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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Piercing ear cartilage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Piercing ear cartilage Piercing ear cartilage Name: Mark Reynolds Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My name is Mark Reynolds. I have heard that there is a nerve in the cartilage area of the ear. My question is as follows: If you pierce your ear(s) and do hit the nerve, could permanent paralysis or brain damage occur? Thank you. Replies: No. Basically nerves serve two purposes: gathering information from the senses (sensory nerves) and controlling muscles (motor nerves). If you damage a sensory nerve, then that nerve can't send messages to the brain, but this will not damage the brain. If you damage a motor nerve then the brain can't send messages to a muscle and indeed paralysis occurs. But nerves are laid out sensibly, that is, nerves do not go from your brain through your earlobe and then on to your leg or arm. Damaging a motor nerve in your ear won't affect anything other than your ear muscles, if there are any. Paralysis is usually temporary if motor nerve damage occurs outside of the spinal cord, since the main body of the motor nerve cells are in the spinal cord and the "axons" connecting them to the muscles can regrow (about a millimeter a day). If nerve cell bodies themselves are damaged by injury to the spinal cord they may recover and paralysis go away. This may also happen even if nerve cells are killed, as long as not too many are, and other cells can take over. But if too many are killed paralysis is permanent, since nerve cells never reproduce.

2

Digital ear scanner : measuring the compliance of the ear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper seeks to resolve the biggest problem with hearing aids, their physical fit. By digitally scanning the ear canal and taking the dynamics of the ear into account the performance and comfort of a hearing aid can ...

Hernandez-Stewart, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

black ears to blonde cats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

black ears to blonde cats: paths for designing change Ben Bederson & Allison Druin Computer Science of cats lived in a remote village. A river divided the village in two. Black cats lived on one bank and blonde cats lived on the other... In summer and autumn, a black cat ruled the village and in spring

Golbeck, Jennifer

4

On guided model-based analysis for ear biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ears are a new biometric with a major advantage in that they appear to maintain their structure with increasing age. Current approaches have exploited 2D and 3D images of the ear in human identification. Contending that the ear is mainly a planar shape ... Keywords: Biometrics, Ear biometrics, Ear embryology, Model-based analysis, Occlusion analysis

Banafshe Arbab-Zavar; Mark S. Nixon

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

EAR ROT IN THE 2006 CORN CROP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several incidences of ear rot have been noticed across Illinois and Iowa this year. In most cases, these fields were grown to corn the previous year. It is not surprising that ear rots are developing this year, given the late summer rains and high amount of stalk rots. Growers should be alerted to

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

THE BLACK-EARED MINER A DECADE OF RECOVERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BLACK-EARED MINER A DECADE OF RECOVERY David Baker-Gabb 2007 #12;Copyright © 2007. All or otherwise without prior written permission. The Black-eared Miner. A Decade of Recovery. © 2007 Black-eared Miner Recovery Team. Recommended citation: Baker-Gabb, D. (2007). The Black-eared Miner. A Decade

Frappell, Peter

7

Neurosensory Development in the Zebrafish Inner Ear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vertebrate inner ear is a complex structure responsible for hearing and balance. The inner ear houses sensory epithelia composed of mechanosensory hair cells and non-sensory support cells. Hair cells synapse with neurons of the VIIIth cranial ganglion, the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG), and transmit sensory information to the hindbrain. This dissertation focuses on the development and regulation of both sensory and neuronal cell populations. The sensory epithelium is established by the basic helixloop- helix transcription factor Atoh1. Misexpression of atoh1a in zebrafish results in induction of ectopic sensory epithelia albeit in limited regions of the inner ear. We show that sensory competence of the inner ear can be enhanced by co-activation of fgf8/3 or sox2, genes that normally act in concert with atoh1a. The developing sensory epithelia express several factors that regulate differentiation and maintenance of hair cells. We show that pax5 is differentially expressed in the anterior utricular macula (sensory epithelium). Knockdown of pax5 function results in utricular hair cell death and subsequent loss of vestibular (balance) but not auditory (hearing) defects. SAG neurons are formed normally in these embryos but show disorganized dendrites in the utricle following loss of hair cells. Lastly, we examine the development of SAG. SAG precursors (neuroblasts) are formed in the floor of the ear by another basic helix-loophelix transcription factor neurogenin1 (neurog1). We show that Fgf emanating from the utricular macula specifies neuroblasts, that later delaminate from the otic floor and undergo a phase of proliferation. Neuroblasts then differentiate into bipolar neurons that extend processes to hair cells and targets in the hindbrain. We show evidence that differentiating neurons express fgf5 and regulate further development of the SAG. As more differentiated neurons accumulate, increasing level of Fgf terminates the phase of neuroblast specification. Later on, elevated Fgf stabilizes the transit-amplifying phase and inhibits terminal differentiation. Thus, Fgf signaling regulates SAG development at various stages to ensure that proper number of neurons is generated.

Vemaraju, Shruti

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Effect of Annealing Condition on Earing and Texture Formation in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At low heating rate (0.01-1K/s) the ears on drawn cup situated at 45 deg. to the sheet rolling .... Corrosion Performance of New Generation Aluminum-Lithium Alloys for .... Increased Production and Quality with Reduced Operating Costs and...

9

Media representation of maternal neonaticide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present research conducted a rich discourse analysis of an episode of the fictional television crime drama, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, as well as a content analysis of local and national news transcripts focusing on the representation of mothers who commit neonaticide. Both fictional and non-fictional media sources exhibited aspects of the monstrous maternal theme and the strain defense theme. The monstrous maternal theme consists of words and statements that indicate the descriptions of crime committed against the newborn as well as negative responses and reactions by others to the young mother and her crime. The strain defense theme refers to instances that discuss the internal and external strains of the young woman that may have contributed to her committing neonaticide. However, the "monstrous maternal" is the prevailing representation of mothers who commit neonaticide in both fictional and non-fictional media sources. This media representation utilizes "control talk" to separate "us" the good mothers, who abide by the cultural expectations of traditional gender roles and embrace the internal and external strains of motherhood, from "them" the criminal mothers, who fail to adhere to these role expectations of motherhood by committing neonaticide. The present research reveals that cultural stories and scripts of the monstrous maternal still exist. This contemporary folklore may serve as a form of social control to scare women into conforming to these traditional gender roles and bearing the burden of the motherhood strains, in order to avoid being branded a bad mother. Finally, the present research develops the application of General Strain Theory to explain the internal and external strains of a young woman that may contribute to her committing the criminal act of maternal neonaticide. These media representations of maternal neonaticide could impact the criminal justice system and public policy. Questions of accuracy, gendered understandings of crime and gendered understanding of appropriate punishment are areas the present research explores. Most importantly, the present research seeks to investigate the connection between legal culture in both media and professional practice - and what those connections mean for our general cultural understandings of violence and aggression in women.

Lewis, Jocelyn Renee

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Modernizing the handling of ear corn. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to modernize the handling of ear corn. The corn was picked with a three row JD 300 picker pulled by a tractor. Pulled behind the picker was a side dump wagon with a capacity of 150 bushels of ear corn. When the dump wagon was full, a grain truck was driven along side of the wagon and the dump wagon, controlled by the tractor driver, was emptied into the truck. After two dumps of the wagon, the truck was driven to the storage area. The storage area consisted of ten (ten) 2000 bushel corn cribs set in a semi circle so that the elevator that filled the cribs could be moved from one crib to the next without changing the fill point. At the storage area, the truck full of corn was dumped into the platform feeder. By using a platform feeder to feed the elevator, all ten (10) cribs could be filled without moving it. After the harvest was complete, the corn remains in the cribs until needed for feed or until the corn is sold. During the time that the corn remains in the cribs, the turbine ventilator draws air through the corn and dries it.

Kleptz, C.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Challenges in the design of a GNSS ear tag for feedlot cattle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) based ear tag was designed developed and tested for use on cattle in feedlots. Previous research by others has primarily used GNSS collars; however the widespread use of a Position, Velocity and Time (PVT) ... Keywords: Ear tag, Feedlot, GNSS, GPS, Livestock health, Low-power, Wireless sensor network

J. B. Schleppe; G. Lachapelle; C. W. Booker; T. Pittman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person's identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual's ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications.

Bouchard, Ann Marie (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon Cecil (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Auditory system comparisons between sand cats and other felid species : acoustic input admittance of ears and auditory brainstem responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sand cat, one species of the cat family, is found only in deserts and has unusually large ear canals and middle-ear air cavities. Recent work has shown that sand cat ears absorb acoustic power at low frequencies (<1 ...

Chan, Howard F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Comparative approaches to otoacoustic emissions : towards and understanding of why the ear emits sound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ear represents a remarkable achievement in sensory physiology. It is very fast (timescales on the order of 1-100 kHz), has a large bandwidth (-10 octaves in the human), highly sensitive (threshold is ultimately determined ...

Bergevin, Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose distributions were clinically identical. In all patient cases, radiation oncologists rated O-MAR corrected images as higher quality. Formerly obscured critical structures were able to be visualized. The overall image quality and the conspicuity in critical organs were significantly improved compared with the uncorrected images: overall quality score (1.35 vs 3.25, P= 0.0022); bladder (2.15 vs 3.7, P= 0.0023); prostate and seminal vesicles/vagina (1.3 vs 3.275, P= 0.0020); rectum (2.8 vs 3.9, P= 0.0021). The noise levels of the selected ROIs were reduced from 93.7 to 38.2 HU. On most cases (8/10), the average CT Hounsfield numbers of the prostate/vagina on the O-MAR corrected images were closer to the referenced value (41.2 HU, an average measured from patients without metal implants) than those on the uncorrected images. High {gamma} pass rates of the five IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated that the dose distributions were not significantly affected by the CT image improvements. Conclusions: Overall, this study indicated that the O-MAR function can remarkably reduce metal artifacts and improve both CT Hounsfield number accuracy and target and critical structure visualization. Although there was no significant impact of the O-MAR algorithm on the calculated dose distributions, we suggest that O-MAR corrected images are more suitable for the entire treatment planning process by offering better anatomical structure visualization, improving radiation oncologists' confidence in target delineation, and by avoiding subjective density overrides of artifact regions on uncorrected images.

Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Philips Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

RESEARCH Open Access Choice in maternity care: associations with unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH Open Access Choice in maternity care: associations with unit supply, geographic European countries, current trends in maternity unit closures create a context in which user choice may women's choice of maternity unit. We study here how pregnant women's choices interact with the distance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

17

Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus) roosting in abandoned coal mines in West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We surveyed bats at 36 abandoned coal mines during summer 2002 and 47 mines during fall 2002 at New River Gorge National River and Gauley River National Recreation Area, WV. During summer, we captured three federally endangered Virginia big-eared bats at two mine entrances, and 25 were captured at 12 mine entrances during fall. These represent the first documented captures of this species at coal mines in West Virginia. Future survey efforts conducted throughout the range of the Virginia big-eared bat should include abandoned coal mines.

Johnson, J.B.; Edwards, J.W.; Wood, P.B. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (US). Wildlife & Fisheries Resources Programme

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes decrease survival of larval southern toads (Bufo terrestris) Brian S. Metts a, * , Kurt A....

19

Reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality with a Solar Suitcase...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality with a Solar Suitcase: The Power to Save Lives Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Hal Aronson Karina Garbesi Laura Stachel Date: February 23,...

20

Does the infrasound from wind turbines affect the inner ear? Alec N. Salt1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does the infrasound from wind turbines affect the inner ear? Alec N. Salt1 1 Washington University turbines adversely affects human health. The unweighted spectrum of wind turbine noise slowly rises (needing over 120 dB SPL to detect 2 Hz) it is claimed that infrasound generated by wind turbines is below

Salt, Alec N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Intra- and interspecific responses to Rafinesques big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) social calls.  

SciTech Connect

Bats respond to the calls of conspecifics as well as to calls of other species; however, few studies have attempted to quantify these responses or understand the functions of these calls. We tested the response of Rafinesques big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) to social calls as a possible method to increase capture success and to understand the function of social calls. We also tested if calls of bats within the range of the previously designated subspecies differed, if the responses of Rafinesques big-eared bats varied with geographic origin of the calls, and if other species responded to the calls of C. rafinesquii. We recorded calls of Rafinesques big-eared bats at two colony roost sites in South Carolina, USA. Calls were recorded while bats were in the roosts and as they exited. Playback sequences for each site were created by copying typical pulses into the playback file. Two mist nets were placed approximately 50500 m from known roost sites; the net with the playback equipment served as the Experimental net and the one without the equipment served as the Control net. Call structures differed significantly between the Mountain and Coastal Plains populations with calls from the Mountains being of higher frequency and longer duration. Ten of 11 Rafinesques big-eared bats were caught in the Control nets and, 13 of 19 bats of other species were captured at Experimental nets even though overall bat activity did not differ significantly between Control and Experimental nets. Our results suggest that Rafinesques big-eared bats are not attracted to conspecifics calls and that these calls may act as an intraspecific spacing mechanism during foraging.

Loeb, Susan, C.; Britzke, Eric, R.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

A wearable heart monitor at the ear using ballistocardiogram (BCG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) with a nanowatt ECG heartbeat detection circuit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a wearable heart monitor at the ear that uses the ballistocardiogram (BCG) and the electrocardiogram (ECG) to extract heart rate, stroke volume, and pre-ejection period (PEP) for the application of ...

He, David Da

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ICT-enabled delivery of maternal health services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fresh opportunities are being created daily for the deployment of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) [42] particularly in the area of poverty alleviation and sustainable economic growth in developing countries in particular. Therefore, ... Keywords: Ghana, ICT4D, development, e-governance, maternal mortality, mobile phones, public policy

Johanna E. Awotwi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Forces between clustered stereocilia minimize friction in the ear on a subnanometre scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of sound begins when energy derived from acoustic stimuli deflects the hair bundles atop hair cells. As hair bundles move, the viscous friction between stereocilia and the surrounding liquid poses a fundamental challenge to the ear's high sensitivity and sharp frequency selectivity. Part of the solution to this problem lies in the active process that uses energy for frequency-selective sound amplification. Here we demonstrate that a complementary part involves the fluid-structure interaction between the liquid within the hair bundle and the stereocilia. Using force measurement on a dynamically scaled model, finite-element analysis, analytical estimation of hydrodynamic forces, stochastic simulation and high-resolution interferometric measurement of hair bundles, we characterize the origin and magnitude of the forces between individual stereocilia during small hair-bundle deflections. We find that the close apposition of stereocilia effectively immobilizes the liquid between them, which reduces t...

Kozlov, Andrei S; Risler, Thomas; Versteegh, Corstiaen P C; Hudspeth, A J; 10.1038/nature10073

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Seasonal and multiannual roost use by Rafinesque's Big-eared Bats in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little is known about factors affecting year-round use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) or the long-term fidelity of this species to anthropogenic or natural roosts. The objectives of this study were to test whether seasonal use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats varied with roost type and environmental conditions within and among seasons and to document multiannual use of natural and anthropogenic structures by this species. We inspected 4 bridges, 1 building, and 59 tree roosts possessing basal cavity openings; roosts were inspected at least once per week from May through October in every year from 2005 through 2008 and once a month from November through April in every year from 2005 through 2009. We found that use of anthropogenic roosts was significantly greater than the use of tree roosts in summer but that the use of structure types did not differ in other seasons. There was significant seasonal variation in use of anthropogenic and tree roosts. Anthropogenic roost use was higher in summer than in all other seasons. There was no significant difference in tree use among spring, summer, and fall, but use in winter was significantly lower in 2 years of the study. Overall use of anthropogenic and tree roosts was positively related to minimum temperature, but the relationship between use of roosts and minimum temperature varied among seasons. Bats showed multiannual fidelity ({ge} 4 years) to all anthropogenic roosts and to some tree roosts, but fidelity of bats to anthropogenic roosts was greater and more consistent than to tree roosts. Our data indicate that Rafinesque's big-eared bats responded differently to environmental conditions among seasons; thus, a variety of structure types and characteristics are necessary for conservation of these bats. We suggest long-term protection of roost structures of all types is necessary for conservation of Rafinesque's big-eared bats in the southeast Coastal Plain.

Loeb, Susan, C.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Forces between clustered stereocilia minimize friction in the ear on a subnanometre scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of sound begins when energy derived from acoustic stimuli deflects the hair bundles atop hair cells. As hair bundles move, the viscous friction between stereocilia and the surrounding liquid poses a fundamental challenge to the ear's high sensitivity and sharp frequency selectivity. Part of the solution to this problem lies in the active process that uses energy for frequency-selective sound amplification. Here we demonstrate that a complementary part involves the fluid-structure interaction between the liquid within the hair bundle and the stereocilia. Using force measurement on a dynamically scaled model, finite-element analysis, analytical estimation of hydrodynamic forces, stochastic simulation and high-resolution interferometric measurement of hair bundles, we characterize the origin and magnitude of the forces between individual stereocilia during small hair-bundle deflections. We find that the close apposition of stereocilia effectively immobilizes the liquid between them, which reduces the drag and suppresses the relative squeezing but not the sliding mode of stereociliary motion. The obliquely oriented tip links couple the mechanotransduction channels to this least dissipative coherent mode, whereas the elastic horizontal top connectors stabilize the structure, further reducing the drag. As measured from the distortion products associated with channel gating at physiological stimulation amplitudes of tens of nanometres, the balance of forces in a hair bundle permits a relative mode of motion between adjacent stereocilia that encompasses only a fraction of a nanometre. A combination of high-resolution experiments and detailed numerical modelling of fluid-structure interactions reveals the physical principles behind the basic structural features of hair bundles and shows quantitatively how these organelles are adapted to the needs of sensitive mechanotransduction.

Andrei S. Kozlov; Johannes Baumgart; Thomas Risler; Corstiaen P. C. Versteegh; A. J. Hudspeth

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Effects of Maternal Nutrition Manipulation on Mares and Their Foals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous research documented the fetus is sensitive to nutrition of the dam, but this has not been thoroughly investigated in horses. Objectives of the current studies were to determine effect of manipulation of maternal nutrition during the last third of pregnancy on mare performance, intake, hormones, foaling parameters, colostrum, and foal passive transfer of immunity and growth, and effects of supplemental arginine. Plane of nutrition influenced mare performance, and DMI was influenced by time with the first trial finding all mares consumed less in the 10th month of pregnancy compared to the 11th month, and the second trial finding all mares consumed less during the 11th month. Additionally, the second study determined arginine supplementation has no detrimental effects on DMI. Both studies indicated the dual marker system was sufficient at estimating DMI. Neither trial found an influence of treatment on foaling parameters or physical measurements obtained following parturition, and the second study determined arginine supplementation also did not affect foaling or measurements. The first study determined maternal nutrition did not affect foal growth or ADG. When colostrum quality was evaluated, the first study determined mares consuming only hay had increased specific gravity and Brix% indicating higher quality. This was confirmed by IgG analysis finding a tendency for increased IgG concentration. However, colostrum volume was not affected by nutrition, nor was total g IgG. The second study found contrasting results with greater specific gravity in mares on a high plane of nutrition, and a tendency for moderate plane of nutrition mares to have greater volume. Additionally, the second study determined that arginine supplementation does not influence colostrum volume or quality (measured by specific gravity or Brix %). In the first trial, maternal diets affected glucose and insulin AUC in mares, which altered insulin dynamics in the resulting foals. Foal insulin AUC and peak insulin concentration were greater in foals from mares supplemented with concentrate compared to foals from mares fed hay alone. These studies have provided a wealth of information to help elucidate the impact of maternal nutrition in late gestation on mares and their foals.

Winsco, Kelly N

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality with a Solar Suitcase: The Power to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality with a Solar Suitcase: The Power to Reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality with a Solar Suitcase: The Power to Save Lives Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Hal Aronson Karina Garbesi Laura Stachel Date: February 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Karina Garbesi This seminar presents the progress to date of WE CARE Solar (at http://wecaresolar.org), a Berkeley-based non-profit, in delivering ultra-efficient lighting, power for mobile communication, and medical equipment to maternal health clinics of the developing world. In 2008 - 2009, when OB/GYN doctor Laura Stachel was studying clinical practices in an urban state hospital and surrounding clinics in Nigeria, she found a surprising result. Lack of reliable electricity was a major factor for material and infant mortality, even in grid connected buildings. Women with

29

PRIORITY COMMUNICATION Maternal Stress Beginning in Infancy May Sensitize Children to Later Stress Exposure: Effects on Cortisol and Behavior*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neonatal environment can permanently alter an individuals responses to stress. To demonstrate a similar phenomenon in humans, we prospectively examined the relationships of maternal stress beginning in infancy and concurrent stress on preschoolers hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity and later mental health symptoms. Methods: Salivary cortisol levels were assessed in 282 4.5-year-old children and 154 of their siblings. Maternal reports of stress were obtained when the children were ages 1, 4, and 12 months, and again at 4.5 years. Childrens mental health symptoms were assessed in first grade. Results: A cross-sectional analysis revealed that preschoolers exposed to high levels of concurrent maternal stress had elevated cortisol levels; however, a longitudinal analysis revealed that concurrently stressed children with elevated cortisol also had a history of high maternal stress exposure in infancy. Importantly, children exposed only to high levels of concurrent or early stress had cortisol levels that did not significantly differ from those never exposed to stress. Further analysis of the components of stress indicated that maternal depression beginning in infancy was the most potent predictor of childrens cortisol. We also found that preschoolers with high cortisol levels exhibited greater mental health symptoms in first grade. Conclusions: These results link the findings of preclinical studies to humans by showing that exposure to early maternal stress may sensitize childrens pituitary-adrenal responses to subsequent stress exposure. Biol Psychiatry 2002;52:776784 2002 Society of Biological Psychiatry

Marilyn J. Essex; Marjorie H. Klein; Eunsuk Cho; Ned H. Kalin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Magnesium-based Bioceramics in Orthopedic Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructural Characteristics of Nano Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride and Titanium Ions Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Nano Hydroxyapatite...

31

International Scholarly Research Network ISRN Orthopedics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

towards bactericidal properties. The electrospun fibers were processed and tested in the presence of light necrosis have been extensively reported [10­14]. Recently, the efficacy of self-standing electrospun TiO2 cells upon brief activation by infrared radiation, was also demonstrated [15­17]. Others have

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

32

Advanced Materials in Dental and Orthopedic Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This symposium provides an opportunity for the medical and dental ... and the patient needs from medical and dental research community perspectives.

33

Treatment and Prognosis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Review of 87 Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the relative roles of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in the management of patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the external auditory canal and middle ear. Methods and Materials: The records of 87 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma who were treated between 1984 and 2005 were reviewed. Fifty-three patients (61%) were treated with surgery and radiotherapy (S + RT group) and the remaining 34 patients with radiotherapy alone (RT group). Chemotherapy was administered in 34 patients (39%). Results: The 5-year actuarial overall and disease-free survival (DFS) rates for all patients were 55% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, T stage (Stell's classification), treatment modality, and Karnofsky performance status had significant impact on DFS. On multivariate analysis, T stage and treatment modality were significant prognostic factors. Chemotherapy did not influence DFS. The 5-year DFS rate in T1, T2, and T3 patients was 83%, 45%, and 0 in the RT group (p < 0.0001) and 75%, 75%, and 46% in the S + RT group (p = 0.13), respectively. The 5-year DFS rate in patients with negative surgical margins, those with positive margins, and those with macroscopic residual disease was 83%, 55%, and 38%, respectively (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Radical radiotherapy is the treatment of choice for early-stage (T1) diseases, whereas surgery (negative surgical margins if possible) with radiotherapy is recommended as the standard care for advanced (T2-3) disease. Further clarification on the role of chemotherapy is necessary.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)]. E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Uno, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Fuwa, Nobukazu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kojya, Shizuo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Heart Life Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Nakashima, Torahiko [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shinhama, Akihiko [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nakagawa, Takashi [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Sakai, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Suzuki, Mikio [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Hisao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Research Article Association of Low Birth Weight Infants and Maternal Sociodemographic Status in Tuzla Canton during 19921995 War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2010 Fahrija Skoki? et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Objectives. We examined association between incidence rate of low birth weight in liveborn infants and maternal sociodemographic status in Tuzla Canton during 19921995 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods. The present study covers a 22-year period (19882009), including the war period (19921995), and we retrospectively collected data on a total of 108 316 liveborn infants and their mothers from three different socioeconomic periods: before (19881991), during (19921995), and after the war (1996 2009). Association between incidence rate of low birth weight in liveborn infants and maternal sociodemographic status were determined for each study period. Results. There were 23 194 live births in the prewar, 18 302 during the war, and 66 820 in the postwar period. Among the liveborn infants born during the war, 1373 (7.5%) had birth weight of <2500 g, which is significantly more in comparison with 851 (3.6%) liveborn infants in this birth weight group born before and 1864 (2.8%) after the war. We found the number of examinations during pregnancy was 1.8 per pregnant woman in the war period, which was low in comparison with the number of examinations before (4.6 per pregnant woman) and after (7.1 per pregnant woman) the war (P <.001 for both). Prewar perinatal mortality LBW infants of 6.2 per 1000 live births increased to 10.8 per 1000 live births during the war (P <.001), but after the war, perinatal mortality LBW infants (5.2) and early neonatal mortality (2.4) decreased. Conclusions.

Period In Bosnia; Fahrija Skoki?; Dubravka Ba?aj; Amela Selimovi?; Evlijana Hasanovi?; Selma Muratovi?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

VoIP Panacea or PIG's Ear?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voice over IP (VoIP) hit the headlines during the mid-1990s amid claims concerning its potential impact upon existing switched-circuit telephony services. While VoIP has provided a focus for much debate within the industry, there has been a clear gulf ...

R. P. Swale

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Potential effects of maternal contribution on egg and larva population dynamics of striped bass: Integrated individual-based model and directed field sampling  

SciTech Connect

We have used a bioenergetically-driven, individual-based model (IBM) of striped bass as a framework for synthesizing available information on population biology and quantifying, in a relative sense, factors that potentially affect year class success. The IBM has been configured to simulate environmental conditions experienced by several striped bass populations; i.e., in the Potomac River, MD; in Hudson River, NY; in the Santee-Cooper River System, SC, and; in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River System CA. These sites represent extremes in the geographic distribution and thus, environmental variability of striped bass spawning. At each location, data describing the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the spawning population and nursery area are being collected and synthesized by means of a prioritized, directed field sampling program that is organized by the individual-based recruitment model. Here, we employ the striped bass IBM configured for the Potomac River, MD from spawning into the larval period to evaluate the potential for maternal contribution to affect larva survival and growth. Model simulations in which the size distribution and spawning day of females are altered indicate that larva survival is enhanced (3.3-fold increase) when a high fraction of females in the spawning population are large. Larva stage duration also is less ({bar X} = 18.4 d and 22.2 d) when large and small females, respectively, are mothers in simulations. Although inconclusive, these preliminary results for Potomac River striped bass suggest that the effects of female size, timing of spawning nad maternal contribution on recruitment dynamics potentially are important and illustrate our approach to the study of recruitment in striped bass. We hope to use the model, field collections and management alternatives that vary from site to site, in an iterative manner for some time to come. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Cowan, J.H., Jr. (Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Maternal phenotypic engineering : adaptation and constraint in prenatal maternal effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Naast de bekende genetische overdracht zijn maternale effecten van groot belang voor de ontwikkeling van het fenotype van de nakomelingen. Maternale effecten worden door het (more)

Mller, Wendt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Textile-Based Sensor Development for the Continuous Monitoring of Proper Orthopedic Cast Fit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ran 107 milliamps at 0.5 volts for 5 minutes. This ensureda failure when stressed to 6 volts and 1.1amps. This isby the circuit is 2.9 volts DC. The first choice based

Umsted, Carson Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Textile-Based Sensor Development for the Continuous Monitoring of Proper Orthopedic Cast Fit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constructing a platform out of plywood and two by two inchLength Pipe N/A 3x4x0.5 Plywood Sheet N/A 2x2x8 Pine

Umsted, Carson Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

SmartCast - Novel Textile Sensors for Embedded Pressure Sensing of Orthopedic Casts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e.g. polyester w/ woven carbon fibers or Velostat Layer 4.of polyester with woven carbon fibers, and Layer 5 has beenthan polyester with carbon fibers. Conductive thread was

Danilovic, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Textile-Based Sensor Development for the Continuous Monitoring of Proper Orthopedic Cast Fit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be a fair amount of the battery capacity. A thought was toidentical in each case. Battery Capacity Consumed Per Wake,sd_off,'k') ylabel('Battery Capacity Consumed Per Wake,

Umsted, Carson Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ENGINEERING comBINEd yEARS of ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, university budget cuts have led to the closing of our Department of Industrial and Management Systems." Assistant professor Mahmoud Alahmad, who teaches electrical system design for the built environment with UNL/isolated approach to segments of the energy system in the house," Alahmad said. "The I-SAVE system allows for non

Farritor, Shane

43

DUF6 Managment Engineering Analysis Report (EAR) Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas is corrosive. To neutralize it, or make it harmless, lime would be added, forming calcium fluoride (CaF ). The analysis assumes that the cleaned, emptied cylinders will be...

44

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - An Ear for Science: The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and they are very small. As a result, Bellis inhabits a world of visualizations. Animations, graphs, computer-drawn images, Bellis uses them all to try to picture the scene...

45

"Falling upon deaf ears" : the case of colloquial architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World War II had instigated a strong national movement in The Middle East. In the Fifties and Sixties this region witnessed the end of colonialism in wide spread revolutions. The predominantly agrarian societies of The ...

