National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for orm shelter emigran

  1. Rapid deployment shelter system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2006-10-10

    A shelter for the protection of for the protection of persons, animals, equipment, materials, property, and similar things of value from potentially damaging environmental conditions is disclosed. Various embodiments include the use of a frame structure and hinged panels which are unfolded to create the walls of the structure. Optionally flexible surfaces may be added to the ends of the shelter to at least partially close the end of the shelter.

  2. ORMS Undergraduate Student Learning Goals All Operations Research and Management Science graduates are expected to acquire the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    ORMS Undergraduate Student Learning Goals All Operations Research and Management Science graduates in practice. The ORMS (Operations Research and Management Science) program has four possible concentrations, statistics, operations research, and management sciences. · Learn how to apply these skills and tools

  3. Earth shelter goes international

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1983-06-01

    Since the mid-1970's earth sheltered buildings in the US have become more numerous and important as a contemporary passive building concept. Further, an intense international interest has now developed, as evidenced by a number of important activities. One of these events is the 1983 International Conference on Energy Efficient Buildings with Earth Shelter Protection to be conducted during 1-6 August in Sydney, Australia. A review of past activities leading up to this event, as well as a brief review of the conference program, is the subject of this discussion.

  4. Earth sheltered housing phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1981-06-21

    Both national and international attention has recently been focused on earth sheltered construction as an emerging energy alternative. This is especially true for the High Plains region of the central United States. Traditionally, inhabitants of this region have been sensitized to the need for windstorm protection. However, the dramatic potentials for energy savings have served as a strong secondary inducement to the burgeoning construction activity in what is now viewed as a contemporary dwelling concept. The typical characteristics of such dwellings are reviewed as well as the educational challenge awaiting professional input to this developing boom in earth sheltered construction. 12 refs.

  5. Earth-sheltered apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germer, J.

    1984-12-01

    Earth-sheltered apartments for students at St. Johns University, Collegeville, MN are described. The intent was to provide energy-efficient, low maintenance housing in a neighborhood environment for the students. Students would learn about energy-conscious architecture from living in the buildings. The buildings have had few problems, but energy performance has not been up to expectations. The consumption of electricity exceeded predictions by 49%. The most likely answer to the problem is deviation from design. Several items of energy-efficient design were specified but deleted in order to cut costs.

  6. Earth sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1982-01-01

    The earth shelter concept has been utilized successfully around the world for thousands of years, but its use with contemporary mechanically conditioned buildings dates only from the oil embargo of the mid-1970s. This is an architectural innovation and a growing and viable response to the energy imperative. Most of the technical problems of earth shelters have been effectively addressed, but a systems design approach could further enhance overall energy savings. Although occupant lifestyle seems to be at a high level, areas that require further attention include site design, daylighting, and refined thermal design. The proper integration of passive solar heating and disaster protection represent opportunities for improved multifunctional aspects. With proper design, annual heating and cooling energy use reductions on the order of 80% can be anticipated. Research on energy design refinements and occupancy aspects necessary to achieve such levels of savings is presently under way at Oklahoma State University, the University of Minnesota, and other study centers throughout the nation and the world.

  7. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummaryDIST OF COLUMBIANorthSEP PADepartmentSENIORThesponsors anSHELTER3

  8. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummaryDIST OF COLUMBIANorthSEP PADepartmentSENIORThesponsorsSHELTER3

  9. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThisSF424RRBudget3YearPolicy.pdf MoreSmart GridSHELTER3

  10. Taxonomic Classification of Planning Decisions in Health Care: a Review of the State of the Art in OR/MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Taxonomic Classification of Planning Decisions in Health Care: a Review of the State of the Art Classification of Planning Decisions in Health Care: a Review of the State of the Art in OR/MS 2 1. Introduction a comprehensive bibliography on operating room management articles. `ORCHID' [181] is a reference library, which

  11. Wood panel earth shelter construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J.R.; Loveless, J.G.; Senkow, W.

    1986-05-27

    An earth sheltered building is described including an arch structure, the structure including footings, a floor extending between the footings and arch means extending between the footings and having a base having lower ends on the footings for defining an enclosure which is covered with earth and open at opposite ends. The arch structure consists of: joined, curved wooden panel sections arranged in tandem in adjacent rows with more than two panel sections in a row, each of the sections including circumferentially extending wooden side members; wooden sheathing sections overlying the top skins of panel sections, the sheathing including a plurality of plywood sheets lapped over the joints between the panel sections and treated with a preservative; an adhesive joining the panel sections together within each row and to adjacent rows; waterproofing means on the sheathing for waterproofing the exterior surface of the arch means; connecting means engaging the base of the arch means at the footings and within the floor for tying the base together at its lower ends; and end walls and fastener means for joining the end walls to lateral edges of the arch means, the end walls dimensioned to extend above the arch means to retain earth placed on the arch means.

  12. Constructing earth sheltered housing with concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spears, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This manual provides a state - of - the - art review of the design and construction of an earth - sheltered house using cast - in - place concrete, precast concrete, and concrete masonry. Based on a literature survey, theoretical work, and discussions with researchers and engineers in the concrete industry, the text is designed for use by architects, engineers, and homebuilders. The features of concrete construction that are current accepted practice for the concrete products discussed are shown to be applicable with reasonable care to building a safe, dry, and comfortable earth - sheltered house. The main considerations underlying the recommendations were the use of the earth's mass and passive solar effects to minimize energy needs, the structural capacity of the separate concrete products and their construction methods, and drainage principles and waterproofing details. Shelter ranging from those with at least 2 feet of earth cover to those with an uncovered roof of usual construction are included. To be considered an earth - sheltered residential building, at least half of the exterior wall and roof area that is in direct contact with the conditioned living space must be sheltered from the environment by earth berm or earthfill. Siting considerations, the fundamentals of passive solar heating, planning considerations, and structural considerations are discussed. Detailed guidelines are provided on concrete masonry construction, joint details in walls and floors, waterproofing, formwork and form removal, concrete construction practices, concrete masonry, and surface finishes. Numerous illustrations, tables, and a list of 32 references are provided. (Author abstract modified).

  13. Scorpion shelter-seeking behavior; pg 1 of 5 Assay of Shelter-Seeking Behavior in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffin, Doug

    of the arena to cast a shadow on the sand. Scorpions were placed in the arenas and exposed to the experimental the supposed cuticular light perception to detect shelter. We designed circular sand-lined experimental arenas

  14. Earth sheltered housing performance: a summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.; Fitzgerald, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    Oklahoma and the surrounding interior plains region is being studied with respect to the extensive development of earth sheltered housing. An understanding of the occupant responses to this rediscovered dwelling concept is being determined through extended questionnaires and telephone interviews. Statistical evaluation of these responses should suggest regional relationships between the interior human environment and the exterior environment as expressed by earth sheltered architecture. Habitability and passive energy design are the main topics of interest being investigated at Oklahoma State University. Initial results indicate that occupants are generally satisfied with such attributes as structural safety, thermal comfort, and acoustic environment; but have some reservations concerning daylighting, site design, privacy of family members, and energy design and performance. Despite reservations on energy performance, owners have still achieved significant savings in comparison to their previous homes. A most promising fact is that these savings have been realized with little decrease and often an increase in comfort and habitability aspects.

  15. Zoning for earth sheltered buildings. A guide for Minnesota communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Background information on earth sheltered buildings and the zoning issues related to this construction techniques is provided. Ways to develop goals and policies on earth sheltering and integrate them into existing planning documents are outlined. Ways to eliminate prohibitions and barriers to earth-sheltered buildings from zoning language are explained. Subdivision and planned unit development (PUD) regulations designed to facilitate and encourage new developments of earth sheltered homes are considered. Model language on planning, zoning, and subdivisions and planned unit developments and a summary of the various recommendations made throughout the guidebook are included. (MHR)

  16. Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to be limited because of the position of the home's windows, and courtyard drainage and snow removal should be carefully thought through during design. Bermed Earth-Sheltered Homes...

  17. Two earth sheltered passive solar residences with photovoltaic electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strong, S.J.; Osten, R.J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The design and construction of two earth sheltered passive solar residence with photovoltaic electricity are described. The sizing and design of the P.V. system as well as the module fabrication and array integration are also discussed.

  18. Habitability and energy performance of earth sheltered dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.

    1980-12-01

    The High Plains region of the central United States has become host to an emerging dwelling concept which incorporates the use of earth shelter technologies. Traditionally, inhabitants of this region have been sensitized to the need for windstorm protection. More recently, dramatic potentials for energy savings have served as a strong secondary inducement to the exploration of earth sheltered housing as an energy alternative. Habitability and passive energy design of earth sheltered structures are key focal elements being investigated at Oklahoma State University. Habitability aspects have received little treatment elsewhere, and existing passive energy design strategies have generally not considered the passive cooling benefits of earth sheltered construction. Extended questionnaires were used to obtain earth sheltered occupant responses to both habitability and energy design aspects including measured energy usage. Preliminary analysis has been completed on about 80 (eighty) projects in the State of Oklahoma, and the study is being extended to 8 (eight) additional surrounding states. Initial results indicate that occupants are generally satisfied with such attributes as structural safety, thermal comfort, and acoustical environment; but have some reservations concerning daylighting, site design, and energy design and performance. Energy usage patterns tend to indicate that, in fact, sizeable savings are being realized by owners of current generation earth shelters. However, it is anticipated that with optimized passive systems design, the presently realized savings could be further increased by perhaps a factor of two. An appropriate design balance must be realized between passive heating and passive cooling needs.

  19. Suitable thin shell structural configurations for earth sheltered housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behr, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    An earth sheltered house is one whose building envelope is substantially in contact with soil, without necessarily being totally underground. Hence, it can provide the commonly sought attributes of a residence, including natural light, exterior views, and curb appeal. It also exhibits strong energy performance, lower maintenance, and good storm protection. Despite the longer-term life cycle cost advantages of earth sheltered buildings, a current hindrance to the mass market acceptance of earth sheltered housing is higher initial cost which is caused, in part, by the inability of conventional rectilinear structural systems to support economically the massive soil loads imposed on earth covered buildings. In deference to the premise that technical suitability is no guarantee of innovation acceptance in the housing industry, a survey of the nontechnical impediments to housing innovation was first undertaken. These impediment areas include: market inhibition; builder trepidations; industry constraints; and financing problems. As a result of an architectural design program written under contract for the Department of Energy, it was possible to include a rather extensive (but necessarily subjective) evaluation of the architectural potential for earth sheltered shell structures. Engineering suitability dimensions included structural effectiveness, constructability, and economy of construction for single- and double-curvature thin shell structures. Overall engineering suitability and architectural potential are deemed to be adequate, although non-engineering impediments to housing innovation appear to raise significant questions regarding the potential for mass market implementation of thin shell stuctures in earth sheltered housing.

  20. Organizational and social-psychological issues relevant to fallout-shelter evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernette, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary review of the literature on organizational and social-psychological issues relevant to fallout-shelter evaluation. Fallout-shelter options are evaluated along two dimensions: shelter size, and extent of shelteree participation in the shelter construction. Four functional criteria are used in the evaluation: decision-making, member coordination, social control, and maintaining morale. Smaller shelters requiring shelteree participation in construction appear preferable as measured in most of these criteria. Additional factors mentioned include demographic characteristics of the shelter population, degree and type of ventilation system, and availability of medical equipment and personnel. 10 references.

  1. Two-dimensional heat transfer from earth-sheltered buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krarti, M. (Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (US)); Claridge, D.E. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-02-01

    This paper describes use of the interzone temperature profile estimation (or ITPE) technique, an analytical calculation procedure to predict heat transfer within earth in contact with a structure. The solutions governing steady-state and steady-periodic heat conduction are derived for rectangular earth-sheltered buildings. The procedure accepts continuously variable values of geometric dimensions, insulation levels, and constant soil thermal characteristics and considers the presence of a finite water table level. Soil temperature profiles are shown for both steady-state and steady periodic conditions. The effects of insulation and water table depth on the heat losses from an earth-sheltered building envelope are discussed.

  2. Effects of a standardized obedience program on approachability and problem behaviors in dogs from rescue shelters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Lauren Denise

    2004-11-15

    Improved adoptability is a common goal among rescue shelters. Dogs are more likely to be adopted if they are friendly, mannerly, and approachable. The possibility of improving rescue shelter dogs' behavior through an ...

  3. Aphid-tending Ants Affect Secondary Users in Leaf Shelters and Rates of Herbivory on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Nathan J.

    Aphid-tending Ants Affect Secondary Users in Leaf Shelters and Rates of Herbivory on Salix communities within leaf shelters on Hooker's willow (Salix hookeriana) in a coastal dune ecosystem in northern

  4. Petrography and Bedrock Origin of Shelter Rock, a Large Glacial Erratic in Western Long Island, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Petrography and Bedrock Origin of Shelter Rock, a Large Glacial Erratic constrain the mineralogy and petrography of Shelter Rock. The dominant mineral suite

  5. Objective and subjective perceptions of energy efficiency: the case of earth sheltered homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Consumer perceptions of earth sheltered homes are compared with perceptions of more traditional, nonsheltered homes. Despite general perceptions of earth sheltered homes as energy efficient with lower costs of maintenance and greater privacy, consumers do not favorably evaluate earth sheltered homes in terms of overall liking. Only a moderate amount of sheltering, as in bermed houses is preferred. Differences are particularly significant for male and female respondents. 8 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  6. Earth sheltered housing in the south central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grondzik, W.T. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater); Grondzik, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study of identified, occupied earth sheltered residences in the south central United States has been conducted by the Oklahoma State University. Selected results from this investigation of more than 150 residences in the states of Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas are presented, focusing upon the issues of habitability and energy performance of such structures.

  7. Civil defense shelters: a state-of-the-art assessment - 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1986-12-01

    The literature on the design, construction, testing, and cost of blast and fallout shelters was reviewed, and a bibliography of over 1000 documents was assembled. It was found that nuclear weapon effects and shelter design are well understood. The principal technical barrier to construction of permanent shelters is cost. Single-purpose blast shelters cost in the high hundreds to low thousands of dollars per space, depending on size, hardness, location, and whether the shelter is part of new construction or retrofit. The risk area population requiring blast protection is approximately 160 million. The very-low-cost options open to the U.S. Government, with its present civil defense budget, remain: (1) maintain the inventory on fallout shelter and identify space with some blast protection potential; (2) plan for crisis upgrading to improve existing space in a crisis, and (3) plan for construction of expedient shelter in a crisis. Fallout shelters might be mandated in appropriate new construction outside risk areas at little cost to the government. Options in the mid-range of expense, a few tens to a few hundreds of dollars per space include: (1) requiring modified limestone-mining practices, where appropriate, to generate useable shelter space near cities; (2) encouraging the construction of earth-sheltered housing and other buildings, and (3) requiring and/or subsidizing the construction of dual-use basement shelter in new construction.

  8. Architecture earth-sheltered buildings. Design manual 1. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    Design guidance is presented for use by experienced engineers and architects. The types of buildings within the scope of this manual include slab-on-grade, partially-buried (bermed) or fully-buried, and large (single-story or multistory) structures. New criteria unique to earth-sheltered design are included for the following disciplines: Planning, Landscape Design, Life-Cycle Analysis, Architectural, Structural, Mechanical (criteria include below-grade heat flux calculation procedures), and Electrical.

  9. Energy-efficient buildings with earth-shelter protection. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.; Sterling, R.L.; Baggs, S.A. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Climate and proximity to the equator as well as acceptance of the concept made Australia a logical place for an international conference on the energy-efficiency opportunities of earth-sheltered buildings. Papers presented at the conference are grouped under 10 general topics: earth environment, landscape/site, passive solar integration, hazard protection, design process, livability/acceptance, interior environment, energy conservation, performance simulation, and structural variations. Sixty-two papers were separately abstracted for the Department of Energy's Data Base.

  10. Civil defense shelters: A state-of-the-art assessment, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1987-02-01

    The literature on the design, construction, testing, and cost of blast and fallout shelters was reviewed, and a bibliography of over 1000 documents was assembled. It was found that nuclear weapon effects and shelter design are well understood. An important barrier to construction of permanent shelters is cost. Single-purpose shelters cost in the high hundreds to low thousands of dollars per occupant (or per space), depending on size, hardness, location, and whether the shelter is part of new construction or retrofit. Multiplied by a risk area population of approximately 160 million, the cost of a blast shelter construction program would rival that of a major strategic weapon system. Options in the mid-range of expense, a few tens to a few hundreds of dollars per space include (1) requiring modified limestone mining practices, where appropriate, to generate usable shelter space near cities; (2) encouraging the construction of earth-sheltered housing and other buildings; and (3) requiring and/or subsidizing the construction of dual-use basement shelter in new construction. A program using this approach would require an annual expenditure of approximately 1% of the annual defense budget for 10 or more years. 950 refs., 68 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Narrative on history of demonstration unit concept of E3 Corporation earth sheltered homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-06

    Problems and other experience involved in the building of earth sheltered homes are detailed. A design summary and final cost sheet of the demonstration home are presented. (MHR)

  12. Solar greenhouse as an integral part of an earth-sheltered home: the first two years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malott, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of a solar greenhouse as an integral part of an earth-sheltered home is discussed. The problems of building such a home are described.

  13. Ferrocement: a technique for passive solar earth sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Impson, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    A system of construction is discussed which allows for the least cost with the most return yet noted in any of the current publications. This system utilizes commonly available and relatively inexpensive materials. The use of unskilled labor is possible, thereby expanding one's labor pool. This system also allows more design freedom than do any of the other construction techniques now widely practiced. This system of construction is ferrocement, a technique which has been in use intermittently since 1847. A method of insulating Earth Shelters is also discussed, as well as air flow characteristics of domes.

  14. Earth-sheltered construction: thoughts on public policy issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    A number of public-policy issues related to the use of the subsurface have come to light as interest in underground-space development has grown. Issues of national importance include energy, urban transportation, defense, and natural resources. Many underground proponents are convinced of the economic and environmental benefits that can result from a lower consumption of hydrocarbon fuels through earth-sheltered, energy-efficient buildings. Public-policy issues of local significance include public demand, building regulation aesthetics, and public utilities. Those interested in underground development must articulate policy issues and responses that demonstrate its value and foster public interest in using the subsurface. 10 references.

  15. Sheltering in Place | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 Unlimited Release4:SeymourSheddingSheldonSheltering in

  16. Radon in energy-efficient earth-sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.

    1983-05-01

    Exposure o the radioactive-decay products of radon 222 that are present in indoor air constitutes the most-significant radiation dose received by the general population in most countries. Indoor concentrations vary from one building to another, ranging from insignificant to very high levels that cause radiation doses higher than those experienced by uranium miners. This wide range of concentrations is attributable to variability in the rate at which radon enters buildings, and differences in the ventilation rate. Earth-sheltered dwellings, because they are more completely surrounded by earth material than other structures, have an as yet unquantified potential for having radon entry rates that are higher than typical for other houses in the region. Moreover, measures that save energy by reducing ventilation rates (for example by reducing infiltration) can also raise indoor radon concentrations. For these reasons a significant effort is needed to determine the potential for ventilation-reducing measures and earth sheltering to increase radon concentrations, especially in regions where they are already high. Where necessary, proper attention to specific design features that affect radon entry rates or residence time indoors should be adequate to avoid undue risk to the public.

  17. SHELTER-IN-PLACE DRILL DURING THE SHELTER-IN-PLACE DRILL BETWEEN 2:30pm AND 2:45pm, READ & DISCUSS THIS DOCU-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    SHELTER-IN-PLACE DRILL DURING THE SHELTER-IN-PLACE DRILL BETWEEN 2:30pm AND 2:45pm, READ & DISCUSS of Drill THIS DRILL IS A DISCUSSION BASED DRILL ONLY. At approximatley 2:30pm a BeachALERT Emergency Notification Message will go out to announce the drill. At 2:30pm there will be 15 minutes to go over

  18. In Search of Shelter Mapping the Effects of Climate Change on Human Migration and Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a In Search of Shelter Mapping the Effects of Climate Change on Human Migration and Displacement #12;#12;In Search of Shelter Mapping the Effects of Climate Change on Human Migration and Displacement be addressed to the primary authors Koko Warner (warner@ehs.unu.edu), Charles Ehrhart (ehrhart

  19. In Search of Shelter Mapping the Effects of Climate Change on Human Migration and Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    a In Search of Shelter Mapping the Effects of Climate Change on Human Migration and Displacement of Shelter Mapping the Effects of Climate Change on Human Migration and Displacement Authors: Koko Warner are welcome and should be addressed to the primary authors Koko Warner (warner@ehs.unu.edu), Charles Ehrhart

  20. MANAGEMENT AND REHABILITATION OF INTER-DOG AGGRESSION IN ANIMAL SHELTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    MANAGEMENT AND REHABILITATION OF INTER-DOG AGGRESSION IN ANIMAL SHELTERS by Jane S. Orihel B dogs in shelters and explored the feasibility of implementing rehabilitation for inter-dog aggression, and 2) an experimental study of the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program for reducing inter

  1. Earth-sheltered building yields energy savings for University of Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The design and energy efficiency of the Civil/Mineral Engineering Building at the University of Minnesota is discussed. The building combines relatively common energy-efficient surface building practices with earth-sheltered techniques already proven on the University Campus and innovative deep-earth sheltering.

  2. LWDA Shelter Shielding Factor Ylva Pihlstrm (UNM), Dan Mertely (NRAO) & Eduardo Aguilera (UNM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    1 LWDA Shelter Shielding Factor Ylva Pihlström (UNM), Dan Mertely (NRAO) & Eduardo Aguilera (UNM) 8/17/06 Summary We report on measurements of the LWDA shelter shielding factors. From these measurements we adopt a minimum shielding of 30 dB for frequencies 0.2­3 GHz. On average, the shielding in this frequency range

  3. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for an urban nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-05-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. This study examines shelter-evacuate policies and effectiveness focusing on a 10 kt scenario in Los Angeles. The goal is to provide technical insights that can support development of urban response plans. Results indicate that extended shelter-in-place can offer the most robust protection when high quality shelter exists. Where less effective shelter is available and the fallout radiation intensity level is high, informed evacuation at the appropriate time can substantially reduce the overall dose to personnel. However, uncertainties in the characteristics of the fallout region and in the exit route can make evacuation a risky strategy. Analyses indicate that only a relatively small fraction of the total urban population may experience significant dose reduction benefits from even a well-informed evacuation plan.

  4. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a Chicago nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2011-09-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kt detonation in Chicago. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at selected exemplary points. For many Chicago neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

  5. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a national capital region nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2011-12-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kT detonation in the National Capital Region. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at one exemplary point. For most Washington, DC neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

  6. Analysis of transient heat loss in earth-sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydlowski, R.F.

    1980-09-01

    The two-dimensional transient Fourier heat conduction equation has been solved in cartesian coordinates using an alternating direction implicit finite difference technique for several earth sheltered building configurations. The model has been computer coded and verified by comparing results with data taken from an instrumented conventional residence basement. The present model considers variable soil properties, different types of below grade configurations, and various types, thicknesses, and locations of insulation. The model has been used to analyze the thermal impact of varying levels of interior and exterior insulation on conventional basements, earth bermed walls, and earth covered structures. Local and integrated heat transfer through the exterior building envelope versus time of year are given as functions of construction materials, insulation, and soil geometry. Temperature distributions within the building envelope material and in the surrounding soil are presented versus time of year. An economic analysis is also given to indicate the cost effectiveness of the insulation levels analyzed.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Clinch, J.M.; Davis, F.H.; Hill, L.G.; Lynch, E.P.; Tanzman, E.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft/sup 2/ per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft/sup 2/ per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements.

  8. Earth-sheltered housing: an evaluation of energy-conservation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    The Innovative Structures Program (ISP) began an evaluation of the energy conservation potential of earth-sheltered houses in late 1979. Since that time, several projects have been undertaken as part of this evaluation. The findings of these projects, plus a discussion of the work of others in the field, form the body of this report. Although a comprehensive evaluation of earth-sheltered housing has not been completed, this report presents a compendium of knowledge on the subject. The conclusions are more qualitative than quantitative in nature because of the limited information on which to base projections. The major conclusions to date are as follows: Earth-sheltered houses are capable of very good energy performance. Earth-sheltered houses, as a passive means to conserve energy, perform significantly better in some climatic regins than in others. Earth-sheltered houses are not the optimum passive concept in several major housing growth regions of the country. Earth-sheltered houses, including their land and site improvements, will cost an estimated 10 to 35% more than comparable aboveground houses, and this additional cost may not be justified on a life cycle cost basis, given 1981 market conditions. The use of earth sheltering will probably grow in some parts of the country; however, broad-scale national or regional utilization is not likely to occur in the next 20 to 30 years.

  9. Sustainable shelters for post disaster reconstruction : an integrated approach for reconstruction after the South Asia earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zehra (Zehra Hyder)

    2007-01-01

    A year after the South Asia earthquake, over 60% of the survivors are still vulnerable due to the lack of adequate shelter, the absence of basic facilities for water and sanitation and livelihood restoration. The harsh ...

  10. Appropriate technology water treatment processes for MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vater, Katherine Ann

    2008-01-01

    This thesis recommends the use of horizontal-flow roughing filters to treat spring water of variable annual quality in MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand. The public drinking water system for 45,000 refugees is overseen by ...

  11. Construction details of an earth-sheltered passive solar thermosiphon air house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashelman, R.B.; Hagen, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    Construction details are presented for Sunrise, a passive solar, earth-sheltered house in eastern West Virginia. Particular attention is paid to the thermosiphon air system, as well as structural, waterproofing and insulation details.

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF PRE-SERVICE TRAINING METHODS FOR ANIMAL SHELTER VOLUNTEERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Veronica J.

