive pulses from an oscillator and to output an accumulated value. An adjustor module is configured to store an adjustor value used to correct local oscillator drift. A digital adder adds values from the accumulator module to values stored in the adjustor module and outputs their sums to the accumulator module, where they are stored. The digital adder also outputs an electrical pulse to a logic module. The logic module is in electrical communication with the adjustor module and the network. The logic module may change the value stored in the adjustor module to compensate for local oscillator drift or change the frequency of output pulses. The logic module may also keep time and calculate drift.

  10. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul William; Boukhalfa, Hakim

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240Pu desorbed from the colloids during the second column injection compared to the first injection, but then desorption decreased significantly in the third injection. This result suggests that the Pu(IV) nanocolloids probably at least partially dissolved during and after the first injection, resulting in enhanced desorption from the colloids during the second injection, but by the third injection the Pu started following the same trend that was observed for 137Cs. The experiments suggest a transport scale dependence in which mobile colloids and colloid-associated radionuclides observed at downstream points along a flow path have a greater tendency to remain mobile along the flow path than colloids and radionuclides observed at upstream points. This type of scale dependence may help explain observations of colloid-facilitated Pu transport over distances of up to 2 km at Pahute Mesa.

  11. Quantum chaos in Aharonov-Bohm oscillations (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: Quantum chaos in Aharonov-Bohm oscillations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum chaos in Aharonov-Bohm oscillations × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also

  12. HEAVY OIL PROCESS MONITOR: AUTOMATED ON-COLUMN ASPHALTENE PRECIPITATION AND RE-DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr; Mark Sanderson

    2006-06-01

    About 37-50% (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolve in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. This solubility measurement can be used after coke begins to form, unlike the flocculation titration, which cannot be applied to multi-phase systems. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. A more rapid method to measure asphaltene solubility was explored using a novel on-column asphaltene precipitation and re-dissolution technique. This was automated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment with a step gradient sequence using the solvents: heptane, cyclohexane, toluene:methanol (98:2). Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric method. The measurement time was reduced from three days to forty minutes. The separation was expanded further with the use of four solvents: heptane, cyclohexane, toluene, and cyclohexanone or methylene chloride. This provides a fourth peak which represents the most polar components, in the oil.

  13. Space-charge waves in magnetized and collisional quantum plasma columns confined in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Abdikian, Alireza

    2014-04-15

    We study the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating in a column of quantum magnetized collisional plasma embraced completely by a metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The analysis is based on the quantum linearized hydrodynamic formalism of collective excitations within the quasi-static approximation. It is shown when the electronic de Broglie's wavelength of the plasma is comparable in the order of magnitude to the radius of the nanotube, the quantum effects are quite meaningful and our model anticipates one acoustical and two optical space-charge waves which are positioned into three propagating bands. With increasing the nanotube radius, the features of the acoustical branch remain unchanged, yet two distinct optical branches are degenerated and the classical behavior is recovered. This study might provide a platform to create new finite transverse cross section quantum magnetized plasmas and to devise nanometer dusty plasmas based on the metallic carbon nanotubes in the absence of either a drift or a thermal electronic velocity and their existence could be experimentally examined.

  14. Full-Column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, ML

    2016-01-01

    The vertical distributions of CO2, CH4, and other gases provide important constraints when determining terrestrial and ocean sources and sinks of carbon and other biogeochemical processes in the Earth system. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Earth System Research Laboratory to quantify the vertically resolved distribution of atmospheric carbon-cycle gases(CO2, CH4 ) within approximately 99% of the atmospheric column at the DOE ’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma . During the 2012 to 2014 campaign period, 12 successful Air C ore flights were conducted from the SGP site . In addition to providing critical data for evaluating remote sensing and earth system models, valuable lessons were learned that motivate improvements to the sampling and recovery systems and campaign logistics . With the launch of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory - 2 (OCO - 2) and Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite ( GOSAT ) satellites, we look forward to proposing additional sampling and analysis efforts at the SGP site and at other sites to characterize the vertical distribution of CO2, CH4 over time and space.