Mejel, Jalal B. (Jalal Bezee)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Music to our ears During a visit to Santa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lynn M. Stegner Porter '78 Shelburne, Vermont A Foundation for the Future The UC Santa Cruz Foundation

California at Santa Cruz, University of

47

Analysis of Assembly Bill 185: Maternity Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health treatment; prescription drugs; rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices; laboratory

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Analysis of Senate Bill 155: Maternity Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health treatment; prescription drugs; rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices; laboratory

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Analysis and restoration of a 1960s ear vacuum tube AM-FM reflex receiver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the analysis, restoration, and evaluation of a 1960s era vacuum tube AM-FM reflex receiver. External influences such as tax laws necessitated clever designs to minimize the use of expensive vacuum tubes ...

Golden, Adam J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Phylogeny and Taxonomy of the Round-Eared Sengis or Elephant-Shrews, Genus Macroscelides (Mammalia,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. pilicaudus from the Nama-Karoo in South Africa; [7]). However, genetic analyses have not yet been applied at Wlotzkasbaken, Namibia, on 25 May 2000 (photo by GBR). B (bottom). M. p. proboscideus captured in the Nama-Karoo the Nama-Karoo. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0032410.g001 Taxonomic Revision of Macroscelides PLoS ONE | www

51

Transport Analysis of Bat-eared T_e Profile Discharges in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618135

Austin, M.E.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

TinyEARS: spying on house appliances with audio sensor nodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine-grained awareness on how and where energy is spent is being increasingly recognized as the key to conserve energy. While several solutions to monitor the energy consumption patterns for commercial and industrial users exist, energy reporting systems ... Keywords: audio data classification, energy monitoring, house appliances, wireless audio sensor networks

Z. Cihan Taysi; M. Amac Guvensan; Tommaso Melodia

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Maternal care in the bromeliad crab Metopaulias depressus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1991). However, harsh physico-chemical conditions in. Correspondence to: R. Diesel the environment have frequently been held responsible for the evolution of...

54

Medical Simulator Training Systems for: Maternal-Fetal Health ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 18,573 Occupational Fatalities 4 (2007) 5,488 ... hospitals in US of the safety events studied, VA ranks among the ... Neurosurgery Nuclear medicine ...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Impacts of Maternal Obesity on Metabolic Profiles in Postpartum Ewes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study determined the effects of gestational obesity on the long-term metabolic status of the mother and if obesity management during or after pregnancy could attenuate these effects. At 120 days prior to estrus, 8 ewes received 100 percent of NRC nutrient requirements (control group) and 24 ewes had free access to feed (obesity induction). Beginning on day 42 of gestation, 8 obese ewes were restricted to 65 percent of NRC nutrient requirements. Following parturition, controls and all but one group of obese ewes were fed 100 percent of NRC nutrient requirements. At postpartum days (PPD) 1 and 150, glucose tolerance tests were administered to ewes. At both PPD1 and PPD150, obesity resulted in insulin resistance, impairment of whole-body glucose utilization, increased levels of circulating leptin, and altered profiles of amino acids in plasma; however, these effects were diminished in ewes receiving obesity management during or after gestation. Additionally at PPD150, obesity increased the circulating levels of ammonia and urea in ewes, which was prevented by realimentation to 100 percent NRC requirements. These results indicate that weight reduction in obese dams during pregnancy or after parturition can beneficially ameliorate the adverse effects of gestational obesity on the mother.

McKnight, Jason Ray

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Pulmonary imaging in pregnancy. Maternal risk and fetal dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

A Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion lung scan and a Tc-99m DTPA aerosol ventilation scan were performed for suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE) in a patient who was ten weeks pregnant. There was considerable reluctance on the part of the obstetricians to permit this study. Standard MIRD dose estimates to the fetus were performed, which showed a maximum fetal exposure of about 50 mrem. It was concluded that the risk to mother and fetus from undiagnosed and untreated PE is much greater than the negligible risk to the fetus from the radiation exposure; fear of fetal radiation damage should not be a deterrent to performing these scans.

Marcus, C.S.; Mason, G.R.; Kuperus, J.H.; Mena, I.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses  

SciTech Connect

This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements that provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Evaluations are also presented for inhaled inert gases and for selected radiopharmaceuticals. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials. The ratios were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. These results are given as tables of deposition and retention in the embryo/fetus as a function of gestational age at exposure and elapsed time following exposure. Methodologies described by MIRD were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed using a model situation that assumed a single injection of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman`s blood; independent calculations were performed for administration at successive months of pregnancy. Gestational -stage-dependent dosimetric tabulations are given together with tables of correlations and relationships. Generalized surrogate dose factors and categorizations are provided in the report to provide for use in operational radiological protection situations. These approaches to calculation yield radiation absorbed doses that can be converted to dose equivalent by multiplication by quality factor. Dose equivalent is the most common quantity for stating prenatal dose limits in the United States and is appropriate for the types of effect that are usually associated with prenatal exposure. If it is desired to obtain alternatives for other purposes, this value can be multiplied by appropriate weighting factors.

Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

AN EAR FOR YOUR QUOTES PATENT CITATIONS AND THE SIZE OF PATENTED INVENTIONS, EVIDENCE FROM HYBRID CORN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper links applications for utility patents between 1985 and 2005 with field trial data on improvements in yields to examine whether citations are a good measure for the size of the inventive step, measured as improvements in yield. These data indicate that a large and robust correlation between citations and the size of improvements. In the most conservative estimates, a 10 percent increase in yields is associated with 1.7 additional citations, implying a 24 percent increase. A small number of highly cited patents appear to be cited mostly to establish the patentability of corn hybrids. Estimates that exclude these patents indicate that a 10 percent in yields is associated with 1.2 additional citations, implying a 34 percent increase. Analyses of claims and renewal data as alternative measures of patent value suggest that citations are in fact the most informative measure for the size of patented inventions.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Daylight in faade renewal : using new metrics to inform the retrofitting of aging modern-ear faade types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New methods for quantifying daylight are increasingly accessible to designers and planners. While these methods have enabled new building facades to better balance the admission of daylight with the maintenance of thermal ...

Rice, Edward Oren

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Monaural perception under dichotic conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most people have two ears, but we can hear with only one ear. The ability to use two ears can substantially improve performance in many circumstances. There are times, however, when the addition of a second ear results in ...

Shub, Daniel E. (Daniel Eric), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Comparison of maternal and neonatal outcome before and after the availability of a rapid assay for fetal fibronectin at a tertiary level maternity hospital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

before and after test availability as compared to those whoBenjamin A. (2005). Does availability of fetal fibronectinBefore and After the Availability of a Rapid Assay for Fetal

Poeltler, Debra Ann Milbert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Case Report Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery 2010;2:186-190 doi:10.4055/cios.2010.2.3.186 Arthroscopic Treatment of Septic Arthritis of Acromioclavicular Joint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Septic arthritis requires an early diagnosis and proper treatment to prevent the destruction of articular cartilage and joint contracture. This paper presents a rare case of septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint that was treated with arthroscopic debridement and resection of the distal clavicle.

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Available Technologies: Mineralization of Biocompatible ...  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; ... Unlike the bioinert materials currently used in the fabrication of orthopedic implants ...

64

Is decreased bone mineral density associated with development of scoliosis? A bipedal osteopenic rat model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orthopedics and Traumatology, Ankara, Turkey. 2 Izmir KentHospital, Cigli, Izmir, Turkey. 3 University of California

Dede, Ozgur; Akel, Ibrahim; Demirkiran, Gokhan; Yalcin, Nadir; Marcucio, Ralph; Acaroglu, Emre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

influence of cold rolling on microstructure and the passive film of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Advanced Materials in Dental and Orthopedic Applications. Presentation Title...

66

Evidence to Policy: Do Voucher Programs Improve Maternal Health in Developing Countries?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DC: World Bank. 6. Bhatia MR, Gorter AC: Improving access toGroup, The World Bank Group, Washington D.C. 12. Gorter AC,

Brody, Carinne Delia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Validation of a maternal questionnaire on correlates of physical activity in preschool children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are monitored during their pregnancy then followed up after the birth of their child. When the children are four years old, a sub- sample is seen for a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan [25], forming the source of participants for a secondary study... to March 2006 (total n = 419) showed no significant differences in child's gender, child's age or mother's eth- nicity. Table 4 shows the results of the PCA with varimax rotation and the Cronbach's alpha for each factor identified. ThePage 5 of 12 (page...

McMinn, Alison M; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Harvey, Nicholas C; Cooper, Cyrus; Inskip, Hazel M; Godfrey, Keith M; Griffin, Simon J

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

68

Standardized functions for smartphone applications: examples from maternal and child health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are unlikely to bemet in most low- andmiddle-income countries (LMIC). Smartphones and smartphone proxy systems using simpler phones, equipped with the capabilities to identify location/time and link to the web, are ...

Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Mark Tomlinson, Dallas Swendeman, Adabel Lee, Erynne Jones

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MAVIDOS Maternal Vitamin D Osteoporosis Study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status assessed after ultrasound scanning in the twelfth week of pregnancy at 3 trial centres (Southampton, Sheffield, Oxford). Women with circulating 25(OH)-vitamin D levels 25-100 nmol/l are randomised in a double-blind design to either oral vitamin D...

Harvey, Nicholas C; Javaid, Kassim; Bishop, Nicholas; Kennedy, Stephen; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Fraser, Robert; Gandhi, Saurabh V; Schoenmakers, Inez; Prentice, Ann; Cooper, Cyrus

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

HYDROLOGY OF SOUTHWESTERNENCINAL OAK ECOSYSTEMS:A REVIEW AND MORE Gerald J. ~ottfried,'Peter F. Ffolliott, and Daniel G. ear^^  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Burns, R.M., Honkala, B.H., 1990. Silvics of North America. 2. Hardwoods. US Dept. Agric. Hdbk. 654, Vol

71

REcuRsiVE TRust-REGion MEthoDs FoR MuLtiLEVEL NonLinEAR ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 11, 2004 ... the minimie ing se& uence at level6s 1.`r f%n&s 1b&t belongs to this minimie ing se uence,Hg e use the notation n55 Pt...

72

For scars, use the following table which is based upon the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nose MISS N0SE Pancreas MISS PANCR Missing Penis MISS PENIS Prostate Gland MISS PR0ST Arm, right MISS R ARM Ear, right MISS R EAR ...

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Disability trajectories : disabled youths' identity development, negotiation of experience and expectation, and sense of agency during transition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How do youth with orthopedic impairments negotiate expectations and experiences as they transition from high school to college and from family-delivered supports to independence? And (more)

Stolz, Suzanne Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Licenses Available in Energy & Utilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surgical Tools and Orthopedic Implants 200000789 Device for Separating CO2 from Fossil Power Plant Emissions 200000791 Wheel Reaction Force Sensing ApparatusWhole-Vehicle Brake...

75

Sintering Behavior of TiH2 for Manufacturing of Titanium Alloys and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Additive Manufacturing of Titanium For Orthopedic Implants Laser Beam Welding of ATI 425 Titanium Local Heat Treatment of Titanium Alloys:...

76

Production of High Translucent Self-Colored Dental Zirconia Blocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borate Glass Nanofiber/Whiskers in a Hybrid Orthopedic Composite Implants for ... G6: Production of High Translucent Self-Colored Dental Zirconia Blocks.

77

Dealloying of NiTi by Immersion in Metallic Melt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borate Glass Nanofiber/Whiskers in a Hybrid Orthopedic Composite Implants for ... G6: Production of High Translucent Self-Colored Dental Zirconia Blocks.

78

Radiographic and Histologic Response to Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy in Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Center, Sacramento, CA; 2 Division of OrthopedicDavis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA; 3 Department ofMedical Center, Sacramento, CA; 4 Division of Biostatistics,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 29, NO. 12, PAGES 4157--4166,DECEMBER 1993 Monthly TemperatureandPrecipitationFields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foundationgrant EAR- 9017724.This supportis gratefullyacknowledged. REFERENCES Jeppson,R. W., et al., Hydrologic atlas

80

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Trace Space Back to You.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Illuminating Materials MEDICAL Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) ER Infrared Ear Thermometers Automatic Insulin Pumps

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pretend Play of Young Children in North Tehran: A Descriptive Cultural Study of Children's Play and Maternal Values  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hafezi, P. (2010, April 28). Iran's housing prices createBBC Bews. (28 April 2008). Iran calls for ban on Barbieplay functions. Albany, NY: SUNY. Iran's brain drain. (2010,

Shahidi, Behnaz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Effects of Maternal Welfare Participation on Childrens Developmental Outcomes in the Welfare Reform Era.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since welfare reform legislation in 1996, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) has been implemented. Under TANF, most recipients are required to work. Work requirements (more)

Lee, Wonik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A low-power cochlear implant system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cochlear implants, or bionic ears, restore hearing to the profoundly deaf by bypassing missing inner-ear hair cells in the cochlea and electrically stimulating the auditory nerve. For miniaturized cochlear implants, including ...

Baker, Michael W. (Michael Warren), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A fully implantable intracochlear drug delivery device : development and characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Draper Laboratory is developing an implantable microfluidic drug delivery system for long-term treatment of inner ear disorders and prevention of ...

Swan, Erin Eileen Leary, 1976-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Brainwaves as a Biometric Parameter for Unique Identification and Authentication  

A number of biometric parameters exist for positive identification of individuals including, fingerprints, facial recognition, ear pattern, eye iris ...

87

University Policy on Student Maternity, Paternity and Adoption Leave These policies aim to create an improved framework for student parents' interactions with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the adequacy of its support mechanisms; and targeting student parents with relevant information and advice. The NUS Student Parent Project published a report in 2009 (`Meet the Parents: the experience of students specification for the replacement student system which will be introduced in 2013. 1.2 The University will use

Oxford, University of

88

Effects of Web Variation on Prey Capture in Tangaroa tahitiensis spiders (Araneae:Uloboridae) and the Influence of Substrate, Spider Size, and Maternal State on Web Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation of Hawaiian web- building spiders. Proceedings ofmediated defense by an orb web spider against predatory mud-caught in artificial spider webs, with considerations of how

Liew, Qi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Five-year Distribution and Patterns of Maternal Child Health Indicators after Institution of PEPFAR and Global HIV/AIDS Initiatives in Uganda.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the HIV/AIDS epidemic escalated worldwide, the global community responded by a large increase in international aid to countries with high HIV/AIDS prevalence such as (more)

Nguyen, Jeannie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Relation of Exposure to Violence and Maternal Responsiveness to Young Children's Behavioral Functioning: Evidence from a High-Risk Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Hersen & C.G. Last (Eds. ), Handbook of child and adultChild psychology: A handbook of contemporary issues (2ndM. Hersen (Eds. ), Handbook of child psychopathology (3rd

Dunlap, Lynne Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nanoscale influences on bioactivity : ultrastructure and nanomechanics of model bioactive hydroxyapatite based biomaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a significant need for improved synthetic materials as orthopedic implants to replace human bone lost and damaged due to disease or injury. Certain ceramics, such as hydroxyapatite (HA), have the special property ...

Vandiver, Jennifer M. (Jennifer McKeehan)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 304 (2009) 1929 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and increased somatic growth (Miltenberger et al., 1997). Optimal maternal dietary sup- plementation

Blumberg, Bruce

93

Bioinspired Materials Derived from Butterfly Wing - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Bioinspired Materials Derived from Butterfly Wing ... Investigation of Material Property Variation in Red-Eared Slider Turtle Shell Bone Using...

94

NEWTON's Zoology Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Robins Nest Duck Behavior Desert Hair Migrating Robins and Breast Color Fish Nostrils Insect Gas Exchange Shrew Physiology Fish Respiration Rates Long-eared Owl...

95

Sheet1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a the class of air-breathing vertebrate animals characterized by the possession of hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands functional in ...

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

RESPONSE ROBOTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Maryland Task Force 1 Training Facility iv ... Compliance with these personal protective equipment rules are mandatory - it is ... Ear protection We'll ...

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

97

RESPONSE ROBOTS RESPONSE ROBOTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Maryland Task Force 1 Training Facility 6 Event Introduction ... Safety 16 Page 22. Personal Protective Equipment ... Ear protection We'll supply these. ...

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING IN LARGE-SCALE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ear- her experiments where a relatively crude filter has ... rate adjustable 0.930180 advertise environmental 0.124026 petroleum aerospace 0.207406 ...

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

99

The science of the stars in Danzig from Rheticus to Hevelius /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Polish Academy of Sciences Press, 1973. Bogucka, Maria.Baine Campbell. Wonder & Science: Imagining Worlds in Earlys Island: Tycho Brahe, Science, and Culture in the Sixteenth

Jensen, Derek

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Acoustics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acoustics Program Developed to help designers accurately model the sound level reaching building tenant's ears, the Trane Acoustics Program (TAP) "projects" equipment sound power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

OrganiZatiONal Profile rev  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... as Lin- ear Accelerators for IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy), among ... an environment of openness and eliminates fear of retribution; (4 ...

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

102

Part 1, Chapter 8: Reference Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Bar. Fork/join. Diamond. Decision/merge. Dog-eared rectangle. Note. To simplify the diagrams, the following shortcuts have been taken: ...

103

GoodwinNUG2013.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) 1 ASCR 1 0 Y ear P lan * Replace 2007 ASCR Strategic Plan (on ASCR homepage; science.energy.govascr). * Only constraint: 30 Megawatts...

104

Arch supports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arch supports Arch supports Name: Tu Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My question is about the foot. Actually, it's not really on the chemistry of the human body. I have flat feet and I need to wear an orthopedic, otherwise know as an arch support in my shoe. What it does is elevate and support the arch of my foot. Here is my scenario question. The orthopedic is very rigid and has a spring constant much higher than the rest of my foot. As a result, at high pressures, my foot will first absorb some of the force. At higher forces and as my foot had absorbed some of the force, the orthopedic begins to play a greater role. It's much stiffer. Thus a greater proportion of force is placed on my arches than on a person's arches who is not flat footed at high forces. Ideally then, an orthopedic would have the same spring constant as a natural arch and/or the foot. Is this the case of the use of an orthopedic?

105

Microsoft Word - LL_Report_7-12-13rev.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

s ince 1 978. U .S. Department o f E nergy n ational l aboratories r eceived a t otal 3 6 a wards i n t his y ear's j udging. This y ear's L ivermore R &D 1 00 a wards c ould p...

106

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-eared Owl Status Long-eared Owl Status Name: Joll Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Is the long-eared owl endangered? I have mixed information. Replies: No, long-eared owls are not on the US endangered species list, either as endangered or threatened. The only owls on the list are both northern and Mexican spotted owls. The US list is on line at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html A species may be listed as endangered as a population within a state even if it is not on the US list. You could search for information for your state to see the status. If your location as noted below is California, long-eared owls are not endangered in California. J. Elliott Joll It's endangered. br> http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?q=326032

107

The Chipmunk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ground squirrel has a longer slenderer body, a short skimpy tail, smaller ears, and 13 stripes on its back and sides: the dark stripes dotted with rows of yellowish spots. The...

108

The Americans with Disabilities Act: Effective Legal Protection against Secondhand Smoke Exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ear infection may qualify as disabled under the ADA if theirLiving decision. Association for Disabled Americans, Inc. v.substantially impairs a disabled person in a place of public

Douglas, Clifford

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Lorentz-force actuated needle-free injection for intratympanic pharmaceutical delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delivery of pharmaceuticals to the inner ear via injection through the tympanic membrane is a method of local drug delivery that provides a non-invasive, outpatient procedure to treat many of the disorders and diseases ...

Cloutier, Alison (Alison Marie)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Ocean shell noises  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean shell noises Name: Rick A Cazzato Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do you here noises when you put a ocean shell to your ear? Does this happen because of...

111

Eye movement studies with a vestibular prosthesis/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vestibular loss, which can manifest as dizziness, imbalance, or spatial disorientation, is widespread and often caused by inner ear hair cell malfunction. To address these problems, we are developing a vestibular implant ...

Saginaw, Michael A. (Michael Adlai)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Continuous Humidity Monitoring in a Tropical Region with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radar remote sensing technique that estimates humidity profiles using a wind profiler is applied to the equatorial atmosphere radar (EAR) to monitor detailed humidity variations in tropical regions. Turbulence echo power intensity is related to ...

Jun-ichi Furumoto; Toshitaka Tsuda; Satoshi Iwai; Toshiaki Kozu

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Large Owls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"ear" tufts. The nest is usually a remodeled hawk or owl's nest, but they even drive eagles from their eyries and take over. The food is extremely varied; mostly mice, rabbits...

114

No Slide Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for FY'06, FY'07, and FY'08 through November 30, 2007 0 2 4 6 8 10 1 2 14 AFRD ALS Chemic al Scienc es Computational Res ear ch Earth Scienc es Engineering Env ironmental...

115

REVIEW AR TICLE O p tic a l m a g n e to m e try  

R ecent breakthroughs in laser coolin g an d trappin g have open ed n ew avenues for precision m easurem ents usin g lon g-lived, n ear-station ary

116

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CFL) offers a considerable increase in energy efficiencyCFL/(I-T&D loss) * Lamp hrs/day * 365 day sly ear d.Based on power plant efficiency

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Neural correlates of auditory perceptual organization measured with direct cortical recordings in humans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the primary functions of the human auditory system is to separate the complex mixture of sound arriving at the ears into neural representations of individual sound sources. This function is thought to be crucial for ...

Dykstra, Andrew R. (Andrew Richard)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Using stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions to study basic properties of the human medial olivocochlear reflex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) is a brainstem-based neural feedback circuit by which mammals adaptively adjust the gain of their ears in response to changing environmental conditions. Activating the reflex with ...

Backus, Bradford Clark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Squirrel Hunting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

others and the only cure is to go squirrel hunting. Farmers have it during the sultry dog days of August and early September when the hired man stops whistling, the mules' ears...

120

Sayings of Southern Indiana and Illinois  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full as a tick. I put a bug in his ear (started him to thinking). Like a blind dog in a meat-house"; "dark as the inside of a cow, "proud as a dog with two tails";...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Measurements and calculations on the simple up-down adaptive procedure for speech-in-noise tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simple up-down adaptive procedure is a common method for measuringspeech reception thresholds. It is used by the Dutch speech-in-noise telephone screening test [National Hearing test; Smits and Houtgast Ear Hear.26

Cas Smits; Tammo Houtgast

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

math_patterns.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

musical scale is based upon the ratios of 1:2, 1:3, 1:4, etc. The Parthenon of ancient Greece is designed with these very ratios, which are pleasing to the eye and to the ear. The...

123

Richard Gerber! NERSC User Services NUG Teleconference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIN: 4 866820 Agenda * Alloca1on Y ear C hangeover i ssues * NUG 2013 annual mee1ng - hSp:www.nersc.govusersNUGannual---mee*ngs2013 - Registra*on O pen - Schedule -...

124

NIAID: Programs in HIV/AIDS Therapeutics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

made in the area of HIV/AIDS research has been to give its full support to the .... Site: The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. r International Maternal...

125

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

medical implants comes from medical implants comes from nanostructuring April 3, 2012 Quality of treatment for those with medical implants improves as science and medicine unite once more Metals have provided the strength, durability, and other characteristics that have been needed in bone implants since the inception of orthopedics. However, cobalt-chromium superalloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys-the most commonly used materials in today's orthopedic devices- have the potential to present serious side effects. A more recent innovation in metals technology-nanostructuring-heralds a new era for metals in medical implants. - 2 - Scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory and several institutes in Russia worked together to develop a simple method to modify the internal structure of any metal at

126

BME395 Disease, Medical Devices, and Global Health Spring 2012 Week Topic Reading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_child_adolescent/topics/maternal/maternal_perinatal/en/index.html WHO Mother/Baby whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/1994/WHO_FHE_MSM_94.11_Rev.1.pdf WHO TB Diagnostics www.who.int/tb/laboratory/en/ World Health Organization Data and Statistics www.who.int/research/en/ #12;

MacIver, Malcolm A.

127

Dog Teeth and Hearing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dog Teeth and Hearing Dog Teeth and Hearing Name: Chad Status: other Grade: 9-12 Location: Outside U.S. Country: Canada Date: Spring 2011 Question: Can a bad tooth problem, infection (we've had several teeth pulled) cause a problem with deafness in a dog ? We have a snoodle 14 years old, but still in other wise good health. Replies: Hi Chad, Sorry to hear about Snoodle's hearing and dental problems. Deafness in an older dog is not uncommon and it would not likely be due to any tooth related problems. A severe tooth infection that extends or penetrates through the bone into the ear canal would be very rare and you would see very obvious symptoms in the ear. If your vet has examined Snoodle and there were no obvious problems related to the ear canal, then I would attribute the hearing loss to an age related change. I hope this helps.

128

Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snakes Snakes Nature Bulletin No. 36 October 13, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation SNAKES If you were a snake you would never have an earache or get dust in your eye. They have inner ears but no trace of an outside ear or eardrum, A sleeping snake will pay no attention to shouts or banging on a tin pan, but rouses immediately when a man or other animal walks near. Apparently snakes hear by feeling the vibrations of the earth, just as a person can hear a distant train by putting his ear to the track. Snakes are very short-sighted, their eyes being specially constructed for focusing on nearby small objects. That "glassy stare" is produced by a transparent cap or lid which covers the eye and cannot be moved. The eyeball inside is just as movable as yours.

129

Microsoft Word - 43C4089A.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-1 10-1 10. GLOSSARY Term Definition "A-weighted" Scale Assigns a weight to sound frequencies that is related to how sensitive the human ear is to each sound frequency. Frequencies that are less sensitive to the human ear are weighted less than those for which the ear is more sensitive. A-weighted measurements indicate the potential damage a noise might cause to hearing. Ambient Noise Background noise associated with a given environment. Ambient noise is typically formed as a composite of sounds from many near and far sources, with no particular dominant sound. Aquifer Body of rock or sediment that is capable of transmitting groundwater and yielding sufficient quantities of water to wells or springs. Arterial Highway Highway generally characterized by its ability to quickly move a relatively large

130

Noise and Hearing Conservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hearing Conservation Hearing Conservation Mary L. Doyle NOISE & HEARING CONSERVATION Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 16, 2002 1.0.1.~ CAUSES OF HEARING LOSS * Congenital * Environmental Exposures * Hereditary * Illness *Injury * Noise * Occupational * Non-Occupational * Sociacusis S.O.S. eon.ua.nt. OTOTOXIC DRUGS Can Affect Cochlea or Vestibular System * Aminoglycoside Antibiotics * Diuretics * Cancer Chemotherapy * Aspirin * Quinines * Usually Permanent * Consider Benefit-Risk Ratio S.O.S. eon.ua.nts HEARING * Modification of Acoustic Wave by Outer Ear * Conversion of Modified Acoustic Wave to Vibration of Eardrum * Middle Ear * Inner Ear * Transformation of Mechanical Movement to Nerve Impulses S.O.S. CoMubRis OTOTOXIC INDUSTRIAL

131

Genetic Variants of NPAT-ATM and AURKA are Associated With an Early Adverse Reaction in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With Pelvic Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study sought to associate polymorphisms in genes related to cell cycle regulation or genome maintenance with radiotherapy (RT)-induced an early adverse reaction (EAR) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 243 cervical cancer patients who were treated with pelvic RT. An early gastrointestinal reaction was graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2. Clinical factors of the enrolled patients were analyzed, and 208 patients were grouped for genetic analysis according to their EAR (Grade {<=}1, n = 150; Grade {>=}2, n = 58). Genomic DNA was genotyped, and association with the risk of EAR for 44 functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 19 candidate genes was assessed by single-locus, haplotype, and multilocus analyses. Results: Our analysis revealed two haplotypes to be associated with an increased risk of EAR. The first, comprising rs625120C, rs189037T, rs228589A, and rs183460G, is located between the 5' ends of NPAT and ATM (OR = 1.86; 95% CI, 1.21-2.87), whereas the second is located in the AURKA gene and comprises rs2273535A and rs1047972G (OR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.10-2.78). A third haplotype, rs2273535T and rs1047972A in AURKA, was associated with a reduced EAR risk (OR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.20-0.89). The risk of EAR was significantly higher among patients with both risk diplotypes than in those possessing the other diplotypes (OR = 3.24; 95% CI, 1.52-6.92). Conclusions: Individual radiosensitivity of intestine may be determined by haplotypes in the NPAT-ATM and AURKA genes. These variants should be explored in larger association studies in cervical cancer patients.

Ishikawa, Atsuko; Suga, Tomo; Shoji, Yoshimi [RadGenomics Project, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yoshinaga, Shinji [Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ohara, Kiyoshi [Tsukuba University Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Ariga, Hisanori [Tohoku University Hospital, Miyagi (Japan); Nomura, Kuninori [Toyama University Hospital, Toyama (Japan); Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Hospital, Aichi (Japan); Ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Moritake, Takashi; Michikawa, Yuichi; Iwakawa, Mayumi [RadGenomics Project, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Imai, Takashi, E-mail: imait@nirs.go.jp [RadGenomics Project, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mobile Persuasive Technologies for Rural Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Iterative Design with Rural Health Workers 4.13 Understanding the Role of Technology in Rural Maternal 3.15 Mobile Persuasive Messages for Rural Health Promotion 5.1

Ramachandran, Divya Lalitha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 11, 10111022, March 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and phosphorylation are dis- rupted in another maternal-effect mutant, nuclear-fallout. It is possible that nuclear-fallout (Sullivan et al., 1990, 1993; Postner et al., 1992). nuclear-fallout has recently been cloned; it encodes

Sullivan, William T.

134

Francis Rubinstein  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality with a Solar Suitcase: The Power to Save Lives The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry Special Presentation: Key...