    2013-08-31

    The current studies aim to develop a cost-effective pre-service training package for animal shelter volunteers. Study 1 compared the cost and effectiveness of three training package variations on student volunteer integrity ...

  13. Earth-sheltered housing: the what and the why. Special report 100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCray, J.W.; Brubaker, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Four basic styles of earth-sheltered structures are illustrated and described. Benefits of earth-sheltered homes are cited, including energy savings potential, protection from natural elements and intruders, privacy, and owner pride. Construction-related considerations discussed include: layout, site, construction materials, moisture control systems, insulation, and building codes. Finally, the aspects of life-cycle costs and insurance costs and financing are discussed briefly. (LEW)

  14. Computer simulation of heat transfer from earth sheltered structures: A comparison of varying levels of earth sheltering in five different climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixel, G.D.

    1980-12-01

    Computer predictions of the HVAC energy consumption for single story office buildings with varying levels of earth-sheltering indicate that significant energy savings are possible with fully-bermed and bermed-and-covered configurations. As shown by the computer analysis, increased earth-sheltering reduced uncontrolled infiltration; improved the thermal performance of the walls, roof, and floor; and located the windows for more favorable passive solar gain. For example, 50% reductions in winter heating energy for Boston occurred with the fully-bermed and the bermed-and-covered configuration. Earth-sheltering also significantly reduced the predicted peak heating and cooling loads. The Boston heating season showed the most favorable response with the fully-covered office building having a peak heating load only 35% of that for the above-grade configuration. In Manila the predicted peak cooling load for the fully-covered building is 63% of that for the slab-on-grade configuration. Details of the impact of earth-sheltering on the single story office building model are presented for each of the five locations.

  15. Needs assessment for remote systems technology at the Chornobyl Unit 4 shelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carteret, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Holliday, M.A.; Jones, E.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    The accident at Chornobyl Unit 4 on April 26, 1986, resulted in a series of unprecedented scientific and technical challenges. The reactor building was damaged extensively. Following the accident, immediate action was needed to seal off the gaping crater created by the accident, which was a continuing source of airborne contamination. Under extreme conditions, a structure called the {open_quotes}Shelter{close_quotes} was built over the remains of the reactor building. The Shelter, which was quickly completed in November 1986, was meant to provide immediate but temporary containment. Now, 11 years later, there are significant concerns about its structural integrity and projected life expectancy. The United States and other participating G-7 countries are supporting nuclear safety upgrade efforts in Eastern Europe with a primary focus on placing the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Unit 4 Shelter in a stable and environmentally acceptable condition. Application of remote systems technologies will play an important part in achieving the goals of this program. The G-7 nations have agreed to support these efforts, including the identification and development of remote system technologies for fuel removal. However at this time they have taken a firm stance against funding actual fuel removal activities. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology requested that a needs assessment be performed to evaluate the requirements for applying remote systems, including robotics, at the Shelter. This document is intended to be used to identify remote systems needs and requirements at the Shelter and to provide general information on the conditions in the Shelter that could impact the use of remote systems. This document is intended as a source of information to assist those who will be implementing the Shelter Implementation Plan tasks. The document provides background information and general guidance on the application of remote systems.

  16. Improved structural systems for earth sheltered housing. Structural supplement to the design program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behr, R.

    1981-10-01

    Additional engineering information is provided with regard to the structural analysis and design of thin shell concrete structures. The design program has tentatively demonstrated the overall architectural and marketing feasibility of curved, thin shell structural systems for earth sheltered housing. This supplement will address the structural feasibility question by presenting a complete manual analysis and structural design of an earth sheltered dome/tension ring/wall structural system, and also by presenting the results of a parametric sensitivity study of the dome/ring/wall configuration with respect to variations in span and rise for a three foot soil loading condition. Double curvature dome configurations are emphasized in this structural supplement because their analysis is not extensively addressed in earth sheltered housing literature.

  17. Earth sheltering: the form of energy and the energy of form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenette, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Winners in a national competition illustrate the state of the art in earth-sheltered construction. The winners were chosen from student and professional entries in four categories: single-family residential, multi-family residential, non-residential, and research. The book presents architectural details, including construction plans, floor plans, landscaping ideas, and photographs of the 50 examples. The three research examples include a regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate, biotechnical earth-support systems, and evaluation of free-span earth-sheltered structure and its method of production. 199 figures. (DCK)

  18. Applying genetic algorithms to the location allocation of shelter sites Xiang Li, Hsiang-te Kung, Jerry Bartholomew, Esra Ozdenerol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang

    Applying genetic algorithms to the location allocation of shelter sites Xiang Li, Hsiang-te Kung-specific genetic algorithm is proposed and applied to the location allocation of 50 shelter centers in Shelby are encoded as individuals of a chromosome. A population-based fitness function is defined to examine each

  19. Wind Sheltering of a Lake by a Tree Canopy or Bluff Topography Corey D. Markfort1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porté-Agel, Fernando

    1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Wind Sheltering of a Lake by a Tree Canopy or Bluff, Minnesota, USA. 3 National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics (NCED), Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA Abstract A model is developed to quantify the wind sheltering of a lake by a tree canopy or a bluff

  20. GIS representation and assessment of water distribution system for Mae La Temporary Shelter, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding, Mary Pierce

    2008-01-01

    ArcGIS is used to analyze water access in Mae La, Thailand, home to 45,000 residents living as refugees in a temporary camp. Drinking water for the shelter is supplied at public tap stands while water for hygienic purposes ...

  1. The consumer's guide to earth sheltered housing: A step-by-step workbook for prospective owners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollwagen, M.

    1985-01-01

    Earth sheltered homes have captured the imagination of many homeowners seeking the cost and energy savings features they offer. This book provides the discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of such homes and includes illustrations showing interiors and exteriors with advise to owners on dealine with architects and contractors.

  2. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  3. The future potential of earth sheltered structures: cost, acceptability and planning considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, R.L.; Carmody, J.

    1980-12-01

    Earth sheltered structures have received an increasing amount of attention over the past few years. This has been primarily due to their typically low requirements for both heating and cooling energy. Their potential; however, not only lies in their energy performance but also in their ability to deal with a number of planning and design issues that must be faced in many locations. These issues include: noise protection, storm protection, saving a usable land area above the building and providing a minimum impact on the environment and ecology of a site. Against this promising potential must be weighed the factors which have made such structures undesirable from a designer's and user's point of view in the past. In addition, there are also a few new constraints which have arisen as the use of this building form has grown. This paper examines these issues and discusses the current acceptability and possible future potential of earth sheltered structures.

  4. Step-by-step cost-estimation guide for residential earth-shelter construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Designers and builders of earth-sheltered structures will find this guide to be a basic outline for estimating construction costs. It considers, besides the basic materials and costs of any construction project, the regional, experience, and other variables that affect underground construction costs. The guide format permits the user to tally individual estimates and derive a simple cost per square foot. Space is also provided to tally actual costs for comparison. (DCK)

  5. Earth sheltered bee wintering and solar honey house. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The construction and operation of an indoor wintering facility and a passive solar honey house are discussed. Goals for the project included both energy savings and financial savings for the beekeeping industry. The underground winter shelter provided a control temperature of approximately 46/sup 0/F in order to decrease both mortality rates and honey consumption rates of the bees. Three hundred square feet of glazing combined with wall insulation maintained comfortable work space temperatures for the ground level storage of honey. (BCS)

  6. Attributes of Indoor Environmental Quality to Earth-sheltered Building Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheta, S.

    2010-01-01

    , while the second ranking was indoor radon (Huelman, 2004, pp. 10-21). Indoor environmental quality problems in earth sheltered buildings can take many forms but the main way to look at problems is to remember the three ?P?s? of indoor....), carbon monoxide and other combustion products, radon, pesticides, and household chemicals (Barcik, 2005, pp. 30-1). There are three basic aspects of indoor environmental quality that will be covered in this article?the sources of indoor air...

  7. The Paleoindian skeletal material from Horn Shelter, Number 2, in central Texas: an analysis and perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Diane Elizabeth

    1986-01-01

    individuals to I) more recent Texas aboriginal populations and 2) a temporal sample comprised of the other generally accepted Paleoindian skeletons in North America . In the regional comparison, the question asked is simply, are the Horn individuals... in order to establish a biological framework within which to interpret Pal eoi ndi an skeletal material . Finally, Chapter VII compares the Horn Shelter individuals to I) more recent Texas aboriginal populations and 2) a temporal sample comprised...

  8. Consumer attitudes concerning construction features of an earth-sheltered dwelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKown, C. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock); Stewart, K.K.

    1980-01-01

    Consumer responses to construction features of earth-sheltered houses were collected from a volunteer sampling of visitors to an ''open house'' in South Carolina. Consumers reported they had not expected the exposed-front elevation, that skylights are needed in some of the darker areas, and that they were favorably impressed with the solar heating for space and water, the energy efficiency, and the low cost of construction and utilities. Savings of $3000 in initial costs and $300 in annual utility costs were specified as requirements for purchase by the majority. Responses were generally favorable, although only five percent had visted an earth-insulated or underground home before.

  9. Earth sheltered homes plans and designs: Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, D.; Ellison, T.; Sterling, R.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed construction information, plans, and energy data for 23 successful earth-sheltered homes throughout the US and Europe illustrate that such homes can be aesthetically pleasing as well as ecologically sound. Gross area, materials for construction, type of earth cover, method of insulation, and waterproofing techniques are all included in data sheets and charts that accompany a full description of each house. Comprehensive plans and over 250 photographs of both interior and exterior views demonstrate how attractive and comfortable the houses can be.

  10. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers IslandShelter Island NY

  11. Sheltering in Place | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-NicholasReports andRobert(SC) ShapeSheltering in

  12. Instrumented performance study of a passive solar heated earth sheltered residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarnell, R.C.; Yarnell, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a one year effort to gather performance data on an earth sheltered, passive solar house located in Carson City, Nevada. Automatic equipment logged insolation and temperature data for a one (1) year period commencing shortly after completion of construction of the structure and its occupancy by the owners. The use of a recording micrologger reflects an effort to obtain unbiased, factual data on the performance of the house and to reduce the impact of subjective perceptions of the occupants' comfort on the report. Raw data was gathered continuously. A pyranometer measured the amount of whole sky solar radiation. Results were recorded as Btu's per square foot. Thermistors measured temperatures of: (a) outdoor ambient air, (b) indoor living room ambient air, (c) indoor greenhouse ambient air, (d) dining room mass wall, (e) greenhouse mass wall, (f) perimeter earth-sheltered wall, and (g) solar heated DHW storage tank. An event counter recorded user operated insulating adjustments (raising and lowering of insulating of curtains) and auxiliary heating (building or stoking a fire in the wood burning stove).

  13. Process optimization of solid rad waste management at the Shelter object transformation to the ecologically safety system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batiy, V.G.; Stojanov, A.I. [Institute for Safety Problems of NPP of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Chornobyl (Ukraine); Schmieman, E. [Battelle Memorial Institute (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Methodological approach of optimization of schemes of solid radwaste management of the Object Shelter (Shelter) and ChNPP industrial site during transformation to the ecologically safe system was developed. On the basis of the conducted models researches the ALARA-analysis was carried out for the choice of optimum variant of schemes and technologies of solid radwaste management. The criteria of choice of optimum schemes, which are directed on optimization of doses and financial expenses, minimization of amount of the formed radwaste etc, were developed for realization of this ALARA-analysis. (authors)

  14. Induced Churn as Shelter from Routing-Table Poisoning Tyson Condie, Varun Kacholia, Sriram Sankararaman, Joseph M. Hellerstein, Petros Maniatis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Induced Churn as Shelter from Routing-Table Poisoning Tyson Condie, Varun Kacholia, Sriram. In this paper we address routing-table poisoning attacks against structured overlays, in which adversaries to redi- rect an outgoing link to her, thereby poisoning its routing table. All lookups routed via

  15. Induced Churn as Shelter from Routing-Table Poisoning Tyson Condie, Varun Kacholia, Sriram Sankararaman, Joseph M. Hellerstein, Petros Maniatis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellerstein, Joseph M.

    Induced Churn as Shelter from Routing-Table Poisoning Tyson Condie, Varun Kacholia, Sriram, induced churn, utilizes periodic routing-table re- sets, unpredictable identifier changes, and a rate limit on routing-table updates. Induced churn leaves adversaries at the mercy of chance: they have

  16. An analysis of different insulation strategies for earth-sheltered buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forowicz, T.Z. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Dept. of Architecture; [Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Fundamental Technological Research; [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Center for Energy Management

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of the energy performance of various insulation configurations for earth-sheltered buildings. It discusses the effectiveness of each insulation configuration in reducing the heating and cooling load. The long-term unsteady thermal processes between the building and the surrounding soil are considered. The mathematical model of the problem consists of a heat conduction equation with appropriate boundary and initial conditions. The variations in outside air temperature are driven by a harmonic function. The set of algebraic equations obtained by balancing the elementary heat flows into control elements is solved by an explicit scheme. The simulation program enables a two-dimensional thermal analysis in two cross sections for an underground building of any size situated at any depth. It predicts the heat flow between the building and the surrounding soil and through the ground`s surface. Internal building surface and soil temperatures are also calculated.

  17. Orme School Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpen EnergyPre-Tax Charge

  18. Architectural Design Factors Of Domestic Violence Shelters That Affect Outcomes For Female Domestic Violence Victims: A Naturalistic Inquiry To Establish Grounded Theory For Future Research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestwood, Laura E.

    2011-08-08

    Designing domestic violence shelters for women must be considered from a feminist perspective, inclusive of theories of embodiment, as the female victim's emotional state (mind) is a critical component in determining her overall state (i.e., level...

  19. Biogas from refuse via an earth-sheltered passive solar digester. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    As originally conceived, the project involved the design, construction and operation of a test-scale refuse digestion system and alternative energy technology, as an integral component of a planned comprehensive waste management system based on the concept of recycling and resource recovery. Specific technologies employed in the digestion system included aerobic composting and anaerobic fermentation. System inputs included non-recycleable organic refuse (paper, food wastes, etc.) and septage (septic tank sludge), both of which represent disposal problems for many North American communities, and heat. Anticipated system outputs were biogas (50 to 60% methane), a premium fuel, and compostable sludge, a potential soil amendment-fertilizer. Projected net energy output was enhanced by incorporating biological feedstock preheating, earth sheltering, passive solar heating, and sludge heat recovery into the project design. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the economic and environmental viability of this system versus competing waste-to-energy technologies. Due primarily to institutional barriers and related factors, the project did not progress to the point of enabling the stated purpose to be demonstrated.

  20. Passive energy design and habitability aspects of earth-sheltered housing in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.; Weber, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    Identified earth-sheltered houses in Oklahoma were examined through a detailed questionnaire during the first phase of a long-range funded project. Preliminary results of energy and habitability aspects are presented here. Saving energy is reported to be the primary incentive for building such structures. Habitability aspects have generally not received much study until recently. The results indicate that although a majority of the respondents feel their energy-savings expectations have been reached, over 40% feel that their energy consumption is much higher than they expected. Preliminary energy performance studies indicate that in a majority of the projects, the potential thermal mass of the structure has been decoupled by insulation and furred interior surface treatments. This situation can lead to a significant reduction in the amount of free earth cooling available during the summer months. Other factors, not yet studied, undoubtedly contribute additional adverse effects. The substantial energy savings that are realized have been achieved with little decrease, and often an increase, in comfort and habitability aspects. Most occupants are particularly satisfied with the safety of the structure and the arrangement of the rooms, which in most cases were custom designed by or for the occupants. However, daylighting and privacy of family members, for example, were not as highly rated. A number of other parameters are identified from the survey that present implications for design enhancement in this contemporary type of residential structure. 14 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  1. Financing earth-sheltered housing: a report on a project to facilitate the loan process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The problem of financing innovative energy-conserving dwellings is exacerbated by two key factors. The first is that borrowers (potential homebuilders) do not understand the mortgage process and needs of the lenders and are therefore unable to communicate effectively the various issues of interest to lenders. The second is that lenders do not have a familiarity with the concept and are therefore unable to evaluate the potential marketability should the borrower default. This situation is compounded by the fact that there are, in general, few or no earth-sheltered comparables on which to verify the market value. This borrower's guide is presented to explore the situation and with the help of financial agencies, to develop means to mitigate the problems. Information is presented on options available for short- and long-term financing; lenders' obligations and concerns; criteria lenders' use in deciding eligibility for a loan; shopping for a lending institution; and making the presentation to a lending institution for an earth-covered building. (MCW)

  2. ICUSESS '92: 5th Int. Conference on Underground Space and Earth Sheltered. Structures. August 2--7, 1992 The use of rock mass classification systems in assessing the long term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    ICUSESS '92: 5th Int. Conference on Underground Space and Earth Sheltered. Structures. August 2;ICUSESS '92: 5th Int. Conference on Underground Space and Earth Sheltered. Structures. August 2--7, 1992 2 openings. H.R.G.K. Hack and R.F. Bekendam1 ITC (Int. Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences

  3. CHAPTER 6: HOUSING AND FENCING Shelter for most 4-H horses should provide protection from hot sun, wind or stormy weather. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    be kept clean. Listed below are some standard dimensions. Your stable or shelter may not fit the listed should have access to clean water at all times, either automatic waterers or buckets. Hang water buckets Height 8' minimum Doors 4' wide x 8' high Hay Manger 28" sides, 38" high top edge Grain Box 24" to 30

  4. Simulation-based design of energy management system with storage battery for a refugee shelter in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaji, K.; Zhang, J.; Horie, H.; Tanaka, K. [Department of Technology Management for Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Akimoto, H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-10

    Since the massive earthquake hit eastern Japan in March, 2011, our team has participated in the recovery planning for Kesen Association, which is a group of cities in northeastern Japan. As one of our proposals for the recovery planning for the community, we are designing energy management system with renewable energy (RE) and storage batteries. Some public facilities in the area have been used as refugee shelters, but refugees had to put up with life without electricity for a while after the disaster. If RE generator and storage batteries are introduced into the facilities, it is possible to provide refugees with electricity. In this study, the sizes of photovoltaic (PV) appliances and storage batteries to be introduced into one public facility are optimized. The optimization is based on simulation, in which electric energy is managed by charge and discharge of storage battery.

  5. Data from one-, two-, and three-dimensional temperature fields in the soil surrounding an earth-sheltered house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bligh, T.P.; Knoth, T.P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents data from one-, two-, and three-dimensional temperature fields in the soil surrounding an earth-sheltered house. The construction and installation of the temperature sensors is discussed, and the sources of error are evaluated. The precision of the measured temperatures is shown to be + or - 0.12/sup 0/C. Twenty-four hours of data from the one-dimensional temperature field in the roof soil are presented in the form of tautochrones. Data from cross-sections of the two- and three-dimensional temperature fields are presented as isotherms taken at approximately one-month intervals during winter and spring. The data show that extended roof insulation impedes heat flow to the ground surface in winter but allows heat to flow to the cool soil depths in summer.

  6. Surgical PediatricS ObStetricS Public health SchOOl nurSe internatiOnal health agencieS addictiOnS Shelter agencieS lOng-term care rehabilitatiOn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    OnS Shelter agencieS lOng-term care rehabilitatiOn nurSe educatOr rural and remOte nurSing nOn-PrOfit SectOr f

  7. Barriers and incentives to the adoption of innovative, energy-efficient housing: Passive and active solar and earth-sheltered

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine intermediaries perceptions of barriers and incentives to innovative, energy-efficient housing in Iowa. Data were collected by two surveys. The questionnaire for the first survey collected data from 102 communities. The second questionnaire surveyed housing intermediaries drawn from the 102 communities included in the first survey. The sample consisted of 481 builders, building inspectors, realtors, lenders, and solar suppliers. Intermediary groups differed in their perceptions of barriers and incentives to innovative, energy-efficient housing. Significant differences were found among the intermediaries for whether state-mandated solar standards would reduce the risk of inspection of solar-energy houses and whether risky resale potential acts as a barrier to building solar energy housing. The major barriers were the first costs associated with building active solar and earth-sheltered housing and the lack of skills among subcontractors to build these types. There was not significant relationship between rate of adoption among communities and their location in the state. There was, however, a significant relationship between category of building official and rate of adoption among communities.

  8. A trigger-based middleware cache for ORMs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Priya

    Caching is an important technique in scaling storage for high-traffic web applications. Usually, building caching mechanisms involves significant effort from the application developer to maintain and invalidate data in the ...

  9. Family Shelter Planning. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Laura J.; Riney, Bobye J.

    1964-01-01

    , standard water purification methods such as (1) boil- ing, (2) chlorination, (3) purification tab- lets or (4) iodine drops. 8 SANITATION Tightly ,covered cans for garbage (wrap garbage in newspaper before putting in can). Human waste... Sanitation area located near entrance for dis- posal ease. Food and water storage area located above and below food preparatior counter for convenience to serving table. HINGED WALL TABLE Size, 27" x 48" attached to wall so that it can be raised when...

  10. Searching for shelter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Frederick Martin

    1997-01-01

    Architecture is born out of a need for the re-definition and intensification of t he existing physical landscape. An architects services respond and re-define culture and can never be legitimized by the want of form. ...

  11. Smoking Shelters FREQUENT DESTINATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    Sideling (SDL) B6 Pocomoke (POC) B6 Manokin (MAN) B6 Patuxent (PTX) C6 Elk (ELK) C6 Deep Creek (DPC) C6 Casselman (CAS) C6 Breton (BRE) C6 West Hill Apartments Severn (SEV) C5 Chester (CHS) C4 Wye (WYE) C4 PLANT TERRACE APARTMENTS HILLSIDE APARTMENTS WEST HILL APARTMENTS CHILD CARE CENTER ERICKSON HALL HARBOR

  12. Surgical PediatricS ObStetricS Public health SchOOl nurSe internatiOnal health agencieS addictiOnS Shelter agencieS lOng-term care rehabilitatiOn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Surgical PediatricS ObStetricS Public health SchOOl nurSe internatiOnal health agencieS addictiOrenSicS flight nurSe OccuPatiOnal health nOrthern nurSing gOvernment nurSing OfficerS Surgical PediatricS ObOnS Shelter agencieS lOng-term care rehabilitatiOn nurSe educatOr rural and remOte nurSing nOn-PrOfit SectOr f

  13. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummaryDIST OF COLUMBIANorthSEP PADepartmentSENIORThesponsors

  14. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThisSF424RRBudget3YearPolicy.pdf MoreSmart

  15. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMay 13, 2015reports issued byForms available in MS

  16. MATH Evacuation and Shelter Procedures Quicksheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly Beranger

    2013-08-14

    In the event that there is an active shooter, intruder, or chemical spill, or other condition requiring you to ... outside air, or a civil disturbance. When you hear the

  17. Earth shelter performance and evaluation proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Papers from 16 states, plus New South Wales, Australia, Alberta, Canada, and the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were presented in the conference. About one-third of the papers are authored by architects, nearly one-half by engineers, and the remainder are mainly by building contractors. Slightly over half of the authors are associated with universities, of which 13 are represented. The scale of the projects discussed varies from domestic, to commercial, to institutional; with an increased emphasis on passive solar inputs and earth cooling. Of the 32 papers presented, 19 were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (JMT)

  18. Proceedings: earth sheltered building design innovations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts are prepared for 22 papers presented at the conference. One paper has previously appeared in the appropriate DOE Energy Data Base. (MCW)

  19. Effectiveness of Urban Shelter-in-Place. II: Residential Districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, W.R.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Price, P.N.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    US EPA, 2006. Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres User’as ALOHA (Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres), assumes

  20. Earth shelter 2. 1979-1980 USC Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts are prepared for 22 papers presented at the conference and exhibition. One paper had previously appeared in the appropriate DOE Energy Data Base. (MCW)

  1. Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Arizona and the House of Refuge Sunnyslope are partnering to install solar hot water systems at five Phoenix-area housing sites for homeless men.

  2. Earth-sheltered industrial utility park. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The potential to develop the Cumberland (Wisconsin) industrial park site using earth-integrated techniques is discussed. The concept feasibility study concerned the site, the land-use plan, and building types. An assessment of energy use in the Cumberland community for 1979 and 1980 was made by compiling sales data from the various suppliers of gasoline, diesel, electricity, natural gas, and other fuels. A resource and technology assessment of biomass feedstocks for a possible community scale bioenergy facility was made. Details of each element of the study are presented and conclusions are summarized. (MCW)

  3. Earth-sheltered compromise home saves on heating, cooling costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankhauser, T.

    1985-02-01

    Building a home into the side of a hill to take advantage of the earth's temperature-neutralizing qualities and facing it to the south will reduce heating and cooling costs. A home in North Dakota based on these principles has never had two unheated rooms freeze and needs no air conditioning. Mutli-zoned thermostats are located in the south-facing rooms. Other features are a five-foot overhang, lower ceilings, aluminum foil deflectors beneath carpets and above the plasterboard in the ceiling, and extra insulation. By eliminating an earth covering that would require sturdier support, construction costs were competitive with regular frame construction.

  4. Earth sheltered industrial/utility park. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    A proposed industrial park in Cumberland, Wisconsin is discussed. Planners identified 4 land use elements for the site. A concept feasibility study for the earth-covered industrial park, an analysis of energy flows within the Cumberland community, and a resource and technology assessment of biomass feedstocks for a possible community scale bioenergy facility are discussed. (MCW)

  5. Thermal performance of an earth-sheltered passive solar residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaVigne, A.B. (Puget Sound Power and Light Co., Bellevue, WA); Schuldt, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of the measured thermal performance of a direct gain, passive solar residence in the Pacific Northwest. The east, west, and north exterior walls of the house are bermed to within 12 inches (30 cm) of the ceiling; sliding interior insulated panels cover the double glazed, south facing windows when appropriate. The cost of the house construction was kept modest.