  15. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D. [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  16. SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS OF LARGE-AMPLITUDE LONGITUDINAL OSCILLATIONS IN A SOLAR FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Ting; Zhang Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2012-11-20

    We present the first Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of the large-amplitude longitudinal (LAL) oscillations in the south and north parts (SP and NP) of a solar filament on 2012 April 7. Both oscillations are triggered by flare activities close to the filament. The period varies with filamentary threads, ranging from 44 to 67 minutes. The oscillations of different threads are out of phase, and their velocity amplitudes vary from 30 to 60 km s{sup -1}, with a maximum displacement of about 25 Mm. The oscillations of the SP repeat for about four cycles without any significant damping and then a nearby C2.4 flare causes the transition from the LAL oscillations of the filament to its later eruption. The filament eruption is also associated with a coronal mass ejection and a B6.8 flare. However, the oscillations of the NP damp with time and die out at last. Our observations show that the activated part of the SP repeatedly shows a helical motion. This indicates that the magnetic structure of the filament is possibly modified during this process. We suggest that the restoring force is the coupling of the magnetic tension and gravity.

  17. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This workmore » also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.« less

  18. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This workmorealso studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.less

  19. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This work also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.

  20. ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucker, G

    2007-05-01

    Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and contaminate drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminates. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: contaminant decay, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use.

  1. Estimating fate and transport of multiple contaminants in the vadose zone using a multi-layered soil column and three-phase equilibrium partitioning model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucker, Gregory G.

    2007-07-01

    Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and pollute drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminants. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: decay processes, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use. (authors)

  2. RHEOLOGY OF SETTLED SOLIDS IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, C.; Prior, M.; Koopman, D.; Edwards, T.

    2011-06-20

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank as process housing. This method includes the addition of monosodium titanate (MST) to a waste tank containing salt solution and entrained sludge solids, followed by tank mixing and filtration. The filtrate is then processed through in-tank ion exchange columns containing crystalline silicotitanate (CST) media. While the process is operating, it is known that solid particles begin to settle in the tank and temperatures may reach beyond 45 C. Previous testing has shown that sludge-MST slurries that sit for extended periods at elevated temperatures can develop large shear strengths, making them difficult to resuspend and remove from the tank. The authors conducted rheological testing of mixtures containing various concentrations of sludge simulant, MST, and CST (three preparations) that were aged at different times (i.e., 0 to 13 weeks) and isothermally maintained to 30, 45, or 60 C. Two types of grinding methodologies were employed to prepare CST for this testing, herein called Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) ground materials. Unground CST particles were also tested. A small number of samples were irradiated prior to 4 week settling and 60 C temperature treatment, with exposures ranging from 0 to 100 MRad. Additional tests are also being conducted that will allow the solid particles to settle at 45 C for 6, 12, and 24 months. The objectives of this task are to determine the impact of feed composition, settling time, and temperature on the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency of the slurries and to determine the impact of radiation on slurry rheology. The testing will determine the relative impact of these parameters rather than predict the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency as a function of feed and operating conditions. This document describes the rheology of slurries containing MST, CST, and simulated sludge that sat at indicated temperatures for up to 13 weeks. A previous SRNL report described preliminary rheology data of slurries containing MST and sludge. Preliminary results of the irradiation tests are also presented in this report, though additional data are still being collected. Rheology of the long term settling samples (6, 12, and 24 months) and additional irradiation test results will be reported at a later date. Conclusions from this analysis are as follows: (1) Slurries containing MST and unground CST have the largest shear strength. Due to the high shear strengths measured in slurries containing unground CST, evaluations of specific tank contents and mixing capability should be performed prior to any addition of this material into a waste tank. Experimentally determined shear strengths indicate mixing could be problematic in mixtures containing unground CST. (2) Increasing the ground CST fraction in the slurry increases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (3) Increasing the sludge fraction in the slurry decreases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (4) Slurries containing VSL ground CST have larger shear strength, yield stress, and consistency than slurries containing SRNL ground CST. (5) The effects of settling time and temperature on slurry shear strength are slurry dependent. (6) No effects of settling time and temperature on slurry yield stress or consistency were observed. (7) Radiation up to 100 MRad does not appear to affect properties of shear strength, yield stress, or consistency of process feeds.

  3. NGC 1365: A low column density state unveiling a low ionization disk wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Risaliti, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present the time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of NGC 1365 collected during one XMM-Newton observation, which caught this 'changing-look' active galactic nucleus in a high flux state characterized also by a low column density (N {sub H} ? 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2}) of the X-ray absorber. During this observation, the low-energy photoelectric cut-off is at about ?1 keV and the primary continuum can be investigated with the XMM-Newton-RGS data, which show strong spectral variability that can be explained as a variable low N {sub H} that decreased from N {sub H} ? 10{sup 23} cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} in a 100 ks timescale. The spectral analysis of the last segment of the observation revealed the presence of several absorption features that can be associated with an ionized (log ? ? 2 erg cm s{sup 1}) outflowing wind (v {sub out} ? 2000 km s{sup 1}). We detected for the first time a possible P-Cygni profile of the Mg XII Ly? line associated with this mildly ionized absorber indicative of a wide angle outflowing wind. We suggest that this wind is a low ionization zone of the highly ionized wind present in NGC 1365, which is responsible for the iron K absorption lines and is located within the variable X-ray absorber. At the end of the observation, we detected a strong absorption line at E ? 0.76 keV most likely associated with a lower ionization zone of the absorber (log ? ? 0.2 erg cm s{sup 1}, N {sub H} ? 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2}), which suggests that the variable absorber in NGC 1365 could be a low ionization zone of the disk wind.