135

Chromatin signature of embryonic pluripotency is established during genome activation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After fertilization the embryonic genome is inactive until transcription is initiated during the maternalzygotic transition. This transition coincides with the formation of pluripotent cells, which in mammals can be used ...

Vastenhouw, Nadine L.

136

Genomic Analysis of Parent-of-Origin Allelic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana Seeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles of a gene is referred to as gene imprinting, a form of epigenetic gene regulation common to flowering plants and mammals. In plants, imprinting primarily ...

Gehring, Mary

137

Winter and Holiday Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons HOME HOME HOME HOME Do not drink and decorate. Inspect, properly set up, and position ladders. Use a step stool instead of furniture. Be mindful of rearranged furniture. Minimize clutter. LUGGAGE LUGGAGE LUGGAGE LUGGAGE Pack light. Use proper lifting techniques. Do not rush when lifting or carrying heavy suitcases or packages. Take care when placing luggage in overhead compartments. WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS Warm up muscles. Wear appropriate protective gear. Know and abide by winter sports rules. Keep equipment in good working condition and use properly. If you or someone else experiences hypothermia, immediately seek shelter and medical attention.

138

Licenses Available in Energy & Utilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Utilities Energy and Utilities SHARE Energy and Utilities 200000741 Automatic Detection of Bone Fragments in Poultry 200000782 Droplet Acoustic Wave Sensors 200000784 Method for the Enhancement of Aqueous Cleaning Operations 200000785 Bulk Metallic Glass Surgical Tools and Orthopedic Implants 200000789 Device for Separating CO2 from Fossil Power Plant Emissions 200000791 Wheel Reaction Force Sensing Apparatus/Whole-Vehicle Brake Tester 200000796 Fossil Fuel Combined Cycle Power System 200000799 Method for Accelerated Curing of Coatings for Explosion Prevention and Other Needs Using Microwave Technology 200000807 Effective Switching Frequency Multiplier Inverter 200000809 Improved Response Microcantilever Thermal Detector 200000813 High Slot Utilization System for Electric Machines

139

YuccaMountainasaRadioactiveWaste Circular 1184  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Infiltration Estimates A R e p o r elevation model of Yucca Mountain and vicinity. Contour lines of equal water table elevation are for early.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Infiltration Estimates Report to the U.S. Congress and the Secretary

140

Appendix 35 Pre-1850 Species List for the Flathead Subbasin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common Name Birds Red-necked Grebe Podiceps grisegena Birds Eared Grebe Podiceps nigricollis Birds Birds Mallard Anas platyrhynchos Birds Blue-winged Teal Anas discors Birds Cinnamon Teal Anas cyanoptera Birds Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata Birds Northern Pintail Anas acuta Birds Green-winged Teal Anas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grebe Red-breasted Merganser N. Rough-winged Swallow Red-necked Grebe Ruddy Duck Bank Swallow Eared Brown Creeper Red-eyed Vireo Golden-mantled Grnd Squirrel CFLS Brown-headed Cowbird CFLS Red CFLS Williamson's Sapsucker CFLS Red Squirrel CFLS Gyrfalcon FS Willow Flycatcher River Otter Hammond

142

Wildlife Supplement Table 1. Land protection status by habitat type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-skinned Newt Yes Yes Dunn's Salamander Larch Mountain Salamander Western Red-backed Salamander Ensatina Clouded Pacific Chorus (Tree) Frog Yes Yes Red-legged Frog Yes Yes Cascades Frog Columbia Spotted Frog Yes Yes Yes Pied-billed Grebe Yes Yes Horned Grebe Yes Yes Red-necked Grebe Yes Yes Eared Grebe Yes Western

143

Richard Gerber!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 2x o ver n ext 3 y ears * Sequencer c ost d eceasing b y 1 0 o ver s ame p eriod Compu>ng * Simulaons a t S cale a nd a t H igh V olume a lready p roduce P etabytes o f data a...

144

Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing  

SciTech Connect

The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

Kotas, Charlotte W [ORNL; Rogers, Peter [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yoda, Minami [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Modified MFCC windowed technique for speaker word recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) are one of the most popular forms of parameterization of the speech signal in speaker word recognition systems. MFCC's are based on the known variation of the human ear's critical bandwidths. In this paper, ... Keywords: DCT, MFCC, hamming window, kaiser window, modified MFCC, speaker word recognition, windowing techniques

I. Patel; Y. S. Rao

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Submit this form and associated sheets ONLY if you do not use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

___ Northern Black Korhaan1035 1 ___ Karoo Korhaan0220 2 ___ Blue Crane0216 5 ___ African Rail0197 6 ___ Black4126 5 ___ Karoo Long-billed Lark4127 7 ___ Short-clawed Lark0465 2 ___ Black-eared Sparrowlark0486 2-toed Rock-Thrush0561 3 ___ Groundscraper Thrush0557 5 ___ Karoo Thrush1104 2 ___ Chat Flycatcher0663 3

de Villiers, Marienne

147

CX-006244: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Craig-Bears Ears-Hayden Substations Fiber Optic and Pole Installation, Moffat and Routt Counties, ColoradoCX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.7Date: 05/17/2011Location(s): Moffat, ColoradoOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

148

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 67, NO. 5 (SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2002); P. 15321541, 5 FIGS. 10.1190/1.1512749  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- mum support stabilizing functional, similar to the one intro- duced by Last and Kubic (1983 be- tween our approach and the one discussed by Last and Kubic (1983) is in constructing an iterative in several ear- lier publications (Last and Kubic, 1983; Wolke and Schwetlick, 1988; O'Leary, 1990

Utah, University of

149

Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study Funded by the National Institute on Aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS) Funded by the National Institute on Aging #12;EHLS is there continuing deterioration · Why does hearing worsen with aging · Does the middle ear stiffen with aging · How;Why do hearing impairments develop? Clues from Beaver Dam · Older age · Men more than women

Sheridan, Jennifer

150

Export Control Regulations Michigan Technological University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulations (EAR) Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) Commercial or dual-use items Control (OFAC) Department of Justice Department of Energy Nuclear Regulatory Commission Department of Homeland Security Boarder and Transportation Security U.S. Customs #12;15 CFR 730.5; 22 CFR 120.17 Export

151

Microsoft Word - LL_Report_3-22-13rev.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

p rovide unprecedented d etail a bout a l arge, g aseous p lanet o rbiting a y oung, b right s tar c alled H R 8 799, a bout 130 l ight y ears a way f rom t he s un. Pointing t...

152

Ogmios 10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a a es: e tte t t e erse anguage hift in Ireland, cotland, eden and ales J. illia e is he olitics of on the eservation: riting urriculu in ar prings, regon Joseph Sel yn aori in ecent ears e it ree ac a a aji a a e e tre...

Ostler, Nicholas D M

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

On selecting Gabor features for biometric authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a Gabor feature selection technique that allows us to develop a fast and robust Gabor-feature based biometric system. Existing Gabor based methods use a huge number of Gabor features to represent the patterns. Our experiments on different ... Keywords: Gabor features, automated identification, biometrics, ear authentication, equal error rate, feature selection, finger authentication

Loris Nanni; Alessandra Lumini

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.iugonet.org/en IUGONET Development of analysis software The IUGONET project - objectives Metadata DB for Upper Atmosphere on TDAS (THEMIS Data Analysis Software Suite) composed of IDL routines. The software will have capability AE index MAGAS KTB Meteor EAR MU GUI mode Loaded data list Time-range set Choice of instrument Choice

Takada, Shoji

155

HRSG/SR Revised 07/01/08 Page 1 of 2 HAZARD ASSESSMENT SURVEY & ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HRSG/SR Revised 07/01/08 Page 1 of 2 HAZARD ASSESSMENT SURVEY & ANALYSIS PERSONAL PROTECTIVE is accomplished by surveying the workplace to determine where physical or health hazards are present or likely to noise levels. (>85 dBA 8-hour TWA) Ear muffs or plugs Nuisance dust/mist Welding fumes Asbestos

Eirinaki, Magdalini

156

Evaluation of Spatial Displays for Navigation without Sight JAMES R. MARSTON and JACK M. LOOMIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spatial information (waypoint direction and distance) through small air-tubes inserted into the ear of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. Permissions may be requested from Publications Dept., ACM

Loomis, Jack M.

157

stronomers will soon be treated to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advantage of the relatively close pass. The Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes will join with dozens amount of input. Yet the human ear can hear and process sounds rang- ing from a pin drop to the roar Areas 60, 80, 100, 120, 130, 160, 200, 350 sq.m. and more, as room/open space, short-term available Apt

Long Jr., John H.

158

Digital image correlation used for mechanical tests on crimped glass wool samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ET,England. Doumas, Department, of Archaeology & History of Art, University Campus, 157 84 Ilissia, Athcns, Greece. Sarpaki Department. of History & Archaeology, IJniversity of Crete, Rethymno 74 100 for a sail, a large cloak,a funeraryshroud).The ide- ogram translated as wool is derived from Lin- ear A

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

c INRA/DIB-AGIB/EDP Sciences, 2010 DOI: 10.1051/apido/2010050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ET,England. Doumas, Department, of Archaeology & History of Art, University Campus, 157 84 Ilissia, Athcns, Greece. Sarpaki Department. of History & Archaeology, IJniversity of Crete, Rethymno 74 100 for a sail, a large cloak,a funeraryshroud).The ide- ogram translated as wool is derived from Lin- ear A

Starks, Philip

160

Music & Dramatic Arts RONALD D. ROSS, Penniman Family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examination in theory. This includes ear-training, keyboard work, harmonization, and analysis. The results; Director of M.F.A. Acting Program, Department of Theatre MADELINE AHLGREN Business Manager CAROL LARSEN: Performance, Design/Technology, Theatre Studies, Arts Administration, and Literature/History/Theory. Both

Harms, Kyle E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

www.osa-opn.org36 | OPN July/August 2008 1047-6938/08/0??/0036/6-$15.00 OSA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light through an optical fiber to the scanner. For hemoglobin imaging, the laser wavelength is typically. This system is safe for human imaging because it delivers a fluence of only about 6 mJ/cm2 at the optical in the ear of a nude mouse is captured using transmission optical microscopy. #12;OPN July/August 2008 | 37

Wang, Lihong

162

FacultyAwards Grants and Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The Center for Engineering Outreach hosted the second annual South Plains Math & Science Competition on Nov), a nonprof it agency celebrating 30 y ears of encouraging Texas students to pursue careers in science, technology , engineering, and math. Ov er 250 sixth through 12th grade students f rom 26 schools participated

Gelfond, Michael

163

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Individual identification of all cows in the herd is essential. Ear tags are the most popular, of which be observed at a distance. Facilities Adequate facilities are fundamental for a successful A.I. program. A good corral for sorting cows and a chute for restraining them are absolutely essential. Some breeders

164

Computational and conditioning issues of a discrete model for cochlear sensorineural hypoacusia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interest of inner ear research towards the cochlear simulation is due to the lack of imaging techniques for human noninvasive investigation. Unfortunately, in case of Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SHL), the majority of the models developed in the literature ... Keywords: Cochlear modeling, Conditioning, Integrodifferential models, Iterative methods

Daniele Bertaccini; Stefano Fanelli

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Toward automation in hearing aid design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the manufacturing of customized medical prostheses, such as in-the-ear hearing aids, the design process often is dictated by a source template representing the anatomy of a patient and a set of work instructions representing the description of surface ... Keywords: Application, Automation, CAD, CAM, Expert systems, Feature recognition, Hearing aid design, Medical prostheses manufacturing, Modeling, Rule-based systems, Shape transformation

Konrad Sickel; Sajjad Baloch; Rupen Melkisetoglu; Vojtech Bubnik; Sergei Azernikov; Tong Fang

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Thermal Imaging of Medical Saw Blades and Guides  

SciTech Connect

Better Than New, LLC., has developed a surface treatment to reduce the friction and wear of orthopedic saw blades and guides. The medical saw blades were thermally imaged while sawing through fresh animal bone and an IR camera was used to measure the blade temperature as it exited the bone. The thermal performance of as-manufactured saw blades was compared to surface-treated blades, and a freshly used blade was used for temperature calibration purposes in order to account for any emissivity changes due to organic transfer layers. Thermal imaging indicates that the treated saw blades cut faster and cooler than untreated blades. In orthopedic surgery, saw guides are used to perfectly size the bone to accept a prosthesis. However, binding can occur between the blade and guide because of misalignment. This condition increases the saw blade temperature and may result in tissue damage. Both treated ad untreated saw guides were also studied. The treated saw guide operated at a significantly lower temperature than untreated guide. Saw blades and guides that operate at a cooler temperature are expected to reduce the amount of tissue damage (thermal necrosis) and may reduce the number of post-operative complications.

Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Steffner, Thomas E [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Newark Neighbors Saving Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Newark Neighbors Saving Energy Newark Neighbors Saving Energy Newark Neighbors Saving Energy April 2, 2010 - 2:32pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Rosa and Francisco Sanchez are ecstatic about the weatherization work done to their Newark, N.J., home. When Francisco explains the changes they have seen, his smile beams from ear to ear. "They replaced my boiler, put in some new CFL light bulbs and gave me some carbon monoxide detectors," he says. "I was happy when I got approved after filling out the application for weatherization and even happier about the work they did for me - I appreciate it a lot." The Sanchez family was able to take advantage of both the Weatherization Assistance Program and a federally funded heating improvement program ran by La Casa de Don Pedro, a community action agency that is expected to

168

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Owl Predators Owl Predators Name: Mia Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: MN Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: What are the predators of a owl? Replies: Mia: Our largest adult owls have few predators. Smaller owls may be prey of other owls, long-eared owls are sometimes eaten by great horned owls, for example. Ground nesting owls, like short-eared owls, and especially nestlings, may be hunted by many predators, coyotes and other hawks and owls most likely. Nestlings of all birds, including owls may be hunted by other birds, raccoons, snakes and other animals that can climb trees. J. Elliott Hi Mia Predators of owls include: Opossums Racoons Hawks, Eagles and other raptors Other owls House cats Snakes that raid nests Accidents such as falling out of a nest, colliding with a tree, and electric power lines also contribute to owl mortality.

169

Newark Neighbors Saving Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Newark Neighbors Saving Energy Newark Neighbors Saving Energy Newark Neighbors Saving Energy April 2, 2010 - 2:32pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Rosa and Francisco Sanchez are ecstatic about the weatherization work done to their Newark, N.J., home. When Francisco explains the changes they have seen, his smile beams from ear to ear. "They replaced my boiler, put in some new CFL light bulbs and gave me some carbon monoxide detectors," he says. "I was happy when I got approved after filling out the application for weatherization and even happier about the work they did for me - I appreciate it a lot." The Sanchez family was able to take advantage of both the Weatherization Assistance Program and a federally funded heating improvement program ran by La Casa de Don Pedro, a community action agency that is expected to

170

NERSC-8 Vendor Market Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antypas! Antypas! NERSC-8 Project Lead NERSC-8 Market Survey --- 1 --- November 15, 2012 * Seek v endor i nput t o o p6mize 6 ming, r equirements and business prac6ces * Opportunity f or v endors t o p rovide i nput p rior t o formal p rocurement p rocess We are starting our next procurement, NERSC-8, with a round of market surveys Vendor B riefing --- 2 --- NERSC's mission is to enable science NERSC Mission: To accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing high-performance computing, data systems and services to the DOE Office of Science community. NERSC has over 4500 users in 650 projects that produce about 1500 publications per year! --- 3 --- Vendor B riefing NERSC's Long Term Strategy * New s ystem e very ~ 3 y ears, r un f or 5 ---6 y ears - Maximizes s tability r ather t han p eak / m achine

171

New HP 1304A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of others will make you more productive (and more valuable!) If no one else has seen the problem, you must solve it yourself. At this stage, apply the Rules of Logical Troubleshooting. This consists of milking the instrument for all symptoms available. Use your eyes, ears and nose. Are lights lit? Readouts active? Are there any signs of heat or broken components? Are there any abnormal sounds? Pops, hissing, hum? Is there a smell associated with a particular area? Essence

Servl Ce; Info R Mati; N From; He Wlett-packard

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

An infant with double trisomy (48,XXX,+18)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report on an infant with double trisomy 48,XXX,+18. She presented with manifestation of trisomy 18: prominent occiput, microphthalmia, small mouth, micrognathia, malformed ears, congenital heart defect, overlapping fingers, talipes equinovarus, and rockerbottom feet. An extra palmar crease was present only on the right hand. This patient was alive at 12 months. The clinical manifestations are compared with those of 10 previously reported cases. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Jaruratanasirikul, S.; Jinorose, U. [Prince of Songkla Univ. (Thailand)

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

EPRI-SQUG Damage-Indicating Parameter Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information assembled for the purpose of developing damage-indicating parameters (DIPs) for power plant equipment. An existing Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) seismic experience database is used to develop candidate DIP values associated with two database sites subjected to earthquake events. The two sites are described, the candidate DIPs are derived from the recorded site motions, and the equipment items at these sites are categorized according to performance during an ear...

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

174

Performance and Electrical Characterization Tests on a Microturbine Commercial Prototype - Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is testing various commercial microturbine generators (MTGs) to verify performance claims, identify any critical technology issues, and assess viability of units for utility applications. This report provides test results on two commercial prototype microturbine generators. The units were identical except that the first unit could only operate in the grid-parallel mode whereas the second unit had the capability to operate in both the grid-parallel and grid-independent modes. The tests continue earli...

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mercury in Alaskan Eskimo mothers and infants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential danger of natural mercury accumulation in the diet of the Eskimo is evaluated through mercury levels determined in cord blood, placenta, maternal blood, hair, and milk of 38 maternal-infant pairs from Anchorage and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Although mercury levels are not discernably dangerous, trends to larger accumulations in maternal and fetal RBC and placental tissue with proximity to the sea and consumption of seals during pregnancy provide the basis for considering possible indicators of neonatal involvement. Mercury level in RBC from cord blood appeared as the best potential indicator of this involvement, although relationships with the mother's diet and level of mercury in the placenta also appear useful. In this area, average and maximal mercury levels in cord blood are 39 and 78 ng/ml, respectively, far below the acknowledged toxic level in infants of these mothers who eat seals or fish every day during their pregnancy.

William A. Galster

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fetal cardiac signal extraction from magnetocardiographic data using a probabilistic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fetal magnetocardiographic sensor measurements are contaminated by undesired environmental and biological signals, such as the maternal cardiac signal. Several methods have been used in an attempt to extract the fetal cardiac signal from these data, ... Keywords: Denoising, Fetal MCG, Independent components analysis, Interference rejection

Kenneth E. Hild, II; Hagai T. Attias; Silvia Comani; Srikantan S. Nagarajan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Publications Margaret Jolly Books and Edited Volumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1998 K. Ram and M. Jolly (eds) Maternities and Modernities: Colonial and Postcolonial Experiences in Asia and the Pacific, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 2001a M. Jolly and K. Ram (eds) Borders Model'. Social Analysis 16:10-13. 1987a The Forgotten Women: A History of Migrant Labour and Gender

178

Signal processing for an acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A least?mean?square (lms) linear prediction algorithm has been developed to accomplish detection of fetal heart tones and thereby derive heart rate from a raw signal generated by a previously described passive acoustical sensor array. The desired heart tone signal has a characteristic signature but is of extremely low amplitude and contaminated with noise consisting of large?amplitude maternal heart tones

Robert A. Pretlow; John W. Stoughton

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY HEALTH INSURANCE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS & EXCHANGE VISITORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Emergency services; 3. Hospitalization; 4. Maternity and newborn care; 5. Mental health and substance use disorder services; including behavioral health treatment; 6. Prescription drugs; 7. Rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices; 8. Laboratory services; 9. Minimum $100,000 USD per sickness or injury 10

Stuart, Steven J.

180

AR Ins. Lic. #245544 CA Ins. Lic. #0633005 d/b/a in CA Seabury & Smith Insurance Program Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services · Emergency services · Hospitalization · Maternity and newborn care · Mental health/substance abuse treatments · Prescription drugs · Rehabilitative services · Laboratory services · Preventive-swing with the heftiest legislation set for 2014 -- when health insurance will become available to millions of Americans

Miami, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

From psychophysics to management of noise?disturbance in a large, Arctic carnivore, the polar bear.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 50% of maternal dens excavated by pregnant female polar bears on Alaskas North Slope occur on land or land?fast ice. Management agencies and the public have raised concerns that noise from human activities could adversely affect denning female polar bears

Ann E. Bowles; Megan A. Owen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Classification of communication signals of the little brown bat Karla V. Melendez  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- clay et al., 1979; Thomas et al., 1979 , maternal reunion with offspring Balcombe, 1990; Matsumura, 1979, 1981 , avoid- ing predators, and defending or advertising feeding areas Fenton, 1985; Wilkinson inspection of the call's spec- trograms. Only more recently have rigorous statistical analy- ses been applied

Jones, Douglas L.

183

OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report Annual Report O H A ffice of earings ppeals & O H A ffice of earin s ppeals & g Doe/hg-0023 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Hearings Appeals & FY 2011 Annual Report Message from the Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I. Areas of JURISDICTION II. Working with Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V. General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 5 A. Personnel Security B. Contractor Employee Protection Program C. 11 D. 13 F. Elk Hills Oil Field (formerly Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1) 16 17 18 I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

184

OHA 2010 ANNUAL REPORT FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report Annual Report O H A ffice of earings ppeals & O H A ffice of earin s ppeals & g Doe/hg-0022 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Hearings Appeals & FY 2010 Annual Report Message from the Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I. Areas of JURISDICTION II. Working with Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V. General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 5 A. Personnel Security B. Contractor Employee Protection Program C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts 11 D. Exceptions and Special Redress 12 F. Elk Hills Oil Field (formerly Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1) 14 15 16 I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

185

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (EM) EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (EM) OBJECTIVE EM.1 The selection, training, and qualification for operations, maintenance, operations support personnel, and technical staff have been established, documented, and implemented meet the following criteria: EM. 1.1 A routine drill program and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have been established and implemented. REVIEW APPROACH: Document Reviews: * Review applicable operational event scenarios for identification and implementation of emergency management responses. * Review applicable EARS. * Review Emergency Management drill and exercise training records to determine effectiveness of program and activity personnel. * Review Emergency Management drill and exercise training records to

186

A Real-time Localization System Using RFID for Visually Impaired  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gadgets helping the disabled, especially blind that are in least accessibility of information, use acoustic methods that can cause stress to ear and infringe user's privacy. Even if some project uses embedded Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) into the sidewalk for blind's free walking, the tag memory design is not specified for buildings and road conditions. This paper suggested allocation scheme of RFID tag referring to EPCglobal SGLN, tactile method for conveying information, and use of lithium battery as power source with solar cells as an alternative. Results have shown independent mobility, accidents prevention, stress relief and satisfied factors in terms of cost and human usability.

Qinghui, Tae; Hong, Youngjee; Park, Jinwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Interview of Ben Shneiderman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

come by a much more conscious, systematic approach, working on the problem; I am quite flexible in the way I work; I don't carry a notebook with me; I am a list-maker and very persistent on things; my favourite way is socially working through; I work... with music in the background nor go jogging with music in my ears 26:26:17 My father had more of a religious training at a traditional Heder, and he was quite knowledgeable and skilled at reading from the Torah in Hebrew; I went to a Hebrew school after...

Shneiderman, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Methods of and apparatus for levitating an eddy current probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An eddy current probe is supported against the force of gravity with an air earing while being urged horizontally toward the specimen being examined by a spring and displaced horizontally against the force of the spring pneumatically. The pneumatic displacement is accomplished by flowing air between a plenum chamber fixed with respect to the probe and the surface of the specimen. In this way, the surface of the specimen can be examined without making mechanical contact therewith while precisely controlling the distance at which the probe stands-off from the surface of the specimen.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1988-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ogmios 32  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pitfalls, but the factors they cite only under- score the grip English has on the world: cataclysms like nuclear war or climate change or the eventual perfection of a translation machine that would make a common lan- guage unnecessary. Some insist... words like thou, theeand thineare combined with a virtu- oso use of the letter h: earbecomes hearand her- ringbecomes erring. The uninitiated listener is left in a daze as to which century they are in. Ive spoken the language all my...

Ostler, Nicholas D M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

OHA 2009 ANNUAL REPORT FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report Annual Report O H A ffice of earings ppeals & O H A ffice of earin s ppeals & g Doe/hg-0021 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Hearings Appeals & FY 2009 Annual Report Message from the Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ntroduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I. Areas of JURISDICTION II. Working with Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V. General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Personnel Security B. Contractor Employee Protection Program C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts 11 D. Exception and Special Redress 12 G. Elk Hills Oil Field (formerly Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1) 15 15 16 I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

191

Computer simulation of static localization cues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for imposing static (fixed?head) localization cues on an artificial sound source is described. The system is based on the measurement of the peripheral binaural impulse responses at a series of target source positions using small microphones in the subject's ear canals. A computer with associated waveform processing software convolves these impulse responses with widehand noise bursts and plays the results to the subject over headphones. The headphone impulse responses are also measured and deconvolved out of the waveforms in advance by the computer. Both live and simulated localization trials have been carried out

Mark F. Davis

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

OHA 2008 ANNUAL REPORT FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY FY 2008 Annual Report O H A ffice of earings ppeals & O H A ffice of earin s ppeals & g Doe/hg-0020 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of hearings and appeals Organization chart On September 4, 2008, OHA was honored to host a visit by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman U.S. D E O H A epartment of nergy ffice of earings and ppeals 2008 a R nnual eport 3 Director (HG-1) Deputy Director (HG-2) Personnel security and appeals division (HG-3) Management operations unit (HG-5) Employee protection and exceptions division (HG-4) II. Working with Others Over the years, OHA has collaborated and partnered with other DOE offices . We have found that sharing information and ideas with other organizations benefits both sides of the conversation. Further, those with a better understanding of OHA and what we do can take advantage of the expertise, resources, and services we

193

The Badger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Badger Badger Nature Bulletin No. 180-A February 20, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BADGER One of the largest of the weasel tribe, which includes the skunks, mink, otters, martens and wolverine, is the Badger. It is much different from the others. Like the mole, it is a digger built for digging; squat heavy muscular body, short neck, and short powerful legs with large strong claws which are more than one inch long on its big forefeet. Its small flat broad head, with low rounded ears and white cheeks with a black bar in front of each ear, is featured by a narrow white stripe that runs, from the sharp-pointed nose, back over the forehead to shoulders. It has a very short bushy tail and its long shaggy fur is grizzled yellowish-gray, parted in the middle along the back and hanging down almost to the ground. A badger, 27 to 29 inches long including a 5- inch tail, is so low, flat, broad and shaggy that, when running, he reminds you of a galloping doormat.

194

Mounting assembly for heater thermostat control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an assembly for mounting a thermostat control on the outer wall of a heater tank including an external spud in which a heating element is mounted. The mounting assembly comprises: a first bracket made from a spring material and including a body having an opening adapted to lockingly fit over the tank spud. The first bracket further includes a pair of laterally-spaced legs extending from the body and having a bent upper end portion adapted to apply spring pressure toward the tank outer wall when the first bracket is locked on the tank spud. Each of the legs includes in the upper end portion an elongated slot having an upper end; a second bracket carrying the thermostat control and having a pair of laterally -spaced, upstanding ears adapted to fit beneath the upper end portions of the legs. Each of the ears includes a nib received in a slot for interlocking the first and the second brackets and having an upper edge adapted to engage the upper end of the slot and cooperate therewith to urge the thermostat control into firmer contact with the tank outer wall in response to upward vertical movement of the second bracket relative to the first bracket; and the assembly further characterized by a retaining lip on the first bracket, the lip located between the legs and positioned to bear against the end wall of the thermostat control when the parts are in assembled position and an outward horizontal load is applied.

Murphy, M.A.