  6. Shelter Island Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low EmissionTianhongKansas:Information GmbH

  7. Shelter Island, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low EmissionTianhongKansas:Information GmbH(Redirected from

  8. Shelter Island, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low EmissionTianhongKansas:Information GmbH(Redirected

  9. Rapid Deployment Shelter System | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2 RadiometerRafael L.Ralph(MeVcm²/mg)Rapid

  10. Rapid Deployment Shelter System, Application | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2 RadiometerRafael

  11. Florida's Emergency Shelters Go Solar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,EnergyFinancingWIPPFixedFlorida

  12. Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of Energy Facilities By

  13. Employee Giving Campaign proceeds will help support animal shelters and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio Segrè AboutAbout Usother

  14. Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAboutReubenPress ReleasesEducational

  15. Page 192 Music Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog DirectOr, schOOl Of perfOrming arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Palmer, Musicology Jeff Langley, American Music History Laxmi G. Tewari, Ethnomusicology Performing Ensembles - Vocal Bob Worth, Chamber Singers, Bach Choir Laxmi G. Tewari, Indian Singing Ensemble Lynne

  16. 410 VOLUME 47 | NUMBER 4 | APRIL 2015 Nature GeNetics l e t t e r s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbett, David S.

    s Toelucidatethegeneticbasesofmycorrhizallifestyle evolution,wesequencednewfungalgenomes,including13 ectomycorrhizal(ECM),orchid(ORM)andericoid(ERM ECM asso- ciations but also those with ERM and ORM mycorrhizae13. It is not known whether

  17. Proceedings TFPIE 2015: the Fourth International Workshop on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    , they developed the Middle- sex Robotic plaTfOrm (MIRTO), an open-source platform built using Raspberry Pi

  18. Picking up the pieces : transitional shelters for disaster relief in the northern mountainous regions of Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Weifeng Victoria

    2006-01-01

    This thesis seeks to tackle a complex problem - disaster housing relief - from the angle of architecture design discipline and attempts to find a logical approach to solve such a problem via an in depth examination of a ...

  19. Sheltering in place : the limits of integrative bargaining following industrial accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macey, Gregg P

    2007-01-01

    This study grew out of an interest in environmental justice and the unique problems faced by neighborhoods located near petrochemical facilities. It also focuses on negotiation theory and how it can be applied under an ...

  20. "Shelter within my reach" : medium rise apartment housing for the middle income group in Karachi, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmood, Saman, 1972-

    1999-01-01

    This thesis identifies the project development processes of medium rise (five storied or less) apartment housing built by the private formal sector, catering to the middle income groups in Karachi, Pakistan. Middle income ...

  1. Resilience in Pre-Columbian Caribbean House-Building: Dialogue Between Archaeology and Humanitarian Shelter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samson, A. V. M.; Crawford, C. A.; Hoogland, M. L. P.; Hofman, C. L.

    2015-04-23

    The diversity of island landscapes across the Caribbean archipel- ago is unified by a shared maritime climate, diurnal variation in wind and temperature, and periodic dramatic climatic and seismic events.Hurricanes, tropical storms, tsunamis and to a less... ), and Trinidad and Tobago and the south- ern offshore islands because they are south of the common hurricane boundary. The analysis is supplemented with a number of incomplete domestic structures from other sites 2 Carlson 2007; Curet 1992; Delpuech et al. 1997...

  2. Cyclone shelters and cyclone resilient design in coastal areas of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Zheng, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of those countries that are most vulnerable to tropical cyclones. In recent decades, cyclone mitigations by the Government of Bangladesh and international organizations have greatly increased the coastal ...

  3. The feasibility of using paperboard as a basic material for housing shelters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roscoe Paul

    1965-01-01

    become economically or socially undesirable. Perhaps we should take another look at structural durability as one of the major factors in evaluating a building. It is the conviction of the author that light weight, non-permanent, very low cost structures...

  4. Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Archive in a Hostile World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    which would store: ­ atmospheric model outputs (wind data), ­ results generated by the hydrodynamic describes the design and implementation process for a data archive, which was required for a coastal modelling project. The construction of the archive is described in detail, from its design through

  5. The evolution of shelter: ecology and ethology of chimpanzee nest building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Fiona Anne

    2011-11-08

    characteristics of chimpanzee nests, nesting trees, nest shape, and architecture in two savanna-dwelling populations on opposite sides of Africa: Fongoli, Senegal, and Issa, Tanzania. Savanna habitats are the most extreme habitats in which chimpanzees survive...

  6. Teachers as a Context of Reception for Immigrant Youth: Adaptations in "Sheltered" and "Mainstream" Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabach, Dafney Blanca

    2009-01-01

    to learn the stuff. Classroom management is just not even anclassroom. Issues with classroom management were apparentpacing, or classroom management. While Ms. Mueller’s classes

  7. Review: Shadow and Shelter: The Swamp in Southern Culture by Anthony Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piselli, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    for academic and larger public libraries. Kathy Piselli,Atlanta Fulton Public Library, One Margaret Mitchell SqPiselli Atlanta-Fulton Public Library, USA Anthony Wilson.

  8. Potential of earth-sheltered and underground space: today's resource for tomorrow's space and energy viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holthusen, T.L. (ed.)

    1981-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for forty-one papers presented at the meeting. One paper had previously appeared in the appropriate data bases. Thirty-seven abstracts will appear in the Energy Analysis for Policy Abstracts. (MCW)

  9. Detailed thermal performance measurements and cost effectiveness of earth-sheltered construction: a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1985-09-01

    Earth-covering, solar gain, and massive construction are the design concepts successfully blended to produce an energy-efficient, durable, and comfortable building. Twenty-four-hour-quiet sleeping quarters and quality office space were the first design objectives of this building, these were successfully accomplished. The data acquisition system and a unique energy-balance analysis documents the thermal performance of each envelope component. Since the building's typical number of occupants, size, and internal electric loads are similar to those of a large residential building, the energy-performance data are extended to the residential marketplace. First-cost estimates for the whole building, earth-covered roof, and bermed wall are used with the detailed measured energy-use data to estimate cost effectiveness using residential economics criteria, such as 3% discount rate and 30-year life. The results from this analysis confirm the fact that earth, sun, and mass can save substantial amounts of annual and peak energy demand. However, further construction cost reductions are needed to produce more favorable cost effectiveness in the residential market arena. The overall thermal conductance value of this building is lower than the average values from the 300 low-energy residences as reported in the Building Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis, Part A (BECA-A), data base. However, the balance point of this building, with mechanical ventilation to ensure about 0.5 air change per hour, is substantially higher than those reported for low-energy residential buildings. This suggests that most of the energy-efficient homes either have an air-to-air heat exchanger or infiltration levels far below the generally accepted 0.5 air change per hour to ensure healthy indoor air quality. Reflective insulating blinds were installed in this building and have enhanced the daylighting and usability of the building. 9 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Passive solar/earth sheltered office/dormitory cooling season thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.

    1984-01-01

    Continuous detailed hourly thermal performance measurements have been taken since February 1982 in and around an occupied, underground, 4000 ft/sup 2/ office/dormitory building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This building has a number of energy saving features which have been analyzed relative to their performance in a southeastern US climate and with respect to overall commercial building performance. This analysis documents cooling season performance, as well as effects of earth contact, interior thermal mass, an economizer cycle and interface of an efficient building envelope with a central three-ton heat pump. The Joint Institute Dormitory obtains a cooling energy savings of about 30% compared with an energy-efficient, above-grade structure and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The proper installation of the overhand, interior thermal mass, massive supply duct system, and earth contact team up to prevent summertime overheating. From May through September, this building cost a total of $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate 24 hours per day. Besides thermal performance of the building envelope, extensive comfort data was taken illustrating that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time according to the PMV measurements.

  11. Cooling season performance of an earth-sheltered office/dormitory building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Detailed hourly measurements taken in and around an underground office-dormitory building for two summers document energy savings; whole building-component interface problems; and specific cooling contributions from earth contact, interior thermal mass, and an economizer. The Joint Institute Dormitory (JID) saves about 30% compared with well-built above-grade buildings in a climate typical of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The detailed measurements, which include extensive thermal comfort data, indicate that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time. The thermal performance measurements and analysis determine that the peak cooling requirement of this building is 50% less than that of well-built above-grade structures, permitting a cost savings on installed cooling capacity. The dominant building components contributing to the good thermal performance are the structural thermal mass, the earth-covered roof, and the earth contact provided by the bermed walls and slab floor. The 372-m/sup 2/ (4000 gross ft/sup 2/) building used about $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate from May through September. Eliminating a number of building design and construction anomalies could improve the whole-building performance and reduce the seasonal cooling cost another $85. Close examination of the thermal performance of this building revealed that a very efficient heat pump and thermally sound envelope do not necessarily produce otpimum performance without careful attention given to component interface details. 8 references, 24 figures, 12 tables.

  12. Underground and earth sheltered food storage: historical, geographic, and economic considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunkel, F.V.

    1985-01-01

    Storage structures now used for bulk grain and beans have been derived from a combination of scientific experiments and tradition. Recent generations of US farmers have grown up with the understanding that grain is best stored in round metal bins or wooden cribs aboveground. It is generally thought that natural wind movements in the crib structures and forced air flow from aeration fans in metal bins will keep grain and beans safe, i.e., free of moisture accumulation and the resulting insect and fungal growth, and protected from germination, all of which deteriorate the commodity. North American farmers further believe that the low temperature of northern winters combined with careful use of aerating fans will keep the grain dry or beans safe (less than 14% moisture content) for years of storage. Traditional forms of grain and bean storage in other parts of the world have evolved differently. With the exception of North America, the people of every continent in the world have developed underground structures for long-term storage of food. A review of the varieties of underground structures that have evolved throughout the world, and research related to underground storage of grain and beans is presented.

  13. Smart Shelter: A Sustainable Power System Design Using Micro-Energy Harvesting Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilton, Benjamin D

    2013-09-25

    from temperature differences in materials ? Radio-frequency (RF) Energy: Energy from ambient RF waves Recent technological breakthroughs have enabled the efficient conversion of these free forms of energy into electrical power [4]. Each energy... of power were unable to be extracted from energy harvesting due to the low conversion efficiency. On the power management side, existing power management devices required large amounts of power to operate. A large percentage of the generated electrical...

  14. Teachers as a Context of Reception for Immigrant Youth: Adaptations in "Sheltered" and "Mainstream" Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabach, Dafney Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Ms. Benavides Science Mr. Montero Science Irish Americanquickly burnt out. Mr. Montero, a self-identified Mexican-3/28/08) Unless Mr. Montero actively complained, the default

  15. MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOysterRelianceSandySeagenOrkney <

  16. ORISE: Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency | How ORISE is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE TheForensic ScienceHowNews ReleasesdiseaseOakMaking a

  17. E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sectorfor $1.14Dynein Motor

  18. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  19. Natural History and Leaf Shelter Construction of the Asian Rice Leptispa Beetle Leptispa pygmaea Baly (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae: Leptispini)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prathapan, Kaniyarikkal Divakaran; Chaboo, Caroline S.; Karthikeyan, Kolandaivelu

    2009-01-15

    1909, Maulik 1919, Khanvilkar et al. 1983, Dalvi et al. 1985a, Dale 1994, Karthikeyan 2007). Anand (1984 1986 1989) also indicated L. pygmaea as a pest of sweet potato (Convolvulaceae: Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) and sugarcane (Poaceae: Saccharum... 1909, Maulik 1919, Khanvilkar et al. 1983, Dalvi et al. 1985a, Dale 1994, Karthikeyan 2007). Anand (1984 1986 1989) also indicated L. pygmaea as a pest of sweet potato (Convolvulaceae: Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) and sugarcane (Poaceae: Saccharum...

  20. Food, Carvings and Shelter: The Adoption and Appropriation of Information and Communication Technologies in Tanzanian Micro and Small Enterprises 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molony, Thomas S J

    African countries have recently experienced an extraordinary and largely unanticipated boom in the uptake of mobile phones, and increasing rates of access to the internet. This thesis investigates how and why these ...

  1. Building & Enhancing Interorganizational Relationships for Disaster Preparedness and Response Capacity: a Study of Community-based Organizations Serving Vulnerable Populations: a Focus on the Homeless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Donata Christiane

    2012-01-01

    e.g. food, water, shelter, hot meals), Functional Needs (Food Water Shelter/Housing Sanitation Clothing Protection* Functional

  2. Prevalence of Salmonella sp. in domestic cats in an animal shelter and the comparison of culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques as diagnostic tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Melinda J.

    2004-11-15

    &M University. 3. Carli, K., C. Unal, V. Caner, and A. Eyigor. 2001. Detection of Salmonellae in chicken feces by a combination of tetrathionate broth enrichment, capillary PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis. J. Clinic...

  3. Analysis of the physical and mechanical properties of the pine nut as criteria in the design of a pine nut shelter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menchaca Lara, Jesus

    1996-01-01

    damage the nuts and reduce value of the product. Improved mechanical shelling techniques are needed to provide a quality product at reasonable prices. The overall goal of this work was to develop information to establish design criteria for applying...

  4. Society for Tropical Ecology | Gesellschaft fr Tropenkologie e.V. COupLINg sOCIO-eCONOmIC fACTOrs AND eCO-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    understanding of the eco-hydrological processes of a catchment. sessION 4-O2 - geOINfOrmATICs fOr TrOpICAL e

  5. Postmenopausal estrogen and progestin effects on the serum proteome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    PGLYRP2 ORM2 C4BPA CFHR1 CFB C8A C4BPB PGLYRP1 CFHR5 MASP2MCAM NOV TFF2 ECM1 IGFBP4 CFB Lymphatic vessel endothelial

  6. THE MECHANISM OF INTRAGRANULAR MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machiels, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    of Brine Inclusions in a Salt Repository", ORM. -5526 (JulyOF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT A.J. Machiels, S. Yagnik, D.R.OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT by A.J. Machiels S. Yagnik D.R.

  7. J,'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ii tio 0 opennessin :, ublic. In ed, information hat performed rovided for ible for r-mining their ', orming ents. ,A' hese the, . 1 Co. site and t necessary : is site, we....

  8. John Widdicombeżs contribution to respiratory physiology and cough: reminiscences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Kian Fan; Nadel, Jay A; Fontana, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    But urge-to-cough is perplexing. I await confirmation orM, Widdicombe J: Fog-induced cough with impaired respiratoryJ: Desensitization of the cough reflex by exercise and

  9. A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P roject D irector Douglas D oerfler Trinity C hief A rchitect 2 Outline * ASC C ompung S trategy * Project D rivers a nd P rocurement P rocess * Pla;orm A rchitecture O...

  10. A simple, fast, and accurate method of phylogenomic inference.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Neis s den bac orm a A trop tica BH7 N1 ii acte se il is TClum IA str Goetting cteri tica A Pelo oxyd u en Des tomac

  11. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemelli, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.gemelli@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Gottardi 100, 41125 Modena (Italy); Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  12. Prevalence and predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms among child survivors 1 year following the Wenchuan earthquake in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying, LH; Wu, XC; Lin, CD; Chen, C

    2013-01-01

    shelters or prefabricated houses within an earthquakeliving at prefabricated and temporary houses had more severe

  13. Semantic Feature Selection for Object Discovery in High-Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Hui

    research work. Motivating Examples. Users are interested in different types of objects on Earth as well who are trying to find shelters to accommodate a large number of people. However, shelters shelter in emergency. In addition, qualified shelter should not be far away from water source. Therefore

  14. Surgical PediatricS ObStetricS Public health SchOOl nurSe internatiOnal health agencieS addictiOnS Shelter agencieS lOng-term care rehabilitatiOn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    and Yorkton. The use of new technology simulating typical nursing practice and innovative teaching methods-professionalyearwithotherstudentswhoareinterested in health science professions, such as Clinical Psychology, Dentistry, Kinesiology, Medicine, Nutrition will be working in other health science professions when you become a Registered Nurse. This

  15. 578 I The Johns Hopkins and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Earthquake in Yogyakarta, Indonesia May 2006. Little girl building her own little shelter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    weeks) and any of the following: haemorrhagic or purpuric rash, vomiting with blood, cough with blood tract infections/ pneumonia in children cough or difficulty breathing and Breathing 50 or more = cough or difficulty breathing + one or more of the following (inability to drink or breast feed, severe

  16. Beginning in 2008, George Mason University began making saving for retirement under the 403(b) Tax-Sheltered Annuity Plan (the "TSA") even easier by offering an automatic enrollment feature. This automatic enrollment feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beginning in 2008, George Mason University began making saving for retirement under the 403(b) Tax or less, you must complete a 403(b) Salary Reduction Agreement and submit it to Human Resources & Payroll

  17. FBP-ER-RIFS-BG-PLN-0036 Rev. 6 1 DOE/PPPO/03-0383&D4

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Forces Office Trailer X-104C 1 Protective Forces ShowerLocker Trailer X-108A South Portal and Shelter-Drive Gate X-108B North Portal and Shelter X-108E Construction Entrance...

  18. Teacher retention : an appreciative approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesavento-Conway, Jennifer Jean

    2010-01-01

    sheltered general math, algebra, and sheltered algebra;” “I’At [my site] Algebra Readiness is the lowest math classI, and Algebra Readiness. Now, I teach really low-level math

  19. Heritage Modern: Cityscape of the Late Socialist Political Economy in Trinidad, Cuba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Maki

    2011-01-01

    tsunamis wiped out a northeastern region, sending tens of thousands into life in shelters, and crippled nuclear

  20. Report on Installation Activities at the LWDA Site John Copeland, Aaron Kerkhoff, Charlie Slack, Johnathan York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    to complete the trip. On entering the site, there was a point at which the truck pulling the trailer became at a setting of 80o F. #12;We had intended to install an external light fixture to the shelter. However, the site light located at the junction box illuminates the external stairs to the shelter, and the shelter

  1. The Astronomical Journal, 135:400407, 2008 January doi:10.1088/0004-6256/135/1/400 c 2008. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewitt, David C.

    of the perihelion distance would allow heat conducted from the surface to reach the CO ice, driving outgassing of the surfaces, and outgassing activity on the JFCs becomes restricted to a few, small "active areas 709, Orme des merisiers, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France. Cometary outgassing at heliocentric distances

  2. OSU Office of Risk Management Foreign Citizens Working Abroad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    OSU Office of Risk Management Foreign Citizens Working Abroad Student/Employee Name: Phone: E the Office of Risk Management (ORM) for additional information. Student/Employee Status: (full warning or sanction, contact the Office of Risk Management at OSU. Special conditions may apply

  3. The prehistoric diet and subsistence of the lower Pecos region, as reflected in coprolites from Baker Cave, Val Verde County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobolik, Kristin Dee

    1988-01-01

    1 1 i f ormes Anguillidae An uilla rostrata Longnose gar American eel Clupeiformes Clupeidae Dorosoma ce edianum a~ere e e e a e Cypri niformes Cyprinidae Cam ostoma anomalum Dionda diabo i a~credo a G~ila a dora H bo nathus nuchalis H...

  4. ORBIT-RESPONSE MATRIX ANALYSIS AT HERA Georg H. Hoffstaetter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    by an iterative method, we have measured the Twiss functions of the HERA rings. Furthermore one can fit op- tical measured regularly during the ongoing commissioning process. 1.1 Obtaining Twiss Parameters Since we have not yet analyzed the coupled ORM, we will refer to the Twiss parameters of one transverse plane a

  5. Rapid GRB Followup with the 2m Robotic Liverpool Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomboc, Andreja

    Rapid GRB Follow­up with the 2­m Robotic Liverpool Telescope Andreja Gomboc #,+ , Michael F. Bode. We present the capabilities of the 2­m robotic Liverpool Telescope (LT), owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University and situated at ORM, La Palma. Robotic control and scheduling of the LT

  6. APOLLO 11 .V O ICE TRANSCRIPT PERTAINING TO THE GEOLOGY OF THE LANDING SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    * * *: {( APOLLO 11 .V O ICE TRANSCRIPT PERTAINING TO THE GEOLOGY OF THE LANDING SITE #12;APOLLO 11 VOICE TRANSCRIPT Pertaining to the geology of the landing site by N. G. Bailey and G. E. Ulrich U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Astrogeology Flagstaff, Arizona 1974 #12;USCOMM·OC 8265-P74THIS ~ORM 1\\1A) HI

  7. Consolidating the Access Control of Composite Applications and Workflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemper, Alfons

    .rits, volkmar.lotz}@sap.com Abstract. The need for enterprise application integration projects leads to complex¨unchen, Germany 2 SAP Research, Font de l'Orme, 06250 Mougins, France {wimmerma, kemper}@in.tum.de, {maarten systems (ERP) that rely on database backends. Also, business processes that are realized as Web service

  8. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 565:280296, 2002 January 20 ( 2002. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    , Postfach 1603, D-85740 Garching, Germany;fu r aws=mpe.mpg.de JONATHAN F. ORMES NASA Goddard Space Flight calculation of the secondary antiproton Ă?ux provides a "" background ĂŹĂŹ for searches for exotic signals from such tests to be performed. We use our propagation code GALPROP to calculate interstellar cosmic

  9. Transportation Network Equilibrium --The Formalism for Networks Today from the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    #12;US Railroad Freight Flows #12;Natural Gas Pipeline Network in the US #12;World Oil Trading Network Econometrics Input/Output Analysis Engineering - OR/MS Computer Science Routing Algorithms Price of Anarchy; · alternative and at times conflicting criteria used in decision-making; · constraints on resources: natural

  10. Jian-Xin Zhu Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Orbital? e They e merge f rom c ompe9ng i nterac9ons H. C. Manoharan et al., Nature 403, 512 (2000) dIdV maps out eigenmodes Quantum m irages f ormed b y c oherent p roject...

  11. Domed community and several alternatives for Winooski, Vermont: the environmental, organizational, and energy conservation issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The environmental, organizational, and energy conservation issues related to a domed structure enveloping Winooski, Vermont, are discussed. Alternative means of accomplishing energy conservation will be addressed. These include retrofitting of existing structures, replacement with state-of-the-art structures, the use of planting shelter-belts, redevelopment to an earth-sheltered community, and redevelopment to a composite domed neighborhood and earth-sheltered community. The assets and liabilities of each alternative are addressed.

  12. Catalogue No. EN40-517/1996E ISBN 0-662-24464-8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including genes, species, ecosystems, and the evolutionary and functional processes that link them, food for predators. Dense vegetation is also favoured for cover and shelter. Stepwise plant layers

  13. 07123-01 - Final Report, C - 03-04-14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operations can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on wildlife. Benefits include food, water and shelter provided by roadside ditches, while disadvantages include the...

  14. Emergency preparedness briefing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-12

    shelter in place procedures and locations. ? additional building ... a tornado, a civil disturbance including a shooting or release of hazardous materials in the ...

  15. Problems and Solutions: Training Disaster Organizations of the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Soft Costs Author Florida Solar Energy Center j-fsec-pf-371-03.pdf More Documents & Publications Florida's Emergency Shelters Go Solar Disasters: Photovoltaics for Special Needs...

  16. Forest Products Industry Profile

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wood and paper products meet the everyday needs of consumers and businesses. They provide materials essential for communication, education, packaging, construction, shelter, sanitation, and protection.

  17. 5/2/2005 Industry Seminar -April 2005 The Housing Market and Demand for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    homes4 .1 - .2 million Shelter Demand (include HUD code) 1.8 ­ 2.1 million 1 Middle and high immigration

  18. 2015 United Way Campaign Appeal & Kick off Picnic Announcement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the elderly, hospice care, job training for the less fortunate and even food and shelter are just some of the benefits that result from your donations. JLab's...

  19. EECBG Success Story: Solar Projects Provide Energy to County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds September 23, 2010 - 1:01pm Addthis Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. |...

  20. EECBG Success Story: The Jury's In: Hillsborough County Courthouse...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Sallie Glaize EECBG Success Story: Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. |...

  1. New observational evidence for global warming from satellite Menglin Jin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Menglin

    , 2001; Jones et al., 1999]. This thermodynamic temperature, measured by thermometers sheltered, is derived from the thermal emission of the Earth's surface. A brightness temperature is calculated from

  2. Chapter Eight Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Most earth scientists thinking about geochemical sediments envisage strati- graphic sequences shelters in limestone areas Oxalate crust Mostly calcium oxalate and silica with variable concentrations

  3. Population Displacements Associated with Environmentally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of Public Health 2 Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), the Earth Institute of Land, Employment, Shelter 4. Marginalization (reduced economic mobility) 5. Increased morbidity

  4. Thermal benefits and cost effectiveness of earth berming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speltz, J.; Haves, P.

    1980-01-01

    A number of advantages are claimed for earth sheltered buildings; the earth provides both insulation and thermal storage and also serves to reduce infiltration and noise. This paper seeks to quantify the thermal advantages of both earth sheltering and perimeter insulation by comparing the simulated thermal performance of an earth sheltered house, a house with perimeter insulation and a house with neither. The fuel savings are then compared to the estimated construction costs to determine cost-effectiveness. The major saving from an earth sheltered building is obtained in colder climates where the effective elevation of the frost line due to the earth berms considerably reduces the cost of the foundation.