  4. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, P. R.; Ford, G. W.; Milonni, P. W.

    2014-10-28

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r{sup ?4}, a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called remarkable formula for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. OConnell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  5. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  6. Guidelineless system for riser entry/reentry that permits quick release of a riser column from a subsea installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConaughy, R.C.; Wright, J.W.

    1983-08-23

    A guidelineless riser entry/reentry system is disclosed which permits a safe and quick release of riser column from a subsea installation. The system includes two guide funnels mounted on opposite sides of the subsea installation at the upper end thereof for the purpose of engaging respective telescopic posts mounted at the lower end of the riser column. With the posts in an extended position the riser may be appropriately maneuvered to position the posts in their respective guide funnels. This way, the riser is properly positioned on and orientated with respect to the subsea installation. The riser may then be disconnected or connected to the subsea installation and the posts moved into retracted position so that the riser may be rapidly removed from the subsea installation.

  7. water infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    infrastructure - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  8. water savings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    savings - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  9. water scarcity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scarcity - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  10. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.3. Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  11. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  12. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  13. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed

  14. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel

  15. Diagnosis of Differences Between Stratiform Clouds Simulated by Large-Eddy Simulation and Single-Column Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagnosis of Differences Between Stratiform Clouds and Simulated by Large-Eddy Simulation and Single-Column Models S. J. Ghan and M. Ovtchinnikov Climate Physics Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction An adequate parameterization of cloud microphysics is essential for estimating the indirect aerosol effect in large-scale models. Such a parameterization must rely on a physically sound treatment of spatial variability that affects many microphysical processes in a

  16. A study of out-of-phase power instabilities in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, J.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1988-06-20

    This paper presents a study of the stability of subcritical neutronic modes in boiling water reactors that can result in out-of-phase power oscillations. A mechanism has been identified for this type of oscillation, and LAPUR code has been modified to account for it. Numerical results show that there is a region in the power-flow operating map where an out-or-phase stability mode is likely even if the core-wide mode is stable. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Oscillation phenomena of a plasma produced by an AC driven hot cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Yuki; Miyamoto, Naoki; Kasuya, Toshiro; Wada, Motoi

    2012-11-06

    Amplitude of oscillating discharge current has been measured for Bernas-type ion source equipped with an alternating current heated hot tungsten filament cathode. Measurements have been made by changing the filament diameter from 0.2 mm to 0.7 mm, and by changing the DC discharge current from 0.1 A to 1.5 A. The fluctuation amplitude of the discharge current was found decreased as the diameter of the filament was enlarged. The fluctuation amplitude took the minimum value at a frequency from several hundred Hz to 1 kHz depending upon the filament diameter and DC discharge current. For example, the relative oscillation amplitude was the smallest at 1 kHz for 0.7 mm diameter filament. Increase in discharge current had reduced the minimum oscillation amplitude, and increased the frequency at which the oscillating amplitude took the minimum. Fundamental mechanisms relevant to these characteristics of oscillation amplitude of discharge current from an AC driven hot cathode filament are discussed.

  18. VERTICAL KINK OSCILLATION OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE STRUCTURE IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; Cho, K.-S.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2014-12-20

    Vertical transverse oscillations of a coronal magnetic rope, observed simultaneously in the 171 and 304 bandpasses of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), are detected. The oscillation period is about 700 s and the displacement amplitude is about 1 Mm. The oscillation amplitude remains constant during the observation. Simultaneous observation of the rope in the bandpasses corresponding to the coronal and chromospheric temperatures suggests that it has a multi-thermal structure. Oscillatory patterns in 171 and 304 are coherent, which indicates that the observed kink oscillation is collective, in which the rope moves as a single entity. We interpret the oscillation as a fundamental standing vertically polarized kink mode of the rope, while the interpretation in terms of a perpendicular fast wave could not be entirely ruled out. In addition, the arcade situated above the rope and seen in the 171 bandpass shows an oscillatory motion with the period of about 1000 s.

  19. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  20. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these conditions.