1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Take Notes from Corn Hybrid Plots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn harvest is slow to get going this year, with only 5 % of the states crop reported harvested as of 24 Sep (USDA-NASS, 25 Sep 2006). The causes of the slow start to harvest are slower than normal maturation of the grain (Fig 1), cool temperatures (slower grain drying), and muddy field conditions due to the continuing pattern of frequent rains. The slow pace of corn harvest coupled with the poor stalk quality in some fields (Nielsen, 2006) reminds us how spoiled we were with generally good harvest conditions of the past two seasons. But, that is not the point of this article. Fig. 1. Percent of Indianas corn crop that is rated mature and safe from frost, as of 24 Sep 2006. Data source: USDA-NASS. If rainy weather and soggy field conditions are keeping you from your own harvest, spend some of your down time to walk or re-walk neighborhood on-farm hybrid plots before they are harvested. Many of these trials are still signed so that you can identify 2006, Purdue UnivRL (Bob) Nielsen Page 2 9/27/2006 the seed company and their hybrid numbers. Record notes on hybrid characteristics such as ear height, ear size, completeness of kernel set, husk coverage, standability, and

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Microsoft Word - LL_Report_4-5-13rev.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ---5, 2 013. NOVA h ost a nd t ech g uru D avid P ogue ( right) i nterviews L LNL's T om B rown. Living t hings c onstantly r eplenish t he c arbon i n t heir b odies. W hen a l iving o rganism d ies, t he c arbon 1 4 in i ts b ody d ecays a t a s teady r ate a nd t he a toms c an b e c ounted. Tom B rown, w ho w orks a t t he L ab's C enter f or A ccelerator M ass S pectrometry, c an c arbon d ate s amples as o ld a s 4 0,000 y ears a go. H e r ecently d ated a d ead t ree s ample t aken f rom t he M ono L ake r egion i n California. "Intact w ood i s v ery g ood f or c arbon d ating," B rown s aid. " It r etains t he c arbon w hen t hat m aterial died." He p ut t he s ample i n t he L ab's a ccelerator w here t he c arbon 1 4 a toms a re c ounted. A ccording t o h is count, t he t ree d ied 1 50 y ears a go. To s ee m ore, g o t o t he

197

Role of vitamin C transporters and biliverdin reductase in the dual pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant effect of biliary compounds on the placental-fetal unit in cholestasis during pregnancy  

SciTech Connect

Maternal cholestasis causes oxidative damage to the placental-fetal unit that may challenge the outcome of pregnancy. This has been associated with the accumulation of biliary compounds able to induce oxidative stress. However, other cholephilic compounds such as ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and bilirubin have direct anti-oxidant properties. In the present study we investigated whether these compounds exert a protective effect on cholestasis-induced oxidative stress in placenta as compared to maternal and fetal livers, and whether this is due in part to the activation of anti-oxidant mechanisms involving vitamin C uptake and biliverdin/bilirubin recycling. In human placenta (JAr) and liver (HepG2) cells, deoxycholic acid (DCA) similar rates of free radical generation. In JAr (not HepG2), the mitochondrial membrane potential and cell viability were impaired by low DCA concentrations; this was partly prevented by bilirubin and UDCA. In HepG2, taurocholic acid (TCA) and UDCA up-regulated biliverdin-IX{alpha} reductase (BVR{alpha}) and the vitamin C transporter SVCT2 (not SVCT1), whereas bilirubin up-regulated both SVCT1 and SVCT2. In JAr, TCA and UDCA up-regulated BVR{alpha}, SVCT1 and SVCT2, whereas bilirubin up-regulated only SVCT2. A differential response to these compounds of nuclear receptor expression (SXR, CAR, FXR and SHP) was found in both cell types. When cholestasis was induced in pregnant rats, BVR{alpha}, SVCT1 and SVCT2 expression in maternal and fetal livers was stimulated, and this was further enhanced by UDCA treatment. In placenta, only BVR{alpha} was up-regulated. In conclusion, bilirubin accumulation and UDCA administration may directly and indirectly protect the placental-fetal unit from maternal cholestasis-induced oxidative stress.

Perez, Maria J. [Research Unit, University Hospital, Salamanca (Spain); Castano, Beatriz; Jimenez, Silvia; Serrano, Maria A. [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting, CIBERehd, University of Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca (Spain); Gonzalez-Buitrago, Jose M. [Research Unit, University Hospital, Salamanca (Spain); Marin, Jose J.G. [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting, CIBERehd, University of Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca (Spain)], E-mail: jjgmarin@usal.es

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Estimation of heterosis and heterosis retention in the development of a synthetic breed of goat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of crossbreeding research indicates that the dominance model does not always adequately account for heterosis. With this in mind, genetic models were fit to goat crossbreeding data for type of birth, birth weight, and adjusted (for age) weights at two and four months of age. Data resulted from the development of a composite breed of goat in Kenya (KDPG) which is composed of 1/4 East African, 1/4 Gak 1/4 Toggenburg, and 1/4 Anglo-Nubian. Genetic models included a breed specific dominance model and epistasis models (also included breed specific dominance effects). The general epistasis models included direct and maternal effects for six two-locus configurations and direct and maternal linkage effects, but the majority of the maternal nonadditive effects were confounded and so this model was excluded from further analyses. Specific epistasis models excluded the linkage effects and made an assumption regarding the nature of epistasis (additive x additive, additive x dominance, or dominance x dominance). An additive effects model was also used as a basis for testing the significance of all the nonadditive genetic effects. All models included breed additive effects and fixed effects for type of birth (except for the analysis of type of birth), dam age, gender, birth year, and season of birth. Model comparisons were made to assess the importance of dominance and epistasis in explaining variation in performance. The specific epistasis models tended to be better than the dominance models. Model comparisons with the additive effects models also suggested that nonadditive effects were important. Performance of various crosses was also predicted from the model results and heterosis estimated. Heterosis estimates were generally negative possibly due to unaccounted for interactions among type of birth and the genetic effects and(or) due to inadequate estimation of the direct and maternal additive effects for the Nubian. Results suggest that use of Toggenburg, Nubian, and(or) KDPG bucks to be used to grade up the indigenous breeds would be advantageous.

Jones, Matthew Blain

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Spinal and Epidural Endoscopy: A Historical Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In current-day medicine, endoscopy plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of many different conditions. This improving technology has led to new areas of endoscopic visualization, particularly of the epidural space, spinal cord and contiguous structures. A review of the medical literature indicates that clinicians have been working with various types of endoscopes for over sixty years, with varying degrees of success. Only recently has fiberoptic technology been integrated with computer-enhanced imaging to provide a new medium for viewing the central nervous system. The initial results are promising and will likely pave the way for newer, less invasive means of diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system pathology. The direct visualization of the spinal canal and its contents was born in 1931 from the pioneering work of Michael Burman, an orthopedic surgeon from the New York Hospital for Joint Diseases [1]. With each decade since then, myeloscopists and epiduroscopists have attempted to develop a means of fiberoptic visualization that would be easy and safe to apply in medical practice. Unfortunately, until the recent advent of both flexible fiberoptic light sources and optics [2], this could not be achieved. In 1931, Burman removed eleven vertebral columns from cadavera and examined

Lloyd R. Saberskia; Sorin J. Brull; Department Ofanesthesiology The

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Effect of Ag and Ag+N Ion Implantation on Cell Attachment Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implanted biomedical prosthetic devices are intended to perform safely, reliably and effectively in the human body thus the materials used for orthopedic devices should have good biocompatibility. Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly Ethylene (UHMWPE) has been commonly used for total hip joint replacement because of its very good properties. In this work, UHMWPE samples were Ag and Ag+N ion implanted by using the Metal-Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implantation technique. Samples were implanted with a fluency of 1017 ion/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used for surface studies. RBS showed the presence of Ag and N on the surface. Cell attachment properties investigated with model cell lines (L929 mouse fibroblasts) to demonstrate that the effect of Ag and Ag+N ion implantation can favorably influence the surface of UHMWPE for biomedical applications. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to demonstrate the cell attachment on the surface. Study has shown that Ag+N ion implantation represents more effective cell attachment properties on the UHMWPE surfaces.

Urkac, Emel Sokullu; Oztarhan, Ahmet; Gurhan, Ismet Deliloglu; Iz, Sultan Gulce [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Tihminlioglu, Funda [Chemical Engineering Department, Izmir Institute of High Technology, Gulbahcekoyu Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Oks, Efim; Nikolaev, Alexey [High Current Electrnonics, Institute , Tomsk (Russian Federation); Ila, Daryush [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal, Huntsville AL 35762 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TITANIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS ONNANOPOROUS ALUMINA TEMPLATES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of the nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Both the 20 nm and 100 nm titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not exhibit statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. In addition, 20 nm pore size titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exposed to ultraviolet light demonstrated activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for 'smart' drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

Brigmon, R.

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

202

Letter to the Editor : Rapidly-deployed small tent hospitals: lessons from the earthquake in Haiti.  

SciTech Connect

The damage to medical facilities resulting form the January 2010 earthquake in haiti necessitated the establishment of field tent hospitals. Much of the local medical infrastructure was destroyed or limited operationally when the Fast Israel Rescue and Search Team (FIRST) arrived in Haiti shortly after the January 2010 earthquake. The FIRST deployed small tent hospitals in Port-au-Prince and in 11 remote areas outside of the city. Each tent was set up in less than a half hour. The tents were staffed with an orthopedic surgeon, gynecologists, primary care and emergency care physicians, a physician with previous experience in tropical medicine, nurses, paramedics, medics, and psychologists. The rapidly deployable and temporary nature of the effort allowed the team to treat and educate, as well as provide supplies for, thousands of refugees throughout Haiti. In addition, a local Haitian physician and his team created a small tent hospital to serve the Petion Refugee Camp and its environs. FIRST personnel also took shifts at this hospital.

Rosen, Y.; Gurman , P.; Verna, E.; Elman , N.; Labor, E. (Materials Science Division); (Superior NanoBioSystems LLC); (Fast Israeli Rescue & Search Team); (Clinique Adonai); (Mass. Inst. Tech.); (Univ. Haifa)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Review Peer Review September 29, 2008 Washington D.C. Evaluation of Lead-Carbon Devices for Utility Applications DOE Energy Storage Program Sandia Contract 659172 Paula Walmet Specialty Chemicals Division MeadWestvaco Corporation Funding: Congressional ear-mark. 2 Program Overview Phase One: Explore possible advantages to carbon in energy storage  Evaluate lead based energy storage technologies  Develop carbon for lead based technologies - Increase cycle life for some applications - Improve charging characteristics Phase Two: Investigate performance benefit and refine understanding  Verify performance  Focus on material properties/mechanisms that result in performance benefit Phase Three: Determine best technology for application needs  Select best technology for 1 MW, 1 MWh utility demonstration

204

Appendix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix Appendix Name: Arthur K Gum Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do we have an appendix when we can live fine without it? Replies: You are assuming that the human body was designed purposely and cleverly. Not everyone believes this. There are a number of dumb and useless features about the human body. For example, the blood vessels supplying the retina (sensitive back surface) of the eye pass *in front* of the retina, thus obstructing our vision. People choke to death because both breath and food go down the same pipe. Sound vibrates the eardrum, which moves the delicate set of tiny bones in the middle ear (susceptible to infection and damage), which do nothing more than vibrate another, inner "eardrum" on the cochlea. Why not dispense with the in-between stuff?

205

Alternative Fuel News, Volume 6, Number 4, March 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Hydrogen The Hydrogen Economy U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 6 - No. 4 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Cross-border exchanges foster training and trade AFVs in bIndia PLUS: AFVs for Emergencies LNG at UPS ear Readers: Since the Clean Cities Program was born a decade ago, its growth pattern has been impressive, but hardly a straight line. The program was created with strong congressional backing, primarily as a tool to implement the AFV provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct). Today it is a broad-based government-industry partnership with a diverse agenda, supporting infrastructure development and AFV deployment, now even including hybrids. In the earliest coalitions, most coordinators were overworked volunteers juggling other jobs as

206

National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wnchington, DC 20585 Wnchington, DC 20585 July 13, 2010 OFFICE O F THE ADMINISTRATOR 'l'he Honorable Peter S. Winokur Chairman Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20004 [>ear Mr. Chairman: By the direction of the Secretary of Energy, the enclosed is the Department's Implementation Plan (Plan) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2009-2, Los Alamos Nutional Luhorutory Plutoniu?lt Fucilitj. Sr i s m ic Sufety. The Plan provides the Department's approach for implementing near-term actions to reduce the consequences of seismically-induced events at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, and longer-tcrm actions to ensure continued safe operation of the facility. Mr. James .I. McConnell. Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nuclear Safety and

207

Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sept. 21, 2012 Sept. 21, 2012 Sandia's Explosives Technology Group discovers key detonation behavior in common explosive NOT SO BIG BANG - Alex Tappan (left) and Rob Knepper (both 2554) watch the detonation of a Sandia critical thickness experiment. The experiment typically uses less explosive material than the size of one-tenth of an aspirin tablet to determine small-scale detonation properties. The bench-top experiment is so small, researchers can stand next to the firing chamber with eye and ear protection. (Photo by Randy Montoya) by Sue Major Holmes The explosive PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) has been around for a century and is used by everyone from miners to the military, but it took new research by Sandia to begin to discover key mechanisms behind what causes it to fail at very small scales.

208

Alternative Fuel News, Volume 7, Number 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Garman David Garman on Hydrogen U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 7 - No. 1 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy PLUS: School Bus Stories West Coast Ethanol Building Successful AFV Fueling Stations - Tips, Best Practices, and Lessons Learned ear Readers: Whenever I hear criticism of alternative fuels from advocates of competing fuels, I smile. Reg- gie Jackson once said, "Fans don't boo nobodies." If they weren't losing market share, our com- petitors wouldn't care. And with one of every four new transit buses purchased now fueled by natural gas, that's what I call market share. Alternative fuels are finding homes in high fuel-use fleets, but it hasn't been easy. The chal-

209

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 19, 2011 May 19, 2011 CX-005981: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti Substation Containment Wall, Montrose County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.6 Date: 05/19/2011 Location(s): Montrose County, Colorado Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region May 18, 2011 CX-005937: Categorical Exclusion Determination Boyd-Valley Transmission Line Optical Ground Wire Fiber Optic Installation, Larimer County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 05/18/2011 Location(s): Larimer County, Colorado Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region May 17, 2011 CX-006244: Categorical Exclusion Determination Craig-Bears Ears-Hayden Substations Fiber Optic and Pole Installation, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.7 Date: 05/17/2011

210

Childhood Customs and Superstitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Childhood Customs and Superstitions Childhood Customs and Superstitions Nature Bulletin No. 627 February 4, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist CHILDHOOD CUSTOMS AND SUPERSTITIONS In all the world there remains only one large tribe of savages which shows no signs of dying out or becoming civilized. These people have a language of their own; they practice magic; and they follow weird customs which have come down by word of mouth from the far-off past. Actually they are only part-time savages because, most of the time, these are our sons and daughters or our grandchildren who go to school, live in our homes, wash behind their ears, and seem to be civilized. The strangest thing about them is their ability to shift personalities right in front of your eyes.

211

Easter Bunnies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Easter Bunnies Easter Bunnies Nature Bulletin No. 61 April 13, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation EASTER BUNNIES Rabbits do have eggs. But they are only 1/300 of an inch in diameter and develop into young which are born and nursed like other mammals. Molly Cottontail has already had the first of the three or four litters she produces per year in this climate. Each litter numbers from 4 to 6 little rabbits born in a nest which is a shallow hole dug in the ground by the mother, usually in an open field, padded with grass and with fur which she plucks from herself. Their ears are small at first, their eyes are closed, and they have only a coat of fuzz. After about a month they leave the nest and soon are shifting for themselves.

212

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA Production Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t.Jt'S~l t.Jt'S~l National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy NNSA ProductiOn Office Post Off1ce Box 2050 Oak Ridge. Tennessee 37831-8009 FEB -7 2013 MEMORANDUMFORKARENBOARDMAN CHAIRPERSON FROM: SUBJECT: REFERENCE: FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAP ABIL KENNETH A. HOAR ASSISTANT MANAGER ENVIRONMENT, SAFET Staffing Plan for the National Nu ear Security Administration Production Office DOE Memorandum, ANNUAL WORKFORCE ANALYSIS AND STAFFING PLAN REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR (CY) 2012, Boardman/Agents, dated October 24, 2012 We have completed our analysis of staffing needs per the guidance in the referenced memorandum. Our revised staffing plan for the NNSA Production Office is attached. Should you have any questions, please contact me at (806) 4 77-7158 or Susan Morris at

213

Alternative Fuel News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One For All: One For All: Station Cars U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 5 - No. 2 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy PLUS: Clean Cities Conference Coverage NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY Brings Alternative Fuels, AFVs, and Clean Cities into Focus in Washington NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY Brings Alternative Fuels, AFVs, and Clean Cities into Focus in Washington 2 ear Readers, The landscape for alternative fuels continues to be lush and vibrant. This was most evident as we celebrated the 7th National Clean Cities Conference and Expo in Philadelphia. Alternative fuel stakeholders from across the country-from all over the world, for that matter-spent three robust days in Philadelphia, experiencing "The Alternative Fuels Revolution." The conference

214

January 13, 2012, Technical Qualification Program, Revision 3 - Sandia Site Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF DOCUMENT: OF DOCUMENT: SANDIA SITE OFFICE COORDINATION/APPROVAL SSO CP 0603.03, Technical Qualification Program DESCRIPTION (e.g., summary of changes): Incorporated: (I) changes to governing order (DOE 0 426.1); (2) SSO FR T&Q and CT procedures; (3) recommendations from recent self-assessments. Chan ed re- ualification eriodicity from 3 to 5 ears. REVISION NO.: 3 DATE: 1/11/12 Subject Matter Expert (SME) (name, org., & phone): Allen D. Tate, AMNO 845-4050 COORDINATING/APPROVING ORDER SIGNATURE DATE ORGANIZATION & NAME SME Allen D. Tate Environment, Safety & Health Dan Pellegrino, Assistant Manager Facilities & Projects Mike McFadden, Assistant Manager Nuclear Operations Jim Todd, Assistant Manager, FTCP Agent Safeguards & Security

215

Alternative Fuel News Volume 5, Number 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Cities Clean Cities in Peru U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 5 - No. 4 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy PLUS: ProCon's LPG Vans Technician Training Creative Alliances Fuel Success in Infrastructure Development 2 ear Readers, Lately, in the aftermath of September 11th, I have been thinking about commitment and sacrifice, and about how easy it is to talk about patriotism without ever having to make the smallest sacrifice. I have been thinking also about how easy it is to support a war on terrorism without ever understanding the connections among energy security, dependence on imported oil, vehicle and fuel use efficiency, and our policies affecting energy producing countries.

216

Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing World Underfoot Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing World Underfoot August 13, 2012 - 2:33pm Addthis By developing a better understanding of the microbes that affect the growth of other plants (crops like corn or wheat) researchers may be able to improve their growth -- or provide better care for them in times of drought. By developing a better understanding of the microbes that affect the growth of other plants (crops like corn or wheat) researchers may be able to improve their growth -- or provide better care for them in times of drought. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What Is A Weed It's also known as a mouse-ear cress. The scientific name is Arababidopsis thaliana.

217

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2008 2008 1 Jim Eyer - Distributed Utility Associates, Inc. 17 Electric Utility-Related Electricity Storage Benefits, Featuring T&D Deferral DOE Peer Review September 2008 - Washington D.C. by Distributed Utility Associates, Inc. Jim Eyer, Senior Analyst jim@dua1.com This project is part of the Energy Storage Collaboration between the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/ESS) and managed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funding: Congressional ear-mark. DOE Peer Review 2008

218

,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O' P.ear. I have determiaed Volume If, Design sad ProcurePent Ehtoq of Nanford Enginaar works and ClAnton Semi-Works, may be declaseified. Aomrdingly, by my authority, Volume II is declassified effeotive Hay 4, 1964. Volume II h& bean deterdaed to contdn~ Section148 infonzation~ however, olswe lthasnotbeenreviewed

219

LANL/LANS 2014 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES  

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4 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES 4 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES At-A-Glance: Comparing the 2014 PPO & HDHP Medical Programs Ž Medical Program Benefit Comparison PPO Benefits & Cost-Sharing HDHP + HSA Benefits & Cost-Sharing Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Calen dar Y ear D educ tible - All services are subject to deductible unless otherwise indicated below. $300 Individual $900 Fam ily $500 Individual $1,500 F amily $1,500/Individual $3,00 0/Fam ily $3,000/Individual $6,000/F amily Family deductible is an ag gregate of three times the Individual amo unt. PPO and non-PPO deductibles do NOT cross-apply. Family deductible is an ag

220

Rabbits and Hares  

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Rabbits and Hares Rabbits and Hares Nature Bulletin No. 473-A December 2, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RABBITS AND HARES The Cottontail Rabbit, with his long hind legs, big ears and a tuft of cottony white fuzz underneath his bobtail, is proverbial for his timidity, speed and dodging tactics; for his skill at concealment by camouflage: and for his prolific, rapidly growing families. He is our most common and best known mammal. American folklore and literature are filled with jingles, songs, cartoons, old sayings and children's stories about him. B'rer Rabbit in the Uncle Remus tales, Molly Cottontail, Bugs Bunny, the Easter rabbit, and the Hare and the Tortoise, are famous animal characters.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 23660 of 31,917 results. 51 - 23660 of 31,917 results. Download CX-006242: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Gunnison-Salida 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Jumper Cable Replacements, Gunnison County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/14/2011 Location(s): Gunnsion, CO Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006242-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006244: Categorical Exclusion Determination Craig-Bears Ears-Hayden Substations Fiber Optic and Pole Installation, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.7 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Moffat, Colorado Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006244-categorical-exclusion-determination

222

An Integrated Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Control For Fumarole Location In The Eburru Volcanic Complex, Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: An Integrated Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Control For Fumarole Location In The Eburru Volcanic Complex, Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Eburru volcanic complex is located in the central portion of the Kenya Rift. It belongs to the complex of volcanoes - Suswa, Longonot, Olkaria, Eburru, and Menengai - that. form the Kenya Dome. These volcanoes are geothermal fields, and Olkaria is the site for the first geothermal power plant commissioned in 1981 in the East African Rift System (EARS).

223

Export.gov - Malaysia - Welcome Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Malaysian Importers Malaysian Importers Register | Manage Account Search Our Site Click to Search Our Site Export.gov Home Opportunities By Industry By Country Market Research Trade Events Trade Leads Free Trade Agreements Solutions International Sales & Marketing International Financing International Logistics Licenses & Regulations Trade Data & Analysis Trade Problems Locations Domestic Offices International Offices FAQ Blog Connect Home > Malaysia Local Time: Print | E-mail Page Malaysia Malaysia Home Doing Business in Malaysia Services for U.S. Companies Business Service Providers Contact Us Our Worldwide Network About Us Press Room Other Worldwide Markets Welcome to U.S. Commercial Service Malaysia! U.S. Commercial Service Malaysia is your eyes and ears in the local marketplace. We promote the export of U.S. goods and services and protect

224

Hearing Loss  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earphones Potentially as Dangerous as Noise from Jet Engines, Earphones Potentially as Dangerous as Noise from Jet Engines, Researchers Find Aug. 29, 2012 - Turning the volume up too high on your headphones can damage the coating of nerve cells, leading to temporary deafness, scientists from the University of Leicester have shown for the first time. Earphones or headphones on personal music players can reach noise levels similar to those of jet engines, the researchers said. Noises louder than 110 decibels are known to cause hearing problems such as temporary deafness and tinnitus (ringing in the ears), but the University of Leicester study is the first time the underlying cell damage has been observed. The study has been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. University of Leicester researcher Dr Martine Hamann of the Department of Cell Physiology and Pharmacology,

225

Construction Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

226

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - SR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lllS.81 lllS.81 United States Government Department of Energy (DOE\ memorandum Savannah River Operations Office (SR) DATE: REPLY TO ATINOF: FEB 132811: MGR (Moody/(803) 952-9468) SUBJECT: Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2012 To: Karen L. Boardman, Chairperson, Federal Technical Capability Panel The Calendar Year 2012 DOE-SR Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report is attached. This analysis was conducted in conjunction with the development of the DOE-SR 5-Y ear Workforce Management Plan. If you have any questions, please contact me or have your staff contact Mr. Edgar Gates at 803-952-9227 or Mrs. Deanna Yates at 803-952-6925. MGR:EG:lec OHCM-13-0025 Attachment: DOE-SR Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report

227

10 Questions for a Particle Physicist: Dave Schmitz | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Particle Physicist: Dave Schmitz Particle Physicist: Dave Schmitz 10 Questions for a Particle Physicist: Dave Schmitz April 7, 2011 - 5:46pm Addthis Dave Schmitz | Photo Courtesy of Fermilab Dave Schmitz | Photo Courtesy of Fermilab Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs "Neutrinos have developed a reputation for themselves by repeatedly surprising the science community. The first surprising thing was their simple existence." Dave Schmitz Particle physicist Dave Schmitz works on the MINERvA experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Lab -- he took some time to tell us why neutrinos (electrically neutral, subatomic particles) are important to the universe and why the time 1:32am has special meaning for his experiment. And, check out Dr. Schmitz's talk yesterday -- "In One Ear and Out the Other: A

228

Alternative Fuel News: Volume 7, Number 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. D S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Enforcement settlements offer new possibilities for financing alternative fuel and renewable energy projects Funds Funds from Fines PLUS: Clean Transport in Europe 10 Questions for Boone Pickens Vol. 7-No. 2 Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable D ear Readers: Public funding is a key component of government-sponsored programs such as Clean Cities. Many of our stakeholders including coordinators spend a great deal of time researching, soliciting, applying for, and spending money that originates with taxpayers. Grants from government agencies are

229

Alternative Fuel News Vol 5 No 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Propane Propane Vehicle Rally ALTERNATIVE FUEL NEWS ALTERNATIVE FUEL NEWS U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 5 - No. 1 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clean Cities Maps Its Strategy for a Decade of Success Strengthening coalitions, cultivating niche markets Clean Cities Maps Its Strategy for a Decade of Success Strengthening coalitions, cultivating niche markets PLUS: Washington Day Highlights Cargo Fleets Deliver Clean Air 2 ear Readers, Welcome to the pre-conference issue of Alternative Fuel News. We have an action-packed week planned for the Seventh National Clean Cities Conference in Philadelphia, especially designed for all Clean Cities coalitions and industry stakeholders. This year's conference will feature discus-

230

Export.gov - Chile - Welcome Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chilenos chilenos Register | Manage Account Search Our Site Click to Search Our Site Export.gov Home Opportunities By Industry By Country Market Research Trade Events Trade Leads Free Trade Agreements Solutions International Sales & Marketing International Financing International Logistics Licenses & Regulations Trade Data & Analysis Trade Problems Locations Domestic Offices International Offices FAQ Blog Connect Home > Chile Local Time: Print | E-mail Page Chile Chile Home Doing Business in Chile Services for U.S. Companies Business Service Providers U.S. Gov. Business Resources Career Opportunities / Internships Links Contact Us Our Worldwide Network About Us Press Room Other American Markets Other Worldwide Markets Welcome to U.S. Commercial Service Chile! U.S. Commercial Service Chile is your eyes and ears in the local

231

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Acoustics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acoustics Program Acoustics Program Developed to help designers accurately model the sound level reaching building tenant's ears, the Trane Acoustics Program (TAP) "projects" equipment sound power data through the surroundings (e.g., floors, ductwork, walls), to estimate the sound level that will be heard. Industry-standard calculations published by ASHRAE's 1991 Algorithms for HVAC Acoustics handbook are the basis for this estimate. In TAP, you can model the conditions of an HVAC system by choosing specific equipment and building component criteria. TAP will analyze the sound path and calculate the total effect for the enclosed space. You can continuously adjust the data and system design criteria to compare the results effortlessly. TAP will even plot presentation quality graphs of

232

untitled  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT GULF OF MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MAY 2011 DOE/EA-1792 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT GULF OF MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MAY 2011 DOE/EA-1792 iii May 2011 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS APE area of potential effects CFR Code of Federal Regulations dBA decibel on the A-weighted scale, used to approximate the human ear's response to sound DMR Maine Department of Marine Resources

233

Alternative Fuel News Volume 4 No 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05 05 Bus Futures Bus Futures A look at the choices for transit agencies Plus: Refuse Haulers Carry More Than Trash Inside: Prius hits U.S. market ALTERNATIVE FUEL NEWS U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 4 - No. 3 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ear Clean Cities Stakeholders: As we head into fall and the temperatures start to cool, the energy industry is heating up. The high price of oil and our nation's dependence on imports continue to make headlines, and for the first time in a long while, the issue of a national energy policy is making waves. October was also Energy Awareness Month, and Secretary Richardson kicked off the celebration at a press event at

234

LANL/LANS 2014 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL/LANS 2014 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES LANL/LANS 2014 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES At-A-Glance: Comparing the 2014 PPO & HDHP Medical Programs Ž Medical Program Benefit Comparison PPO Benefits & Cost-Sharing HDHP + HSA Benefits & Cost-Sharing Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Calen dar Y ear D educ tible - All services are subject to deductible unless otherwise indicated below. $300 Individual $900 Fam ily $500 Individual $1,500 F amily $1,500/Individual $3,00 0/Fam ily $3,000/Individual $6,000/F amily Family deductible is an ag gregate of three times the Individual amo unt. PPO and non-PPO deductibles do NOT cross-apply. Family deductible is an ag

235

RECIPIENT:Montana DEQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u.s. u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DI!TER1IllNATION PROJECT TITLE : Ear1 Fisher Biofuels Page 1 of2 STATE: MT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Proc:uremenllnstruml.'nt Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOOOS2 DE-EE-OOOO138 GF().()()()()I38-007 EEO Based on my ",view or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A),1 have made the follo~-ing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B5.1 Actions to oonserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efflciency that do 1"101 increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

236

AFN 3-3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Inside: The Sky's the Limit for Airport AFVs Celebrating Celebrating ear Clean Cities Stakeholders: The leaves are falling and autumn is here, and although it's cooling down outside, the alternative fuel industry is heating up. It's a very exciting time to be in the energy business, especially when it comes to transportation. We're celebrating the milestone 75th Clean Cities coalition. We're kicking off the new Federal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) USER Program in cities across the country. We're rolling out the new and improved Fuel Economy Guide. We're gearing up for the new model year, which will include the

237

AFN 3-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Special Clean Cities Conference Issue Conference Issue Conference Issue ear Clean Cities Stakeholders: Summer is nearly over, but it wasn't that long ago when I stood among the more than 700 friends and supporters of Clean Cities at the Fifth National Conference and Expo in Louisville, Kentucky. It was an action-packed few days, complete with panel presentations, table talk sessions, exhibits, and ride and drives-with a little taste of Louisville's unique flavor in between. I would like to personally extend my thanks to Melissa Howell and the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition, as well as the city of Louisville, for their

238

Alternative Fuel News - Volume 4 Number 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Up Close Up Close with Ford Interview with Beryl Stajich, Fleet/AFV Brand Team Manager ALTERNATIVE FUEL NEWS ALTERNATIVE FUEL NEWS U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 4 - No. 4 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The AFV Resale Market Gearing up to put cleaner vehicles on the road Gearing up to put cleaner vehicles on the road The AFV Resale Market PLUS E85 Grows in Popularity A success story from Minnesota PLUS E85 Grows in Popularity A success story from Minnesota 2 ear Readers, Happy New Year! This issue marks the start of the fifth volume of AFN. The Clean Cities net- work is growing, and more fleets are considering alternative fuels. "Industry old-timers" that

239

General Category  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Noise and Hearing Noise and Hearing Name: Florence Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: Outside U.S. Country: Australia Date: Spring 2012 Question: Why does noise damage our hearing? Replies: Hi Florence, The principal mechanism for hearing loss due to noise, whether chronic or acute, is through damage to the stereocilia possessing sense cells of the cochlea in the inner ear compartment. The cochlea is a fluid filled organ that is lined with sensing cells possessing stereocilia(little hairs) that vibrate in response to sound. The cochlea is horn shaped so that the vibrations of the cilia reflect the frequency of the sound perceived. Vibrating stereocilia are attached to the sensing cell which converts the vibrations to a neural signal and that impulse is sent on to the brain through cochlear nerve fibers.