  5. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavanaugh, Kyle

    Earth Research Institute, 2 Department of Geography, and 3 Marine Science Institute, University regions were related to wave disturbance, while kelp dynamics in sheltered regions tracked sea surface

  6. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Snow-Covered Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    snow cover through shading, wind sheltering, and interception. Changes in snow cover associated and nitrogen cycling. Introduction Approximately 60% of the terrestrial earth surface experiences seasonal snow

  7. Strategic intent College of Agricultural Sciences Academic Programs, Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , and shelter, and ensuring the health of more than nine billion people by the year of Distinction: Advancing the Science of Sustainable Earth Ecosystems (Healthy Planet

  8. RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    shelter, transportation, water supply and waste disposal and/or recycling. Constructed facilities, construct and maintain the physical infrastructure, which supports the quality of life of the Earth

  9. Sub-mesoscale coastal eddies observed by high frequency radar: A new mechanism for delivering nutrients to kelp forests in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Libe

    for Computational Earth System Science and Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara ecosystems with habitat- forming macroalgal species such as Macrocystis pyrifera. In sheltered regions within

  10. LAURA HILL, PH.D. Lecturer and Research Associate, University of Vermont (UVM) Plant Biology Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molofsky, Jane

    plants for food, medicine, clothing, and shelter, why plant biologists are concerned about invasive species and habitat fragmentation, how plants influence earth's climate, why different plant communities

  11. 11/12/12 Take action on climate change OR THE PANDA GETS IT The Register 1/3www.theregister.co.uk/2012/11/12/climate_change_pandas/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth' Mysterious galactic glow caused by Hitchhikers' Krikkit style stars Lone darknesswrapped suns food and shelter for other wildlife in the forest, including endangered species like the ploughshare

  12. Managing Earth's Ecosystems: An Interdisciplinary Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Paul R.

    Managing Earth's Ecosystems: An Interdisciplinary Challenge Gretchen C. Daily* and Paul R. Ehrlich sheltered from competitive market forces, such as universities. Channels developed to direct flows

  13. Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

  14. The Raman spectra of seventeen alkyl substituted cyclopentanes and cyclohexanes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faubion, Billy Don

    1965-01-01

    - pentana suggested by Pitzer and Donath are shown in Figure III. 9 H H H CH H H H CH Figure 0 Two F orms of M ethylcyclohexone 0. 0 -. 24 . I 8 . lO . IO -. 29 ENVELOPE (Cs) HAL F-CHAIR ( C2) Figure III. Two F orms of Cyclopentone... ? Depolarization ratios corrected to theoretical maxbnum of 0. 75. ' forces l00 80 80 dIO AXIAL 20 0 IOO s3000 5500 5000 2500 2000 80 80 40 20 0 2000 2500 l000 Roman Shift in cm I 500 0 (4358. 35A) 79A5A K U 0N IPFPS)lY lLll8M'( IVI~ 7(iesrs...

  15. Supplement 16, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Parasites: Protozoa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Dorothy B.; Humphrey, Judith M.; Beard, Mary I.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Margie D.

    1966-01-01

    coxinga coxinga (blood) Babesia spp. life cycle "Babesia argentina, re- sembling" cattle Babesia argentina resistance of Drought- master cattle Babesia argentina bovine immunity to tick-transmitted Babesia argentina (Lig- Mahoney, D. F., 1964 a... ni?res, 1903) complement fixing antibody significsnce Babesia argentina Parra Orme?o, ?. E., 1953 f? Lignieres, I9OI pl. figs. 1-6 Syn.: Babesiella minor Rees, 1934 Alperin, A. L.; and Bevins, N. F., 1963 a, figs. 1-2 California Mc...

  16. Plotting vectors on a cathode ray oscilloscope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Kenneth William

    1950-01-01

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6 Square 1avs Generator. . . ~ ~ ~ . ~ . . ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 Input and Outpu t Wavef orms ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 8 Pulse Forming Set%0 rk o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o 10 Pulse Adding Circuit... in Figure 8 with a zero orossing point the same as that of the oorresponding input (Figure 4) ~ Ry feeding the output of the squ~re wave generator into a differentiating circuit with a short time constant, a pulse can be obtained whose width...

  17. The effects of output transformers on distortion in audio amplifiers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanier, Ross Edwin

    1949-01-01

    in Pig. 8. The audio frequency amplifier is a conventional single-ended, fixed bias, power amplifier using a 6?6 tube connected for triode operation and driven by a low impedance audio frequency oscillator. The amplifier was coupled to its recommended... distortion in either the primary or the output of the transformer. 52 INTZRMODUIATION DISTORTION Hewlett-Packer Audio Frequenc Oscillator odel 200 Regulate Power Supply Aud o Frequenc Am lifie rane orme under Hew e -Pac sr Harmonic lliave...

  18. On Integrating Theories of International Economics in the Strategic Planning of Global Supply Chains and Dynamic Supply Chain Reconfiguration with Capacity Expansion and Contraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chaehwa

    2012-02-14

    supply chain design, since it has a rich history within the OR/MS community and since it is central to strategic planning in the global economy. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has increased trade among member countries (Canada, Mexico... and economic gains that improve income and living standards. A number of free trade agreements have been initiated around the world (e.g. regional and bilateral free trade agreements (FTA); the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) (1994), the Central...

  19. Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoorrelease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

    2006-06-01

    This report quantifies the effectiveness of ''sheltering in place'' in a commercial building in the event of an outdoor radiological release. The indoor exposure to airborne particles is calculated by solving the mass balance equation that accounts for the loss of particles due to deposition, filtration and exhaust. Quantitative estimates of shelter-inplace effectiveness are provided for typical commercial buildings.

  20. t r i a l r u n m a y 7 , 1 9 4 5 A crew prepares fission products from the Hanford slug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greisen, Eric

    the shot. Blast and earth shock data were valuable not only for calibrating instruments but for providing stand- ards for the safe design of shock proof instrument shelters. Measurement of the effects from roads between Ground Zero and the various shelters and the roads that did exist were in intoler- able

  1. Frontispiece Advanced Lunar Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built sod houses as their first homes on the new land; settlers of the Moon may seek out lava tubes for their shelter or cover

  2. Global Consequences of Land Use Jonathan A. Foley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    , fiber, water, and shelter to more than six billion people. Global croplands, pastures, plantations in atmospheric composition to the extensive modification of Earth_s ecosystems (3­6). For example, land and ecosystem services, such as food, fiber, shelter, and fresh- water. On the other hand, some forms of land

  3. Research Article Geoarchaeological and Bioarchaeological Studies at Mira, an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    Luminescence Dating Research Laboratory, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois of the early Gravettian, while the upper layer (I) contained traces of an artificial shelter and hundreds Europe, how- ever, probably owing to the scarcity of natural shelters on the former, especially

  4. Frontispiece Advanced Lunar Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    inhabitants may use chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built for their shelter or cover space station modules with lunar regolith for radiation protection. The pioneers moved

  5. 6.4 ARCTIC OBSERVATIONS WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    @lidar.ssec.wisc.edu 2 NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO, USA taneil seatainers are joined together as shelter for the lidar, radar, and PAREI instruments. The 35 GHz radar antenna is seen on the near corner of the shelter and the zenith facing lidar window is located

  6. Autumn 2014, No.1 106 107 Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissel, Jeffrey K.

    the food, safe water, healthcare, and shelter they need for mere survival. Those just above poverty), a Serbian translation of which is being published by CIRSD. Jeffrey D. Sachs is the Director of the Earth- care, unsafe shelter, and the lack of safe drinking water and sanitation. The world economy is not only

  7. 3 6 / H a r v a r d U n i v e r s i t y G a z e t t e D e c e m b e r 1 8 , 2 0 0 8 -F e b r u a r y 4 , 2 0 0 9 Green chief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    -year- old Declaration of Human Rights closes with talk and song. Page 17 Gimme shelter PBHA's entirely stu- dent-run homeless shelter gives solace, succor, and counsel to area homeless. Page 18 December 18,Mid- dletonisnotpreparing for the New England winter; she is prepar- ing for an expedition through the Earth's coldest

  8. Photosynthesis Research 51: 126, 1997. c 1997 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    attending the South Shields High school for Boys), there was a long hiatus while air shelters were built largely unknown in South Shields but, by then, there was no shortage of air-raid shelters. The feathery corners of the earth in a succes

  9. Underground Manufacturing Facility, Sterling, Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, R.M.

    1981-09-25

    The author set out to build an earth-sheltered light manufacturing plant (to produce expanded polystyrene insulation) and also an earth-sheltered passive solar residence. Results are presented of waterproofing, thermal monitoring, and life cycle study on the plant. It is concluded that the added cost of providing a support for carrying the earth deadload far outweighs the energy savings. (DLC)

  10. Emergency Action Plan and Annexes 2014 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey emergency.rutgers.edu 18 of 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    .rutgers.edu 18 of 39 SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS AND LIGHTNING If you are caught outdoors in a severe thunderstorm or when lightning threatens: 1. Immediately seek shelter in a substantial building. DO NOT seek shelter stand on end, squat low to the ground on the balls of your feet. Place your hands over your ears

  11. 231USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. An Evaluation of Coast Live Oak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    leaf mulch, tree shelters plus mulch, and an unprotected control. Seedling survival 1 year after planting ranged from 14.3 to 37.1 percent. The greatest survival was obtained with oak mulch (Plumb and Hannah 1991, Swiecki and Bernhardt 1991). Plastic translucent tubes called tree shelters

  12. KALELE ROAD Parking Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FREEWAY H1 KALELE ROAD Parking Office on ground floor Bike Rack Locations Bike Lockers BICYCLE RACK Hale Kahawai Environmental Protection Services Federal Credit Union Energy House & Safety Office Bus Shelter Bus Shelter Art Building Sustainability Courtyard Kuykendall Hall Campus Center Jakuan Tea

  13. Cost and energy comparison study of above- and below-ground dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, H.B.; Cristy, G.A.; Brite, S.E.; Yost, M.B.

    1983-08-01

    Designs of earth-sheltered (ES) homes were examined and compared with identical aboveground (AG) homes. The homes are identical except where changes were necessitated by earth-sheltering and energy conservation. The study involved design, construction costing, energy analysis, and life-cycle costing (LCC). It was concluded from this study that under present market conditions, if aboveground and earth-sheltered dwellings of equal size and quality are built on similar lots, the construction cost of the earth-sheltered structure compares poorly with that of the aboveground structure. Lowered operation and maintenance costs, including the lower fuel bills of the earth-sheltered structure, are outweighed by the current high interest rates, which cause an increase in monthly payments. 24 references.

  14. Cost and code study of underground buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Various regulatory and financial implications for earth-sheltered houses and buildings are discussed. Earth-sheltered houses are covered in the most detail including discussions of building-code restrictions, HUD Minimum Property Standards, legal aspects, zoning restrictions, taxation, insurance, and home financing. Examples of the initial-cost elements in earth-sheltered houses together with projected life-cycle costs are given and compared to more-conventional energy-conserving houses. For larger-scale underground buildings, further information is given on building code, fire protection, and insurance provisions. Initial-cost information for five large underground buildings is presented together with energy-use information where available.

  15. Adding OAI-ORE Support to Repository Platforms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maslov, Alexey; Mikeal, Adam; Phillips, Scott; Leggett, John; McFarland, Mark

    2009-05-17

    ?OAI?ORE?Support?to? Repository?Pla8orms? Alexey?Maslov,?Adam?Mikeal,?Sco3?Phillips,?? John?Legge3,?Mark?McFarland? Texas?Digital?Library? OR?09? Overview? ?? Texas?Digital?Library? Use?Case?for?OAI?ORE? ?? Mapping?ORE?model?to? DSpace?architecture? ?? ImplementaJon?? ?? Results...: A case study of a digital library application?, Adam Mikeal, James Creel, Alexey Maslov, Scott Phillips, John Leggett, Mark McFarland. JCDL 2009 Current?PrioriDes? ?? Live?deployment?at?TDL? ?? Release?to?the?open?source?community? ?? Integra...

  16. Akt Isoforms in Vascular Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Haixiang; Littlewood, Trevor; Bennett, Martin

    2015-04-28

    aneurysm; eNOS, endothelial nitric oxide synthase;mTOR,mammalian target of rapamycin. 44 1223 331505. . This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). orms in vascular disease, Vascul. Pharmacol. (2015... p85 subunit and a catalytic p110 subunit that directly phosphorylates the ribosomal protein kinase p70s6k [29], the rho family polypeptide Rac [30], the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinases SGK [31–33], and the serine/threonine kinase Akt [34...

  17. Carolina Master Scholars Adventures Series | University of South Carolina Carolina Gives Back

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    resources to enhance the community's overall well-being. Donations: Canned meat and fish, peanut butter swabs, baby oil, mineral oil, pill bottles, blankets, towels, wash cloths, collars, leashes. July 13th, shelter, resources, an

  18. The provision of low-income housing within the context of a new town in Lazard Cardenas - Las Truchas, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Juan Marcos

    1985-01-01

    This thesis is essentially the description of the shelter components of a World Bank co-financed urban development project in the new town of Lazaro Cardenas and its twin, the poor city of Guacamayas. The document presents ...

  19. On the Fundamental Unsteady Fluid Dynamics of Shock-Induced Flows through Ducts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza, Nicole Renee

    2013-04-29

    Unsteady shock wave propagation through ducts has many applications, ranging from blast wave shelter design to advanced high-speed propulsion systems. The research objective of this study was improved fundamental understanding of the transient flow...

  20. Building houses for people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townes, Anne E. (Anne Elizabeth)

    1995-01-01

    " ... shelter is part of daily human life and will come about wherever and whenever people will share space. Today, in a new age where so much more is possible, the professional plays a crucial role in that process. Yes, ...

  1. Structural blast design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kieval, Tamar S. (Tamar Shoshana), 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Blast design is a necessary part of design for more buildings in the United States. Blast design is no longer limited to underground shelters and sensitive military sites, buildings used by the general public daily must ...

  2. Field Assessment Concerning Multiple Deprivations in Slums and Squatter Settlements in Kathmandu, Nepal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Adam

    2012-11-01

    of life. The areas under assessment include: Household Profiles; Housing, Shelter and Safety; Sanitation and Water Infrastructure; Food Security and Urban Farming; Energy Infrastructure; Access to Capital and Financial Services; Economic Self...

  3. M A J O R A R T I C L E Widespread Outbreak of Norovirus Gastroenteritis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a temporary shelter in the New Orleans Superdome. As conditions in New Orleans deteriorated, many individuals who weathered the storm at the Superdome and/or other New Orleans locations were quickly relocated

  4. Harboring chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey Arthur)

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane shelters have become the unknown point of last resort for many coastal communities. Harboring displaced populations during a hurricane and it's chaotic aftermath are no longer seen as a need in a coastal communities ...

  5. (H1) Logic Tools Selmer Bringsjord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bringsjord, Selmer

    (used to stand for propositions) p0, p1, p2, . . . and the truth functional connectives (and), (or and possibility: 1. It's necessary that you renew your driver's license before it expires. 2. Food, shelter

  6. Emergency Action Plan [This template has been developed for you to use to create your own area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    [LOCATION] Emergency Action Plan [DATE] [This template has been developed for you to use to create ............................................................................................................................... 5 A. Shelter Locations have been designated for the building .................................................................................................................................................... 5 C. Hazardous Material Incident

  7. Nomenclature of *Aulactinia* (=*Bunodactis*), with description of *Aulactinia incubans* n.sp. (Coelentera: Actiniaria), an internally brooding sea anemone from Puget Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Chia, Fu-Shiang; Levine, Regina

    1980-01-01

    *Aulactinia incubans* n.sp. is an internally brooding actinian known from the San Juan Archipelago, Washington, U.S.A., and from Torch Bay, Alaska, U.S.A. Found in sheltered intertidal habitats, this sea anemone averages ...

  8. Operating Plan for "Helios"; A Builder and Manufacturer of Energy Efficient Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossyphas, Leonidas

    2006-05-19

    The purpose of this project is to develop a comprehensive business operating plan for a home building company that emphasizes and promotes the use of passive solar energy systems and earth sheltering designs in its products. The Kansas City based...

  9. Hysteresis and urban rail : the effects of past urban rail on current residential and travel choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block-Schachter, David

    2012-01-01

    Cities are endowed with and accumulate assets based on their unique histories, which in turn define the choice set of the present. These assets range from the natural-sheltered ports, fertile land--to the constructed--concrete ...

  10. Examination of offsite radiological emergency protective measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, David C.

    1979-01-01

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted ...

  11. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS A: MATHEMATICAL AND THEORETICAL J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 (2009) 434008 (14pp) doi:10.1088/1751-8113/42/43/434008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindenberg, Katja

    2009-01-01

    Marie Curie/CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 5, France 3 Department of Chemistry their lives searching for different things-- better jobs, shelters, partners, lost keys; they also seek

  12. Atmospheric interventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Rena, M. Arch Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Humans have been sheltering themselves from the harsh elements of their surroundings to maintain comfort since the discovery of the hearth. With the rise of the Industrial Revolution came innovations that made mitigating ...

  13. SITE SELECTION AND FORAGING BEHAVIOR OF ALEUTIAN CANADA GEESE IN A NEWLY COLONIZED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Jeff

    requirements for daily maintenance energy. Key words: abdominal profile, activity budgets, Aleutian Canada on a temporarily flooded pasture located behind large dunes that provided shelter from pre- vailing oceanic winds

  14. This article was downloaded by: [University of Arizona], [Rebecca Rundell] On: 09 February 2012, At: 19:53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundell, Rebecca J.

    discovery (Giere 2009). It is also home to some of the most poorly understood metazoan lineages on Earth, which may provide shelter or water currents to supplement the entoprocts' own ciliary feeding

  15. Patent Law, HIPPO, and the Biodiversity Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    Planet earth is host to a dazzling variety of living organisms. This diversity of life, or – biodiversity, is vital to the survival and prosperity of humanity, supplying such vital amenities as food, clothing, shelter, natural biochemicals useful...

  16. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, J. Emmett

    microalgae that fuel food webs and a shelter for inver- tebrates and fishes that reach substantially greater on earth (Duarte & Cebrián 1996), and their provision of nursery areas for juvenile stages of commercially

  17. Quaternary Science Reviews 26 (2007) 32983310 Warmer early instrumental measurements versus colder reconstructed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esper, Jan

    2007-01-01

    in early thermometer shelters and the relevance of proxy/target discrepancies for understanding Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction To understand and quantify past variations in the earth

  18. Water Pool Management in Relation to Mosquito Abundance and Control Methods at the University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have colonized almost every habitat type on earth, with a few exceptions, and the understanding (Burkett-Cadena et al. 2011). The adult females will seek out hibernating shelter

  19. IN THIS ISSUE: Using LiDAR to locate cave openings, geography and geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weishampel, John F.

    DAR system was used to generate a 1 m resolution, bare-earth digital elevation model (DEM) from and mythological importance in addition to functioning as shelters. They were sites of rituals, ceremonies

  20. Gordon Wu '58 Professor of Chinese Studies, Professor of East Asian Studies and History, 211 Jones Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1008; elman@princeton.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elman, Benjamin

    into an elliptical low Earth orbit and thereby threw our free press and public media into a tizzy. I re- member. The revolution in science education was a matter of national security. Oth- erwise, head for the bomb shelters

  1. Funcitonal importance of Belize coral reefs, Wulff52 FUNCTIONAL IMPORTANCE OF BIODIVERSITY FOR CORAL REEFS OF BELIZE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    , and other animals shelter and find food, while sponges glue living corals onto the reef frame and protect manufactured or released from inside the earth), too many species may be diminished or deleted simultaneously

  2. Biological reserve design Page 1 Chave et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    rainforest, a biome that is under threat of continuing fragmentation, yet which shelters the majority of living species on Earth. Simple dynamic and spatially explicit simulations, which model the dynamics

  3. Discuss this paper at http://blogs. nature.com/nature/journalclub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    culturing. PLANETARY SCIENCE Martiancoldtraps Icarus doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2010.03.039 (2010) On Earth, caves can shelter ice, allowing it to persist all year round, even when temperatures outside rise above

  4. Criss Cross Heel and Toe Touch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    Clam Free Clock Dead Ant Tag Dragon Tail Tag Drip Drip Drop Earth Air Water Fire (E) Ecological Values) Spaghetti Soup Sticky Situation Team on a Tarp Texas Big Foot The Shelter Tie One In Touch my Can Toxic

  5. Kring/Space Sciences 2006 Lunar Exploration Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    to maintain ready access to shelter in case these types of storms occur Updated 3 April 2006 #12;Kring/Space Sciences 2006 Lunar Exploration Initiative Galactic Cosmic Rays · Isotropic field of GCR exist at Earth

  6. Friends of Long Marine Lab Board of Directors 2014 -2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    on the Homeless Services Shelter and the Santa Cruz Land Trust boards. Kenneth Bloome Following college graduation husband, Bob, has given her the nickname "Mother Earth" because of her love and protection of nature

  7. 2012 by the Association of Paci c Coast Geographers. All rights reserved. Case Hardening Vignettes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    on Earth's topography (Ollier 1984, Pain and Ollier 1995), as exempli ed by di erent classic landforms the formation of visually interesting forms such as honeycombed weathering features and rock shelters used

  8. Collaborative Studies Target Volcanic Hazards in Central America Gregg J. S. Bluth and William I. Rose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluth, Gregg

    America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries. This agency is responsible for hazard education, as well as recommending evacuation routes and relief shelters

  9. Historical rates of salt marsh accretion on the outer Bay of Fundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chmura, Gail L.

    on sheltered marine and estuarine coastlines. Over 33 000 ha of salt marshes are found along the coast habitats on Earth, with rates of primary productivity comparable with those of agricultural systems

  10. Joseph Skowronek, '06 Khao Lak, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    just roofs. Until then, families had to live in temporary shelters like the one below. #12;Along on earth escaping the monsoon in the village kitchen. I loved working on his house because him and his wife

  11. APPLYING CASE-BASED REASONING IN THE EVOLUTION OF DEFORESTATION PATTERNS IN THE BRAZILIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    action destruction stands out the tropical forests, which shelter at least the half of the vegetable of the tropical forest in the Earth surface because of the large volume and quality of images acquired everyday

  12. OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM Grade 45 minutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the environment based on observed patterns. Ocean Literacy Principles: 4. The ocean makes Earth habitable. 5 (photosynthesis) 8. Ask if the students think algae can still provide shelter and food after being washed up

  13. February 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 2 BioScience 111 The panoramic splendor and complexity of high-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Mark W.

    inspiration,and as some of the last untamed natural places on Earth. In our time, the perception to protect leeward portions or by sheltering in snowdrifts that accumulate in and around the vegetation

  14. 2/12/2014 More households could strain natural resources and the environment -UPI.com http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2014/02/11/Household-explosion-replaces-population-explosion-as-world-concern/UPI-87811392152198/?spt=rln&or=2 1/8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    explosion. A previous norm of one large household sheltering many people is giving way across the world/8 Previous Story Climate change may drive fish species from Earth's equatorial regions Next Story City bees

  15. The Decline and Fall of the Non-avian Dinosaurs MacLeod, N., Palaeontology Department, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archibald, J. David

    create a `thermal pulse' that would kill any land-dwelling organism that could not find shelter quickly. Given the certain knowledge that several potential extinction mechanisms were active in the Earth

  16. Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    are represented herein, including closely related species inhabiting caves on opposite sides of the Earth, thus of fishes, lobster, and mysidaceans seek shelter within marine caves but must venture out into open waters

  17. Energy-Efficient Home Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    climatic and site conditions to provide heating in the winter and cooling in the summer. Earth-Sheltered, Straw Bale, Log, and Manufactured Homes If you live in or are planning to...

  18. UNESCO RAPCA ELEMENTOS EN RIESGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Essential y High Potential Loss Facilities 12. Debris10. Fire 15. Economic14. Shelter9. Inundation 11. HazMat 16. Indirect Economic Losses Potential Earth Science Hazards Direct Economic/ Social Losses Induced

  19. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 433445, 2006 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/6/433/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    . Gallagher1, and I. Longley1 1School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental science, University develops during pe- riods of onshore flow which partially shelters the site from marine boundary layer air

  20. Visit Us Again! 100 E. Northwestern Avenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    biological and structural component of many ecosystems on Earth. Evidence suggests that native tree species cavities provide shelter for many animals. 5 Shagbark hickory Carya ovata · Known for strength

  1. Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    , and works closely with the Southern California Earth- quake Center, headquartered at USC. This year into pro- duction to provide shelter for people in China made homeless. The department is home

  2. First U.S.Tsunami Evacuation Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    of the Earth's crust are colliding on the ocean floor some 50 miles ofifehore. Can- non Beach, Oregon (pop. 1 could shelter about 1,500 people. The building site sits about 20 feet above sea level. Its design

  3. JULY 1997 1505J I N E T A L . 1997 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Menglin

    by a sheltered thermometer 1.5­3.5 m above a flat grassy, well-ventilated surface has been referred to as surface tem- perature, is inferred from the thermal emission of the earth surface and is generally some

  4. Observations of the Subtropical Mode Water Evolution from the Kuroshio Extension System Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    of Rhode Island, Narragansett, Rhode Island HUMIO MITSUDERA Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science reservoir: it is a direct product of win- tertime air­sea interaction but is sheltered from surface

  5. Cell, Vol. 101, 58, March 31, 2000, Copyright 2000 by Cell Press The ABCs of Floral Evolution Minireview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    , B plus C specify the earth. Some 250,000 flowering plant species exist today, identity of stamens, and C alone directs carpel identity. from which we obtain food, clothing, shelter, medicines

  6. TYPES OF FLOODING IN AUSTRALIA Floods are part of the natural water cycle or a "Hydrologic Cycle". In this natural cycle, the energy of the sun causes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    · develop an evacuation strategy which identifies routes and safe locations in which to shelter · prepare and take your mobile phone o place a strong plastic bag full of sand or earth in the toilet bowl and over

  7. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    , Nha Trang, Viet Nam c Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University, USA 1. Introduction exploitation on the coastal zone for shelter, food, recreation, and commerce, which results in increasing

  8. Participatory modeling of endangered wildlife systems: Simulating the sage-grouse and land use in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    use in Central Washington Allyson Beall, Len Zeoli School of Earth and Environmental Sciences because they depend on sagebrush for food, shelter and nesting. The sagebrush areas of Douglas County

  9. FAQ | Register Now | Sign In HOME > LIFE SCIENCES > EVOLUTION > ADAPTIVE COMPLEXITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Yingguang

    Reveals Driving Force Behind Cell Evolution 3. Don't Shelter Your Children: Coping With Stress As A Child That Changed the World more HOME PHYSICAL SCIENCES EARTH SCIENCES LIFE SCIENCES MEDICINE SOCIAL SCIENCES

  10. Influence of logjam-formed hard points on the formation of valley-bottom landforms in an old-growth forest valley, Queets River, Washington, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    -growth forest valley, Queets River, Washington, USA David R. Montgomery *, Tim B. Abbe 1 Department of Earth for the role of logjam-formed ``hard points'' on creating and maintaining valley-bottom surfaces that shelter

  11. ach year, the United States experiences approximately 1,300 tornadoes. No state is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    peo- ple and communities more time to seek shelter and secure property. Watches and warnings above the Earth's surface. These "eyes in the sky" track the development of severe weather

  12. Biodiversity and Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    Abstract Rice fields are an alternative habitat for waterbirds and provide food and shelter for many avian ecosystems on Earth. Nevertheless, they have been submitted to intensive transformation and drainage

  13. Preservation of Late Amazonian Mars ice and water-related deposits in a unique crater environment in Noachis Terra: Age relationships between lobate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    02912, USA b Department of Earth Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA a r t i c l e i n f, for the surrounding annular valleys. The occurrence of steep slopes (>20°), relatively narrow (sheltered) valleys

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Small Pressurized Rover Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    research. One of the goals for testing these prototypes on Earth is to identify the benefits of the SPR packages. Even in the midst of challenging terrain, emergency shelter and support can be less than an hour

  15. 24 Summer 2007s c i e n c e s c o p e b i o l o g y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    of animals on Earth, and spotlights the group's ability to occupy some of the most challenging niches heated by the Sun and blown by the wind, but also provides shelter for animals that can get below its

  16. CCrreeee CCuullttuurree,, NNaattuurraall RReessoouurrcceess,, aanndd SSuussttaaiinnaabbiilliittyy 22001133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    or moss house, the warmest winter shelter of the Cree people, Cultural Village, Ouje Bougoumou, Quebec in James Bay several times as a researcher, both for this project, and for her earth science undergraduate

  17. New additions to the spider fauna of Kansas discovered near black-tailed prairie dog towns in shortgrass prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, William M.

    and diverse part of the grassland ecosystem. Although approximately 80% of the Earth's species are terrestrial as a preservative. A plywood sun/rain shelter was installed above each trap. The pitfalls were emptied twice: on 8

  18. his issue of Resource is about the future of agriculture, so let's talk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    more from the earth's limited resources, we have a huge challenge, and a huge opportunity. A recent and a half bil- lion residents. Those millions need to eat ... " ... and they will need shelter, water

  19. C H A P T E R 3 Ecosystem functions and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Cagan Hakki

    purify the air and water, generate oxygen, and stabilize our climate. Earth would not be fit for our, animal and microorganism species for food, shelter, medicinal, cultural, aesthetic and many other

  20. Epiphyte communities on redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) in northwestern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sillett, Stephen Charles

    analysis suggested that an environmental gradient from exposed to sheltered habitats was the strongest and Lichenological Society, Inc. 0007-2745/07/$3.45/0 #12;Earth's tallest, largest and oldest trees occur in western

  1. Aqua-Rock Climbers E n d pa p E r

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    most people to Earth's gentler slopes. Yet there are those among us who venture onto cliff faces with silk, from nets that filter food particles, to wearable protective shelters, to pupal cases in which

  2. CORRESPONDENCE NATURE|Vol 435|19 May 2005 more valuable when expressed in the absence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Michael

    the Earth experiences winter and summer, despite having been explicitly taught such facts several times to inject religion into public education. Sheltered within the confines of academia, most biologists find

  3. Sustaining the marine ecosystem of the Pribilof Domain Kudaliig^in maqax^takan txichin aguqangin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g., ecosystem services) to one of receiving Earth's services in a respectful way (Schumacher and Kendall, 1995 or family consumption as food, shelter, clothing, tools or transportation. By 1834, Russian overseers

  4. Buoyancy Flux, Turbulence, and the Gas Transfer Coefficient in a Stratified Lake Sally MacIntyrea,b, Anders Jonssonc, Mats Janssonc, Jan Abergc, Damon Turneyb, Brian Emery b, and Scott Millerd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106 (Contact: sally@icess.ucsb.edu) bEarth for quantifying k600 as meteorological forcing of lakes varies by latitude, size, and degree of sheltering

  5. Columbia-UCF TRECVID2010 Multimedia Event Detection: Combining Multiple Modalities, Contextual Concepts, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    .579). Sequence matching with Earth Mover's Distance (EMD) further improves the results (mean MNC 0 in Assembling a shelter Figure 1: Example frames of the three events evaluated in TRECVID MED 2010. Content

  6. Marsh Collapse Does Not Require Sea Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing nurseries for fish species and shelter and food for endangered birds. Salt marshes also mitigate the impacts of hurricanes and tsunamis, and sequester ...

  7. Expulsions from public housing: The hidden context of concentrated Institute of Geography, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Drummond Street, Edinburgh EH8 9XP, Scotland, United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as if there is a systematic plan to expel low-income and unwanted populations from the face of the earth.'' David Harvey (2010. Displacement involves the re- moval of a basic human need (shelter) upon which people depend absolutely

  8. Ecological Applications, 17(2), 2007, pp. 587597 2007 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Carlos

    % of Earth's 5700ţ amphibian species have undergone recent declines. Despite the likely involvement of pesticides much stronger than that of fish. The degree to which a site was sheltered from the predominant

  9. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY Int. J. Climatol. (in press)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandsma, Theo

    . Internationally, temperature of the air near the earth's surface is defined as `the temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation' (WMO, 1992). Alternatively

  10. For talk at Computing At School (CAS) Conference, Birmingham, University, July 2010 The Science of Nearly Everything.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloman, Aaron

    , psychology, biology, social science, mathematics, physics, earth sciences, and many more. I.e. those who with good stuff, bad stuff, obstacles, supports, shelters) · Things that have to be manipulated to be eaten

  11. NATURE REVIEWS | GENETICS VOLUME 6 | APRIL 2005 | 257 Life on Earth has undergone several transitions during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Gene E.

    REVIEWS NATURE REVIEWS | GENETICS VOLUME 6 | APRIL 2005 | 257 Life on Earth has undergone several,which for non-sessile creatures requires foraging. Many species create a nest or shelter to rear young

  12. LOCUST HABITAT MONITORING AND RISK ASSESSMENT USING REMOTE SENSING AND GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchininsky, Alexandre

    Antarctica and can affect the livelihoods of one in 10 people on Earth. To prevent economic and environmental habitat, providing the insects with nutrition and shelter. Under the preventive mode, locust control

  13. 1 NUMERICAL MODELS OF SALT MARSH 2 EVOLUTION: ECOLOGICAL, GEOMORPHIC,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    ]. They typically form in sheltered 45environments where fine sediments can accumulate, such 46as in estuaries et al., 2004a; Kirwan and Murray, 1 Department of Earth Sciences and Marine Program, Boston

  14. SUSTAINABILITY CONNECTIONISSUE 12 JANUARY 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    firmly held view that food, water, energy, shelter, transportation, healthcare, and employment--aproviderofnaturalresourcessuchaswater,air,andsunlightthatevery living inhabitant of earth is dependent upon--is limited in its carrying capacity. Two major requirements

  15. Monitoring of thermal mass performance, Wathen residence, Aledo, Texas. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, W.S.

    1982-07-06

    The design, construction, and monitoring of an earth sheltered, passive-solar heated home with rock bed heat storage are described. Problems with the data recording equipment are detailed. (MHR)

  16. Biology, ecology, and fisheries for K. Limburg lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    they clustered around him for shelter." Seconds later, the herring surrounded Vanstrum, who recalls getting Source: Ian Bell & Martin Visbeck, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory #12;4 Corten 1999. ICES J. Mar

  17. Silviculture of upland native Recognition of the value of native woodlands, particularly Ancient Woodlands, has been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of such natural habitats was emphasised at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 and in the resolutions of the Ministerial of timber. · Traditionally, upland native woodlands were used to shelter low numbers of livestock (usually

  18. IUCN The World Conservation Union Rue Mauverney 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    wellbeing depends on the capacity of the earth's natural systems to provide ecosystem goods and services. We rely on ecosystem services1 to provide the basics of life - food, water, shelter, clothing and clean

  19. Rehousing homeless families in Massachusetts : an analysis of "best practice" in Boston and Worcester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Laura Humm

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, three significant events related to family homelessness converged on the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD). First, the shelters for homeless families in Massachusetts were at ...

  20. Tracing public space : a participatory approach to transform public spaces in low-income communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas, Ana Cristina, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Rapid urban growth has challenged our traditional planning methods. It has been a driver for the increase of overcrowded informal settlements in major cities of the developing world, which shelter one third of the world ...

  1. Proc. of the 2002 Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME-02), Dublin, Ireland, May 24-26, 2002 The Edge of NIME -from Cult to Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    amount of talent and dedication. Once people exploit a new technology for food, shelter, or defense to move in many other direc- tions. Although bound by the capabilities of available analog and vacuum tube

  2. Time, energy & form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnis, Martha Jane

    1982-01-01

    Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

  3. H A&S 222a Introduction to Energy and Environment (Life Under the Pale Sun) out: 11 April

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H A&S 222a Introduction to Energy and Environment (Life Under the Pale Sun) Essay 2 out: 11 April in challenging environments, with reference to their needs for energy and shelter. We will continue to develop

  4. Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to restore hundreds of acres of historic wetlands in the next few years to provide food and shelter for salmon migrating to and from the ocean. The acquisition protects more...

  5. Stochastic modeling to allocate and assess disaster response capacity in logistics networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seelbach, Lauren A

    2015-01-01

    When a disaster occurs in the United States, individuals in the impacted areas look to the local, state and federal government agencies to provide aid in the form of food, water, shelter, and other essential commodities. ...

  6. A comparative study of structural material for dome construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Chun Wai

    2009-01-01

    Unobstructed free space is a pervasive goal in the design of structures intended to provide shelter and protection. This is especially essential for venues such as athletics, spectator activities, and large congregations. ...

  7. Winter Weather Preparedness Have a Plan -Make a Kit -Stay Informed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Winter Weather Preparedness Have a Plan - Make a Kit - Stay Informed during winter weather. Move livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking. If necessary insulate walls and attic. Caulk and weather-strip doors and windowsills

  8. The Shelterbelt Project: a study of tree planting on the Great Plains, 1934-1942 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilkemann, Virginia Violet

    1978-01-01

    for the Shelterbelt Project. From the beginning it was apparent that the Shelter- belt Project rested on "shaky" ground. During its lifetime the Project suffered from financial difficulties and public misunderstanding of its aims and purpose. Although it never...-108 A PRESS RELEASE 100 B A TEN-ROW SHELTERBELT DESIGN 103 D THE LENRD DISTRICT THE GREAT PLAINS REGION NEBRASKA 104 105 106 EFFECTS OF SHELTER BELTS ON WIND VELOCITY 107 LOCATION OF THE ORIGINAL SHELTERBELT ZONE 108 VITA 109 CHAPTER I...

  9. Operational results of National Solar Demonstration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waite, E.V.

    1981-01-01

    Included in the National Solar Demonstration Program are examples of earth-sheltered, passive solar designs. The data obtained from these sites presents an interesting look at what is both technically and economically feasible. Data from four demonstration sites that are members of the National Solar Data Network are utilized to present an economic and technical analyses of a group of four sites. Three of these sites are earth sheltered residential structures, the fourth is a commercial passive structure. This sample of four demonstration sites is not intended to provide a statistical representation of passive earth sheltered structures, but rather, an example of the type of information available through the National Solar Data Program and how this information may be utilized.

  10. Influence of civil defense on strategic countervalue fatalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, T.F.

    1982-04-28

    Two modeling studies were conducted to simulate the effect of fallout shelters on the outcome of a massive countervalue nuclear exchange between the Soviet Union and the United States. One was to determine the number of nuclear weapons required to mount an effective fallout attack against a country with dispersed population; the other was to determine the number of expected US fatalities resulting from a countervalue attack against US urban population centers. The results of these studies indicate that the number of weapons required to mount such an attack depends on the adequacy of the shelter system and that the evacuation of urban populations can substantially reduce expected fatality levels.

  11. Heavy loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The extreme pressures on the roof and walls of an earth-sheltered residential home are discussed and the need for careful planning is stressed. Pertinent terms are defined. Footings and wall structure (reinforced concrete walls and concrete block walls) are described. Roofing systems are discussed in detail and illustrated: (1) poured-in-place concrete roof slabs; (2) pre-cast concrete planks; and (3) heavy timber roofs. Insulation of earth-sheltered homes is reviewed in terms of using: (1) urethanes; (2) extruded polystyrene; and (3) expanded polystyrene. Advantages, disadvantages, R-factors, costs, and installation are discussed. (MJJ)

  12. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  13. Liberalism, Religion, and the Sources of Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Simon

    2004-01-01

    . Chlaholm ~ fu.oom M'IO ""' S.ll Stual1 HamJIIahl,. r •uo:>m o1 u.no William J<. P'rankana SOme 8H •t' &eo~~ M ile• Wllfrfd aallarw F'orm •"" Conltnl '"' (lt\\•Cti il'leOIJ J. N. P'lndlalf Alan QewlrUI Uotaf 1\\atONtt, Alba11 Hofetadter lllaul... that it works, and that you rely on it all the time. Pop­ per may have thought that the scientific assertion that arsenic poisons 2 is hut a hold cm~jcctun·, lik<· tlw cot~j<•ctun· that an asteroid will de­ stroy lilc on earth within fi~·c hundn·d years...

  14. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 24852491, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/2485/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    , Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA to the current reliance on diesel generators for electricity at Summit, unavoidable local emissions placed into providing electricity, communications, and shelter at this remote location has paid off

  15. Diurnal temperature range over the United States: A satellite view Donglian Sun,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    Diurnal temperature range over the United States: A satellite view Donglian Sun,1 Rachel T. Pinker; published 4 March 2006. [1] Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important climate change index. Information on this parameter comes primarily from sparse and unevenly distributed observations of shelter air

  16. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE O F THE CHIEF O F ENGINEERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    to water resources and sediment quality within the New York and New Jersey Port District, including with the requirements of Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) 1986, as amended. The estimated total Federal first cost for a sheltering berm provides a cost effective disposal method, improves the hydrology of a

  17. DISCRETE AND CONTINUOUS doi:10.3934/dcdsb.2014.19.xx DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS SERIES B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reluga, Tim

    maturity, and energy storage [11]. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification. 92D40, 92D15, 70K42, 70H12. Key risks and take advantage of negative correlation in the spatial components of environmental factors (e.g., gravity, wind, water currents), internal state (e.g., need for food, shelter, mates

  18. H A&S 220C : Energy and Environment : Life Under the Pale Sun Out: 12 October 2004 (Tues)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    science. An example might be to estimate the amount of solar energy hitting Greenland, comparedH A&S 220C : Energy and Environment : Life Under the Pale Sun Out: 12 October 2004 (Tues) Back: 26 of life: water, food, shelter, warmth, transport, plus materials for constructing clothing, tools

  19. Morphological modeling of a nourished bayside beach with a low tide terrace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    of rapidly changing local wind con- ditions and sheltering of ocean waves from the bay entrances. Significant with the size of the bay and local wind strength and direction. The frequent occurrences of short, steep ero with sharp crests and flat troughs, which are responsible for the delivery of offshore sediments to beaches

  20. C:\\Users\\arbeaug\\Desktop\\GA Templates\\Gift in Kind Donor Questionnaire.docx 1 Gift in Kind -Donor Questionnaire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    for capital property, the adjusted cost base) of the donated property to you? $___________ b. If NO, did you Questionnaire.docx 2 c. If YES, what is the cost (or for capital property, the adjusted cost base) to you that is a tax shelter? YES ______ NO ______ e. If YES, what is the cost (or for capital property, the adjusted

  1. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , during 35-foot seas and 60 miles an hour winds, certainly rough but not unusual Aleutian weather the slow tow to a sheltered bay on Kodiak Island. High winds and large swells made progress slow is towed to Seattle. The drillship is carrying about 150,000 gallons of diesel fuel and lubricant

  2. Scientists unravel secrets of marine life at the only atoll in South Atlantic: Rocas Atoll, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    of a permanent research and monitoring station. Since then, the Marine Biological Reserve of Rocas Atoll have during low tide. The authors believe these environments provide shelter against direct wave action the Northeastern coast of Brazil is Rocas Atoll, the only atoll in the entire Southern Atlantic. Atolls

  3. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 6/10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    locations (i.e., science laboratories, shops, etc.) must be posted with emergency and hazard information. See EHS SOP Door Posting for Potentially Hazardous Locations. · Shelter-in-place locations as well laboratories and shops generally fall into this category. These types of hazardous locations are required

  4. MODELING LAND SURFACE PROCESSES IN SHORT-TERM WEATHER AND CLIMATE STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    , glaciers, inland water, mountains, animals, human beings, their shelters, and much more. Land surface@mail.utexas.edu Website: www.geo.utexas.edu/climate (Manuscript received 31 January 2003) Land exchanges momentum, energy, water, aerosols, carbon dioxide and other trace gases with its overlying atmosphere. The land surface

  5. Judy Loven, Animal Damage Managament Specialist Bats are among Indiana's most interesting and unique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    chance of someone contacting a rabid bat, although the great majority of house-infesting bats in Indiana in caves, hollow trees and other natural shelters. A few species, however, commonly roost and breed within During the first warm days of spring, the brown bats leave their overwintering sites and enter structures

  6. At the time you completed the 2015-2016 FAFSA, you indicated that you were either homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless. Before we can determine your financial aid eligibility, you need to confirm your status and attach the required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    and Urban Development (HUD) 2. Director (or designee) of a runaway or homeless youth basic center) of an emergency shelter program funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 3. Director (or by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 2. Director (or designee) of a runaway or homeless youth

  7. Innovation and the big builders : barriers to integrating sustainable design and construction practices into the production homebuilding industry : the case of Pulte Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Justin T. (Justin Talbott)

    2005-01-01

    The homebuilding industry has held a dominant presence in the U.S. economy over the past century. It has been a source of profit, shelter and jobs for countless Americans. In order to meet the needs of an ever-burgeoning ...

  8. Emergency Power Facility Assessment Tool (EPFAT) Following disasters that disrupt the commercial power service, generators are often required at critical public facilities,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    plants, hospitals, wastewater treatment plants and shelters. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE power service, generators are often required at critical public facilities, such as water treatment) 295-7745 (Primary) · Emergency Power SME (724) 459-4709 (Alternate) Key Web Links: · An EPFAT Tutorial

  9. Financial and Food Assistance 1. 2-1-1: Often times, people don't know where to go for help ... or that help is available.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Financial and Food Assistance 1. 2-1-1: Often times, people don't know where to go for help ... or that help is available. People don't know, for example, that emergency food and shelter assistance Together Motto: "State Employees Helping State Employees!" 3. Food Bank of the Rockies' main programs

  10. Where's My Bus Stop? Supporting Independence of Blind Transit Riders with StopInfo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    in the Seattle area with information entered by the community, primarily as they waited at these stops and Society]: Social Is sues--Assistive technologies for persons with disabilities General Terms Design]. They often search for physical landmarks such as the bus shelter, benches, or transit sign as a cue

  11. CANEXTREMEPOVERTYBEELIMINATED? 4 COOPERATION SOUTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Sven Oliver

    nutrition, uncontaminated drink- ing water, safe shelter and sanitation as The author argues that poverty to pursue at the United Nations Millennium Summit in 2000. Jeffrey Sachs directs the Earth Institute of this century will help by easing pressures on Earth's cli- mate, ecosystems and natural resources -- pressures

  12. Predicting Rock Mass Decay in Engineering Lifetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEORGE KENNETH HACK International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation, P.O. Box 6 of fieldwork by the International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation and Delft. In soluble materials such as the gypsum unit investigated here, water retention in slopes sheltered from

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Milla Rautio Atte Korhola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    - nificant and best shelter from UV radiation and led to best survival. Variation in survival was observed be wavelength spec- trum reaching the Earth's surface. It is divided into two wavebands: wavelengths from 280, in the subarctic region, springtime (February/April) levels of UVB radiation reaching the surface of the Earth have

  14. Inuit Engineering Anton Filatov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inuit Engineering Anton Filatov CDE Standards 2nd Grade Standard: 3. Earth Systems Science 1 animals 3rd Grade Standard: 3. Earth Systems Science 1. Earth's materials can be broken down and. In the provided presentation the first problem is building a weather proof shelter out of available materials

  15. Botanical Diversity (BIOL 110), Spring 2002 Instructors: David Hibbett, dhibbett@black.clarku.edu Sackler N300A. Office hours: Tuesday 1:00-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbett, David S.

    biologists) to appreciate the diversity of life that has evolved on Earth. Biodiversity is an invaluable resource, providing food, shelter, medicine, environmental detoxification, fuel, labor, genes, oxygen should make every effort to document, understand, and protect the diversity of life on Earth. Many

  16. Structure and composition of organic reefs and carbonate mud mounds: concepts and categories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riding, Robert

    Riding* Robert Riding, Department of Earth Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3YE, United Kingdom independently of cementation and particulate sedimentation. Simultaneously, by creating partly open shelter-29-20874326. E-mail address: riding@cardiff.ac.uk (R. Riding). www.elsevier.com/locate/earscirev Earth

  17. A Science Service, Feature Beleased upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :ritS fror.1 the earth riddle one with a thousand stings; eyes, nose, mouth and er'~i:s;",re at once filled with sand; one i s forced t o neelc shelter. Vithout ]muse, sornetines f o r hour on hour, the wind teDrs i

  18. 7 Evolution When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a funda-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulmschneider, Peter

    organism on Earth ghts for its existence (food, light, territory, and shelter) and for its successful7 Evolution When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a funda- mental intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail

  19. Released on receipt but intended f o r use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &-Hol*tein earth walls are thrown up and shrubbery is planted upon them, since forest trees cannot be made t o grow- protected portions of the groves AS i n those sheltered by the windbreak. p s e r i e s of anemometers

  20. A T. r e x N A m e d S u e Currently on tour in the U.S.,Australasia, and the Middle East, AT. rex Named Sue combines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    k g r o u n d o n S u e One of the largest flesh-eaters to have ever inhabited the Earth, Sue probably had a keen sense of smell. Test your nose to find food, water, and shelter. · Completeness

  1. Sunspace Minnesota: passive solar design for winter resorts. Period covered, August 1979-October 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Minnesota winter resorts are discussed as to type, size, and use. Energy needs and conservation techniques are described by cabin type and problem areas. Existing cabins are analyzed for conservation opportunities and solar retrofit potential. New cabin designs and concepts are presented including earth sheltered buildings. (MHR)

  2. Transactions IAU, Volume XXVIB Proc. XXVIth IAU General Assembly, August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Luc

    first with the only planet known to shelter life. If the planet Earth is used as an example to search of vegetation in the spectrum of Earth seen as a simple dot, using the reflection of the global Earth (not possible at our latitudes) and so variations due to different parts of Earth, that is to say

  3. 11/12/12 Climate change could kill off pandas -Telegraph 1/2www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/9670194/Climate-change-could-kill-off-pandas.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11/12/12 Climate change could kill off pandas - Telegraph 1/2www.telegraph.co.uk/earth pandas - Telegraph 2/2www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/9670194/Climate on the bears' menu and also provides essential food and shelter for other animals. The plant's unusual

  4. THEAMAZON 1 THEAMAZON 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    on earth. It is home to nearly 10% of the world's mammals1 and a staggering 15% of the world's known land with everything from food and shelter to tools and medicines, and plays a crucial role in the spiritual life

  5. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are: a review of a greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered home, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution for solar greenhouses, and the future of solar greenhouses.

  6. PLoS Biology | www.plosbiology.org 1300 August 2006 | Volume 4 | Issue 8 | e277

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    diversity of life on Earth is dramatically affected by human alterations of ecosystems [1]. Compelling of environmental change, through its effects on the ecosystem processes that lie at the core of the Earth's most, fiber, potable water, shelter, and medicines. The links between biodiversity and ecosystem services have

  7. Integrated assessment and ValuatIon of ecosystem goods and serVIces proVIded by coastal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    stocks that produce them are critical to the functioning of the earth's life support systems. They also between land and sea, the coastal regions of the earth serve as unique geological, ecological for human activity. Early on, estuaries and inlets served as places of relative shelter that also provided

  8. Forest Influences on Climate and Water Resources at the Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , productivity and functioning of vegetation on earth, our knowledge about the role of forests in regulating Laboratory in the southeast U.S. and a simulation study on the North China Shelter Belt Project. Future research gaps were identified in terms of integrated Earth System modeling to guide forest management

  9. LUNAR UETEORITES Y82].92 AND Y821.93: GEOCHEI{TCAL AI{D PETROI,OGIC COMPARISONS TO OTHER LUNAR BRECCIAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the-Moon. They are random samples of the lunar crust that were sent to Earth by meteorite i4pact breccias. They may have been early breccias-in the megar6golith which were buiied'and sheltered from

  10. Model conservation standards bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This bibliography is divided into sections dealing with building design (superinsulation, solar houses, earth sheltered houses, heat loss calculation, lighting, retrofitting); heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; windows; doors; walls; roofs; floors; air leakage/infiltration; insulation materials; indoor air quality; moisture; performance; codes, laws, standards; economics; and program description. (DLC)

  11. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are a review of greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered house, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution from solar greenhouses, and the future for solar greenhouses.