240

Importance of Measurement: The Impact of Power Quality in Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To implement sustainable and green initiatives in a building it is vital to have a means of measuring and verifying its performance. This is done by the introduction of intelligent utility and energy metering to the facility that would become its eyes and ears. The principle is you cannot control what you cannot measure. Looking closer at the power side, the inefficiencies caused by power quality issues such as power factor and harmonics have often been easily overlooked due to the traditional focus on equipment performance optimisation, rather than on the quality of power which is essential for the operation of any electrical equipment. This paper analyses power factor and harmonics problem areas and offers practical approaches for improvements.

Qazi, T.; Roy, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics  

SciTech Connect

Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Combustion characterization of coals for industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The five parent coals ear-marked for this study have been characterized. These coals include (1) a Texas (Wilcox) lignite; (2) a Montana (Rosebud) subbituminous; (4) an Alabama (Black Creek) high volatile bituminous; and (5) a Pennsylvania (Buck Mountain) anthracite. Samples for analyses were prepared in accordance with the ASTM standard (ASTM D 2013-72). The following ASTM analyses were performed on each coal: proximate, ultimate, higher heating value, Hardgrove grindability index, ash fusibility, and ash composition. Additionally, the flammability index (FI) of each coal was determined in an in-house apparatus. The FI is indicative of the ignition temperature of a given fuel on a relative basis. The combustion kinetic parameters (apparent activation energies and frequency factors) of Montana subbituminous and Pennsylvania anthracite chars have also been derived from data obtained in the Drop Tube Furnace System (DTFS). This information depicts the combustion characteristics of these two coal chars. 1 ref., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Nsakala, N.; Patel, R.L.; Lao, T.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Combustion characterization of coals for industrial applications. First quarterly progress report, 1 April 1982-30 June 1982  

SciTech Connect

Three of the five coals ear-marked for this study have been characterized. These coals include (1) A Montana (Rosebud) subbituminous; (2) An Illinois (No. 6) high volatile bituminous; and (3) A Pennsylvania (Buck Mountain) anthracite. Samples for analyses were prepared in accordance with the ASTM standard (ASTM D 2013-72). The following ASTM analyses were performed on each coal: proximate, ultimate, higher heating value, Hardgrove grindability index, ash fusibility, and ash composition. Additionally, the flammability index (FI) of each coal was determined in an in-house apparatus. The (FI) is indicative of the ignition temperature of a given fuel on a relative basis. These analyses yielded information regarding the ASTM classification of the three coals as well as their chemical, physical, and ignitibility characteristics. 1 figure, 2 tables.

Borio, R.W.; Goetz, G.J.; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Patel, R.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Research Article Genetic diversity among the land races of sorghum collected in Tamil Nadu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixty three local land races of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) collected from different parts of Tamil Nadu were evaluated for their genetic diversity based on nine characters. The genotypes were grouped into 14 clusters indicating high genetic divergence among them. The study indicated no definite relationship between geographic and genetic diversity and geographic diversity cannot be used as an index of genetic diversity. Based on the inter cluster distance and cluster mean for various characters it could be seen that the clusters VI, X, XII were the most divergent from the other clusters. The genotypes from these parents possibly be utilized for hybridization programme. Days to flowering, plant height, ear head length and grain weight contributed highly towards the genetic divergence among the genotypes studied. Keywords: Sorghum, genetic divergence, inter cluster, cluster mean, contributed characters

K. Ganesamurthy; D. Punitha; M. Elangovan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

CAPTURING THE POWER OF NATURE Iowa Stored Energy Park DOE Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Peer Review Fairmont Hotel Washington, DC September 29, 2008 Kent Holst, Development Director Iowa Stored Energy Park Funding: Congressional Ear-mark CAPTURING THE POWER OF NATURE Today's Presentation Past Present Future Funding CAPTURING THE POWER OF NATURE c CAPTURING THE POWER OF NATURE Iowa's municipal utilities saw this. 1. Economic feasibility studies. 2. Geologic research. 3. Computer modeling. CAPTURING THE POWER OF NATURE Will ISEP make money? 1. Missouri River Energy Services. 2. Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency. CAPTURING THE POWER OF NATURE Next steps: 1. Drill two test wells. 2. Pump tests, water & air. 3. Refine computer modeling. CAPTURING THE POWER OF NATURE Funding 1. Municipal utilities -$1.15 million. 2. DOE - $6 million. 3. Iowa Power Fund - $3.2 million.

247

DOE/EA-1792 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT GULF OF MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office SEPTEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1792 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT GULF OF MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office SEPTEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1792 iii September 2011 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS APE area of potential effects CFR Code of Federal Regulations dBA decibel on the A-weighted scale, used to approximate the human ear's response to sound

248

DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Jump to: navigation, search Name DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) Place Washington, Washington, DC Zip 20585 Product String representation "Washington D.C. ... ear operations." is too long. Coordinates 38.89037°, -77.031959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.89037,"lon":-77.031959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

Audiometry (hearing test) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audiometry (hearing test) Audiometry (hearing test) Audiometry (hearing test) The audiogram is an evaluation of how well an individual can hear. Sounds are presented to the individual through earphones during the test. These sounds are presented at different levels of frequency and intensity. The human ear responds to the frequency or pitch of a sound and the intensity or loudness of the sound. The frequency of the sound is measured in Hertz (Hz), and the loudness of the sound is measured in decibels (dB). During the procedure, the responses of the individual are recorded on a graph. An individual has no impairment in hearing if he or she detects the sound that is presented through the earphones in the range of 0 to 25 decibels. The audiogram indicates how much louder (in decibels) the pure tone frequency

250

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) staff on FR Program issues, including staffing, training and qualification, recruitment, and retention. The Board is clearly interested in the

251

June 21, 1999 Memo, Facility Representative Program Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June June 21, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR: Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Director, Office of Science Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FROM: John Wilcynski, Director, Office of Field Integration SUBJECT: FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities

252

A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for developmental exposure to BDE-47 in rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used commercially as additive flame retardants and have been shown to transfer into environmental compartments, where they have the potential to bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans. Of the 209 possible PBDEs, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is usually the dominant congener found in human blood and milk samples. BDE-47 has been shown to have endocrine activity and produce developmental, reproductive, and neurotoxic effects. The objective of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BDE-47 in male and female (pregnant and non-pregnant) adult rats to facilitate investigations of developmental exposure. This model consists of eight compartments: liver, brain, adipose tissue, kidney, placenta, fetus, blood, and the rest of the body. Concentrations of BDE-47 from the literature and from maternal-fetal pharmacokinetic studies conducted at RTI International were used to parameterize and evaluate the model. The results showed that the model simulated BDE-47 tissue concentrations in adult male, maternal, and fetal compartments within the standard deviations of the experimental data. The model's ability to estimate BDE-47 concentrations in the fetus after maternal exposure will be useful to design in utero exposure/effect studies. This PBPK model is the first one designed for any PBDE pharmaco/toxicokinetic description. The next steps will be to expand this model to simulate BDE-47 pharmacokinetics and distributions across species (mice), and then extrapolate it to humans. After mouse and human model development, additional PBDE congeners will be incorporated into the model and simulated as a mixture.

Emond, Claude, E-mail: claude.emond@umontreal.c [Departement de sante environnementale et sante au travail Faculte de medecine, Universite de Montreal, P.O. Box 6128, Main Station, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada); BioSimulation Consulting Inc., Newark, DE 19711 (United States); Raymer, James H.; Studabaker, William B.; Garner, C. Edwin [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Birnbaum, Linda S. [Office of Research and Development, National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nostratic Dictionary - Third Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Gwd ?apu!yya, Gln ?api!yya, Brj abuy?ya2 'maternal uncle' Bl. 1OO, 112, 174, Ss. PEC 15, Ss. B 21, Hn. S 51, PG 58, Grg. 4, Brl. 2-3, Hw. A 336, Oo. 67, HL 59, AMS 31 (Dl apu!yya api!yya 'avunculus' interpreted as 'weiblicher Vater', sc... . (after Bhtlingk) tried to explain the Yk word as a loan from M bicin ? becin , but the latter word means 'ape, monkey', and hence the hyp. is untenable || HS : ?? S *?bX > Ar baaX-, buX- 'lamb' (if *-X- < *-TX-) BK I 1OO ?? ECh: Ll {Grgs} bi...

Dolgopolsky, Aharon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys  

SciTech Connect

The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Palacio, H.A. [Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11 B1096APP La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer Implantation Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer methods are there- fore being explored. The purpose of this study was to perform a proof-of-concept experiment on the use of the radioactive tracer beryllium-7 (7Be) for the determination of in vitro wear in a highly cross-linked orthopedic UHMWPE. Three cross-linked and four conventional UHMWPE pins made from compression- molded GUR 1050, were activated with 109 to 1010 7Be nuclei using a new implantation setup that produced a homogenous distribution of implanted nuclei up to 8.5 lm below the surface. The pins were tested for wear in a six-station pin-on-flat appara- tus for up to 7.1 million cycles (178 km). A Germanium gamma detector was employed to determine activity loss of the UHMWPE pins at preset intervals during the wear test. The wear of the cross-linked UHMWPE pins was readily detected and esti- mated to be 17 6 3 lg per million cycles. The conventional-to- cross-linked ratio of the wear rates was 13.1 6 0.8, in the expected range for these materials. Oxidative degradation dam- age from implantation was negligible; however, a weak depend- ence of wear on implantation dose was observed limiting the number of radioactive tracer atoms that can be introduced. Future applications of this tracer technology may include the analysis of location-specific wear, such as loss of material in the post or backside of a tibial insert.

Wimmer, Markus A. [Rush Uniiv. Medical Center; Laurent, Michael P. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Dwivedi, Yasha [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Gallardo, Luis A. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Blackmon, Jeffery C [Louisiana State University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Patel, Nidhi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Rehm, Karl E. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ahmad, Irshad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greene, John P. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greife, Uwe [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part III: Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, 1950-1987  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of data on the incidence of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors during the period from late 1950 through the end of 1987 (93,696 survivors accounting for 2,778,000 person-years). These analyses add 9 additional years of follow-up for leukemia and 12 for myeloma to that in the last comprehensive reports on these diseases. This is the first analysis of the lymphoma incidence data in the cohort. Using both the Leukemia Registry and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, a total of 290 leukemia, 229 lymphoma and 73 myeloma cases were identified. The primary analyses were restricted to first primary tumors diagnosed among residents of the cities or surrounding areas with Dosimetry Systems 1986 dose estimates between 0 and 4 Gy kerma (231 leukemias, 208 lymphomas and 62 myelomas). Analyses focused on time-dependent models for the excess absolute risk. Separate analyses were carried out for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and adult T-cell leukemia in this population. There was strong evidence of radiation-induced risks for all subtypes except ATL, and there were significant subtype differences with respect to the effects of age at exposure and sex and in the temporal pattern of risk. The AML dose-response function was nonlinear, whereas there was no evidence against linearity for the other subtypes. When averaged over the follow-up period, the excess absolute risk (EAR) estimates (in cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) for the leukemia subtypes were 0.6, 1.1 and 0.9 for ALL, AML and CML, respectively. The corresponding estimated average excess relative risks at 1 Sv are 9.1, 3.3 and 6.2, respectively. There was some evidence of an increased risk of lymphoma in males (EAR = 0.6 cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) but no evidence of any excess in females. 64 refs., 14 figs., 19 tabs.

Preston, D.L.; Izumi, Shizue; Kusumi, Shizuyo (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Tomonaga, Masao (A-bomb Institute of Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)); Ron, E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Dohy, Hiroo (Hiroshima A-bomb Hospital (Japan)); Matsui, Tatsuki (Nagasaki City Hospital (Japan)); Nonaka, Hiroaki (George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

BNL | Jörg Schwender  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jörg Schwender Jörg Schwender Background Plant biomass is of increasing importance as a renewable resource for the production of fuels and of chemical feedstocks that replace petroleum based materials. As a basis for rational engineering of seeds and other plant storage organs, our goal is to increase the basic understanding of the functioning of storage metabolism in plants. Of central interest here is the process of allocation of maternal carbon and nitrogen resources to different storage products (oil, protein and starch) in a sink organ like a developing seed. Schematic of carbon flow during storage synthesis in developing seeds of Brassica napus based on metabolic flux analysis (See publications below). PPP = pentose phosphate pathway; TAG = triacylglycerol. Research Interests

259

CX-006490: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90: Categorical Exclusion Determination 90: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006490: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bat Roost Tower Construction CX(s) Applied: B1.20 Date: 08/11/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) will be performing minor excavation and small scale construction activities associated with construction of the 1140 Bat Roost Tower adjacent to the 182-0 facility located in the 100-0 Area of the Hanford Site. Bat Roost construction supports the protection of a significant roost site for Yuma myotis, pallid, and canyon bats that were discovered to be utilizing the 183-0 filter building headhouse, and potentially the clearwells, as a maternity colony during summer months. Construction of the bat roost will

260

RL-721 Document 10 Number: REV3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

j)tJEfx - j)tJEfx - 66037 I. Project Title: 1140 BAT ROOST TOWER CONSTRUCTION II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): Proposed Action The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) will be performing minor excavation and small scale construction activities associated with construction of the 1140 Bat Roost Tower adjacent to the 182-0 facility located in the 100-0 Area of the Hanford Site. Bat Roost construction supports the protection of a significant roost site for Yuma myotis, pallid, and canyon bats that were discovered to be utilizing the 183-0 filter building headhouse, and potentially the clearwells, as a maternity colony during summer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome in adulthood: Evaluation of a 24-year-old man with a rec(4) chromosome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a profoundly intellectually disabled 24-year-old man with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, left hemiplegia, epilepsy, atrophy of the right cerebral hemisphere, and dilatation of the right ventricle. The patient had a small ventricular septal defect, was wheelchair bound, and totally dependent. He had no speech, but vocalized to show his feelings. In this patient, the del(4)(p15) was subtle and arose due to the inheritance of a recombinant chromosome (4) from a maternal pericentric inversion - 46,XX,inv(4)(p15.32q35). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with probe D4S96 confirmed the deletion. This is the second case of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome resulting from a large pericentric inversion of chromosome 4. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Ogle, R.; Sillence, D.O.; Merrick, A. [Children`s Hospital, Summer Hill, NSW (Australia)] [and others

1996-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Down syndrome clusters in Germany after the Chernobyl accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In two independent studies using different approaches and covering West Berlin and Bavaria, respectively, highly significant temporal clusters of Down syndrome were found. Both sharp increases occurred in areas receiving relatively low Chernobyl fallout and concomitant radiation exposures. Only for the Berlin cluster was fallout present at the time of the affected meiosis, whereas the Nuremberg cluster preceded the radioactive contamination by 1 month. Hypotheses on possible causal relationships are compared. Radiation from the Chernobyl accident is an unlikely factor, because the associated cumulative dose was so low in comparison with natural background. Microdosimetric considerations would indicate that fewer than 1 in 200 oocyte nuclei would have experienced an ionizing event from Chernobyl radioactivity. Given the lack of understanding of what causes Down syndrome, other than factors associated with increased maternal age, additional research into environmental and infectious risk factors is warranted. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Burkart, W.; Grosche, B.; Schoetzau, A. [Institute for Radiation Hygiene, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pharmacokinetics and PBPK Models  

SciTech Connect

Since the landmark report Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children (NRC 1993), children at all stages of development, from fertilization through postnatal maturation, have explicitly been identified as an area of emphasis in human health risk assessments. Exposure to drugs or chemicals at any point in development has the potential for causing irreversible changes that can be unique to each stage of development (Grabowski and Daston 1983; Rodier 1978; Wilson 1973). While exposures of a developing embryo or fetus are mediated by the mother, postnatal exposures consist of maternal influences via breastfeeding as well as environmental factors (Figure 1). As a result, risk assessments for developmental toxicity must consider the sources as well as timing of potential exposures to adequately protect children when they may be the most exposed or the most sensitive to adverse consequences (NRC 1993).

Corley, Richard A.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sintering Effects on Morphology, Thermal Stability and Surface Area of Sol-Gel Derived Nano-Hydroxyapatite Powder  

SciTech Connect

Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics have been recognized as substitute materials for bone and teeth in orthopedic and dentistry field due to their chemical and biological similarity to human hard tissue. The nanosized and nanocrystalline forms of HAP have great potential to revolutionize the hard tissue-engineering field, starting from bone repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery systems. This paper reports the synthesis of biomimetic nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) by sol-gel method using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (CNT) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively to obtain a desired Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Deionized water was used as a diluting media for HAP sol preparation and ammonia was used to adjust the pH to 11. After aging, the HAP gel was dried at 55 deg. C and sintered to different temperatures (200 deg. C, 400 deg. C, 600 deg. C, 800 deg. C, 1000 deg. C and 1200 deg. C). The dried and sintered powders were characterized for phase composition using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The particle size and morphology was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior of the dried HAP nanopowder was studied in the temperature range of 55 deg. C to 1000 deg. C using thermal gravimetric analyser (TGA). The BET surface area of absorbance was determined by Nitrogen adsorption using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The presence of characteristic peaks of the phosphate and OH groups in FTIR spectrums confirmed the formation of pure HAP in dried as well as sintered powders. XRD results also confirmed the formation of stoichiometric nano-HAP. Sintering revealed that with increase in temperature, both the crystallinity and crystallite size of nano-HAP particles increased. The synthesized nano-HAP powder was found to be stable upto 1000 deg. C without any additional phase other than HAP, whereas peak of {beta}-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) was observed at 1200 deg. C. Photomicrograph of TEM showed that the nanopowder sintered at 600 deg. C is composed of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (26.0-45.6 nm), which is well in agreement with the crystallite size calculated using XRD data. TGA study showed the thermal stability of the synthesized nano-HAP powder. The BET surface area decreased with increase in sintering temperature.

Kapoor, Seema [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Batra, Uma [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Kohli, Suchita [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chd. (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

265

Owls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Owls Owls Nature Bulletin No. 267-A April 29, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OWLS The owls, of all our native birds, are least understood. Most kinds remain hidden, motionless and silent during the day and hunt only at night or in the dim twilight of morning and evening. Only a few, like our common Short-eared Owl and those big owls of the far north -- the Snowy Owl, the Great Gray Owl and the Hawk Owl -- habitually hunt in daytime. Because an owl' s feathers are peculiarly soft and fluffy, it flies as silently as a passing shadow, swoops upon its prey unheard, and its Indian name was "hush-wing". Since ancient times there have been many superstitions and legends about these birds. They have been regarded as the companions of sorcerers, witches, ghosts, hobgoblins and Satan himself. Their weird nocturnal hootings, gobblings and screams were and are believed to predict death, illness or disaster. Even today, in our southern states, the plaintive quavering cry of the Little Screech Owl -- which they call the "Shivering" Owl -- will cause some people to get out of bed and turn over their left shoe; others to throw a nail or other iron object into the fire. To the Greeks and Romans, the owl was a symbol of wisdom and was the companion of their goddess of wisdom.

266

Fujifilm_NERSC_StorageOutlook.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Storage Outlook A Storage Outlook for Energy Sciences: Data Intensive, Throughput and Exascale Computing --- 1 --- October, 2 013 National Energy Research Scientific ! Computing Center (NERSC) * L ocated a t B erkeley L ab * User facility to support 6 DOE Offices of Science: * 5000 u sers, 7 00 r esearch p rojects * 48 s tates; 6 5% f rom u niversi=es * Hundreds o f u sers e ach d ay * ~1500 p ublica=ons p er y ear * With s ervices f or c onsul=ng, d ata analysis a nd m ore --- 2 --- Types of Computing at NERSC NERSC Petascale C ompu=ng, Petabyte S torage, a nd E xpert Scien=fic C onsul=ng Data I ntensive Experiments a nd Simula=ons Large S cale Capability S imula=ons High V olume Job T hroughput Data Explosion is Occurring Everywhere in DOE Genomics * Sequencer data volume increasing 12x over the next 3 years * Sequencer

267

Reconnecting broken blood vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reconnecting broken blood vessels Reconnecting broken blood vessels Name: Catherine A Kraft Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: While watching the television program "Chicago Hope" the other day, I watched a doctor sew someone's ear back on using an elaborate microscope. I was wondering if a surgeon is required to reconnect all the broken blood vessels, and how you would accomplish this? Thanks for your time! Replies: I'm not a surgeon, but I think the answer to your question is "no." The blood will flow across the wound (out the end of one blood vessel and into the end of another), although not efficiently. I believe they sometimes use leeches sucking on the end of the reconnected part to help induce flow of blood in the right direction through the area. You probably do need to put the ends of the major vessels near each other, so the distribution of blood flow is reasonably like it was before the injury, and so the vessels can eventually reconnect. But probably the microscope is used mostly to be sure the various layers of muscle, connective tissue, and fat are connected together correctly.

268

Pheasants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pheasants Pheasants Nature Bulletin No. 59 March 30, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation PHEASANTS The cock pheasants are crowing. From daybreak until midmorning, and sometimes in the evening, they may be heard in the forest preserves. During the winter they congregated in small bands, the hens generally separate from the cocks. Now the bands are breaking up and each cock selects a "crowing area" of from 5 to 60 acres which he defends by fighting off other cocks. He attracts hens to his area by lusty crowing. When one appears he clucks and coaxes, picking out choice bits of food for her. Then he begins to strut his stuff, erecting his ear-tufts and preening his gorgeous plumage, walking around with stiff arrogant steps and an exaggerated bobbing motion. If a successful fighter, he may acquire and hold a harem of as many as 8 hens which he protects until the end of the nesting season. If repeatedly whipped, he may become a wandering bachelor. Exit crowing.

269

Richard Gerber! NERSC Senior Science Advisor! User Services Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Group Lead User Services Group Lead NUG Webinar January 2014 --- 1 --- January 9 , 2 014 Agenda * Edison C onfigura6on f or A Y 2 014 * Alloca6on Y ear R ollover I ssues * Project D irectories p er P roject * NUG 2 014 U ser G roup M ee6ng * Automa6c I /O P rofiling f or Y our C ode * Give / T ake U 6lity f or S haring F iles * NUG Q ueue C ommiRee U pdate * User Survey Needs Your Input * Open D iscussion --- 2 --- Edison Update --- 3 --- Jeff B roughton NERSC D eputy f or O pera6ons Systems D epartment H ead Edison at a Glance * First C ray X C30 * Intel I vy B ridge 1 2---core, 2 .4GHz processors * Aries i nterconnect w ith D ragonfly topology for great scalability * Performs 2 ---4 x H opper p er n ode o n real a pplica6ons * 12 x 512GB login nodes to support visualiza6on a nd a naly6cs --- 4 --- * 3 L ustre s cratch

270

Deer Mice and White-Footed Mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deer Mice and White-Footed Mice Deer Mice and White-Footed Mice Nature Bulletin No. 545-A November 23. 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation DEER MICE AND WHITE-FOOTED MICE At night, sitting on a wooded shore, waiting for fish to bite or quietly gazing into the coals of a camp fire, you often become aware of mysterious small noises nearby in the darkness. Sometimes it is only a faint scratching on a tree trunk, or a rustling in the fallen leaves. But, again, you may hear a tiny drumming sound or a musical buzzing hum. Spooks? No. The best guess is that you have disturbed the night life of a wild mouse. He makes the drumming sound by rapidly tapping a dry leaf or hollow stem with his front feet. Unlike house mice, his voice is more of a song than a mere squeak. If you catch him in the beam of a flashlight you see an alert animal face with big ears, large black bulging eyes, and a beautiful coat -- rich brown above with snow-white underparts and feet. From these prominent characteristics came the common names of our two local species, the Deer Mouse and the White-footed Mouse.

271

WSU report12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wayne Wayne S tate U niversity, 7 th y ear i n Q uarkNet Mentors: P rofs. Robert H arr a nd P aul K archin In 2 012, t he W SU QuarkNet center ran a Masterclass, a nd a s ummer r esearch program. T he M asterclass w as h eld on Saturday, March 1 0, a nd h ad 3 t eachers a nd about 2 0 s tudents i n a ttendance. T he students received an introduction to particle physics a nd a nalyzed C MS d ata. T he d ay w as c apped o ff w ith a v ideoconference where t heir r esults w ere d iscussed. The H igh S chool S tudent S ummer R esearch P rogram r an o ver 6 w eeks f rom J une 2 2 to A ugust 1 0, 2 012. T he p rogram w as o rganized a s 3 s essions, e ach w ith 4 s tudents and l asting f or 2 w eeks. T his e nables u s t o s elect 1 2 s tudents f rom a w ide r ange o f backgrounds f or t he p rogram. W e h ad a bout 8 0 a pplicants f or t hese 1 2 p ositions,

272

Busby LWRS for Xcut webinar.pptx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Light W ater R eactor S ustainability R &D P rogram Overview of DOE-NE LWRS Materials and Aging Degradation Pathway DOE-NE Materials Program Crosscutting Coordination Webinar July 30, 2013 Outline of presentation * Mo:va:on a nd O verview o f L WRS P rogram * Key a c:vi:es w ithin M aterials A ging a nd Degrada:on p or:on o f L WRS * Partnerships * Examples o f r esearch - Concrete - Cabling - Metals 2 71 21 13 4 Extension g ranted Extension r equest planned Extending the lifetimes of today's reactors: A sustainable energy solution Most o f U .S. n uclear power p lant ( NPP) fleet i s s cheduled t o re:re b etween 2 029 and 2 056 Extending N PP life:mes to 8 0 y ears o r m ore would provide mul:ple b enefits Subsequent license r enewal makes e conomic sense R&D i s n eeded t o p rovide the technical basis

273

Structural Polymorphism of the Actin-Espin System: A Prototypical System of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymorphism of the Actin-Espin Polymorphism of the Actin-Espin System: A Prototypical System of Filaments and Linkers in Stereocilia Filamentous actin (F-actin), a biological rod-shaped protein, provides the structural framework in living cells. The assembly and organization of F-actin in vivo is controlled predominantly by actin binding proteins which locally crosslink actin into a rich variety of phases, including bundles and networks. Espins are one type of actin binding protein responsible for the formation of large parallel actin bundles. Espin is found in actin bundles in sensory cell microvilli, such as the stereocilia of cochlear hair cells. Within the cochlea of the inner ear, sound waves cause the basilar membrane to vibrate. These vibrations bend the stereocilia in the hair cells, which then trigger nerve impulses that are transmitted to the brain. Genetic mutations in espin's F-actin binding sites cause deafness. In this study crosslinked actin structures formed by mutated espins were studied in order to look into the potential link between the crosslinked bundle structure and deafness.

274

Determining age of whales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining age of whales Determining age of whales Name: Bruce W Walkey Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: While browsing through the Internet, I came upon a question by two fifth grade students. Their question got me thinking and now I pose it to you. How can you determine the age of whales? Since they are mammals, can the methods that are used on humans be used on whales? What are some tests that can be done on bones or tissues to determine age? Looking forward to your reply. Replies: Although it is difficult to determine the age of whales (unless they are born in captivity and we know their birth date), several methods have been commonly used: 1) (if female) the examination of the ovaries 2) Examination of the ridges on baleen, which are not uniform in size and analogous to tree rings. The problem with this is that baleen wears away over time. 3) Studying layers of ossification in an ear bone is probably the most accurate method of aging, since internal bones don't wear away. The biggest problem with aging methods is that they usually require that you are dissecting the animal, and often, we would like a method of aging for live active animals. The best we can do here is to compare the size and markings of whales of known age to those found in the wild. Great question!

275

Alternative Fuel News Vol 4 Iss 1  

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Great Great Salt Lake S a n J o a q u i n V a l l e y Phoenix San Diego Los Angeles San Francisco Sacramento Reno Las Vegas Salt Lake City San Bernardino Cedar City Provo Winnemucca C A L I F O R N I A N E V A D A U T A H A R I Z O N A USPS Leads the Charge with EVs HEVs and Fuel Cells a Big Hit at Auto Shows Inside: Salt Lake City Coalition Makes it Look Easy ALTERNATIVE FUEL NEWS U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 4 - No. 1 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ear Clean Cities Stakeholders: The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads the research, development, and deployment of clean, efficient, and renewable energy technologies, including clean vehicles and alternative fuels. As described in the fall 1999 issue of the Alternative Fuel News, EERE is

276

The Screech Owl  

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Screech Owl Screech Owl Nature Bulletin No. 100 January 25, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE SCREECH OWL At the foot of a dead oak where we hoped to find some winter mushrooms beneath the grass and fallen leaves, we spied several pellets about the size and shape of the end of your thumb. They were clean and odorless, each containing the skull and bones of a mouse tightly wrapped in a layer of the animal's fur. Owls and hawks swallow their prey whole or in large pieces and later spit out the indigestible matter in the form of pellets. Up in this tree was a woodpecker hole from which the round unwinking yellow eyes of a screech owl glared at us. A screech owl, about the size of a robin but much chunkier, is our only small owl with ear tufts like "horns". They prey on mice, chipmunks and ground squirrels, fish, crayfish, amphibians, small snakes, angleworms, and large insects. When other food is scarce, and their fuzzy white young -- usually four in number -- require much food, they frequently kill birds but apparently not enough to seriously affect the bird population. No owl, of any species, should be killed.