  12. Earth coupled cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grondzik, W.T.; Boyer, L.L.; Johnston, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    Earth coupled cooling is an important consideration for residential and commercial designers, owners, and builders in many regions of the country. The potential benefits which can be expected from passive earth contact cooling are reviewed. Recommendations for the design of earth sheltered structures incorporating earth coupled cooling strategies are also presented.

  13. Join today...visit free! Membership is your passport to visitation all year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    on Earth. In a healthy habitat, plants, animals and other organisms have plenty of food and shelter.morrisarboretum.org YOUR PASSPORT TO #12;Did you know that all living and non-living things on Earth are connected in a web or hurt the ecosystems that make Earth a hospitable place for all life. 1 2 THE QUEST BEGINS HEREYOUR

  14. Atmosphere/mantle coupling and feedbacks Cedric Gillmann1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    of Earth Sciences, ETH Zürich, Institute of Geophysics, Zürich, Switzerland, 2 Now at Royal Observatory habitability is to compare the one planet known to shelter life with other similar planets that do not (as far as we know), which are presently Mars and Venus. Extrasolar super-Earths are being discovered

  15. Chana Tilevitz Prof. F. Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    to the rocky desert, with its sheltering caves and tunnels. But he wasn't quick enough, because on his way to incidentally become royalty by being more blue-blooded than any family on Earth, it had to be when I was dying

  16. One way to forecast 1,000 years ahead is to look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varian, Hal R.

    possibility is new intelligent life-forms on Earth based on electronic or biological forms. While life-forms evolving naturally have built-in desires to compete for mates, food, shelter, and resources, new forms may powerful, threatening the existence of human life on Earth. Let us hope we find a way to manage technology

  17. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 325 31 JULY 2009 547 PERSPECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to shelter from the heat being emitted by Earth, with a good view of the sky. A sun shield will protect Earth. It will also look into the dense clouds of matter that enclose stars in the process of for these apparently different young gal- axy populations. If Herschel were placed in orbit around Earth, heat from our

  18. After a damaging earthquake, emergency managers must quickly find answers to impor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and rescue, medical emergency response, mass care and shelter, and other crit- ical response needs must often, not at a single point, the location of the earthquake (the epicenter) tells us only where the earth- quake started Shaking UNDERSTANDING EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS IN URBAN AREAS Immediately following an earth- quake, emergency

  19. Cultivating Answers An Investment in the UW Biology Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    legacy. #12;Life on Earth is not possible without plants. They are the source of our food, they provide us with shelter, shape our environment, and supply us with medications. Understanding the basic of the Earth's growing population, the Greenhouse supports the mission of the University through research

  20. 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 3 BLACK ASH SILVICULTURE PROJECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    material in the manufacturing of hand- crafted baskets. This paper reports the success of artificially early height growth. These shelters, however, decrease seedling photosynthesis rates to about one using stocking charts developed by Erdmann and others (1987). The simulator models, NE Twigs, SILVAH

  1. Wind energy for low head irrigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, J.L.; Bender, A.R.

    1982-12-01

    An air-lift pump utilizing a wind turbine driven air compressor is a viable method of furnishing irrigation water for the establishment of a tree shelter belt. The performance characteristics of the air-lift pump are quantified for use in a design procedure.

  2. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Rodrguez, Beneharo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    del Norte, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, 2 Los Barros 21, E-38410 Los Realejos, Tenerife, Canary, 4 Constitución 19-3, E-38410 Los Realejos, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain and 5 La Habana 8­3°c (edf. Las Vistas), E-38650 Los Cristianos, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain Capsule Taller and sheltered

  3. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Many types of emergencies can occur on campus; instructions for specific emergencies such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Many types of emergencies can occur on campus; instructions for specific emergencies such as severe weather, active shooter, or fire can be found at emergency.uark.edu. Severe Weather (Tornado Warning): · Follow the directions of the instructor or emergency personnel · Seek shelter

  4. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 2011, v. 81, 159184 Research Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gani, M. Royhan

    Chevron Energy Technology Company, 6001 Bollinger Canyon Road, San Ramon, California 94583-0719, U.S.A. e sheltered from wave energy. These progradation directions are consistent with deflection of the deltas that predominantly comprise wave-dominated shoreface­shelf deposits. Two parasequences contain river- dominated delta

  5. Volunteer Weekend University and College Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    at the shelter. Meet at Norman Garage at 8:00am Mill Creek Horse Farm: Help wash retired horses. Meet at Norman, most likely in my car, and I drove him to his house and let him out of the car there. The prepositions

  6. Connaught Hill Park 37.0 acres (Connaught Drive & Queensway St.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    CITY PARKS · Connaught Hill Park 37.0 acres (Connaught Drive & Queensway St.) Picnic Site 346.0 acres (Cranbrook Hill Rd.) Hiking Trails (15.0 km), Picnic Shelter and Sites, Viewpoint, Public (Heather Rd. & Austin Rd. West) Ball Diamonds, Soccer Pitch, Washrooms, Elks Centre · Recreation Place 33

  7. The diet and feeding behaviour of feral cats, Felis catus at Marion Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretoria, University of

    The diet and feeding behaviour of feral cats, Felis catus at Marion Island R.J. van Aarde house cats Felis catus in a wide range of continental and island habitats, have been reviewed recently categories, these being: Felis catus category: remains collected in sheltered #12;--------------- 124 feeding

  8. The New Lemberg Children's Center and Playground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    urban children who live far from a working farm or the woods to explore. Others like, worms and other small insects. We want our children to build with rocks and tree limbs a shelter with tree limbs and woven reeds to keep out the wind and rain. Outdoor science

  9. CoastalandHydraulicsLaboratoryERDC/CHLTR-15-xxx DRAFT 24 July 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    terrain that has been vastly altered by agricultural and urbanized development. Shoreline hardening bathymetry, wind, and island sheltering. Currents vary from nearshore to offshore and within the water column transport of sediment is small. There is evidence of nearshore eddy formation that increases the complexity

  10. OBJECTIVES OF THE EDINBURGH KNOWLEDGE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosché, Frédéric

    is the recommended size for use on A4 publications. Minimum size The logo should never be too small to read. 20mm design; landscape for wind sheltering and wind chill reduction; pedestrian wind safety. Researchers have' system. CONTAMINANT DISPERSION AND AIR POLLUTION Contaminants and pollution are a feature of modern urban

  11. www.swinburne.edu.au Supercomputer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    of technology, and its interest to a wide audience. It is worth reflecting, though, that these applied researchIpe Book calls For a pInch oF antImatter the exotic chemistry made possible by antimatter is being used are reshaping shelter design to help save lives melissa marino Published by Swinburne univerSity of technology

  12. Inorganic and organic carbon variations in surface water, Konza prairie LTER site, USA, and Maolan karst experimental site, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Huan

    2014-05-31

    is controlled by CO2 outgassing. We also used our calculated pCO2 from PHREEQC and gas transfer coefficient (k600=0.5 m/d) for small wind-sheltered lakes from Cole et al. (2010) to derive fluxes (Table 2. 4b) for comparison. Our estimated fluxes (Table 2.4a...

  13. Biodiversity at St Anne's College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ The quads and flowerbeds at College provide habitats for a variety of plants and animals. The College providing shelter for animals. Following the construction of the Ruth Deech Building, we sensitively plants. Compost ­ Leaf mould, bracken, bark and loam generated by the College grounds is composted

  14. Transactions in GIS, 2008, 12(3): 323339 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao Department of Geography University of South Carolina Diansheng Guo Department of Geography of Geography, University of South Carolina, 709 Bull Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. E-mail: liao4@mailbox overu- tilization and underutilization of a shelter. Moreover, due to limited resources, the total

  15. June 3, 2009, Human Resource Services Hurricane Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    #12;June 3, 2009, Human Resource Services #12;Agenda · Hurricane Preparation · Budget Update · Resurvey Updates · Important Dates #12;HR Forum Hurricane Season Preparedness #12;Questions to Ask Yourself · Guideline for developing unit level hurricane plan #12;Employee & Student Sheltering · UF normally opens

  16. ASSESSMENT OF THE RADIONUCLIDE COMPOSITION OF "HOT PARTICLES" SAMPLED IN THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOURTH REACTOR UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

    2011-10-01

    Fuel-containing materials sampled from within the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) 4th Reactor Unit Confinement Shelter were spectroscopically studied for gamma and alpha content. Isotopic ratios for cesium, europium, plutonium, americium, and curium were identified and the fuel burnup in these samples was determined. A systematic deviation in the burnup values based on the cesium isotopes, in comparison with other radionuclides, was observed. The conducted studies were the first ever performed to demonstrate the presence of significant quantities of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 243}Cm. It was determined that there was a systematic underestimation of activities of transuranic radionuclides in fuel samples from inside of the ChNPP Confinement Shelter, starting from {sup 241}Am (and going higher), in comparison with the theoretical calculations.

  17. Heat flows and energetic behavior of a telecommunication radio base station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petraglia, Antonio; Vetromile, Carmela; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Lubritto, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows a study on energetic consumption of BTSs (Base Transceiver Stations) for mobile communication, related to conditioning functions. An energetic "thermal model" of a telecommunication station is proposed and studied. The results have been validated with a BTS in central Italy, showing good agreement. Findings show a substantial high internal-external temperature difference in the containing shelter, particularly during daytime and warm months, due to sources of heat (equipment, external temperature and sun radiation) and to the difficulty in spread the warmth out. The necessity to keep the operating temperatures within a given range for the correct functioning of the electronic equipment requires the use of conditioning setups, and this significantly increases the energetic demand of the whole system. The analysis of thermal flows across the shelter can help to gather further data on its temperature behavior and to devise practical measures to lower the power demand, while keeping the operating...

  18. Up and down: energy and cost comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, H.B.; Brite, S.E.; Yost, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    A study comparing cost and energy performance of equal aboveground and earth-sheltered homes is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five cities were selected to represent five regions of the US. A module of a basic 138 m/sup 2/ (1480-sq-ft) living unit was designed to adapt to both conventional, well-insulated housing and earth-sheltered (ES) housing. The homes were designed to represent the popular home on the market in the particular neighborhood. The designs vary to conform with regional requirements for heating and cooling loads as well as style, construction materials, finish, etc. Finished sets of detailed drawings were prepared for all the sites.

  19. Disaster and disabilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stough, Laura

    2014-01-01

    when schools were closed and programs were reorganized (McAdams Ducy & Stough, 2011). Individuals with disabilities in the United States are entitled to equal access to emergency services, such as evacuation procedures and sheltering. The Stafford Act...; McAdams Ducy, & Stough, 2011) have doc- umented that teachers can provide effective emotional, as well as instrumental, support to students with disabili- ties during disasters. Similarly, employers who provide supported work environments need...

  20. Drinking and Healing: Reflections on the Lost Autonomy of the Innu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samson, Colin

    2001-09-01

    Utshimassits and Sheshatshiu out as villages of pathology. In both villages new institutions to deal with sickness, such as treatment centers, group homes, women's shelters and clinics, have been funded and established rapidly over the last decade and now... that leads to destruction and death. Some drinkers' relationships have been permanently tainted by acts of cruelty and carelessness, and their lives have been cut short in road accidents, exposure to cold weather, self- inflicted gunshot wounds or house...

  1. Mosquitoes and the Diseases they Transmit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, John A.; Olson, Jimmy K.

    2002-06-21

    -term, you need to use several complementary management techniques, including: a73 Sanitation ? removing food, water, and shelter a73 Habitat disruption ? draining the water where mosquitoes breed a73 Biological control ? using mosquito fish, nema- todes... thuringiensis israeliensis especially Anopheles basins, storm sewers, clogged toxin and Bacillus sphaericus punctipennis streams, irrigated land Sanitation?removing food, water and vegetation Floodwater Aedes, Ochlerotatus, flood plains, salt marshes, Habitat...

  2. Steer Feeding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, John C.

    1915-01-01

    in ccnducting this experiment was as follows: 1. To compare cotton seed meal and cold pressed cotton seed in supplementing silaqe for fattening cattle. 2. To determine $lie advieabilitv of supplementing cotton seed meal and silage with grain for Fattening... cattle. 3. To compare rice bran and ground mi10 heads in supplementing cotton peed meal and silage for fattening cattle. 4. To determine the value of shelter in fattening cattle. CATTLE USED. The cattle need were sixtjr high grade, range bred, two...

  3. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  4. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  5. Thermal insulation for Buildings. September 1982-September 1988 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1982-September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (This updated bibliography contains 244 citations, 92 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  6. Apparatus for collecting solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wildenrotter, K.

    1981-08-18

    Apparatus is described for collecting solar energy comprises a collector having a solar-energy collector surface. The collector is mounted on a support and is pivotable between an exposed position in which the collector surface faces the sun and a substantially horizontal sheltered position in which the collector surface faces the earth, thereby protecting the collector surface from the elements and facilitating access thereto for maintenance.

  7. Thermal insulation for buildings. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Thermal insulation for buildings. September 1982-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1982-May 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (This updated bibliography contains 299 citations, 55 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. Eight underground designs: underground plans Book No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.; Wells, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different designs are given for earth-sheltered houses. Each design is depicted thoroughly, with floor plans, cross sections, views from the several sides, and some general comments. The plans are intended as a planning tool to be adapted to individual needs, budgets, sites and local ordinances. Each plan expresses a different idea, with terrain varying from flat land to south and north slopes. Conventional and novel construction and design methods are demonstrated.

  10. FYI: July 5, 1984 - December 20, 1984

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1984-01-01

    Number 768 July 5, 1984 PERSONNEL Pat Wittry has announced her resignation as Research Aide with the Library's Title II-C Central American Cataloging Project, effective August 2. S. Gilliland KPERS TAX SHELTERED Library staff who contribute... in Lippincott, so the phone may go unanswered. Any messages should be left in the SPLAT mail basket or, in case of dire emergency, with the Acquisitions Department. LFA During Ellen Johnson's absence, please refer LFA questions to Annie Williams, Catalog...

  11. Decision process for the retrofit of municipal buildings with solar energy systems: a technical guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Licciardello, Michael R.; Wood, Brian; Dozier, Warner; Braly, Mark; Yates, Alan

    1980-11-01

    As a background for solar applications, the following topics are covered: solar systems and components for retrofit installations; cost, performance, and quality considerations; and financing alternatives for local government. The retrofit decision process is discussed as follows: pre-screening of buildings, building data requirements, the energy conservation audit, solar system sizing and economics, comparison of alternatives, and implementation. Sample studies are presented for the West Valley Animal Shelter and the Hollywood Police Station. (MHR)

  12. A Comparison of Classical Counterconditioning and Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior on Aggressive Behavior in Dogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Kristyn Echterling

    2010-04-10

    ). Many times these dogs are relinquished to local animal shelters (Salman, Hutchison, & Ruch-Gallie., 2000; Wells & Hepper, 2000). Society incurs costs associated with the care of housing such dogs, including food, housing, medical treatment... with people” (Wright et al., 2005, p. 145). Simply put, if a dog is not friendly towards people they risk losing their house or life. In an attempt to properly assess and treat aggressive behavior, many animal behaviorists or trainers analyze...

  13. KALELE ROAD D Dormitory Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FREEWAY H1 KALELE ROAD VV D D D D D D D D D U U U U U U U U U U C C U U U U A A A A A A A C C C VV Kuahine Hale Kahawai Environmental Protection Services Federal Credit Union Energy House & Safety Office Shelter Art Building Sustainability Courtyard Kuykendall Hall UH Bookstore Jakuan Tea House Sinclair

  14. Kemiteknik -Vrme-och strmningsteknik Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    , Z = Pv/RT (for n=1mole) 5. KJ05 Q3-1 An arctic explorer builds a temporary shelter from wind, , the enthalpies h, and the energy flows Q (heat) and W (power), as given in the Table. Calculate all (8) values tar emot W2 = 50 kJ energi i form av arbete, efter vilket den är vid tillstĺnd "2". Frĺn detta

  15. Kemiteknik -Vrme-och strmningsteknik Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    , Z = Pv/RT (for n=1mole) 5. KJ05 Q3-1 An arctic explorer builds a temporary shelter from wind, , the enthalpies h, and the energy flows Q (heat) and W (power), as given in the Table. Calculate all (7) valuesJ värme medan den tar emot W2 = 50 kJ energi i form av arbete, efter vilket den är vid tillstĺnd "2". Frĺn

  16. txH2O: Volume 4, Number 1 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2008-01-01

    more than 20 tons of food for area shelters around El Paso. Daphne Richards, AmeriCorps project manager and El Paso County Extension agent? Horticulture, said, ?The project has not only made a difference in the lives of our commu- nity residents... Educating the community AmeriCorps members contribute to water conservation 18 I Innovative Partnering Texas A&M, McKinney develop water conservation venture 20 I Marketing water Cities, groups promote landscape management, water conservation...

  17. Advances in geotectural design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    Although the price of oil dropped well below $20 US earlier this year from a previous high above $35 US, the interest and participation shown in this conference does not seem to have been materially affected. Perhaps energy, although not unimportant, is no longer the driving force behind the continuing development and exploration of the earth shelter idiom in architecture. Rather, the thrust of most papers seems to seek an understanding of the adaptation of earth shelter into varied types of settings, especially urban applications, and also the understanding of the physical phenomenon of how an earth shelter works. The paper have been grouped into three basic categories with several subsections in each category. First, vernacular approaches are documented from the viewpoint of habitation, and followed by other types of utilization. Then, recent theoretical developments are reviewed in terms of materials, occupant studies, and heat transfer and air flow analyses. The final section deals with contemporary practice, where design concepts and case studies are presented, followed by building systems and urban planning aspects. All 54 papers have been abstracted separately for inclusion on the Energy Data Base.

  18. Passive solar heated energy conserving biosphere home. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarski, R.

    1985-01-01

    ''Warm Gold'' is an original design of a passive solar heated energy conserving biosphere home. It has been owner-built with financial help from the US Department of Energy through its Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program of 1980. The home incorporates the six major components of passive solar design: appropriate geometry and orientation, glazing, light levels and reflective surfaces, ventilation, thermal storage, and insulation. Warm Gold is an earth-sheltered home with earth cover on the roof as well as on the two opaque north leg walls. It is of durable and efficient masonry construction which included stone masonry with on-site materials and cement block and ready mix concrete. Excavation, backfill, and drainage were necessary aspects of earth sheltered construction together with the all-important Bentonite waterproofing system. Warm Gold is a house which meets all the national building code standards of HUD. The home has two bedrooms, one bathroom, living room, dining room-kitchen, greenhouse, and utility annex, all of which are incorporated with the earth-sheltered, passive solar systems to be a comfortable, energy-efficient living environment.

  19. El Roque de Los Muchachos Site Characteristics. III. Analysis of Atmospheric Dust and Aerosol Extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, G; Ortolani, S; Pedani, M; Ghedina, A

    2008-01-01

    Canary Islands are normally interested by dominant North-East winds that, in some meteorological conditions, can transport sand at high altitude from the Sahara desert. The dust may affect the efficiency of the telescopes and decreases the transparency of the sky. In order to maximize the scientific return of the telescopes located at the ORM, we present an analysis of the atmospheric dust content and its effects on astronomical observations. B, V and I dust aerosol astronomical extinction are derived. Using a 5 years series database of data taken from the four channel TNG dust monitor, we compute a mean hourly and daily values of the dust content. We have detected particles having size 0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 um. Using a power law we have derived the content of 10.0 um particles. We found a typical local dust concentration ranging from 3x10^6 particles per cubic meter at 0.3 um, to 10^3 at 5.0 um and 10 at 10.0 um, increasing up to 3 order of magnitudes during the dust storms, with a relative higher increase o...

  20. Probing the Dark Sector with Dark Matter Bound States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haipeng An; Bertrand Echenard; Maxim Pospelov; Yue Zhang

    2015-10-16

    A model of dark sector where $O({\\rm few~GeV})$ mass dark matter particles $\\chi$ are supplied by a lighter dark force mediator $V$, $m_V \\ll m_\\chi$, is motivated by the recently discovered mismatch between simulated and observed shapes of galactic haloes. Such models, in general, provide a challenge for direct detection efforts and collider searches. We show that for a large range of coupling constants and masses, the production and decay of the bound states of $\\chi$, such as $0^{-+}$ and $1^{--}$ states, $\\eta_D$ and $ \\Upsilon_D$, is an important search channel. We show that $e^+e^-\\to \\eta_D +V$ or $\\Upsilon_D +\\gamma$ production at $B$-factories for $\\alpha_D > 0.1$ is sufficiently strong to result in multiple pairs of charged leptons and pions via $\\eta_D\\to 2V \\to 2(l^+l^-)$ and $\\Upsilon_D\\to 3V \\to 3(l^+l^-)$ $(l=e,\\mu,\\pi)$. The absence of such final states in the existing searches performed at BaBar and Belle sets new constraints on the parameter space of the model. We also show that a search for multiple bremsstrahlung of dark force mediators, $e^+e^-\\to \\chi\\bar\\chi+nV$, resulting in missing energy and multiple leptons, will further improve the sensitivity to self-interacting dark matter.

  1. Risk assessment in international operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricklin, Daniela L.

    2008-11-15

    During international peace-keeping missions, a diverse number of non-battle hazards may be encountered, which range from heavily polluted areas, endemic disease, toxic industrial materials, local violence, traffic, and even psychological factors. Hence, elevated risk levels from a variety of sources are encountered during deployments. With the emphasis within the Swedish military moving from national defense towards prioritization of international missions in atypical environments, the risk of health consequences, including long term health effects, has received greater consideration. The Swedish military is interested in designing an optimal approach for assessment of health threats during deployments. The Medical Intelligence group at FOI CBRN Security and Defence in Umea has, on request from and in collaboration with the Swedish Armed Forces, reviewed a variety of international health threat and risk assessment models for military operations. Application of risk assessment methods used in different phases of military operations will be reviewed. An overview of different international approaches used in operational risk management (ORM) will be presented as well as a discussion of the specific needs and constraints for health risk assessment in military operations. This work highlights the specific challenges of risk assessment that are unique to the deployment setting such as the assessment of exposures to a variety of diverse hazards concurrently.

  2. A Re-Examination of the Origins of the Peculiar Velocity Field Within the Local Supercluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Burstein

    1999-08-30

    The recent re-evaulation of the peculiar velocity field outside the Local Supercluster (Dekel et al. 1999, ApJ 522) has permitted a re-examination of the origins of the peculiar velocity field within the Local Supercluster using the Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities for spiral galaxies. It is shown that the large-scale coherent pattern of peculiar velocities within the LSC are well-fit by a combination of the Outside-Region-(generated)-Motions (O-R-M) from the Potent model with a Virgocentric infall pattern that produces 220 km/s of Virgocentric infall at the Local Group (LG) towards the Virgo cluster moving at 88 km/s towards the LG. The part of the Cosmic Microwave Background motion of the LG this model cannot fit is that perpendicular to the Supergalactic plane (the SGZ direction). On what size scale the remaing 270 km/s CMB SGZ motion of the LG is shared by neighboring galaxies cannot be determined from the present data set, but may be found if we can accurately measure galaxy distances close to the Galactic plane.

  3. An analysis of the lithic remains from several ring middens in Crockett County, Texas: A study in site function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Bill

    1980-01-01

    possible that the rock- shelter represents a mult1ple activity area; that 1s, it provided a con- venient place for camping and other indoor activit1es in add1t1on to cooking. If this is true, the artifact collection from site 41 CX 133 would be more... communication concerning site 41 CX 133. The staff of the Cultural Resources Laboratory at Texas A&M University deserves my thanks for their help in providing facilities . Mark Bray, of this office, drafted the illustrations for this thesis, and to him I am...

  4. True Stories For Fictional Children to Tell in the Dark 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsellino, M.

    2007-01-01

    him even in the middle of the cave. It's like he gives off an aura of utter normalcy, canceling out anything odd in the situation around him. Jason wonders briefly how a guy ends up learning how to do that. "And what's that supposed... travel to look like they're not ridiculously expensive. Some guy from a shelter comes by and offers everybody coffee and soup, but Jason's not really hungry and he's already feeling kinda strung out and jittery even without caffeine. It's been a while...

  5. Coupling of Backbarrier Shorelines to Geomorphological Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, Sarah Margaret

    2013-08-14

    (Crossett et al. 2004; Sallenger et al. 2009: New York Times 2012; Anderson 2013). The effects of Hurricane Sandy on New Jersey and Hurricane Katrina?s impact on the Gulf Coast are recent examples (Goodnough 2005; Navarro 2012; New York Times 2012.... 2000; Kennish 2001; Courrat et al. 2009). There is also evidence that sheltered, low-energy coasts like those on the sound- facing back-barrier are also some of the most densely populated and some of the most heavily eroding in the United States...

  6. War against water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitz-Hugh, S.

    1982-01-01

    It is stressed that waterproofing should be the most important concern in an earth-sheltered home, starting with the design and continuing throughout the construction. Damage which may be caused by water leakage is discussed. Proper site selection is most important and the need for outside professionals and consultants is emphasized. The ideal waterproofing system is discussed and illustrated. Waterproofing agents are discussed in detail. They are: (1) sodium bentonite; (2) elastomers, such as isobutylene isoprene (butyl rubber), EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer), and liquid elastomers (polyurethanes); and (3) rubberized asphalt. Availability, sheet sizes and application of these waterproofing agents are discussed. (MJJ)

  7. $50 and up underground house book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehler, M.