277

The EETD Newsletter Collection  

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The The E ETD N ewsletter C ollection Table o f C ontents EETD N ews # 45 - F all 2 013, V ol. 1 2, N o. 2 * A Q &A w ith C indy R egnier, M anager o f t he F acility f or L ow---Energy e Xperiments i n B uildings (FLEXLAB) * CalCharge P rovides E nergy S torage C ompanies w ith A ccess t o S treamlined, C ost---Effective R esearch * Berkeley L ab F inds S teady G rowth A mong U .S. E SCOs, D espite R ecession * Bringing E nergy E fficiency t o H igh P erformance C omputing * U.S. I nstalled P rice o f S olar P hotovoltaic S ystems C ontinues R apid D ecline * Berkeley L ab S tudy F inds N o E vidence o f R esidential P roperty V alue I mpacts N ear U .S. W ind Turbines * Berkeley L ab R esearch H ighlights B est S trategies t o A chieve L ow---Carbon D ata C enters * Conductive A dhesive I mproves L ithium---ion B attery S torage b y 3 0

278

Bats  

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Bats Bats Nature Bulletin No. 147 March 20, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt of Conservation BATS Flying squirrels only glide. Bats are the only fur bearing animals that truly fly, and they've been doing it for at least 50 million years Twisting, looping and zig-zagging through the air, at dusk and dawn, they catch flying insects more skillfully than the swallow or the chimney swift. Each twist and turn means another insect caught, A bat can consume one-half its weight in insects in a single twilight. Harmful? No, We have one in Trailside Museum that likes to be handled and fed mealworms. They do not get in women's hair. They do not distribute our kind of bed bugs. They are not blind; even in daytime they see fairly well. But they can fly through timber or the narrow twisting passages of caves in total darkness because they have radar, Bats have large specialized ears, Their squeak is pitched so high that few people can hear it, As they fly they also make a supersonic squeak about 30 times per second and are guided by the echoes bouncing back from obstacles.

279

Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC Bioinformatics Computing Consultant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Running Jobs on Running Jobs on Genepool --- 1 --- February 1 2, 2 013 Structure of the Genepool System --- 2 --- compute n odes gpint n odes high p riority & interac6ve nodes fpga web services database services login n odes filesystems ssh genepool.nersc.gov h=p://...jgi---psf.org User A ccess C ommand L ine S cheduler S ervice Types of Jobs on genepool * Batch - S cheduled ( compute n odes, f pga) - 8,320 c ores f or 7 2,953,280 c ompute h ours p er y ear i n g enepool - use " qsub" t o s ubmit a j ob * Interac@ve - S cheduled (compute n odes s ubset) - 80 c ores p resently, i ncreasing s ize - use " qlogin" t o s ubmit a j ob * Interac@ve - U nscheduled (login n odes, g pints) - 4 login nodes, 27 gpint n odes - ssh t o t he h ost, d irect---use * Services - U nscheduled ( login n odes, g pints, -

280

EHS 0288 GEM Training Rev 00  

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EHSS EHSS T raining V 1 u pdated 4 /17/2013 EHS 0 228: G EM T raining f or E HSS P ersonnel Required s teps t o b ecoming a uthorized t o d rive a n E HSS G EM e lectric v ehicle: 1. Trainee r eads t he following p olicy a nd d riving rules ( page 1 ) 2. GEM c ustodian p rovides v ehicle o rientation ( page 2 & 3) 3. Trainee r eceives c ourse c redit (page 4 ) Traffic a nd S afety R egulations * All C alifornia d riving r ules a pply w hen o perating a G EM v ehicle; t he d river m ust h ave a v alid state---issued d river's l icense. ( NOTE: Y ou c an f ind t he C alifornia V ehicle C ode u sing G oogle Search o n y our c omputer). * Driver s hould f amiliarize t hemselves w ith t he o wner's m anual. * The d river a nd p assenger m ust w ear s eatbelts w henever t he v ehicle i s i n m otion. * Never u se a c ommunication d evice s uch a s

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281

Alternative Fuel News Vol.2 - No.6  

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NT NT Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M T axis T ransit Parks School Buses Delivery Fleets Airports Shuttle Buses Heavy- Duty T rucks The Niche Market Principle The Niche Market Principle ALTERNATIVE FUEL NEWS The Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center Vol. 2 - No. 6 From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ear Clean Cities Stakeholders: By the time you read this issue of Alternative Fuel News (AFN), we will be well into the new year. But I think it is still appropriate to wish the proverbial "Happy New Year" to each of you, so I will. May 1999 be a healthy and prosperous year for you and your family.

282

Illinois Foxes  

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Foxes Foxes Nature Bulletin No. 700 January 12, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ILLINOIS FOXES The Red Fox and the Gray Fox are the only common wild relatives of the dog in the Chicago region. Another, the coyote, if present at all in recent years, is very scarce, Both foxes have long pointed faces, large ears, long legs, long bushy tails and weigh only about ten pounds. The red fox is reddish yellow with a white tip on the tail and has black stockings on its feet and legs. The gray fox has a grizzled gray back with rusty yellow on the throat, sides, feet and legs. The tip of its tail is black. In Illinois the red fox is most at home in farmlands, open country and the borders of woodlands where it has held its own and thrived over the years in spite of hunters, trappers and the disturbances of its habitat by man. The less common gray is a shy forest animal that has increased in wildlife sanctuaries. However, the total fox population of the Cook County forest preserves is probably little different from that of other areas of similar size in Illinois.

283

NUG2013_Storage.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Systems: Storage Systems: 2012 and beyond --- 1 --- February 1 2, 2 013 2 Astrophysics d iscover e arly n earby s upernova * Palomar T ransient F actory r uns m achine learning a lgorithms o n ~ 300GB/night delivered b y E Snet " science n etwork" * Rare g limpse o f a s upernova w ithin 1 1 h ours of e xplosion, 2 0M l ight y ears a way * Telescopes w orld---wide r edirected w ithin 1 hour Data s ystems e ssen

284

Moles  

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514-A January 26, 1974 514-A January 26, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MOLES Few people have ever seen a mole. That's because this strange animal lives its entire life underground and is rarely dragged out into the light of day. Sometimes we see those long, meandering ridges that it pushes up in lawns and gardens but most of us have no idea what the creature looks like. The mole is built for digging. It has six-inch, torpedo-shaped body covered with dense, dark fur with a silky sheen which, like velvet, can be brushed either backward or forward. The head is cone-shaped with a long sensitive snout used for finding earthworms, grubs and other food. The short naked tail is used for guiding it backwards along the runways. In our common mole, the tiny eyeballs are completely covered with skin. There are no external ears, although they have a keen sense of hearing. The shoulders and forelegs are tremendously powerful with broad, shovel-like paws, each armed with five heavy claws.

285

The Lotus and the Water Lilies  

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Lotus and the Water Lilies Lotus and the Water Lilies Nature Bulletin No. 196-A June 12, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE LOTUS AND THE WATER LILIES In midsummer, when the weather is hot and sultry, Mother Nature puts on an extravagant flower show. She uses just one kind of blossom. Completely covering hundreds of acres of water in shallow lakes or sluggish streams, are dense almost impenetrable beds of plants with huge green leaves like elephant ears and stately creamy-yellow flowers as fragrant as they are beautiful. This is the American Lotus, closely akin to the Egyptian lotus and the sacred lotus of the Hindus. The American lotus grows in quiet water from 2 to 5 feet deep, where its big leaves and flowers usually stand a foot or two above the surface on thick stiff stems rising from fleshy rootstalks buried in the mud. It has several leathery dark green leaves, almost circular and from one to two or more feet in diameter, each balanced at its center, like a platter, on the stem. The great flower buds open into blossoms, from 6 to 10 inches across, with broad petals and sepals. These are followed by conical seed capsules, often the size of a man's fist. From one to two dozen seeds are set in pits in the fist top of the capsule, which breaks off and floats about, scattering the seeds.

286

Alternative Fuel News, Volume 6, Number 3  

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CMAQ Funding CMAQ Funding on Long Island U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y Vol. 6 - No. 3 An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy PLUS: Sales Success Tips for AFV Dealers Cummins Westport Drives Progress A LT E R N AT I V E F U E L S A C R O S S A M E R I C A SUCCESS STORIES FROM EVERY STATE D ear Readers: Mark Twain said, "Facts are stubborn, but statistics are more pliable." The Clean Cities Program is defined by two very clear facts: By 2010 we will have 1 million AFVs on the road and we will be displacing 1 billion gallons of petroleum annually. As 2003 dawns, so does the realization that we have seven years to meet these ambitious goals. So, where are we and how are we going

287

OFA2013_Storage@Distance.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Storage Systems Group NERSC Storage Systems Group Storage at a Distance --- 1 --- Open F abrics A lliance U ser D ay What is storage at a distance? * Data i s n ot l ocal t o t he u ser/resource * Processing a nd w orkflow n eeds a re n ear r eal---7me - Don't w ant t o w ait u n9l d ata t ransfer i s c omplete - Need t o s ee r esults, m ake a djustments, a nd t ry a gain * Network w ill b ecome p art o f t he i nstruments - Telescopes a nd t heir d ata - Sequencers a nd t heir g enome d ata - Light s ources a nd t heir d ata * Is t here a n a rchitecture/protocol t hat i s n ecessary today for successfully providing storage at a distance? - Ethernet v s. I B - ROCE v s. R DMA v s. I P --- 2 --- Open F abrics A lliance U ser D ay Use case 1: Instruments (beam lines) * ShiB w ork ( 24hr c overage) - Scien9sts fl y i n a nd u se t he i nstrument

288

A simple device for high-precision head image registration: Preliminary performance and accuracy tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to present a new device for multimodal head study registration and to examine its performance in preliminary tests. The device consists of a system of eight markers fixed to mobile carbon pipes and bars which can be easily mounted on the patient's head using the ear canals and the nasal bridge. Four graduated scales fixed to the rigid support allow examiners to find the same device position on the patient's head during different acquisitions. The markers can be filled with appropriate substances for visualisation in computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography images. The device's rigidity and its position reproducibility were measured in 15 repeated CT acquisitions of the Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom and in two SPECT studies of a patient. The proposed system displays good rigidity and reproducibility characteristics. A relocation accuracy of less than 1,5 mm was found in more than 90% of the results. The registration parameters obtained using such a device were compared to those obtained using fiducial markers fixed on phantom and patient heads, resulting in differences of less than 1 deg. and 1 mm for rotation and translation parameters, respectively. Residual differences between fiducial marker coordinates in reference and in registered studies were less than 1 mm in more than 90% of the results, proving that the device performed as accurately as noninvasive stereotactic devices. Finally, an example of multimodal employment of the proposed device is reported.

Pallotta, Stefania [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze (Italy)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development of a neural net paradigm that predicts simulator sickness  

SciTech Connect

A disease exists that affects pilots and aircrew members who use Navy Operational Flight Training Systems. This malady, commonly referred to as simulator sickness and whose symptomatology closely aligns with that of motion sickness, can compromise the use of these systems because of a reduced utilization factor, negative transfer of training, and reduction in combat readiness. A report is submitted that develops an artificial neural network (ANN) and behavioral model that predicts the onset and level of simulator sickness in the pilots and aircrews who sue these systems. It is proposed that the paradigm could be implemented in real time as a biofeedback monitor to reduce the risk to users of these systems. The model captures the neurophysiological impact of use (human-machine interaction) by developing a structure that maps the associative and nonassociative behavioral patterns (learned expectations) and vestibular (otolith and semicircular canals of the inner ear) and tactile interaction, derived from system acceleration profiles, onto an abstract space that predicts simulator sickness for a given training flight.

Allgood, G.O.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Requirement for vasoactive amines for production of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injection of antigen into the dermis of the flank of an appropriately immunized rat, guinea pig, monkey, or man results, 24-48 h later, in the formation of an erythematous, indurated lesion. Similar skin testing of immunized mice generally fails to produce such lesions (1-3). The explanation for this particular difference between mice and men is unknown but there is reason to believe that it may not stem from differences in immunologically competent cells. Two observations support this view. (a) Appropriately immunized mice exhibit antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) ' reactions when the site of elicitation is the foot pad (4) or the ear (5). (b) Mice exhibit most other manifestations of cell-mediated immunity, in a normal fashion, despite their failure to produce DTH reactions in the flank skin. Thus, mice must have appropriately reactive T cells but there may be some difficulty in delivering the cells required for the production of DTH reactions to the flank skin. In support of this notion, it has been shown that ifperitoneal exudate cells are added to the eliciting dose of antigen placed in the flank skin the lesions that result are morphologically

K. Gershon; Philip W. Askenase; Michael; D. Gershon

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy in 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results obtained with {sup 192}Ir low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma. Patients and Methods: Between December 1979 and January 1998, 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma were treated by exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy, with or without neck dissection. {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy was performed according to the 'Paris system' with a median total dose of 60 Gy (median dose rate, 0.5 Gy/h). Results: Overall survival was 74.3% and 46.6% at 2 and 5 years. Local control was 79.1% at 2 years and regional control, respectively, 75.9% and 69.5% at 2 and 5 years (Kaplan-Meier method). Systematic dissection revealed 44.6% occult node metastases, and histologic lymph node involvement was identified as the main significant factor for survival. Complication rate was 16.5% (Grade 3, 2.9%). Half of the patients presented previous and/or successive malignant tumor (ear-nose-throat, esophagus, or bronchus). Conclusion: Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for T2 tongue carcinoma. Regional control and survival are excellent in patients undergoing systematic neck dissection, which is mandatory in our experience because of a high rate of occult lymph node metastases.

Bourgier, Celine [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Coche-Dequeant, Bernard [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Fournier, Charles [Department of Biostatistics, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Castelain, Bernard [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Prevost, Bernard [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Lefebvre, Jean-Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Lartigau, Eric [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France)]. E-mail: e-lartigau@o-lambret.fr

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB GeologicPilot Test  

SciTech Connect

WESTCARB, one of seven U.S. Department of Energypartnerships, identified (during its Phase I study) over 600 gigatonnesof CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations located in the Westernregion. The Western region includes the WESTCARB partnership states ofAlaska, Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington and theCanadian province of British Columbia. The WESTCARB Phase II study iscurrently under way, featuring three geologic and two terrestrial CO2pilot projects designed to test promising sequestration technologies atsites broadly representative of the region's largest potential carbonsinks. This paper focuses on two of the geologic pilot studies plannedfor Phase II -referred to-collectively as the Rosetta-Calpine CO2 StorageProject. The first pilot test will demonstrate injection of CO2 into asaline formation beneath a depleted gas reservoir. The second test willgather data for assessing CO2 enhanced gas recovery (EGR) as well asstorage in a depleted gas reservoir. The benefit of enhanced oil recovery(EOR) using injected CO2 to drive or sweep oil from the reservoir towarda production well is well known. EaR involves a similar CO2 injectionprocess, but has received far less attention. Depleted natural gasreservoirs still contain methane; therefore, CO2 injection may enhancemethane production by reservoir repressurization or pressure maintenance.CO2 injection into a saline formation, followed by injection into adepleted natural gas reservoir, is currently scheduled to start inOctober 2006.

Trautz, Robert; Benson, Sally; Myer, Larry; Oldenburg, Curtis; Seeman, Ed; Hadsell, Eric; Funderburk, Ben

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microsoft Word - E&I Entry Enabling Objectives.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E&I MAINTENANCE ENTRY TEST ENABLING OBJECTIVES E&I MAINTENANCE ENTRY TEST ENABLING OBJECTIVES S i t e M a i n t e n a n c e T r a i n i n g P r o g r a m Page 1 of 7 SAFETY Industrial DESCRIBE hazards and precautions taken to avoid injury in the workplace. Example #1: All of the following are common PPE used to perform maintenance activities EXCEPT: a. Safety Glasses a. Gloves b. Ear Plugs c. Work Permits Electrical DESCRIBE electrical hazards and precautions taken to avoid injury in the workplace. Example #2: When performing testing of energized electrical equipment rated at 480VAC what type of gloves are required? a. Low Voltage b. High Voltage c. Listed Leather d. Cotton lined/Temperature rated ELECTRICAL DC Theory Given a formula sheet and schematic drawing, ANALYZE the relationships between voltage, resistance, current and power in series, parallel and series-parallel DC circuits.

295

Grasshoppers  

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Grasshoppers Grasshoppers Nature Bulletin No. 23 July 14, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation GRASSHOPPERS The grasshopper is the clown of the insect world. He does not "chew tobacco", as most boys think, but ejects a dark-brown digestive juice from his crop when captured and held. He is quite an athlete. If a man could leap as big and far, in proportion to his size, a man could jump over an eight-story building. Once in the air, the grasshopper can scar like an airplane with his stiff upper pair of wings, or fly considerable distances by rapidly vibrating his delicate lower pair. He has five eyes. The two big ones are each compounded of thousands of little eyes for seeing distant objects from any angle. The three small eyes, one of them in the middle of his forehead, are for seeing tiny details at close range. His "ears" are on the sides of his stomach just behind the thorax or chest. He has two short "horns" or antennae.

296

Placental concentrations of heavy metals in a mother-child cohort  

SciTech Connect

Heavy metals are environmental contaminants with properties known to be toxic for wildlife and humans. Despite strong concerns about their harmful effects, little information is available on intrauterine exposure in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate prenatal exposure to As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Mn, and Pb and its association with maternal factors in a population-based mother-child cohort in Southern Spain. Between 2000 and 2002, 700 pregnant women were recruited and 137 placentas from the cohort were randomly selected and analyzed for the selected metals by atomic absorption. Maternal sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were obtained by questionnaire after delivery. Bivariate analysis and multivariate linear regression were performed. Cd and Mn concentrations were detected in all placentas, while Cr, Pb, and Hg were found in 98.5%, 35.0%, and 30.7% of samples, respectively. The highest concentrations were observed for Pb (mean: 94.80 ng/g wet weight of placenta), followed by Mn (63.80 ng/g), Cr (63.70 ng/g), Cd (3.45 ng/g), and Hg (0.024 ng/g). Arsenic was not detected in any sample. Gestational age and smoking during pregnancy were associated with placental Cd concentrations, while no factor appeared to influence concentrations of Cr, Hg, Mn, or Pb. In comparison to results of European studies, these concentrations are in a low-intermediate position. Studies are required to investigate the factors contributing to early exposure to heavy metals and to determine how placental transfer of these toxic compounds may affect children's health.

Amaya, E., E-mail: eamayag@ugr.es [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Gil, F. [Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physic Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)] [Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physic Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Freire, C. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain) [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), 21041-210 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Olmedo, P. [Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physic Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)] [Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physic Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Fernandez-Rodriguez, M. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)] [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Fernandez, M.F.; Olea, N. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain) [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nicotine dose-concentration relationship and pregnancy outcomes in rat: Biologic plausibility and implications for future research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure during pregnancy can lead to profound adverse effects on fetal development. Although CS contains several thousand chemicals, nicotine has been widely used as its surrogate as well as in its own right as a neuroteratogen. The justification for the route and dose of nicotine administration is largely based on inferential data suggesting that nicotine 6 mg/kg/day infused continuously via osmotic mini pumps (OMP) would mimic maternal CS exposure. We provide evidence that 6 mg/kg/day nicotine dose as commonly administered to pregnant rats leads to plasma nicotine concentrations that are 3-10-fold higher than those observed in moderate to heavy smokers and pregnant mothers, respectively. Furthermore, the cumulative daily nicotine dose exceeds by several hundred fold the amount consumed by human heavy smokers. Our study does not support the widely accepted notion that regardless of the nicotine dose, a linear nicotine dose-concentration relationship exists in a steady-state OMP model. We also show that total nicotine clearance increases with advancing pregnancy but no significant change is observed between the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Furthermore, nicotine infusion even at this extremely high dose has little effect on a number of maternal and fetal biologic variables and pregnancy outcome suggesting that CS constituents other than nicotine mediate the fetal growth restriction in infants born to smoking mothers. Our current study has major implications for translational research in developmental toxicology and pharmacotherapy using nicotine replacement treatment as an aid to cessation of cigarette smoking in pregnant mothers.

Hussein, Jabeen [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Farkas, Svetlana [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); MacKinnon, Yolanda [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Ariano, Robert E. [Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Sitar, Daniel S. [Departments of Internal Medicine and, Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Hasan, Shabih U. [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada)]. E-mail: hasans@ucalgary.ca

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Moles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

33 September 22, 1945 33 September 22, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F., Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation MOLES Few persons ever see a mole. He lives entirely underground and apparently lives alone, except in the spring when they mate and produce one litter, usually four in number. Each mole has a central nest-chamber deep under a stump, or boulder, or a sidewalk. From this he pushes out an extensive series of runways in search of food. They are enormous eaters. A mole may consume the equivalent of its own weight in worms and insects in a single day. The mole has a long pointed snout which is very sensitive, and a short tail, which is equally sensitive, to guide his backward movements along the runways. Their fur is lye velvet and may be brushed either backward or forward. They have tiny eyeballs about the size of the head of a pin, and tiny ears which, however, are very keen. The mole works like an animated plow, boring through the earth, usually just under the surface, with powerful breast strokes. His paddle-shaped front feet, with five toes each armed with a long broad claw and an extra sickle-shaped bone on the outside of the thumb, his powerful forelegs and shoulders, and his wedge-shaped head, enable him to tunnel at the rate of one foot in three minutes, They have been known to tunnel 100 yards in one night. Placed on the surface, a mole can dig himself out of sight in 10 seconds.

299

Mechanized roadway driving and roofbolting experiment successful in German mine. [Salts also act as anchors for steel mesh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to build an intergrated heading and roofbolting unit, the Austrian firms Voeest Alpine and Boehler Bohr und Dricklufttechnik worked in cooperation. A Boehler all-hydraulic rotary drilling unit as mounted on each side of the slewing gear of the AM 50. Each drilling unit comprised a chain feed carriage for rotary drilling and a hydraulically operated boom to position the drill feed wherever required. The hydraulic drill with hydraulic driven chain feed is only 0.25 meter (10 inches) long. Thus with a chain feed length of 2.62 meters (8.6 feed), 2.25-meter (7.5-foot) holes can be drilled. Maximum drill thrust is 2.5 tons; the total thrust on the drill feed carriage directed against the face is 3 tons. The drill makes 1000 revolutions per minute and the motor can be rotated in both directions. In the non-operating position both drill booms are swung parallel to the AM 50 cutting boom. Since the hydraulic power pack of the AM 50 is not powerful enough to handle the extra drilling equipment Voeest Alpine developed an additional hydraulic unit comprising two pumps, each of 100-liter-per-minute capacity. Because of the extra weight of the modified unit (about 5 tons), the traveling ear of the AM 50 had to be modified to avoid overstraining the traveling motors. It was expected that the drill feed carriages would hinder the AM 50 operator's vision and thus cause difficulties during tunneling. In practice this did not happen. After getting used to the system the AM 50 operator was able to cut the roadway to the desired profile at a satisfactory speed. The additional weight increased the machine's stability.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Li Baoqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

A method for in vitro culture of rat Zymbal gland: use in mechanistic studies of benzene carcinogenesis in combination with 2P-postlabeling. Environ. Health Perspect. 82  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zymbal glands were excised bilaterally from the ear ducts of female Sprague-Dawley rats (three/group), minced into approximately four fragments per gland, and transferred into a microtiter plate containing 1.5 mL per well of Waymouth's tissue culture medium supplemented with fetal calf serum, hydrocortisone, insulin, and gentamicin. After addition of a test compound or solvent vehicle, plates were incubated for 6, 24, 48, or 96 hr at 37C in a humidified atmosphere of 5 % CO2 in air. Tissue in culture for 6 hr was histologically indistinguishable from the freshly excised tissue, while that in culture for 24, 48, and 96 hr showed a progressive deterioration often with necrosis and/or squamous metaplasia. More pronounced deterioration was noted in samples treated with 750 or 1500 pg/mL of benzene. Using a nuclease Pi-enhanced 32P-postlabeling assay, aromatic DNA adducts were detected in cultured Zymbal glands exposed for 48 hr to benzene and its derivatives, as well as to 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF). Benzene produced very low levels of adducts (0.5 adducts per 109 nucleotides), whereas its congeners produced relatively high levels of adducts (50-2000 lesions per 109 nucleotides), which decreased in the order benzoquinone> hydroquinone> phenol> benzenetriol> catechol. Each adduct profile overall was characteristic for the compound studied, suggesting the formation of compound-specific electrophiles. AAF and DMBA adducts were identical to those formed in vivo in animals. Our results show that the Zymbal glands are capable of metabolizing different carcinogens to DNA-reactive intermediates, a process that may be causally associated with tumor formation in vivo in this organ.

M. Vijayaraj Reddy; Gary R. Blackburn; Susan E. Irwin; Choudari Kommineni; Carl R. Mackerer; Myron A. Mehiman

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Erlotinib inhibits T-cell-mediated immune response via down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Erlotinib is a potent inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase and has been demonstrated to treat advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer to prolong survival after failure of first-line or second-line chemotherapy. However, little is known about its effects on immune system. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the immunosuppressive activity of erlotinib on T lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo, and further explore its potential molecular mechanism. Erlotinib exerted a significant inhibition on the T cell proliferation and activation induced by concanavalin A, anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, staphylococcal enterotoxin B or phorbol myristate acetate respectively in a concentration-dependent manner and it also inhibited the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-2 and IFN-{gamma} of activated T cells. Further study showed that erlotinib caused G0/G1 arrest and suppressed the phosphorylations of c-Raf, ERK and Akt in activated T cells. Moreover, erlotinib significantly ameliorated picryl chloride-induced ear contact dermatitis in a dose-dependent manner in vivo. In summary, these findings suggest that erlotinib may cause the impairment of T-cell-mediated immune response both in vitro and in vivo through inhibiting T cell proliferation and activation, which is closely associated with its potent down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway. - Graphical abstract: Erlotinib may cause the impairment of T-cell-mediated immune response both in vitro and in vivo through inhibiting T cell proliferation and activation, which is closely associated with its potent down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway. Display Omitted

Luo Qiong [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Gu Yanhong [Department of Clinical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Zheng Wei; Wu Xingxin; Gong Fangyuan; Gu Liyun; Sun Yang [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu Qiang, E-mail: molpharm@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A complex de novo translocation of chromosomes 4, 6 and 21 in a child with dysmorphic features and unusual hematological findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 5 1/2-year-old white male was referred to our institution for evaluation of easy bruising confined to lower extremities since infancy. His family history is not significant with healthy parents and six normal siblings. Physical examination revealed weight and height both in 50th and 75th percentile, respectively. Major findings included macrocephaly with prominent forehead, hypertelorism with inner and outer canthus distances both above 97th percentile, epicanthus folds, normal ears with prominent upper pinnae, thin, sharp nose with pointed tip, neck with pterygium coli appearance and shortened clavicles, short thumbs with hyperconvex nails that curved around tip of fingers, abnormally bowed elbows and knee joints, prominent abdomen with omphalocele and flat feet with hypoplastic nails. He has a speech articulation problem which may be due to high arched palate. Hematological evaluation revealed PT/PTT values in normal range with prolonged bleeding time > 15 minutes. Because of abnormal elbow and knee joints, Mitromycin C Stress test was performed to rule out Fanconi`s anemia (FA). The chromosome breakage frequency was found to be within the normal range for both the patient and the control. Thus, the diagnosis of FA was ruled out. However, cytogenetic analysis revealed a three-way complex translocation between chromosomes 4, 6 and 21 with an apparent balanced carrier male karyotype: 46,XY,t(4;6;21)(4qter{r_arrow}4p16::21q21{r_arrow} 21qter;6qter{r_arrow}6p21.1::4p16{r_arrow}4pter;21pter{r_arrow} 21q21::6p21.1{r_arrow}6pter). Both parents have normal chromosomes.

Muneer, R.S.; Hopcus, D.J.; Sarale, C. [Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effect of coarse or fine grinding on utilization of dry or ensiled corn by lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the effect of coarse or fine grinding of three forms of corn on the performance of lactating cows. Six diets, fed as total mixed rations, were identical except for the corn portion of the diet. Corn treatments were dry shelled corn, high moisture ensiled ear corn, and high moisture ensiled shelled corn, either coarsely or finely ground. The experimental design was a6 6 Latin square with 36 cows. Eighteen cows were assigned to the six different treatments and were fed once daily. Within this group of 18 cows, six had a ruminal cannula and were used to evaluate nutrient digestibilities and ruminal fermentation. The remaining 18 cows, six of which were ruminally cannulated, were similarly assigned, except they were fed twice daily. In the group fed once daily, milk production and composition were not affected by treatment. Starch digestibility was greater with the high moisture and with the finely ground corn treatments. In addition, the high moisture ensiled corn treatments had reduced ruminal ammonia concentrations. In the group that was fed twice daily, milk production and protein yield were greatest for the finely ground high moisture ensiled shelled corn treatment. Starch utilization was improved by fine grinding. Lower ruminal ammonia concentrations were obtained with the high moisture ensiled corn treatments, and there was a tendency for reduced ammonia concentration with fine grinding. Results indicate that high moisture ensiled corn as well as fine grinding improved nitrogen and starch utilization. (Key words: corn, milk, particle size, starch) Abbreviation key: CG = coarsely ground, DSC = dry shelled corn, FG = finely ground, HMEC = high mois-

F. San Emeterio; R. B. Reis; W. E. Campos; L. D. Satter

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The ePLAS Code for Ignition Studies  

SciTech Connect

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) presents unique opportunities for the extraction of clean energy from Fusion. Intense lasers and particle beams can create and interact with such plasmas, potentially yielding sufficient energy to satisfy all our national needs. However, few models are available to help aid the scientific community in the study and optimization of such interactions. This project enhanced and disseminated the computer code ePLAS for the early understanding and control of Ignition in ICF. ePLAS is a unique simulation code that tracks the transport of laser light to a target, the absorption of that light resulting in the generation and transport of hot electrons, and the heating and flow dynamics of the background plasma. It uses an implicit electromagnetic field-solving method to greatly reduce computing demands, so that useful target interaction studies can often be completed in 15 minutes on a portable 2.1 GHz PC. The code permits the rapid scoping of calculations for the optimization of laser target interactions aimed at fusion. Recent efforts have initiated the use of analytic equations of state (EOS), K-alpha image rendering graphics, allocatable memory for source-free usage, and adaption to the latest Mac and Linux Operating Systems. The speed and utility of ePLAS are unequaled in the ICF simulation community. This project evaluated the effects of its new EOSs on target heating, compared fluid and particle models for the ions, initiated the simultaneous use of both ion models in the code, and studied long time scale 500 ps hot electron deposition for shock ignition. ePLAS has been granted EAR99 export control status, permitting export without a license to most foreign countries. Beta-test versions of ePLAS have been granted to several Universities and Commercial users. The net Project was aimed at achieving early success in the laboratory ignition of thermonuclear targets and the mastery of controlled fusion power for the nation.

Mason, Rodney J

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Converting hard copy documents for electronic dissemination  

SciTech Connect

Since the advent of computer systems, the goal of a paperless office, and even a paperless society, has been pursued. While the normal paper flow in an organization is far from totally automated, particularly for items requiring signatures or authorizations, electronic information dissemination is becoming an almost simple task. The reasons for providing on-line documents are many and include faster and easier access for everyone, elimination of printing costs, reduction of wasted shelf and desk space, and the security of having a centrally-located, always up-to-date document. New computer software even provides the user with the ability to annotate documents and to have bookmarks so that the old scribbled-in and dog-eared manual can be replaced without loosing this `customizability`. Moreover, new hypermedia capabilities mean that documents can be read in a non-linear fashion and can include color figures and photographs, audio, and even animation sequences, capabilities which exceed those of paper. The proliferation of network-based information servers, coupled with the growth of the Internet, has enticed academic, governmental, and even commercial organizations to provide increasing numbers of documents and data bases in electronic form via the network, not just to internal staff, but to the public as well. Much of this information, which includes everything from mundane company procedures to spiffy marketing brochures, was previously published only in hard copy. Converting existing documents to electronic form and producing only electronic versions of new documents poses some interesting challenges to the maintainer or author.

Hoffman, F.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Interstitial brachytherapy of periorificial skin carcinomas of the face: A retrospective study of 97 cases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze outcomes after interstitial brachytherapy of facial periorificial skin carcinomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 97 skin carcinomas (88 basal cell carcinomas, 9 squamous cell carcinomas) of the nose, periorbital areas, and ears from 40 previously untreated patients (Group 1) and 57 patients who had undergone surgery (Group 2). The average dose was 55 Gy (range, 50-65 Gy) in Group 1 and 52 Gy (range, 50-60 Gy) in Group 2 (mean implantation times: 79 and 74 hours, respectively). We calculated survival rates and assessed functional and cosmetic results de visu. Results: Median age was 71 years (range, 17-97 years). There were 29 T1, 8 T2, 1 T3, and 2 Tx tumors in Group 1. Tumors were <2 cm in Group 2. Local control was 92.5% in Group 1 and 88% in Group 2 (median follow-up, 55 months; range, 6-132 months). Five-year disease-free survival was better in Group 1 (91%; range, 75-97) than in Group 2 (80%; range, 62-90; p = 0.23). Of the 34 patients whose results were reassessed, 8 presented with pruritus or epiphora; 1 Group 2 patient had an impaired eyelid aperture. Cosmetic results were better in Group 1 than in Group 2 with, respectively, 72% (8/11) vs. 52% (12/23) good results and 28 (3/11) vs. 43% (10/23) fair results. Conclusions: Brachytherapy provided a high level of local control and good cosmetic results for facial periorificial skin carcinomas that pose problems of surgical reconstruction. Results were better for untreated tumors than for incompletely excised tumors or tumors recurring after surgery.

Rio, Emmanuel [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France)]. E-mail: e-rio@nantes.fnclcc.fr; Bardet, Etienne [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Ferron, Christophe [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France); Peuvrel, Patrick [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Supiot, Stephane [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Campion, Loic [Department of Biostatistics, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Beauvillain De Montreuil, Claude [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France); Mahe, Marc Andre [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Dreno, Brigitte [Department of Dermatology, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Uses of Mussels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uses of Mussels Uses of Mussels Nature Bulletin No. 452-A April 8, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation USES OF MUSSELS The wampum of the early American Indians was beads made from the shells of freshwater mussels or saltwater clams. Each bead, highly polished and cylindrical in shape, was about a quarter of an inch long and either purple or white in color. Strung on strings or woven into patterns on a belt, wampum was used as money, as a symbol of authority, or as a sort of shorthand historical record which only certain interpreters could translate. Each Mussel or Freshwater Clam has a soft oyster-like body enclosed between a pair of shells lined with mother-of-pearl. The mussel family reaches its greatest abundance and variety of kinds in the waters that drain into the Mississippi River. In Illinois streams and lakes, alone, there are several dozen species ranging in size from the little inch-long Peanut Shell up to the heavy 8 or 10 inch shell of a Washboard or Elephant Ear. Each kind has its own distinctive shape, color, and sculpturing on the outside -- some ridged, some warty and some smooth. Each spends its life on the bottom of some river, creek or lake where it feeds on the microscopic life and debris that it strains out of the water. Mussels are slow-moving, but as infants they hitch rides by spending two or three weeks as parasites attached to the gills or fins of a fish.

310

Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Arabian Horse Populations from Syria and other Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans and horses weaved together wonderful stories of adventure and generosity. As a part of human history and civilization, Arabian horses ignite imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries. Here I explored different populations of Arabians representing Middle Eastern and Western populations. The main two aims of this study were to provide the genetic diversity description of Arabians from different origins and to examine the traditional classification system of the breed. A third aim was to tackle the distribution pattern of the genetic variability within the genome to show whether there are differences in relative variability of different types of markers. First, I analyzed the genetic structure of 537Arabian horses from seven populations by using microsatellites. The results consistently showed higher levels of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations compared to the Western populations. All American-Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations. Second, I sequenced the whole mtDNA D-loop of 251 Arabian horses. The whole D-loop sequence was more informative than using just the HVR1. Native populations from the Middle East, such as Syrian, represented a hot spot of genetic diversity. Most importantly, there was no evidence that the Arabian horse breed has clear subdivisions depending on the traditional maternal based strain classification system. Third, I tested the heterozygosity distribution pattern along the genome of 22 Peruvian Paso horses using 232 microsatellites and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). The pattern of genetic diversity was completely different between these two markers where no correlation was found. Runs of homozygosity test of SNPs and associated microsatellites noticeably showed that all of associated microsatellites loci were homozygous in the matched case. The findings of this study will help in understanding the evolutionary history and developing breeding and conservation programs of horses. This study provided databases including parentage testing system and maternal lineages that will help to recover the Syrian Arabian population after the armed conflict started in Syria in 2011. The results here can be applied not only to horses, but also to other animal species with similar criteria.

Khanshour, Anas M

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cancer risk among children of atomic bomb survivors. A review of RERF epidemiologic studies. Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes recent epidemiologic studies of cancer risk among the children of atomic bomb survivors conducted at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. These children include two groups: (1) the in utero-exposed children (ie, those born to mothers who had been pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and (2) the F1 population, which was conceived after the atomic-bombings and born to parents of whom one or both were atomic bomb survivors. Although from 1950 to 1984 only 18 cancer cases were identified among the in utero sample, cancer risk did appear to significantly increase as maternal uterine dose increased. However, since the observed cases are too few in number to allow a site-specific review, the increased cancer risk cannot be definitively attributed to atomic bomb radiation, as yet. For those members of the F1 population who were less than 20 years old between 1946 and 1982, cancer risk did not appear to increase significantly as parental gonadal dose increased. Follow-up of this population will continue to determine if the patterns of adult-onset cancer are altered.

Yoshimoto, Y. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Prenatal dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) exposure and child growth during the first year of life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Due to its long-term persistence in the environment and its ability to cross the placental barrier, prenatal p,p Prime -dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE) exposure continues to be a public health concern. This study aimed to evaluate the association between prenatal DDE exposure and child growth, at birth and during the first year of life. Methods: 253 pregnant women were recruited between January 2001 and June 2005 in a prospective cohort in Morelos, Mexico. Serum levels of DDE were measured during each trimester of pregnancy by gas chromatography with an electron capture detector. Using the generalized mixed-effects models, the association between DDE and child growth parameters (weight-for-age, length-for-age, weight-for-length, BMI-for-age and head circumference-for-age Z-scores) from birth to 1 year of age was assessed. Maternal dietary intake was considered as covariable among others. Results: DDE levels were 6.3{+-}2.8 ng/mL (first trimester), 6.6{+-}2.9 ng/mL (second trimester), and 7.6{+-}2.9 ng/mL (third trimester). After adjusting for potential confounder variables, no significant associations were observed with prenatal DDE exposure and each of the selected parameters. Conclusions: Our results show no evidence of an association between prenatal DDE exposure and child growth during the first year of life.

Garced, Sheyla, E-mail: sgarced@gmail.com [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health Program, 17 E 102nd Street, CAM Building, 3 West, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health Program, 17 E 102nd Street, CAM Building, 3 West, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Torres-Sanchez, Luisa, E-mail: ltorress@insp.mx [National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta Maria Ahuacatitlan, C.P. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)] [National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta Maria Ahuacatitlan, C.P. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Cebrian, Mariano E., E-mail: mcebrian@cinvestav.mx [Department of Toxicology, CINVESTAV, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07360 Mexico, D.F., Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Claudio, Luz, E-mail: luz.claudio@mssm.edu [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health Program, 17 E 102nd Street, CAM Building, 3 West, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health Program, 17 E 102nd Street, CAM Building, 3 West, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Lopez-Carrillo, Lizbeth, E-mail: lizbeth@insp.mx [National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta Maria Ahuacatitlan, C.P. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)] [National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta Maria Ahuacatitlan, C.P. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Established by the World Health Assembly in 2010,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the third annual World Hepatitis Day will be observed July 28, 2013. Viral hepatitis is a leading cause of infectious disease mortality globally, each year causing approximately 1.4 million deaths (1). Most of these deaths occur among the approximately 400 million persons living with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus infection who die from cirrhosis or liver cancer years and decades after their infection. In addition to HBV, hepatitis A virus is a leading cause of vaccine-preventable death globally (1). Hepatitis E virus (HEV) also causes significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in Asia and Africa. HBV and HEV infection are important yet largely neglected causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality in resource-constrained settings. This issue of MMWR includes a report describing the investigation of a hepatitis E outbreak among refugees in South Sudan, where a significant proportion of affected pregnant women died from HEV infection. A second report from Laos describes missed opportunities for vaccination of newborns to protect them from mother-to-child transmission of HBV. Prevention of both new infections and mortality from viral hepatitis are the goals of global control efforts. Additional information on viral hepatitis for health professionals and the public is available at

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Genetic Analysis of Snake River Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka), 2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A total of 1720 Oncorhynchus nerka tissue samples from 40 populations were characterized using mitochondrial DNA RFLPs (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms). Analysis of anadromous sockeye populations indicated the historical presence of four major maternal lineages. Thirty-five composite mitochondrial haplotypes were observed from the 40 populations of O. nerka sampled throughout the Pacific Northwest. Six of these composite haplotypes ranged in frequency from 7-26% overall and were commonly observed in most populations. The six haplotypes together comprised 90% of the sampled O. nerka. An average of 4.6 composite haplotypes were observed per population. Genetic markers used were satisfactory in separating Redfish Lake anadromous sockeye, residual sockeye and outmigrants from the sympatric kokanee population that spawns in the Fishhook Creek tributary. Outmigrants appear to be primarily composed of progeny from resident residual sockeye, and captively-reared progeny of the captive broodstock program. Thus, residual sockeye may be considered a suitable source of genetic variation to maintain genetic diversity among captive broodstocks of anadromous sockeye. Fishhook Creek kokanee are genetically diverse and during spawning, are temporally and spatially isolated from the residual sockeye population. Eleven composite haplotypes were observed in the kokanee population. The unusually high number of haplotypes is most likely a consequence of periodic stocking of Redfish Lake with kokanee from other sources. Genetic data from Redfish Lake creel samples taken during 1996-1999 putatively indicate the incidental take of a listed resident sockeye.

Faler, Joyce; Powell, Madison

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Temperature-sensitive rubisco mutant of Chlamydomonas. [Chlamydomonas reinhardtii  

SciTech Connect

The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant 68-4PP is a temperature-sensitive mutant that lacks photosynthetic ability at 35/sup 0/C, but is able to grow photosynthetically at 25/sup 0/C. Genetic analysis indicated that 68-4PP is a chloroplast mutant that is allelic with known Rubisco large-subunit structural-gene mutants, implying that 68-4PP also resulted from a mutation in the large-subunit gene. The 68-4PP mutant has about 35% of the wild-type level of Rubisco holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 25/sup 0/C, but it has less than 10% of normal holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 35/sup 0/C. However, (/sup 35/S)-sulfate pulse labeling showed that Rubisco subunits were synthesized at normal rates at both temperatures. More significantly, the ratio of carboxylase activity in the absence and presence of oxygen at a limiting CO/sub 2/ concentration (6.6 ..mu..M) was about 2.2 for the mutant enzyme, as compared to about 3.0 for the wild-type enzyme. The decreased ratio of the mutant enzyme is maternally inherited, indicating that this reduced oxygen sensitivity results from a mutation in chloroplast DNA. The authors have recently cloned the 68-4PP Rubisco large-subunit gene, and DNA sequencing is in progress.

Chen, Z.; Spreitzer, R.J.; Chastain, C.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Somatic mosaicism in a patient with neurofibromomatosis type 1  

SciTech Connect

Using loss of heterozygosity analysis, a method designed to detect moderate to large gene deletions, we have identified a new-mutation neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patient who is somatically mosaic for a large maternally derived deletion in the NF1 gene region. The deletion extends at least from exon 4 near the 5{prime} end of the gene to intron 39 near the 3{prime} end. The gene-coding region is, therefore, mostly or entirely deleted, encompassing a loss of {>=}100 kb. We hypothesize that the deletion occurred at a relatively early developmental timepoint, since signs of NF in this patient are not confined to a specific body region, as seen in {open_quotes}segmental{close_quotes} NF, and since both mesodermally and ectodermally derived cells are affected. This report provides the first molecular evidence of somatic mosaicism in NF1 and, taken together with a recent report of germ-line mosaicism in NF1, adds credence to the concept that mosaicism plays an important role in phenotypic and genetic aspects of NF1 and may even be a relatively common phenomenon. 37 refs., 4 figs.

Colman, S.D.; Rasmussen, S.A.; Ho, V.T. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

VDTs: Field levels, epidemiology, and laboratory studies  

SciTech Connect

As the use of video display terminals (VDTs) has expanded, questions have been raised as to whether working at a VDT affects the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. A particular focus for these questions has been the very low frequency (VLF) magnetic field produced by a VDT's horizontal deflection coil. VDTs also produce VLF electric fields, extremely low frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields, and static electric fields, Ten studies of pregnancy outcome in VDT operators have been conducted in six countries, and with one exception, none has concluded that magnetic fields from VDTs may predispose pregnant operators to spontaneous abortion or congenital malformation. The epidemiologic studies conducted thus far do not provide a basis for concluding that VDT work and adverse pregnancy outcome are associated. Studies of fetal resorptions and malformations in rodents exposed to VLF magnetic fields have produced inconsistent findings. Two laboratories in Sweden that studied mice have reported positive results, one laboratory showing field-related malformations (but not resorptions) and the other showing field-related resorptions (but not malformations). Two Canadian laboratories have reported negative results in rats and mice. Studies of avian embryos have also yielded inconsistent results, but lacking a maternal-fetal placental interface, avian embryos are a questionable model for evaluating human reproductive risks. Finally, VLF electric and magnetic fields measured at the operator position are in compliance with field strength standards and guidelines that have been established around the world. 55 refs.

Kavet, R.; Tell, R.A. (Richard Tell Associates, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results  

SciTech Connect

We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Institute for Scientific Computing Research Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is jointly administered by the Computing Applications and Research Department (CAR) and the University Relations Program (URP), and this joint relationship expresses its mission. An extensively externally networked ISCR cost-effectively expands the level and scope of national computational science expertise available to the Laboratory through CAR. The URP, with its infrastructure for managing six institutes and numerous educational programs at LLNL, assumes much of the logistical burden that is unavoidable in bridging the Laboratory's internal computational research environment with that of the academic community. As large-scale simulations on the parallel platforms of DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) become increasingly important to the overall mission of LLNL, the role of the ISCR expands in importance, accordingly. Relying primarily on non-permanent staffing, the ISCR complements Laboratory research in areas of the computer and information sciences that are needed at the frontier of Laboratory missions. The ISCR strives to be the ''eyes and ears'' of the Laboratory in the computer and information sciences, in keeping the Laboratory aware of and connected to important external advances. It also attempts to be ''feet and hands, in carrying those advances into the Laboratory and incorporating them into practice. In addition to conducting research, the ISCR provides continuing education opportunities to Laboratory personnel, in the form of on-site workshops taught by experts on novel software or hardware technologies. The ISCR also seeks to influence the research community external to the Laboratory to pursue Laboratory-related interests and to train the workforce that will be required by the Laboratory. Part of the performance of this function is interpreting to the external community appropriate (unclassified) aspects of the Laboratory's own contributions to the computer and information sciences--contributions that its unique mission and unique resources give it a unique opportunity and responsibility to make. Of the three principal means of packaging scientific ideas for transfer--people, papers, and software--experience suggests that the most effective means is people. The programs of the ISCR are therefore people-intensive. Finally, the ISCR, together with CAR, confers an organizational identity on the burgeoning computer and information sciences research activity at LLNL and serves as a point of contact within the Laboratory for computer and information scientists from outside.

Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R; Bodtker, L K

2003-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orthopedic maternity ear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Social cohesion as a factor in the successful reintroduction of collared peccaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relative importance of social relations on the success of reintroduction of social ungulates was examined using collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu ). Three objectives of the research were to determine to what extent fidelity to release site, fidelity of individuals to the group, and other documented factors would influence the success of the reintroduction of social groups. Thirty-six peccaries, in captivity at Texas A&M University's Small Ungulate Research Facility, were studied to determine their social relations. Peccaries were divided into 6 groups subjected to 3 treatments: long-term female lineages, short-term female lineages, and unrelated females. There were 2 sub-groups per treatment. All peccaries were immobilized, ear-tagged, and radiotagged. They were observed in captivity for a month before being released at 6 different sites on welder Wildlife Refuge, in southeastern Texas. The peccaries were monitored by radio telemetry for 12 weeks to assess fidelity to release site and to group. A log transformation was conducted on data prior to analysis of variance to correct for non-normality. Treatment had a significant (P=0.0001) effect on both fidelity to the release site and fidelity to the group. Unrelated groups were more distant from the release sites and individuals were further apart on the average, compared to the short- and long-term female lineages. However, there was significant (P=0.0001) variation among 6 groups, and the pattern differed for each group over time (group x week; P=0.0001). Variation among groups could not be attributed to differences in social behavior in captivity. Groups did not differ significantly (P>0.05) in frequency of aggressive interactions. Replicate groups differed significantly (P<0.05) in frequency of friendly interactions within the treatments of short-term female lineages and the unrelated groups. Contrary to predictions, the mean of friendly interactions was higher for the unrelated groups than for the long-term female lineages. Success of related female groups appeared more related to the resources available at the release site and the circumstances of accommodation to the release site than to the duration females were together prior to release.

Litondo, Franklin Roosevelt

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Five-Year Assessment of Corn Stover Harvest in Central Iowa, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainable feedstock harvest strategies are needed to ensure bioenergy production does not irreversibly degrade soil resources. The objective for this study was to document corn (Zea mays L.) grain and stover fraction yields, plant nutrient removal and replacement costs, feedstock quality, soil-test changes, and soil quality indicator response to four stover harvest strategies for continuous corn and a corn-soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation. The treatments included collecting (1) all standing plant material above a stubble height of 10 cm (whole plant), (2) the upper-half by height (ear shank upward), (3) the lower-half by height (from the 10 cm stubble height to just below the earshank), or (4) no removal. Collectable biomass from Treatment 2 averaged 3.9 ({+-}0.8) Mg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn (2005 through 2009), and 4.8 ({+-}0.4) Mg ha{sup -1} for the rotated corn (2005, 2007, and 2009). Compared to harvesting only the grain, collecting stover increased the average N-P-K removal by 29, 3 and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn and 42, 3, and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for rotated corn, respectively. Harvesting the lower-half of the corn plant (Treatment 3) required two passes, resulted in frequent plugging of the combine, and provided a feedstock with low quality for conversion to biofuel. Therefore, Treatment 3 was replaced by a 'cobs-only' harvest starting in 2009. Structural sugars glucan and xylan accounted for up to 60% of the chemical composition, while galactan, arabinan, and mannose constituted less than 5% of the harvest fractions collected from 2005 through 2008. Soil-test data from samples collected after the first harvest (2005) revealed low to very low plant-available P and K levels which reduced soybean yield in 2006 after harvesting the whole-plant in 2005. Average continuous corn yields were 21% lower than rotated yields with no significant differences due to stover harvest. Rotated corn yields in 2009 showed some significant differences, presumably because soil-test P was again in the low range. A soil quality analysis using the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) with six indicators showed that soils at the continuous corn and rotated sites were functioning at an average of 93 and 83% of their inherent potential, respectively. With good crop management practices, including routine soil-testing, adequate fertilization, maintenance of soil organic matter, sustained soil structure, and prevention of wind, water or tillage erosion, a portion of the corn stover being produced in central Iowa, USA can be harvested in a sustainable manner.

Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birell; J. Richard Hess

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ePLAS Development for Jet Modeling and Applications  

SciTech Connect

Plasma jets provide an alternate approach to the creation of high energy density laboratory plasmas (HEDLP). For the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), typically 30 partially ionized argon jets, produced with mini-rail guns, will be focused into a central volume for subsequent magnetic compression into high density plasma liners that can reach high (0.1 Mbar) peak pressures upon stagnation. The jets are typically 2.5 cm in radius traveling at Mach number 30. Ultimate success will require optimized tuning of the rail configurations, the nozzles injecting the gases, and the careful implementation of pre-ionization. The modeling of plasma jet transport is particularly challenging, due the large space (100 sq cm) and time scales (microseconds) involved. Even traditional implicit methods are insufficient, due to the usual need to track electrons explicitly on the mesh. Wall emission and chemistry must be managed, as must ionization of the jet plasma. Ions in the jets are best followed as particles to account properly for collisions upon jet merger. This Phase I Project developed the code ePLAS to attack and successfully surmount many of these challenges. It invented a new 'super implicit' electromagnetic scheme, using implicit electron moment currents that allowed for modeling of jets over multi-cm and multi-picoseconds on standard, single processor 2 GHz PCs. It enabled merger studies of two jets, in preparation for the multi-jet merger problem. The Project explored particle modeling for the ions, and prepared for the future addition of a grid-base jet ion collision model. Access was added to tabular equations of state for the study of ionization effects in merging jets. The improved code was discussed at the primary plasma meetings (IEEE and APS) during the Project period. Collaborations with National Laboratory and industrial partners were nurtured. Code improvements were made to facilitate code use. See: http://www.researchapplicationscorp.com. The ePLAS code enjoys EAR99 export control treatment, permitting distribution to most foreign countries without a license.

Dr. Rodney J. Mason

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Opinions of persons from outside the livestock industry on the practice of hot-iron jaw branding as perceived by persons from within Texas livestock show industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine how opinions of persons from outside the livestock industry on the practice of hot-iron jaw branding are perceived by persons from within the Texas livestock show industry. The key-informant interviews conducted revealed interesting findings. The persons interviewed from within the Texas livestock show industry personally did not feel that there was a problem with the practice of hot-iron jaw branding, but they did feel that persons from outside the livestock industry would obtain a negative image of the livestock industry from hearing about or witnessing the practice. The majority of the respondents felt the time for a change had come. The issues which surfaced during every interview centered on more efficient education and good sound reasons for every practice. From within, the livestock show industry must spot and mark for change or justify areas of potential or emerging concern. If a practice can be justified by persons within the livestock industry, it adds validity to the action. If a practice cannot be justified by persons within the livestock industry, the practice should be discontinued. Modern technology now gives us alternatives to hot-iron jaw branding with different perceptions of pain and effectiveness associated with them. Therefore, there is no longer an excuse for using a practice by reasoning that there are no alternatives. Persons from within the Texas livestock show industry perceive that persons from outside the livestock industry would have a negative experience when exposed to the practice of hot-iron jaw branding. If an individual found the practice negative, it could affect future buying choices and some respondents thought it would trigger the individual to continue to discover negative practices. It behooves the Texas livestock show industry to change from the current method of permanent marking at the livestock shows (hot-iron jaw branding) to a method which would be seen as more acceptable to persons from outside the livestock industry. Alternatives which should be considered by livestock shows in Texas include ear tattooing. hoof branding, electronic identification, non-removable eartags, nose printing, nontamperable neck chains, and no permanent marking.

Schlink, Suzanne Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Impacts of Vessel Noise Perturbations on the Resident Sperm Whale Population in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico is home to two of the world?s ten busiest ports by cargo volume, the Port of New Orleans and the Port of Houston; and in 2008, these ports hosted a combined 14,000 ships, a number which is likely only to increase. Past research shows that this increase in shipping worldwide has historically lead to an increase in ambient noise level of 3-5dB per decade. Sperm whales in the Gulf of Mexico are considered a genetically distinct, resident population. They have a preference for the Louisiana-Mississippi Shelf region which directly overlaps with the entrance to the Mississippi and the Port of New Orleans. Disruptions from vessel noise could influence feeding and breeding patterns essential to the health of the stock. Data used in this analysis were collected continuously over 36 days in the summer of 2001 from bottom moored Navy Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys. Results showed a significant difference (P<0.05) in noise level between hours with ships passing and hours without. Metrics for 56 ship passages were analyzed to compare duration of ship passage with duration of maximum received level (MRL) during ship passage. Results of that analysis showed an average ship passage of 29 minutes with average MRL lasting 23% of the ship passage and an average increase of 40dB. Lastly, click counts were made with the Pamguard. Click counts for ship passages were completed for 35 min and 17.5 min before and after the estimated closest point of approach (CPA) for each ship. Results showed a 36% decrease in the number of detectable clicks as a ship approaches when comparing clicks detected at intervals of both 35 minutes before and 17 minutes before the CPA; additionally, 22% fewer clicks were counted 30 min after the ship than 30 min before (results significant at the P=0.01 level). These results indicate a potential change in sperm whale behavior when exposed to large class size vessel traffic (e.g. tankers and container ships) from major shipping lanes. Recommendations for addressing this issue are discussed.