    1981-01-01

    Earth-sheltered housing can be livable, compatible with nature, and inexpensive. Plans and designs for low-cost houses that are integrated with their environment make up most of this book. The author begins by outlining 23 advantages of underground housing and describing the histories of several unconventional buildings in the $50 to $500 price range. He also suggests where building materials can be bought and scrounged, describes construction techniques, and explains how to cope with building codes. Sketches, floorplans, and photographs illustrate the text. 8 references, 4 tables. (DCK)

  8. Experimental plan for investigating building-earth heat transfer at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1980-11-01

    An experimental plan is presented for investigating heat transfer between below-grade portions of building envelopes and the surrounding soil. Included is a detailing of data to be collected at an earth-sheltered structure (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building) to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The attributes of the required data collection instrumentation are defined and a program to assure the accuracy of the collected data is discussed. The experimental plan is intended to be used as a guide to selection, installation, and maintenance of instrumentation as well as in data collection and verification.

  9. Evaluation of the Parameters of Radioactive Contamination of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panasyuk M.I.; Skorbun A.D.; Klyuchnikov O.O.

    2002-02-26

    After Chornobyl NPP (ChNPP) accident the territory near destroyed Unit 4 (that now with the special confinement has the name the ''Shelter'' object) is contaminated of fuel fallouts. During liquidation of the accident consequences this territory was covered with pure earth, concrete, etc. As a result a contaminated anthropogenic layer of the soil on the depth up to 10 m was formed. Now the problem of contamination estimation and the soils management arose. For this tasks a gamma logging method was modified conformably to ChNPP conditions. The methods for necessary coefficients receiving and log treatment have been suggested.

  10. Underground house book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S.

    1980-01-01

    Aesthetics, attitudes, and acceptance of earth-covered buildings are examined initially, followed by an examination of land, money, water, earth, design, heat, and interior factors. Contributions made by architect Frank Lloyd Wright are discussed and reviewed. Contemporary persons, mostly designers, who contribute from their experiences with underground structures are Andy Davis; Rob Roy; Malcolm Wells; John Barnard, Jr.; Jeff Sikora; and Don Metz. A case study to select the site, design, and prepare to construct Earthtech 6 is described. Information is given in appendices on earth-protected buildings and existing basements; financing earth-sheltered housing; heating-load calculations and life-cycle costing; and designer names and addresses. (MCW)

  11. Sustainable urban development under climate change and resource scarcity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olazabal, Marta

    2015-06-09

    , urban land is estimated to occupy between 0.2 and 2.4 per cent3 Seto et al. 2011 of the earth’s surface ( ) and shelter more than 50 per cent of the world’s population (UN 2011). Half of this urban population is living in cities with less than 500... of resources, security to Cities as hubs of development: Employment generation, centralization of services Rural-urban migration: Cities occupy around 3 % of the Earth’s land, but house ~50% of the world population Rapid urbanisation is exerting...

  12. Builders go underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The appeal of earth-sheltered housing increased last year when 1000 new underground houses brought the national total to about 5000. Innovative construction and management techniques help, such as the Terra-Dome's moldset and equipment, which the company sells to builders under a license arrangement. Attention is given to aesthetic appeal as well as to energy savings. The Everstrong company builds all-wood underground houses to cut down on humidity and increase resistance to natural disasters. Tight mortgage money has been a serious problem for underground as well as conventional builders. (DCK)

  13. Low-energy structures concepts. Final report October 1977-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odello, R.J.

    1980-12-01

    This report has discussed various concepts for energy conservation in Navy shore facilities which can be achieved through architectural and structural design decisions. These concepts include earth-sheltered structures, thermal mass concepts, passive solar designs, and exploitation of existing technology. Advantages and disadvantages of the systems were discussed in qualitative terms. Where possible, specific data and equations were presented to show how the benefits could be evaluated for specific designs. Sufficient information is available here and in the references to permit a designer to evaluate any of the concepts for applicability to a specific design case.

  14. Microclimate Corrosion Effects in Coastal Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.

    1996-03-24

    The Albany Research Center is conducting atmospheric corrosion research in coastal environments to improve the performance of materials in the Nation's infrastructure. The corrosion of bare metals, and of painted, thermal-sprayed, and galvanized steels are presented for one-year exposures at sites located on bridges and utility poles along the Oregon coast. The effects of microclimates (for example distance from the ocean, high wind zones, and salt-fog prone regions) are examined in conjunction with sample orientation and sheltered/unsheltered comparisons. An atmospheric corrosion model examines the growth and dissolution of corrosion product layers to arrive at a steady-state thickness and corrosion rate.

  15. Emergency Preparedness: An Analysis of Policy Leader and Community Perspectives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crady, Kristen L.; Hicks, Sarah K.; Jones, Kami L.; Rhodes, Erica D.; Williams, Elena P.; Pool, Scott

    2002-01-01

    . In the context of Anniston, Alabama this includes: 1) risk, 2) the financial burden of reducing air infiltration for sheltering-in-place and, 3) the stigma associated with the storage and incineration site and how it impacts residential property values, use... training, and integrates on-post and off-post emergency preparedness capabilities? (CSEPP Planning Guidance, 1994, ch.2-p. 5). FEMA, on the other hand, plays a support role, working with state and local governments in ?developing off-post emergency...

  16. Technical, environmental, and economic evaluation of Plastic Media Blasting for paint stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.; Wilmoth, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency and the U.S. EPA Water Engineering Research Laboratory cooperated to investigate the feasibility of Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) as a paint-removal technique for aluminum military shelters. The PMB process was compared in field tests with sandblasting and with chemical stripping to determine relative cost, effectiveness, efficiency, and environmental consequence. The PMB process was judged superior to the chemical-stripping process and marginally better than sandblasting based upon the evaluation criteria.

  17. Himalayan Journal of Sciences Volume 3, Issue 5, January - June 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mainali, Kumar P

    2005-01-01

    winding down of the International Biological Programme (IBP) had begun to influence the formulation of the UNESCO MAB–Progamme, Project–6, and had demonstrated the applicability of computer modelling. The Munich participants were presented with a series... that trends in the mountains would destroy us.’ Hassan Saeed stated that there had been 1,451 deaths and that 700,000 flood refugees had been forced to find shelter in Dhaka. Dawn: Sunday magazine, Islamabad, 4 October 1992: Minister for Environment and Urban...

  18. Operation Sandstone. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1948. Annex 8. Gamma-ray measurements. Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Sandstone report No. 29

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonka, F.R.; Pawlicki, G.S.

    1985-09-01

    Curves of absorption of gamma rays in boron carbide and a few points on the absorption curve in lead were obtained during the three atomic explosions of Operation Sandstone. Radiation was detected by integrating ionization chambers and by photographic emulsions. A few recording-type ionization chambers were used to give intensities as a function of time. Radiation detectors were located inside of shelters which protected them from blast and shielded them from scattered radiation. Because of geometry, scattered radiation was negligible and the analysis of absorption curves yields the true total absorption coefficient for the radiation.

  19. Sheridan-PJ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 Unlimited Release4:SeymourSheddingSheldonSheltering inIn

  20. SherryLi.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 Unlimited Release4:SeymourSheddingSheldonSheltering

  1. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Vinalhaven ME US | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers IslandShelter Island

  2. MHK Projects/Galena ABS Alaskan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers IslandShelter IslandABS

  3. MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers IslandShelter

  4. MHK Projects/General Sullivan and Little Bay BRI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers IslandShelterSullivan

  5. Shields Warren, 1971 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-NicholasReports andRobert(SC) ShapeSheltering

  6. Sidney D. Drell, 1972 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-NicholasReports andRobert(SC) ShapeShelteringSidney

  7. Supporting evidence for double-C curve kinetics in the isothermal (delta) --> (alpha)' phase transformation in a Pu-Ga alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudot, B; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

    2006-07-21

    Time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams for the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation in a number of Pu-Ga alloys were first reported in 1975 by Orme et al. Unlike typical single-C curve kinetics observed in most isothermal martensitic transformations, the Pu-1.9 at.% Ga alloy exhibits two noses, and thus double-C curve kinetics. The authors attributed the occurrence of the double C to a difference in mechanism: a massive transformation for the upper C and a martensitic transformation for the lower C. Since that time, the nature, and the existence of the double C have received only limited attention. The results of Deloffre et al. suggest a confirmation of this behavior, but the fundamental origin of the double C remains unknown. Here, we apply differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as an alternative approach to acquiring the TTT data and our experimental evidence suggests a confirmation of the double-C behavior after 18 hours of isothermal hold time. In addition, we report three exothermic peaks corresponding to transformations during cooling at 20 C/min prior to the isothermal holds. These three peaks are reproducible and suggest a number of possibilities for the origin of the unique kinetics: {alpha}{prime} forms with different morphologies, or from different embryos in the upper and lower C curves; {alpha}{prime} forms directly in one C curve and forms via an intermediate phase in the other C curve; the two C curves result from {alpha}{prime} forming by two or more distinct mechanisms (e.g., massive and martensitic transformations).

  8. Chernobyl Deconstruction ALARA Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipler, Dillard B.; Batiy, Valeriy; Povlovsky, Leonid; Schmidt, John P.; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2004-03-24

    The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an ALARA analysis was performed for deconstruction of the major, unstable elements of the Shelter Object over the destroyed Unit 4 of the reactor complex. The major elements addressed in the analysis included the current roof sections and the major beams supporting the roof sections. The analysis was based on the existing configuration of the Shelter Object, the developing conceptual design of the NSC arch structure, the developing conceptual design of the facilities within and associated with the NSC (including handling and processing of deconstructed elements, and waste management), and existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium) is a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium and performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that ALARA could be achieved with appropriate implementation of existing Ukrainian regulations and procedures, and developing conceptual design criteria and features.

  9. High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

    2012-01-31

    The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

  10. El Roque de Los Muchachos Site Characteristics. III. Analysis of Atmospheric Dust and Aerosol Extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lombardi; V. Zitelli; S. Ortolani; M. Pedani; A. Ghedina

    2008-03-26

    Canary Islands are normally interested by dominant North-East winds that, in some meteorological conditions, can transport sand at high altitude from the Sahara desert. The dust may affect the efficiency of the telescopes and decreases the transparency of the sky. In order to maximize the scientific return of the telescopes located at the ORM, we present an analysis of the atmospheric dust content and its effects on astronomical observations. B, V and I dust aerosol astronomical extinction are derived. Using a 5 years series database of data taken from the four channel TNG dust monitor, we compute a mean hourly and daily values of the dust content. We have detected particles having size 0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 um. Using a power law we have derived the content of 10.0 um particles. We found a typical local dust concentration ranging from 3x10^6 particles per cubic meter at 0.3 um, to 10^3 at 5.0 um and 10 at 10.0 um, increasing up to 3 order of magnitudes during the dust storms, with a relative higher increase of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 um particles. The number of local dust storm events is the same in winter- and summertime, but, the average background and storm-related increases in the dust concentration in summer are significantly higher than in winter. In a uniform approximation, during the dust storms, an average height of the dust layer of 2.5 km above the telescope is inferred. During the sand storms La Palma Island is affected by an almost uniform layer extending up to 5 km above the sea level, down, at least the height of the telescope. The visible extinction is dominated by particles at 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 um. In agreement with the results from Carlsberg Automatic Meridian Circle (CAMC) we find a typical extinction during dust storms of about 0.2 mag/airmass.

  11. Materials and society -- Impacts and responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwood, A.R.C.

    1995-11-01

    The needs of today`s advanced societies have moved well beyond the requirements for food and shelter, etc., and now are focused on such concerns as international peace and domestic security, affordable health care, the swift and secure transmission of information, the conservation of resources, and a clean environment. Progress in materials science and engineering is impacting each of these concerns. This paper will present some examples of how this is occurring, and then comment on ethical dilemmas that can arise as a consequence of technological advances. The need for engineers to participate more fully in the development of public policies that help resolve such dilemmas, and so promote the benefits of advancing technology to society, will be discussed.

  12. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  13. Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

  14. Characterization of plasma sprayed and explosively consolidated simulated lunar soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, S.J.; Inal, O.T.; Smith, M.F.

    1997-06-01

    Two methods for the use of lunar materials for the construction of shelters on the Moon are being proposed: explosive consolidation of the soil into structural components and plasma spraying of the soil to join components. The plasma-sprayed coating would also provide protection from the intense radiation. In this work, a mare simulant was plasma-sprayed onto a stainless steel substrate. Deposition of a 0.020 inch coating using power inputs of 23, 25, 27 and 29 kW were compared. Hardness of the coatings increased with each increase of power to the system, while porosity at the interface decreased. All coatings exhibited good adhesion. Simultaneously, an explosively consolidated sample was similarly characterized to afford a comparison of structural features associated with each mode of proposed use.

  15. Energy development and demonstration program: year-end report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, B.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the Energy Development and Demonstration Program is to support projects for the development and demonstration of alternative energy sources available in Wisconsin and of energy conservation methods appropriate for Wisconsin. In September, eleven projects were selected for support in the program. Programs proposed include: monitoring an earth-sheltered dwelling; demonstrating a residential wood pellet eating system; energy management and control system on a dairy farm; three wind energy demonstrations; live-in solar collector; timber utilization project; continuous burn, induced-draft, condensing, modulating natural gas furnace; passive solar prototype for commercial-scale greenhouse; and high performance heat exchange device applied to fuel alcohol distillation processing. The benefits of the projects are briefly summarized. The location of the projects in Wisconsin is identified.

  16. Recent ooids from Mesopotamian shallow shelf, northwest Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aqrawi, A.A.M.; Sadooni, F.N.

    1987-05-01

    Petrographic and mineralogical analyses of available oolitic samples from Khor Abdulla and Khor Al-Umaya, Mesopotamian shallow shelf of the northwest Arabian Gulf, showed that the ooids exhibit extensive variations in their forms according to their nuclei shapes. The ooids cortices are usually of radial structure and are formed mainly of high magnesium calcite. The sediment distribution of the studied area revealed the existence of an oolitic zone extending NW-SE from east of Bubiyan Island toward the open sea. It is believed that these ooids are usually formed in sheltered environments by direct precipitation of high magnesium-calcite around any available nuclei. Then they are concentrated by agitation on small shoal-margins located to the east of Bubiyan Island. At these shoals they attained their final shapes and then dispersed through the studied area. It is thought that these ooids represent a peculiar example of ooid formation in quiet shallow-water environments.

  17. Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBtu) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBtu) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 Btu/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollowcore floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

  18. Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges Residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBTU) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBTU) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 BTU/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollow-core floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

  19. Solarnorth '81 by Tymura Solardesigns: diverse residential, commercial and industrial projects at and above the 48th parallel in Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tymura, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Solar Energy Heating Applications are On the Rise in and above the Northwestern City of Thunder Bay, on the northern shore of Lake Superior. Unique in their diversifications, the architectural commissions range from pure passive residential design thru hybrid systems; residential Greenhouse-Solarium active swimming pool and commercial hotel pool to inexpensive hybrid system for Canada's First Commercial Solar Lumber Drying Kiln; as well as combined earth sheltered with solar system design for a dormitory complex and shopping center. By May 1981, 7 buildings designed by Tymura Solardesigns in the Thunder Bay area will have been subjected to the Extreme Canadian climate (10,500/sup 0/F degree days, yearly temperature maximums from -41/sup 0/F to 90/sup 0/F, and solar fractions vary from 50% to 75%, with economic payback periods ranging between 7 and 10 years.

  20. Chautauqua radio workshop project. Final report, July 1, 1980-October 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-25

    Chautauqua is a daily call-in radio show (260 hour-long shows) broadcast over Public Radio Station WOUB fm, Athens, Ohio. This radio series covers a wide range of topics such as: energy conservation, developing small scale alternative energy sources (like windpower, solar energy, wood heat, alcohol production, earth-sheltered home construction, etc.), backyard vegetable production, and food preservation. The program's information is generated by the guests, listeners, and the show's host. An outline of the proposed steps to accomplish the proliferation of the Chautauqua radio concept throughout the US is presented. The Final Report from the Chautauqua Radio Workshop Project is presented along with the Chautauqua Notebook: appropriate technology on radio. (MCW)

  1. Economical wind protection - underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesling, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    Earth-sheltered buildings inherently posess near-absolute occupant protection from severe winds. They should sustain no structural damage and only minimal facial damage. Assuming that the lower-hazard risk attendant to this type of construction results in reduced insurance-premium rates, the owner accrues economic benefits from the time of construction. Improvements to aboveground buildings, in contrast, may not yield early economic benefits in spite of a favorable benefit-to-cost ratio. This, in addition to sensitivity to initial costs, traditionalism in residential construction, and lack of professional input to design, impede the widespread use of underground improvements and the subsequent economic losses from severe winds. Going underground could reverse the trend. 7 references.

  2. Three-dimensional modeling of heat transfer from slab floors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1989-07-01

    Earth-coupled heat-transfer processes have been recognized in recent years as a potential source of significant energy savings in both conventional and earth-sheltered designs, Because of the complexity of the building/soil/atmosphere interaction, however, important aspects of earth-coupled heat transfer are not well understood. There is a particular lack of three-dimensional foundation heat-loss data. In this study, a detailed three-dimensional finite-difference model of a slab floor was used to generate 93 annual simulations in parametric groups focusing on effects of size and shape, soil properties, boundary conditions, climate, insulation, and building shadow. These results indicate that soil thermal conductivity, ground surface conditions, foundation design, and floor shape/size are essential elements of a general change in heat-transfer rate.

  3. Monitored performance of new, low-energy homes: updated results from the BECA-A data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, J.F.; Meier, A.K.

    1986-03-01

    We compiled and analyzed energy consumption data, construction details, and operating characteristics for over three hundred new, low-energy homes. Over two thirds of the buildings incorporated solar features. A sequence of standardization procedures were developed to compare the energy performance of the buildings. The procedures adjusted the reported heating energy consumption for variations in the climate, floor area, internal gains, and reported indoor temperature. Two indicators of thermal performance were developed, the balance temperature and a k-value, which roughly corresponds to the overall UA of the building but also includes the ability of the house to exploit solar gains and thermal mass. The buildings in the data base have an average balance temperature of 12/sup 0/C and a k-value of 114 W//sup 0/C. Earth-sheltered buildings perform best, but only slightly better than passive solar and superinsulated buildings.

  4. Thurston Energy Outreach Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, P.; Young, M.

    1984-09-01

    In Olympia, the Washington Energy Extension Service program is provided by the Olympic Renewable Resources Association's Energy Outreach Center. The Center has provided Thurston County residents with consistent and reliable information on energy conservation and renewable resources since 1980. During those four years, a seasonal pattern of activities has developed which reflects strong shifts in class attendance and inquiries by EOC users over the course of the year. Classes include: design of superinsulated passive solar and earth sheltered homes; sunspace design, coldframe construction and tax credits for solar energy systems; caulking, weatherstripping, storm windows and chimney cleaning; and solar and wood hot water systems. All are scheduled according to dictates of seasonal needs and interests.

  5. Simulation and design of passive processes. Progress report for 1st and 2nd quarters, August 15, 1981-February 15, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-26

    Two major parts of the research reported concern (1) modeling and design of passive processes, and (2) study of meteorological data to make it useful in evaluating and designing passive processes. Results of the first two quarters of this work include: development and exercise of a sunspace model, and conduct of a first sensitivity study of sunspace design factors; development of a subroutine for calculating effects of ground coupling on performance of basements, earth sheltered buildings and buried tanks; publication of preprocessed meteorological data useful in calculation of passive heating performance by anti theta methods; and development of correlations for degree days for various base temperatures and times of day from monthly average temperatures and solar radiation.

  6. Economic comparison of passively conditioned underground houses. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy, H.L.

    1981-05-01

    The availability of cheap energy sources and the perfection of inexpensive, convenient heating and cooling systems has made the 'climate controlled' environment an integral and irreversible part of American life. However, the current shortage and high cost of fuel is threatening the quality and perhaps the availability of the climate-controlled environment. To prolong the life of the climate controlled environment, the national policy has been one of promoting conservation of the fuels that are available and promoting alternative energy systems that are often of high technology or of energy intensive materials. Fortunately, a grass roots response to the lack of energy has been an increase in the interest and construction of underground or earth-sheltered housing. The underground house, featuring a covering of earth on walls and roof, offers a high degree of energy conservation through low technology construction and the use of low energy intensive materials.

  7. Going underground. [Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Underground space is increasingly used for energy-saving and secure storage that is often less expensive and more aesthetically pleasing than conventional facilities. Petroleum, pumped hydro, water, and sewage are among the large-scale needs that can be met by underground storage. Individual buildings can store chilled water underground for summer cooling. Windowless aboveground buildings are suitable and even more efficient if they are underground. The discovery of ancient underground cities indicates that the concept can be reapplied to relieve urban centers and save energy as is already done to a large extent in China and elsewhere. A national commitment to solar energy will benefit from increased use of underground space. Kansas City is among several cities which are developing the subsurface with success, businesses and schools having found the underground environment to have many benefits. More construction experience is needed, however, to help US lenders overcome their reluctance to finance earth-sheltered projects. (DCK)

  8. Passive cooling and heating program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, H.B.; Kaplan, S.I.; Chester, C.V.

    1981-01-01

    Construction was completed of an earth-sheltered, passively solar heated office-dormitory, the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, designed at ORNL. Instrumentation of the building was designed, procured, and installed. Building performance will be monitored and compared with predictions of the DOE-2 code. A study of the incorporation of vegetation on architecture was conducted by the Harvard School of Design. A final report was issued which is a prototype handbook for the use of vegetation to reduce cooling loads in structures. An experiment to reduce the cooling requirement of mobile homes by shading with fast-growing vines was begun: a maintenance-oriented trellis was constructed and vines were planted. An RFP for the production of a prototype set of reflective insulating blinds was issued.

  9. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  10. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  11. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  12. Air Quality Scoping Study for Sarcobatus Flat, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  13. Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  14. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  15. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  16. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  17. DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  18. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  19. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  20. Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kav, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  1. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  2. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    A quality assurance plan (QAP) is a documented description or a listing of the controls to be implemented to assure that an operation or activity is accomplished in a consistent manner and in accordance with requirements. Federal, state, and local governments require emergency planning for facilities that may affect the public in the event of an accidental release of nuclear or hazardous materials. One of the purposes of this EG G Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) Analysis of Offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) project is to identify the EPZs where actions could be necessary to protect public health. The RFP EPZ project is developing an interim basis for potential sheltering and evacuation recommendations in the event of an accidental release of radionuclides to the atmosphere from this facility. Also, RFP is developing EPZs for accidental releases of major nonradiological hazardous substances to the atmosphere, and will analyze the impacts of an unplanned surface water release from the facility.

  3. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brixner, B.

    1992-09-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are sill classified.

  4. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brixner, B.

    1992-01-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are sill classified.

  5. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate in switchgrass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somleva, Mariya N.; Snell, Kristi D.; Beaulieu, Julie; Peoples, Oliver P.; Garrison, Bradley; Patterson, Nii

    2013-07-16

    Transgenic plants, plant material, and plant cells for synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates, preferably poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (also referred to a as PHB) are provided. Preferred plants that can be genetically engineered to produce PHB include plants that do not normally produce storage products such as oils and carbohydrates, and plants that have a C.sub.4 NAD-malic enzyme photosynthetic pathway. Such plants also advantageously produce lignocellulosic biomass that can be converted into biofuels. An exemplary plant that can be genetically engineered to produce PHB and produce lignocellulosic biomass is switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L. A preferred cultivar of switchgrass is Alamo. Other suitable cultivars of switchgrass include but are not limited to Blackwell, Kanlow, Nebraska 28, Pathfinder, Cave-in-Rock, Shelter and Trailblazer.

  6. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by appropriate responses by local responders and the general population within the hazard zones, regional planning is essential to success. The remainder of this Executive Summary provides summary guidance for response planning in three areas: (1) Public Protection Strategy details the importance of early, adequate shelter followed by informed evacuation. (2) Responder Priorities identify how to protect response personnel, perform regional situational assessment, and support public safety. (3) Key Planning Considerations refute common myths and provide important information on planning how to respond in the aftermath of nuclear terrorism.

  7. Field application of EMI coatings investigation of coating materials and stylus electroplating protocols for shielded facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, L.D.; Donoho, L.H.

    1996-03-01

    To maintain reliable electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding for electronic equipment shelter interfaces, mating surfaces such as doors and interfaces must provide low contact resistances and be resistant to excessive amounts of corrosion and mechanical wear that would tend to degrade their shielding integrity. The objective of this research was to establish the efficacy of stylus electroplating as a potentially viable field maintenance/repair technique for application of corrosion resistant, wear resistant coatings in order to help maintain the shielding integrity of those interfaces. Aluminum alloy (6061-T6) knife-edge and channel test pieces were stylus electroplated with tin or tin-lead coatings with nickel or copper underlayers. A custom-designed electroplating tool developed for electroplating the complex geometry of a knife-edge substrate appears to provide better control of the plating process and circumvents possible interference with previously deposited areas. This research has resulted in an optimized procedure for producing coatings that exhibit greater adherence, better uniformity, less scarring, and fewer blisters and ridges compared to those previously reported. An optimum electroplating strategy is suggested, which includes applying tin or tin-lead top layers over a thick layer of copper and a thin nickel strike.

  8. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  9. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentz, A

    2008-07-31

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

  10. Switchgrass Cultivar/Ecotype Selection and Management for Biofuels in the Upper Southeast USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lemus, Rocky; Parrish, David J.; Wolf, Dale D.