Azzara, Alyson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Physics for Everyone Lecture Series from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Videos)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Physics for Everyone is a lecture series organized by Fermilab's Diversity Council. Lectures have been held at various times since 2000 with the goal of sharing Fermilab's science in layman's language with non-technical staff at the laboratory. This goal makes these lectures very accessible and valuable to the public and to students. The videoed presentations are available on the Fermilab website and from the Visual Media Services of the Office of Communications. For titles that are not posted on the Physics for Everyone web page, go to the streaming video archive at http://vms-db-srv.fnal.gov/fmi/xsl/VMS_Site_2/000Search/video/f_streaming.xsl and select the Physics for Everyone series from the search interface. Video titles include: 1) Particle Physics: The World of Matter, Space, and Time, Chris Quigg; 2) Accelerators: Pushing the Limits of Speed, Linda Spentzouris; 3) Introduction to Particle Physics Detectors, Erik Ramberg; 4) The DZero Experiment, Don Lincoln; 5) Relativity, Harrison Prosper ; 6) Pi in the Sky: the SDSS, Chris Stoughton; 7) Discovery at Fermilab, Leon Lederman; 8) Neutrons Against Cancer, Arlene Lennox; 9) The Connections Between Quarks and Cosmos, Michael Turner; 10) The Search for Dark Matter: A Personal Account, Roger Dixon; 11) Magnets for Everyone, Dave Harding; 12) The CDF Experiment, William Wester; 13) Neutrinos and Neutrino Experiments at Fermilab, P. Shanahan; 14) Matter and AntiMatter, Bob Tschirhart; 15) Many Dimensions in Particle Physics, Joe Lykken; 16) Higgs Bosons, Marcela Carena; 17) Future Accelerators, Dave Finley; 18) Physics is FUNdamental, Mary Jo Murphy; 19) Computing at Fermilab from PCS to Petabytes, Dane Skow; 20) What Really Goes on in the Main Control Room, Bob Mau; 21) Exploring the Universe with Neutrinos, John Beacom; 22) E Communication in Physics, Heath O'Connell; 23) A Day in the Life of a Scientist, Bonnie Fleming; 24) Physics without Boundaries, Chris Quigg; 25) The Future of High Energy Physics (as seen from Fermilab), Michael Witherell; 26) Fermilab: How We Got Here and Where We're Going, Herman B. White; 27) What the Cosmos Can Tell Us, Brenna Flaugher; 28) How Particle Physics Can Benefit Society, Elizabeth Clements; 29) The Hunt for the Higgs, Patrick Fox; 30) Fermilab's Future at the Intensity Frontier, Bob Tschirhart; 31) In One Ear and Out the Other: A Neutrino Talk, Dave Schmitz; 32) The Magic of Muons, Chris Polly; 33) At the Energy Frontier: the Tevatron, Rob Roser

327

JV Task - 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue  

SciTech Connect

Continuing studies under these three funded projects - (JV Task 77 The Health Implications of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, JV Task 96 Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, and JV Task 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue) - were performed to determine the effects of different levels of dietary mercury and selenium on the growth and development of test animals, and related tissue analyses, to understand the protective benefits of dietary selenium in reference to low-level exposure to mercury. Maternal exposure to methylmercury from seafood has been found to cause neurodevelopmental harm in children. However, significant nutritional benefits will be lost if fish consumption is needlessly avoided. The results of these studies support the hypothesis that intracellular Se itself is the physiologically important biomolecule and that the harm of mercury toxicity arises when Hg abundance becomes great enough to bind a significant portion of intracellular Se in vulnerable tissues such as the brain. Formation of HgSe limits bioavailability of Se for synthesis of Se-dependent enzymes, particularly in brain tissues. When production of these enzymes is impaired, the loss of their numerous essential functions results in the signs and symptoms of Hg toxicity. The finding that one mole of Se protects against many moles of Hg indicates that its beneficial effect is not due to sequestration of mercury as HgSe but rather due to the biological activity of the Se. Therefore, the selenium content of seafoods must be considered along with their methylmercury contents in evaluating the effect of dietary exposure to mercury.

Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Developmental toxicity of clarified slurry oil, syntower bottoms, and distillate aromatic extract administered as a single oral dose to pregnant rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clarified slurry oil (CSO), syntower bottoms (STB), and distillate aromatic extract (DAE) are refinery streams produced by processing crude oil. Available data indicate that some refinery streams are developmentally toxic by the dermal route of exposure. However, there is no conclusive evidence for their being teratogenic. The present studies were designed to further explore the suspected teratogenic potency of refinery streams while at the same time limiting embryolethality. In general, evidence of maternal toxicity (i.e., decreased body weight gain, decreased thymus weight) was observed at doses greater than or equal to 500 mg/kg. For each refinery stream tested, the incidence of resorption was greatest on GD 11. A common pattern of fetal malformations was observed for all of the refinery streams tested and included cleft palate, diaphragmatic hernia, and paw and tail defects. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidences of external and skeletal malformations were greatest on GD 11 and 12 for fetuses exposed to CSO; on GD 13 and 14, the incidence of malformation was comparable for CSO- and STB-exposed fetuses. The incidence of visceral anomalies was greatest on GD 11-13 for fetuses exposed to CSO and STB; on Gestation D 14, the incidence was comparable for each of the refinery streams tested. In general, the ability to produce adverse effects on development was greatest for CSO and least for DAE. Effects produced by STB were comparable to or less severe than those observed for CSO. 24 refs., 11 tabs.

Feuston, M.H.; Mackerer, C.R. [Stonybrook Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Clinical Study Is Congenital Syphilis Really Congenital Syphilis?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detroit has recently been distinguished as having the highest congenital syphilis rate in the United States (250.3 cases per 100 000 live births in Detroit versus 10.3 in the US). However, depending on each health departments followup and CDC reporting, these data may not accurately reflect the true congenital syphilis rate. This study examines the reported cases over a three-year time period with focus on the criteria used for diagnosis. All local health department congenital syphilis CDC collection forms (form 73.126) were reviewed for the years in question. The reported congenital syphilis cases in the year 20022004 in Detroit were reviewed. No cases met confirmed case criteria and few probable cases were based on neonatal evaluations. The majority of congenital syphilis cases were established based on incomplete maternal data such as missing followup serologic titers in the absence of complete neonatal information. In conclusion, although the reported congenital syphilis rate in Detroit is alarmingly high, the true occurrence of congenital syphilis is likely to have been overstated. A health department reporting program that includes more diligent neonatal followup would allow for a more accurate representation of this public health concern. Copyright 2006 Y. Li and B. Gonik. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. BACKGROUND Congenital syphilis is one of the most devastating yet preventable causes of perinatal morbidity and mortality. In

Yi Li; Bernard Gonik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Population size and contaminant exposure of bats using caves on Fort Hood Military Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal cave usage patterns were determined in an effort to understand the ecology of a bat colony at Shell Mountain Bat Cave in Fort Hood, Texas. Exit counts were conducted one night each month for 13 consecutive months to estimate the population and determine seasonal patterns. This cave was used as a maternity roost by a colony of cave myotis (myotis velifer) from March through October. Total colony size varies from month to month, becoming zero when bats leave during the winter. Old guano from two abandoned caves, Egypt and Tippet, on Fort Hood, and new guano from Shell Mountain was analyzed. Organochlorine residues showed higher levels of total chlordanes, endrin, dieldrin, mirex, p,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDT in Egypt and Tippet caves; organophosphates showed higher amounts in the Shell Mountain guano. Organophosphates have never before been found in bat guano, and so what effects, if any, these amounts may indicate on the health of the colony are unknown. Some metals were also found in higher amounts in guano from Egypt and Tippet caves. Residue concentrations of organochlorines and metals in guano and carcasses collected from the three caves are low and probably of no concern. Comparisons among spring and fall guano smaples from Shell Mountain suggest that HCB, total chlordanes, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan II, p,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDT are accumulated while the bats are at Fort Hood. Lindane appears to be the only chemical that increases while the bats are at Fort Hood. Organochlorines found in carcasses tended to show smallest amounts in a lactating female and largest amounts in nursing juveniles.

Land, Tarisha Ann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)-induced alterations in vitamin A and thyroid hormone concentrations in the rat during lactation and early postnatal development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In experimental animals fed standard laboratory diets, penta-BDE mixtures can decrease circulating thyroid hormone and liver vitamin A concentrations. A substantial number of pregnant women and their children have marginal vitamin A status, potentially increasing their risk of adverse effects to penta-BDE exposure. The current study investigated the effects of maternal gestational and lactational penta-BDE exposure on thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis in rats of sufficient vitamin A (VAS) or marginal vitamin A (VAM) status and their offspring. Dams were administered daily oral doses of 18 mg/kg DE-71 (a penta-BDE mixture) or a corn oil vehicle from gestation day 6 through lactation day (LD) 18. Thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis were assessed in plasma and tissues of LD 19 dams and postnatal day (PND) 12, 18, and 31 pups. DE-71 exposure induced hepatomegaly in VAS and VAM pups at all timepoints and increased testes weights at PND 31. While liver vitamin A concentrations were low in DE-71 treated dams and pups, plasma retinol concentrations and plasma retinol binding protein levels were only low in VAM animals exposed to DE-71. DE-71 exposure lowered plasma thyroxine concentrations in VAS and VAM dams and pups. Plasma thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations were high in VAM dams exposed to DE-71, suggesting that marginal vitamin A status enhances the susceptibility to thyroid hormone axis disruption by DE-71. These results support the concept that marginal vitamin A status in pregnant women may increase the risk for PBDE-induced disruptions in vitamin A and thyroid hormone homeostasis.

Ellis-Hutchings, Robert G. [Department of Nutrition, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Cherr, Gary N. [Department of Nutrition, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Bodega Bay, CA 94923 (United States); Hanna, Lynn A. [Department of Nutrition, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Keen, Carl L. [Department of Nutrition, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States) and Department of Internal Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)]. E-mail: clkeen@ucdavis.edu

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Evaluation of the Genetic and Nutritional Control of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in a Novel Mouse Model on Chromosome 7: An Insight into Insulin Signaling and Glucose Homeostasis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, accounting for 90-95% of all diabetes cases in the US. Human obesity is a complex trait and can be studied using appropriate mouse models. A novel polygenic mouse model for studying the genetic and environmental contributions to and the physiological ramifications of obesity and related phenotypes is found in specific lines of mice bred and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Heterozygous mice with a maternally inherited copy of two radiation-induced deletions in the p region of mouse chromosome 7, p23DFioD and p30PUb, have significantly greater body fat and show hyperinsulinemia compared to the wild-type. A single gene, Atp10c, maps to this critical region and codes for a putative aminophospholipid translocase. Biochemical and molecular studies were initiated to gain insight into obesity and glucose homeostasis in these animals and to study the biological role of Atp10c in creating these phenotypes. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were standardized for the heterozygous p23DFioD and control mice on a custom-made diet containing 20% protein, 70% carbohydrate, and 10% fat (kcal). Atp10c expression profiles were also generated using Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Heterozygous p23DFioD animals showed insulin resistance after receiving a dose of either 0.375 or 0.75 U/kg Illetin R insulin. RT-PCR data also shows differences in Atp10c expression in the mutants versus control mice. Using these standardized biochemical assays, future studies will further the understanding of genetic and nutritional controls of glucose homeostasis and obesity in animal models and subsequently in human populations.

Nelson, S.; Dhar, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Biomarkers of exposure to complex environmental mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maternal exposure to genotoxic chemicals may produce a variety of adverse birth outcomes. Depending on the dose and duration of exposure, adverse birth outcomes can range from premature or low-birth weight, to congenital abnormalities including neural tube defects (NTDs). The research described in this dissertation focused on several rural counties in Shanxi province, China. Shanxi has one of the highest rates of NTDs in the world. In 2005, the incidence of NTDs in the study counties ranged from 8 to 24 cases per 1,000 births. While some of these birth defects are likely to be related to nutrition, it is also suggested that environmental factors play a significant role. One such factor includes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure as a result of combustion of coal for indoor heating and cooking. Human populations in Shanxi depend heavily on coal as their main source of energy. This study determined the concentrations of PAHs in house dust, venous blood and placenta of study participants. Dust was collected from homes in the study site. Carcinogenic PAH levels in dust collected from kitchen floors ranged from 12 to 2,000 g/m2. The genotoxic potential of dust was confirmed by shortterm bioassays. Median concentrations of total PAHs in placenta from children born with NTDs were elevated compared to matched controls and appeared to be associated with the risk of having a child with a NTD. Tobacco smoking was not associated with elevated levels of PAH biomarkers in this study population. Levels of bulky DNA adducts in placenta have also been quantified using 32P-postlabeling. Adduct levels do not appear to be significantly different between cases and controls and were not associated with deletions in enzymes GSTM1 or GSTT1. These data suggest that children born with NTDs may be at increased risk due to exposure to genotoxic PAHs. Studies with a larger number of subjects are needed to further elucidate the relationship between PAH exposure and adverse birth outcomes.

Naufal, Ziad Sami

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A human factors approach towards the design of a new glovebox glove for Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Present day glovebox gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are underdeveloped and ergonomically inaccurate. This problem results in numerous sprain and strain injuries every year for employees who perform glovebox work. In addition to injuries, using the current glovebox glove design also contributes to breaches and contamination. The current glove used today at LANL has several problems: (1) The length of the fingers is incorrect, (2) the web spacing between the fingers is nonexistent, (3) the angles between each digit on the finger are incorrect, (4) the thumb is placed inaccurately, and (5) the length of the hand is incorrect. These problems present a need to correct the current glove design to decrease the risk of injuries, breaches, and contamination. Anthropometrics were researched to help find the best range of hand measurements to fix the current glove design. Anthropometrics is the measure of the human physical variation. Anthropometrics for this study were gathered from the American National Survey (ANSUR) data that was conducted by the U.S Army in 1988. The current glovebox glove uses anthropometrics from the 95th to 105th percentile range which is too large so the new gloves are going to implement data from a smaller range of percentile groups. The 105th percentile range represents measurements that exceed the human population but are needed to fit certain circumstance such as wearing several under gloves within the glovebox gloves. Anthropometrics used in this study include: 105th percentile measurements for joint circumference which was unchanged because the room for under gloves plus ease of hand insertion and extraction is needed, 80th percentile measurements for crotch length to allow workers to reach the web spacing in the glove, 20th percentile measurements for finger length to allow workers to reach the end of the glove, standard 10.5cm hand breadth to allow more room to accommodate under gloves, 45 degrees abduction angle for the thumb for better positioning, 45 degrees extension angle for the thumb for better positioning, and various angles for the other fingers to allow a more relaxed and natural fit. 3D modeling was used to implement the anthropometric data listed above onto an existing scanned solid model of a human hand. SolidWorks 2010 3-D modeling package was utilized to manipulate the hand model to represent the anthropometric data researched. The anthropometrics and modifications were reviewed by the University of New Mexico Department of Orthopedics hand surgeons. After all modifications and reviews were completed the model was printed out using stereolithography. The printed out model of the hand was used as a mold to create a prototype glovebox glove. The new mold was taken to Piercan USA to produce a 20mil Polyurethane/Hypalon glovebox glove. The Minnesota Dexterity test and Purdue Pegboard test were used to measure the dexterity of the prototype glovebox glove against a current 15 mil Hypalon LANL glovebox glove. Using the data from the tests a student t test was used to determine if there was a significant difference between the current hypalon glove results and the new prototype glove results. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly lower mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Minnesota Dexterity test. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly higher mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Purdue Pegboard test. A p value method was also performed to confirm the results of the student t test. A survey was also given to glovebox workers to determine if they preferred the new design. The best reaction from glovebox workers was the new thumb position, 73.2% of the sample population agreed with the new thumb position. Developing a new glovebox glove will improve the ergonomics of the hand for work performed, decrease exposure time, decreasing risk of breaching, increasing productivity, reducing injuries, and improving work performance. In the future the new glovebox

Oka, Jude M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

335

R AND D 100 EARLYBIRD AWARD ENTRY  

SciTech Connect

The Smart Latch{trademark} is an electronically enhanced door lockset device for industrial and consumer applications, which uses existing neural network technology to analyze the sequence, timing, and acoustic signatures associated with lockset functions and provides immediate indication of failure to correctly lock and latch. It essentially ''listens'' to and learns the sequences and acoustic signatures associated with lockset function and latching. When triggered by specific door activity the Smart Latch{trademark} begins analyzing sequences, frequencies and other parameters. With a satisfactory outcome the device provides positive feedback (e.g. visual and/or audible) and returns to a ''sleep'' state awaiting the next activity. If any part of the normal door operation, including latching and length of time, are incorrect various alarm signals can be generated. With electronics and 5+ year battery integrated, the device is simple to install and transparent to the user. Because the device uses proven voice recognition algorithms, it could meet or exceed the performance of the human ear in detecting the unique and complex acoustic signature associated with a properly operating and secured door. Unlike existing technologies, such as limit switches, it is not easily spoofed or defeated and has a high level of immunity to interference. The Smart Latch{trademark} technology can be integrated into existing lockset and door hardware designs, including both low price consumer products and high end electronic/cipher locks. The concept and design are based on a simple security industry adage: ''It isn't locked if it isn't latched''. Even the most elaborate and robust security barriers are of little use if the locking and latching mechanisms are not properly functioning and engaged. Smart Latch{trademark} provides automatic verification of the first and most important step in facility security: Close and properly latch doors and barriers. It is a compelling product for households with children, elderly, or high traffic areas such as an office where a properly closed and latched door is essential for security and safety. In an age of ever increasing security concerns and limited human resources, Smart Latch{trademark} can be a significant addition to the $20 billion plus industrial and consumer lockset market. The Smart Latch{trademark} is unique because: (1) as an inexpensive, battery powered, stand-alone device or as integrated into any standard consumer lock set, the device uses neural network technology to analyze the acoustic signatures associated with normal door operation and generates an alert if a door is not latched correctly and within a set amount of time. (2) It is not easily spoofed or defeated. (3) Installation, setup, and use are simple.

Dugan, J; Debbie Chapman, D

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the near-term (1-4) years and longer-term (5-10) years planning horizons. Some final observations include acknowledging the enduring nature of several key objectives on the Obama Administration's arms control and nonproliferation agenda. The CTBT, FMCT, bilateral nuclear arms reductions and strengthening the NPT have been sought by successive U.S. Administrations for nearly thirty years. Efforts towards negotiated arms control, although de-emphasized by the G.W. Bush Administration, have remained a pillar of U.S. national security strategy for decades and are likely to be of enduring if not increasing importance for decades to come. Therefore revitalization and expansion of USG capabilities in this area can be a positive legacy no matter what near-term arms control goals are achieved over the next four years. This is why it is important to reconstruct integrated bureaucratic, legislative, budgetary and diplomatic strategies to sustain the arms control and nonproliferation agenda. In this endeavor some past lessons must be taken to heart to avoid bureaucratic overkill and keep interagency policy-making and implementation structures lean and effective. On the Technical side a serious, sustained multilateral program to develop, down select and performance test nuclear weapons dismantlement verification technologies and procedures should be immediately initiated. In order to make this happen the United States and Russia should join with the UK and other interested states in creating a sustained, full-scale research and development program for verification at their respective nuc1ear weapons and defense establishments. The goals include development of effective technologies and procedures for: (1) Attribute measurement systems to certify nuclear warheads and military fissile materials; (2) Chain-of-custody methods to track items after they are authenticated and enter accountability; (3) Transportation monitoring; (4) Storage monitoring; (5) Fissile materials conversion verification. The remainder of this paper focuses on transparency and verification for nuclear arms a

Doyle, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meek, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Determining the antiquity of dog origins: canine domestication as a model for the consilience between molecular genetics and archaeology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaeologists have favored a date of 14,000-15,000 years before present (BP) for canine domestication. However, recent studies of mutations in the mitochondrial DNA sequence by molecular geneticists have implied that dogs were domesticated over 100,000 years ago, which has challenged traditional theory. Geneticists have further hypothesized that dogs originated from wolf ancestors based upon the number of substitutions observed in dog and wolf haplotypes. Although both disciplines provide substantial evidence for their theories, the origin of dog domestication remains controversial. Several areas continue to be debatable. First, both geneticists and archaeologists incorrectly use the term domestication to describe events that clearly can not be proven to under human control. Second, the evolutionary development of canines is viewed by molecular biologists as well as archaeologist to be indicators of domestication without any further exploration of other probable causes. Third, the studies in canine genetics are so complex that most archaeologists have difficulty in providing evidence that would be contradictory to molecular theory. Fourth, both fields of study continually ignore innate behavioral characteristics of wolves that would make domestication highly improbable. Fifth, geneticists rely heavily on data gathered from sequencing of mitochondrial DNA, which has been assumed to maternally inherited. However recent human studies have shown that this assumption has now been proven to be incorrect. And finally, not only are morphological traits of fossilized dogs and wolves so similar that making a taxonomic identification improbable, but also the amount of archaeological remains available are too sparse and fragmented for accurate affiliation. An alternate theory of canine domestication will be proposed utilizing data gathered from the archaeological record and molecular research. I hypothesize that dogs diverged naturally from wolves 100,000 years ago as a result of the natural course of evolution, not human intervention, and had already evolved into a dog prior to being domesticated by humans 14,000-15,000 years ago. Evidence will be presented to clearly show that this hypothesis is a more accurate scenario of canine domestication.

Raisor, Michelle Jeanette

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Amino acids, polyamines, and nitric oxide synthesis in the ovine conceptus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine concentrations of amino acids and polyamines as well as nitric oxide (NO) and polyamine synthesis in the ovine conceptus (embryo/fetal and associated placental membrane). Ewes were hysterectomized on Days 30, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, or 140 of gestation to obtain allantoic and amniotic fluids, intercotyledonary placenta, placentomes and uterine endometrium for the analyses. Alanine, citrulline plus glutamine accounted for about 80% of total ?-amino acids in allantoic fluid during early gestation. Serine (16.5 mM) contributed about 60% of total ?-amino acids in allantoic fluid on Day 140 of gestation. Maximal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginase activities and highest rates of polyamine and NO synthesis occured in all tissues on Day 40 of gestation. In ovine allantoic and amniotic fluids, polyamines were most abundant during early (Days 40-60) and late (Days 100-140) gestation, respectively. Activity of guanosine 5??-triphosphate-cyclohydrolase I (GTP-CH), and concentrations of NOS cofactors, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), peaked on Day 40 of gestation in placental and endometrial tissues. In these tissues, NO synthesis was positively correlated with total NOS activity, GTP-CH activity, and concentrations of BH4 and NADPH. The physiological significance of these changes was manifested by undernutrition-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Maternal undernutrition (50% of National Research Council nutrient requirements) reduced concentrations of total ?-amino acids in fetal plasma and fluids, and retarded fetal growth at both mid (Day 78) and late (Day 135) gestation. Concentrations of polyamines in fetal fluids were lower in underfed ewes than in control-fed ewes. Realimentation of underfed ewes between Days 78 and 135 of gestation increased concentrations of total ?-amino acids and polyamines in fetal plasma and fluids, when compared with non-realimented ewes. Results of these studies demonstrate metabolic coordination among the several integrated pathways to enable high rates of polyamine and NO synthesis in the placenta and endometrium during early pregnancy. Collectively, our findings may have important implications for both IUGR and fetal origins of adult disease.

Kwon, Hyuk Jung

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dusky dolphins of Kaikoura, New Zealand: behavioral effects of genetic sampling and analysis of population structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal differences in group size, behavior, icrographics. distribution, and coloration patterns of dusky dolphins (Lacenorhynchus obscures) in Kaikoura, New Zealand, have led researchers to question whether "winter'' and "summer'' groups are temporally and behaviorally segregated into genetically distinct populations. Exfoliated skin samples were collected in Kaikoura from July 1997 to May 1998 for genetic analysis of 40 "winter'' and 40 "summer'' individuals via skin swab. A 473 base pair section of the mitochondrion DNA control region was amplified and sequenced for the 80 samples. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity were 0.16 and 0.98, respectively. AMOVA and phylogenetie analyses indicate "winter'' and "summer'' groups are not subdivided with respect to maternal lineages. Lack of subdivision between seasonal populations is further supported by: (1) demographic patterns determined from mismatch distribution analysis suggest New Zealand dusky dolphins underwent a population expansion in the Pleistocene; (2) current levels of diversity suggest the long-term effective population size has been large', (3) preliminary analysis of photo-identification data indicate individuals are present in Kaikoura both winter and summer; (4) comparison of 80 samples from Kaikoura to eight beach-east samples from locations throughout New Zealand reveal shared haplotypes between regions. Behavioral responses to sampling were recorded for 315 contacts and 48 controls. The number of pro-and pest-contact joyriders and sample time were used as indicators of group-level response to sampling. The behavioral state of dolphins prior to sampling or time of day did not affect responses to sampling. Small groups were found to be more sensitive to sampling. Dolphin groups appeared to habituate to sampling activities after the first hour spent sampling. Responses to sampling were mild with 18% showing no response to contact. The most frequent response was to move right or left of the bow. Thirty-three percent of dolphins returned to the bow within 10.8 [] 0.73 seconds. There was no significant difference between proportion of responses between treatment and control groups, suggesting a proportion of responses to sampling can be explained by normal behavior in the presence of a vessel.

Harlin, April Dawn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Testing for spatial correlation and semiparametric spatial modeling of binary outcomes with application to aberrant crypt foci in colon carcinogenesis experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an experiment to understand colon carcinogenesis, all animals were exposed to a carcinogen while half the animals were also exposed to radiation. Spatially, we measured the existence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), namely morphologically changed colonic crypts that are known to be precursors of colon cancer development. The biological question of interest is whether the locations of these ACFs are spatially correlated: if so, this indicates that damage to the colon due to carcinogens and radiation is localized. Statistically, the data take the form of binary outcomes (corresponding to the existence of an ACF) on a regular grid. We develop score??type methods based upon the Matern and conditionally autoregression (CAR) correlation models to test for the spatial correlation in such data, while allowing for nonstationarity. Because of a technical peculiarity of the score??type test, we also develop robust versions of the method. The methods are compared to a generalization of Moran??s test for continuous outcomes, and are shown via simulation to have the potential for increased power. When applied to our data, the methods indicate the existence of spatial correlation, and hence indicate localization of damage. Assuming that there are correlations in the locations of the ACF, the questions are how great are these correlations, and whether the correlation structures di?er when an animal is exposed to radiation. To understand the extent of the correlation, we cast the problem as a spatial binary regression, where binary responses arise from an underlying Gaussian latent process. We model these marginal probabilities of ACF semiparametrically, using ?xed-knot penalized regression splines and single-index models. We ?t the models using pairwise pseudolikelihood methods. Assuming that the underlying latent process is strongly mixing, known to be the case for many Gaussian processes, we prove asymptotic normality of the methods. The penalized regression splines have penalty parameters that must converge to zero asymptotically: we derive rates for these parameters that do and do not lead to an asymptotic bias, and we derive the optimal rate of convergence for them. Finally, we apply the methods to the data from our experiment.

Apanasovich, Tatiyana Vladimirovna

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm  

SciTech Connect

Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early-embryonic transcriptional regulation, and a significant proportion may be nonfunctional. Surprisingly, for five of the six factors, their recognition sites are not unambiguously more constrained evolutionarily than the immediate flanking DNA, even in more highly bound and presumably functional regions, indicating that comparative DNA sequence analysis is limited in its ability to identify functional transcription factor targets.

Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nutrient Signaling, Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Ovine Conceptus Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research was conducted to test the hypothesis that select nutrients including glucose, leucine, arginine and glutamine stimulate conceptus development by activating mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin; HGNC approved gene name: FRAP1, FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin associated protein 1) signaling pathway. First, temporal changes in quantities of select nutrients (glucose, amino acids, glutathione, calcium, sodium and potassium) in uterine lumenal fluid from cyclic (Days 3 to 16) and pregnant (Days 10 to 16) ewes were determined. Total recoverable glucose, Arg, Gln, Leu, Asp, Glu, Asn, His, beta-Ala, Tyr, Trp, Met, Val, Phe, Ile, Lys, Cys, Pro, glutathione, calcium and sodium was greater in uterine fluid of pregnant compared to cyclic ewes between Days 10 and 16 after onset of estrus. Of note were remarkable increases in glucose, Arg, Leu and Gln in uterine flushings of pregnant ewes between Days 10 and 16 of pregnancy. Second, effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy, progesterone (P4) and interferon tau (IFNT) on expression of both facilitative (SLC2A1, SLC2A3 and SLC2A4) and sodium-dependent (SLC5A1 and SLC5A11) glucose transporters, cationic amino acid transporters (SLC7A1, SLC7A2 and SLC7A3), neutral amino acid transporters (SLC1A4, SLC1A5, SLC3A1, SLC6A14, SLC6A19, SLC7A5, SLC7A6, SLC7A8, SLC38A3, SLC38A6 and SLC43A2) and acidic amino acid transporters (SLC1A1, SLC1A2 and SLC1A3) in ovine uterine endometria from Days 10 to 16 of the estrous cycle and Days 10 to 20 of pregnancy as well as in conceptuses from Days 13 to 18 of pregnancy were determined. Among these genes, SLC2A3 and SLC7A6 were detectable only in trophectoderm and endoderm of conceptuses. The abundance of mRNAs for SLC2A1, SLC2A4, SLC5A1, SLC5A11, SLC7A1, SLC7A2, SLC1A4, SLC1A5, SLC43A2 and SLC1A3 changed dynamically in ovine uterine endometria according to day of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. Expression of mRNAs for SLC2A1, SLC5A11 and SLC7A1 in endometria was induced by P4 and further stimulated by IFNT with shortterm treatment (12 days), while expression of SLC7A1 and SLC1A5 in endometria required long-term treatment (20 days) with P4 and IFNT. Third, effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy, P4 and IFNT on expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS1, NOS2 and NOS3), GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1), ornithine decarboxylase 1(ODC1), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2), FRAP1 complexes (FRAP1, LST8, MAPKAP1, RAPTOR, RICTOR), regulators (TSC1, TSC2, RHEB) and an effector (EIF4EBP1) of FRAP1 signaling in ovine uterine endometria from Days 10 to 16 of the estrous cycle and Days 10 to 20 of pregnancy as well as in conceptuses from Days 13 to 18 of pregnancy were determined. All of these genes were expressed in ovine uterine endometrium and conceptuses. Among these genes, expression of NOS1, IGF2, RHEB and EIF4EBP1 changed dynamically due to day of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. Progesterone stimulated NOS1 and GCH1 expression while IFNT inhibited NOS1 expression in uterine endometria, and P4 and IFNT stimulated expression of RHEB and EIF4EBP1 in uterine endometria. Collectively, these results indicate that: 1) the availability of select nutrients in the ovine uterine lumen increases to support the rapid growth and elongation of the conceptus during the peri-implantation stage of pregnancy; 2) P4 and/or IFNT stimulate(s) glucose and amino acid transporters to facilitate their transport from maternal tissues and/or blood into the uterine lumen during early pregnancy; 3) the FRAP1 cell signaling pathway mediates interactions between the maternal uterus and peri-implantation conceptus and both P4 and IFNT affect this pathway by regulating expression of RHEB and EIF4EBP1. Expression of NOS, ODC1 and IGF2 appear to be linked to FRAP1 signaling in both uteri and peri-implantation conceptuses.

Gao, Haijun

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy Systems and Population Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z