    2014-01-01

    Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.), a perennial warm-season grass indigenous to the eastern USA, has potential as a biofuels feedstock. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of upland and lowland switchgrass cultivars under different environments and management treatments. Four cultivars of switchgrass were evaluated from 2000 to 2001 under two management regimes in plots established in 1992 at eight locations in the upper southeastern USA. Two management treatments included 1) a single annual harvest (in late October to early November) and a single application of 50?kg N/ha/yr and 2) two annual harvests (in midsummer andmore »November) and a split application of 100?kg?N/ha/yr. Biomass yields averaged 15?Mg/ha/yr and ranged from 10 to 22?Mg/ha/yr across cultivars, managements, locations, and years. There was no yield advantage in taking two harvests of the lowland cultivars (Alamo and Kanlow). When harvested twice, upland cultivars (Cave-in-Rock and Shelter) provided yields equivalent to the lowland ecotypes. Tiller density was 36% lower in stands cutting only once per year, but the stands appeared vigorous after nine years of such management. Lowland cultivars and a one-cutting management (after the tops have senesced) using low rates of applied N (50?kg/ha) are recommended. « less

  11. Fuzziness and Funds Allocation in Portfolio Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack Allen; Sukanto Bhattacharya; Florentin Smarandache

    2002-03-07

    Each individual investor is different, with different financial goals, different levels of risk tolerance and different personal preferences. From the point of view of investment management, these characteristics are often defined as objectives and constraints. Objectives can be the type of return being sought, while constraints include factors such as time horizon, how liquid the investor is, any personal tax situation and how risk is handled. It's really a balancing act between risk and return with each investor having unique requirements, as well as a unique financial outlook - essentially a constrained utility maximization objective. To analyze how well a customer fits into a particular investor class, one investment house has even designed a structured questionnaire with about two-dozen questions that each has to be answered with values from 1 to 5. The questions range from personal background (age, marital state, number of children, job type, education type, etc.) to what the customer expects from an investment (capital protection, tax shelter, liquid assets, etc.). A fuzzy logic system has been designed for the evaluation of the answers to the above questions. We have investigated the notion of fuzziness with respect to funds allocation.

  12. Analysis of dose consequences arising from the release of spent nuclear fuel from dry storage casks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The resulting dose consequences from releases of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) residing in a dry storage casks are examined parametrically. The dose consequences are characterized by developing dose versus distance curves using simplified bounding assumptions. The dispersion calculations are performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS2) code. Constant weather and generic system parameters were chosen to ensure that the results in this report are comparable with each other and to determine the relative impact on dose of each variable. Actual analyses of site releases would need to accommodate local weather and geographic data. These calculations assume a range of fuel burnups, release fractions (RFs), three exposure scenarios (2 hrs and evacuate, 2 hrs and shelter, and 24 hrs exposure), two meteorological conditions (D-4 and F-2), and three release heights (ground level - 1 meter (m), 10 m, and 100 m). This information was developed to support a policy paper being developed by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff on an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and monitored retrievable storage installation (MRS) security rulemaking.

  13. Microwave heating apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew J. (Boulder, CO); Petersen, Robert D. (Thornton, CO); Swanson, Stephen D. (Brighton, CO)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for heating and melting materials using microwave energy, and for permitting them to solidify. The apparatus includes a microwave energy source, a resonant cavity having an opening in its floor, a microwave energy choke encompassing the opening in the floor of the cavity, a metal container to hold the materials to be heated and melted, a turntable, and a lift-table. During operation, the combined action of the turntable and the lift-table position the metal container so that the top of the container is level with the floor of the cavity, is in substantial registration with the floor opening, and is encompassed by the microwave energy choke; thus, during operation, the interior of the container defines part of the resonant cavity. Additionally, a screw feeder, extending into the cavity and sheltered from microwave energy by a conveyor choke, may convey the materials to be heated to the container. Also, preferably, the floor of the resonant cavity may include perforatins, so that the offgases and dust generated in the apparatus may be removed from the resonant cavity by pulling outside air between the container choke and the exterior wall of the container into the resonant cavity and out from the cavity through the perforations.

  14. Investigation of transient, two-dimensional coupled heat and moisture flow in soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, L.S.W.

    1986-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite difference numerical model has been developed to study coupled heat and moisture flow in the soil surrounding an earth-sheltered construction. The model is based on a mechanistic approach formulated by Milly and developed from the work of Philip and deVries. Using soil temperatures and matric potentials as the dependent variables, the model is capable of simulating unsaturated/saturated flow conditions in heterogeneous soil domains. The model is a fully implicit, integrated finite difference approach based on the Patankar Spalding method. The numerical modeling of the governing heat and moisture equations was validated against a number of analytical and quasi-analytical solutions. An axisymmetric, two-dimensional experiment was then defined to which the numerical model could be compared. The experimental apparatus was composed of a cylinder filled with a dredged Mississippi River sand. A series of one and two dimensional heat and moisture flow experiments were run, using boundary conditions consistent with those that occur in the soil surrounding a building. Soil properties used in the model were either calculated from theoretical models or measured experimentally. Agreement between the model and experiments were good, with an error of 10-15% obtained for the two-dimensional coupled heat and moisture flow experiment.

  15. Paleoclimatic implications of glacial and postglacial refugia for Pinus pumila in western Beringia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, P M; Lozhkin, A V; Solomatkina, T B; Brown, T A

    2010-02-05

    Palynological results from Julietta Lake currently provide the most direct evidence to support the existence of a glacial refugium for Pinus pumila in mountains of southwestern Beringia. Both percentages and accumulation rates indicate the evergreen shrub survived until at least {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. in the Upper Kolyma region. Percentage data suggest numbers dwindled into the late glaciation, whereas pollen accumulation rates point towards a more rapid demise shortly after {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. Pinus pumila did not re-establish in any great numbers until {approx}8100 14C yr B.P., despite the local presence {approx}9800 14C yr B.P. of Larix dahurica, which shares similar summer temperature requirements. The postglacial thermal maximum (in Beringia {approx}11,000-9000 14C yr B.P.) provided Pinus pumila shrubs with equally harsh albeit different conditions for survival than those present during the LGM. Regional records indicate that in this time of maximum warmth Pinus pumila likely sheltered in a second, lower-elevation refugium. Paleoclimatic models and modern ecology suggest that shifts in the nature of seasonal transitions and not only seasonal extremes have played important roles in the history of Pinus pumila over the last {approx}21,000 14C yr B.P.

  16. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  17. 1982 Oregon energy resource manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, R.; Ebert, J. (eds.)

    1982-01-01

    This manual is divided into three distinct sections. Part one contains 40 passive solar home plans designed for the Pacific Northwest by Oregon architects and designers. Floor plans and exterior renderings of multi-family and single-family dwellings, earth sheltered and bermed designs, and light commercial structures are included. The degree of solar contribution each residence achieves is graphically presented for ease of understanding. Part two, renewable-energy-resource guide, is primarily designed as a locator to indepth publications that explain specific energy resources in detail. It contains illustrated book reviews of pertinent private and government publications available. Various tables, forms, diagrams, energy system evaluation criteria, an illustrated glossary, BPA energy programs, utility programs, financial outlooks and non-profit organizations are included. The product locator index makes up part three. This indexed directory contains the listings of businesses, including the address, phone number, contact person and a 30 to 50 word description of the product or services currently offered. These renewable energy companies range from architectural and engineering services to research and development firms.

  18. Detecting the oldest geodynamo and attendant shielding from the solar wind: Implications for habitability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarduno, John A; Mamajek, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    The onset and nature of the earliest geomagnetic field is important for understanding the evolution of the core, atmosphere and life on Earth. A record of the early geodynamo is preserved in ancient silicate crystals containing minute magnetic inclusions. These data indicate the presence of a geodynamo during the Paleoarchean, between 3.4 and 3.45 billion years ago. While the magnetic field sheltered Earth's atmosphere from erosion at this time, standoff of the solar wind was greatly reduced, and similar to that during modern extreme solar storms. These conditions suggest that intense radiation from the young Sun may have modified the atmosphere of the young Earth by promoting loss of volatiles, including water. Such effects would have been more pronounced if the field were absent or very weak prior to 3.45 billion years ago, as suggested by some models of lower mantle evolution. The frontier is thus trying to obtain geomagnetic field records that are >>3.45 billion-years-old, as well as constraining solar wi...

  19. Solar optics: light as energy; energy as light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.J.; Eijadi, D.A.

    1980-05-01

    a prominent characteristic of earth-sheltered and underground buildings, as well as buildings designed to accommodate more uses within the same perimeters, is the prominence of interior space without direct access to natural light and view opportunities. Solar Optics, a technique for illuminating interior spaces with natural light, offers a way to satisfy the well-documented human affinity for natural light. The system, which uses a heliostat to track the sun and lenses and mirrors to direct the light to remote interior spaces, is more efficient than converting solar radiation into electricity. Through the use of cold mirrors, it is also possible to separate the infrared portion of the spectrum from visible light, thereby creating a cool light source that can reduce a building's space cooling demand. Solar Optics also offers energy savings by transmitting light through a small aperture, as opposed to a large window. Several design problems must still be addressed. The system will be demonstrated in a new building at the University of Minnesota. Because this is a limited demonstration, it does not include the integration of a natural light system with a central source light system...another promising application of Solar Optics.

  20. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  1. Effectiveness of solar heating and lighting in an underground concrete and glass dwelling high in the Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Div. of Design Technology)

    1993-01-01

    Solar heating and daylighting are two primary design features which can have a major impact on occupant perceptions of an underground living environment. A quantitative design analysis and evaluation of these features has been conducted for an energy conserving earth covered dwelling in a cold climate at high altitude in the Rocky Mountains. For this example, because of the solar contribution, a heating load reduction greater than 45 percent has been calculated and demonstrated on an operational basis, compared to the same earth sheltered construction without solar. The building envelope also has an effective time lag of several months which further increases the annual effectiveness. Also, depending on the sky conditions, the portion of exterior daylight reaching deep into the interior spaces easily exceeds 10 percent in the winter and can reach up to 50 percent or more. Thus, both heating and lighting by natural means are shown to be available in ample quantities in this cave-like structure. Pertinent design features to enhance such performance are highlighted.

  2. Energy-efficient housing alternatives: a predictive model of factors affecting household perceptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreckengost, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The major purpose of this investigation was to assess the impact of household socio-economic factors, dwelling characteristics, energy conservation behavior, and energy attitudes on the perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Perceptions of passive solar, active solar, earth sheltered, and retrofitted housing were examined. Data used were from the Southern Regional Research Project, S-141, Housing for Low and Moderate Income Families. Responses from 1804 households living in seven southern states were analyzed. A conceptual model was proposed to test the hypothesized relationships which were examined by path analysis. Perceptions of energy efficient housing alternatives were found to be a function of selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, household economic factors, and household conservation behavior. Age and education of the respondent, family size, housing-income ratio, utility income ratio, energy attitude, and size of the dwelling unit were found to have direct and indirect effects on perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Energy conservation behavior made a significant direct impact with behavioral energy conservation changes having the most profound influence. Conservation behavior was influenced by selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, and household economic factors.

  3. Why build below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlings, R.

    1982-01-01

    Building homes underground is a rapidly growing concept. From less than 200 in 1977 to about 6000 homes at present, this trend is discussed in detail. Although dirt is a poor insulator, its temperature moderating properties offer advantages. The need for insulating an underground house is discussed as well as the advantages of this type of home: (1) security advantages (fewer entrances); (2) storm resistance; (3) protection against fire; (4) lower maintenance costs; (5) space for lawn and garden is greater; and (6) these homes are quieter. The three principle types of underground homes are discussed in detail and illustrated with drawings and floor plans. These are: (1) the elevational type (most popular) with all doors and windows on one wall with other walls and roof completely covered; (2) penetrational homes with windows and doors on more than one side; and (3) the atrium home which is built around an open courtyard or atrium. Problems associated with earth-sheltered homes (underground water, structural strength requirements, building codes, indoor air pollution, costs, and financing) are discussed and suggestions are made for cutting costs. 4 references. (MJJ)

  4. Structure of trigger factor binding domain in biologically homologous complex with eubacterial ribosome reveals its chaperone action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baram, David; Pyetan, Erez; Sittner, Assa; Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada (WIS-I)

    2010-07-13

    Trigger factor (TF), the first chaperone in eubacteria to encounter the emerging nascent chain, binds to the large ribosomal subunit in the vicinity of the protein exit tunnel opening and forms a sheltered folding space. Here, we present the 3.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the physiological complex of the large ribosomal subunit from the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with the N-terminal domain of TF (TFa) from the same organism. For anchoring, TFa exploits a small ribosomal surface area in the vicinity of proteins L23 and L29, by using its 'signature motif' as well as additional structural elements. The molecular details of TFa interactions reveal that L23 is essential for the association of TF with the ribosome and may serve as a channel of communication with the nascent chain progressing in the tunnel. L29 appears to induce a conformational change in TFa, which results in the exposure of TFa hydrophobic patches to the opening of the ribosomal exit tunnel, thus increasing its affinity for hydrophobic segments of the emerging nascent polypeptide. This observation implies that, in addition to creating a protected folding space for the emerging nascent chain, TF association with the ribosome prevents aggregation by providing a competing hydrophobic environment and may be critical for attaining the functional conformation necessary for chaperone activity.

  5. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) report. Fort Des Moines, Des Moines, Iowa. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, B.; Rausch, K.; Kang, J.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation conducted by The Earth Technology Corporation (TETC) at the Fort Des Moines, a U.S. Government property selected for closure by the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission. Under CERFA Federal agencies are required to identify real property that can be immediately reused and redeveloped. Satisfying this objective requires the identification of real property where no hazardous substances or petroleum products, regulated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed. Fort Des Moines is a 53.28-acre site located in Polk County, Iowa, within the city limits of Des Moines. The installation's primary mission is to provide support and shelter for the U.S. Army Reserve. Activities associated with the property that have environmental significance are photographic processing, vehicle maintenance, printing, and fuel storage. TETC reviewed existing investigation documents; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), State, and county regulatory records; environmental data bases; and title documents pertaining to Fort Des Moines during this investigation. In addition, TETC conducted interviews and visual inspections of Fort Des Moines as well as visual inspections and data base searches for the surrounding properties. Information in this CERFA Report was current as of April 1994.

  6. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  7. Investigation of Spatial Variation of Sea States Offshore of Humboldt Bay CA Using a Hindcast Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    Spatial variability of sea states is an important consideration when performing wave resource assessments and wave resource characterization studies for wave energy converter (WEC) test sites and commercial WEC deployments. This report examines the spatial variation of sea states offshore of Humboldt Bay, CA, using the wave model SWAN . The effect of depth and shoaling on bulk wave parameters is well resolved using the model SWAN with a 200 m grid. At this site, the degree of spatial variation of these bulk wave parameters, with shoaling generally perpendicular to the depth contours, is found to depend on the season. The variation in wave height , for example, was higher in the summer due to the wind and wave sheltering from the protruding land on the coastline north of the model domain. Ho wever, the spatial variation within an area of a potential Tier 1 WEC test site at 45 m depth and 1 square nautical mile is almost negligible; at most about 0.1 m in both winter and summer. The six wave characterization parameters recommended by the IEC 6 2600 - 101 TS were compared at several points along a line perpendicular to shore from the WEC test site . As expected, these parameters varied based on depth , but showed very similar seasonal trends.

  8. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.; Armstrong, C.; Daugherty, N.M.; Foppe, T.L.; Petrocchi, A.J.; Southward, B.

    1990-05-01

    This project plan for Phase II summarizes the design of a project to complete analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Federal, state, and local governments develop emergency plans for facilities that may affect the public in the event of an accidental release of nuclear or hazardous materials. One of the purposes of these plans is to identify EPZs where actions might be necessary to protect public health. Public protective actions include sheltering, evacuation, and relocation. Agencies use EPZs to develop response plans and to determine needed resources. The State of Colorado, with support from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Rocky Flats contractors, has developed emergency plans and EPZs for the Rocky Flats Plant periodically beginning in 1980. In Phase II, Interim Emergency Planning Zones Analysis, Maximum Credible Accident'' we will utilize the current Rocky Flats maximum credible accident (MCA), existing dispersion methodologies, and upgraded dosimetry methodologies to update the radiological EPZs. Additionally, we will develop recommendations for EPZs for nonradiological hazardous materials releases and evaluate potential surface water releases from the facility. This project will allow EG G Rocky Flats to meet current commitments to the state of Colorado and make steady, tangible improvements in our understanding of risk to offsite populations during potential emergencies at the Rocky Flats Plant. 8 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Bottom-up, decision support system development : a wetlandsalinity management application in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-05-10

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin ofCalifornia's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratorywildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during theannual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetland contain saltwhich, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdownperiod, negatively impacts downstream agricultural riparian waterdiverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinityto the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-pointsources, now addresses return flows from seasonally managed wetlands.Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means ofmatching wetland return flows to the assimilative capacity of the SanJoaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring anddecision support systems to implement this concept have failed forreasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed inthe context of more general challenges facing the successfulimplementation of environmental monitoring, modelling and decisionsupport systems. The paper then provides details of a current researchand development project which will ultimately provide wetland managerswith the means of matching salt exports with the available assimilativecapacity of the San Joaquin River, when fully implemented. Manipulationof the traditional wetland drawdown comes at a potential cost to thesustainability of optimal wetland moist soil plant habitat in thesewetlands - hence the project provides appropriate data and a feedback andresponse mechanism for wetland managers to balance improvements to SanJoaquin River quality with internally-generated information on the healthof the wetland resource. The author concludes the paper by arguing thatthe architecture of the current project decision support system, whencoupled with recent advances in environmental data acquisition, dataprocessing and information dissemination technology, holds significantpromise to address some of the problems described earlier in the paperthat have limited past efforts to improve Basin water qualitymanagement.

  10. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  11. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  12. Efficiency, equity and the environment: Institutional challenges in the restructuring of the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeri, M.H.

    1998-07-01

    In the electric power industry, fundamental changes are underway in Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand and, more recently, in Asia. Rooted in increased deregulation and competition, these changes are likely to radically alter the structure of the industry. Liberalization of electric power markets in the United Kingdom is, for the most part, complete. The generation market in the United States began opening to competition following the 1987 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 set the stage for a much more dramatic change in the industry. The most far-reaching provision of the Act was its electricity title, which opened access to the electric transmission grid. With legal barriers now removed, the traditionally sheltered US electric utility market is becoming increasingly open to entry and competition. A number of important legislative, regulatory and governmental policy initiatives are underway in the Philippines that will have a profound effect on the electric power industry. In Thailand, the National Energy Planning Organization (NEPO) has undertaken a thorough investigation of industry restructuring. This paper summarizes recent international developments in the deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets in the U.K., U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. It focuses on the relevance of these experiences to development underway in the Philippines and Thailand, and presents alternative possible structures likely to emerge in these countries, drawing heavily on the authors' recent experiences in Thailand and the Philippines. The impact of these changes on the business environment for power generation and marketing will be discussed in detail, as will the opportunities these changes create for investment among private power producers.

  13. Long-term monitoring of reef corals at the Flower Garden Banks (northwest Gulf of Mexico): Reef coral population changes and historical incorporation of barium in Montastrea annularis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deslarzes, K.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reef coral populations were monitored from 1988 to 1991 at the Flower Garden Banks located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The status of reef coral populations, and natural or man-made factors potentially affecting their well-being were determined. Man-made chronic disturbances are degrading coral reef resources on a global scale. Yet, the Flower Garden coral reefs seem to have been sheltered from the effects of regional stresses generated by population growth and increased industrial activity. Since 1974, reef coral population levels have remained unchanged in the Montastrea-Diploria Zones at the Flower Garden Banks. Live coral cover ranges between 46 and 46.5%. Montastrea annularis and Diploria strigosa comprise 80% of the coral cover on either bank. The remainder of the cover is mostly shared by eight other taxa. Coral taxa appear to be more homogeneously distributed on the West Bank. The relatively greater number of Agaricia spp., Madracis decastis, and P. astreoides colonies on the East Bank may be the source of a decreased evenness. The health of reef corals was assessed using repetitive and non-repetitive photographic methods, and accretionary growth measurements of M. annularis. Reef corals have undergone small scale changes at the Flower Gardens probably reflecting natural disturbance, predation, disease, and inter-specific competition. White mat disease (ridge disease) is shown to generate more tissue loss than any of the three bleaching events that took place at the Flower Gardens (1989, 1990, and 1991). Advance to retreat linear ratios of encrusting growth revealed a net tissue gain on the East Bank and a net tissue loss on the West Bank. Growth rates of M. annularis were highly variable. The annual barium content from 1910 in 1989 in a M. annularis colony from the West Flower Garden did not reveal trends associated with the extensive oil and gas exploration in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  15. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  16. Expedition to the 30-km Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and the Utilization of its Experience in Education and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aszodi, Attila; Yamaji, Bogdan [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Silye, Judit [Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety Directorate, H-1539 Budapest, P.O. Box 676 (Hungary); Pazmandi, Tamas [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    Between May 28 - June 4, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (HYGN) - which operates within the framework of the HNS - a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the surrounding exclusion zone. The participants were young Hungarian nuclear professionals supervised by more experienced experts. The main scientific goals of the expedition were the followings: Get personal experiences in a direct way about the current status of the Chernobyl Power Plant and its surroundings, the contamination of the environment and about the doses. Gather information about the state of the shut down power plant and the shelter built above the damaged 4. unit. Training of young nuclear experts by performing on site measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives by performing wide-range of environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. Within the 30-km exclusion zone the influence of the accident occurred 20 years ago still could be measured clearly; however the level of the radioactivity is manageable in most places. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure occurred among the members of the expedition. The analysis of samples has been started at the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. During the expedition not only environmental sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out but it was also well documented with photos and video recordings for educational, training and PR purposes. A documentary TV film was recorded during the expedition. The first-hand knowledge acquired during the expedition helps the authentic communication of the accident and its present-day consequences, which is especially important in 2006, 20 years after the Chernobyl accident. Since Ukraine and Hungary are neighbor countries the media constantly discuss the accident, the consequences and the risks of using nuclear energy. In addition in November 2005 Hungary's parliament approved plans to extend the lifetime of the country's four-unit nuclear power plant. In order to have the crucial public support for nuclear energy it is very important to dispel unrealistic dismay and misbelieves regarding these questions. Thus it is extremely beneficial to have a film on this topic created by nuclear professionals especially for the public audience. In 2005 a book on the Chernobyl accident was published in Hungary that covers this expedition in a full chapter [2]. We plan to present the film to the audience of the conference. (authors)

  17. Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Henry C.; Han, Taewon; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Tschudi, William F.

    2011-07-17

    There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: closed and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percent age of the recirculation air is make-up air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both closed and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups: (1) Outside - coupons sheltered, located near or at the supply air inlet, but located before any filtering, (2) Supply - starting just after initial air filtering continuing inside the plenums and ducts feeding the data center rooms, and (3) Inside located inside the data center rooms near the IT equipment. Each coupon was exposed for thirty days and then sent to a laboratory for a corrosion rate measurement analysis. The goal of this research was to investigate whether gaseous contamination is a concern for U.S. data center operators as it relates to the reliability of IT equipment. More specifically, should there be an increased concern if outside air for IT equipment cooling is used To begin to answer this question limited exploratory measurements of corrosion rates in operating data centers in various locations were undertaken. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What is the precision of the measurements (2) What are the approximate statistical distributions of copper and silver corrosion rates in the sampled data centers(3) To what extent are copper and silver corrosion measurements related (4) What is the relationship of corrosion rate measurements between outside-air cooled data centers compared to closed data centers (5) How do corrosivity measurements relate to IT equipment failure rates The data from our limited sample size suggests that most United States data center operators should not be concerned with environmental gaseous contamination causing high IT equipment failure rates even when using outside-air cooling. The research team recommends additional basic research on how environmental conditions, specifically gaseous contamination, affect electronic equipment reliability.

  18. Special population planner, version 4.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

    2007-03-26

    Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

  19. A Cultural Resources Inventory and Historical Evaluation of the Smoky Atmospheric Nuclear Test, Areas 8, 9, and 10, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Robert C.; King, Maureen L.; Beck, Colleen M.; Falvey, Lauren W.; Menocal, Tatianna M.

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the results of a National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 cultural resources inventory and historical evaluation of the 1957 Smoky atmospheric test location on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Desert Research Institute (DRI) was tasked to conduct a cultural resources study of the Smoky test area as a result of a proposed undertaking by the Department of Energy Environmental Management. This undertaking involves investigating Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 for potential contaminants of concern as delineated in a Corrective Action Investigation Plan. CAU 550 is an area that spatially overlaps portions of the Smoky test location. Smoky, T-2c, was a 44 kt atmospheric nuclear test detonated at 5:30 am on August 31, 1957, on top of a 213.4 m (700 ft) 200 ton tower (T-2c) in Area 8 of the NNSS. Smoky was a weapons related test of the Plumbbob series (number 19) and part of the Department of Defense Exercise Desert Rock VII and VIII. The cultural resources effort involved the development of a historic context based on archival documents and engineering records, the inventory of the cultural resources in the Smoky test area and an associated military trench location in Areas 9 and 10, and an evaluation of the National Register eligibility of the cultural resources. The inventory of the Smoky test area resulted in the identification of structures, features, and artifacts related to the physical development of the test location and the post-test remains. The Smoky test area was designated historic district D104 and coincides with a historic archaeological site recorded as 26NY14794 and the military trenches designed for troop observation, site 26NY14795. Sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795 are spatially discrete with the trenches located 4.3 km (2.7 mi) southeast of the Smoky ground zero. As a result, historic district D104 is discontiguous and in total it covers 151.4 hectares (374 acres). The Smoky test location, recorded as historic district D104 and historic sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795, is the best preserved post-shot atmospheric nuclear tower test at the NNSS and possibly in the world. It is of local, national, and international importance due to nuclear testing’s pivotal role in the Cold War between the United States and the former Soviet Union. The district and sites are linked to the historic theme of atmospheric nuclear testing. D104 retains aspects of the engineering plan and design for the Smoky tower, instrument stations used to measure test effects, German and French personnel shelters, and military trenches. A total of 33 structures contribute to the significance of D104. Artifacts and features provide significant post-test information. Historic district D104 (discontiguous) and historic site 26NY14794 (the Smoky test area) are eligible for listing on the NRHP under Criteria A, B, C, and D. The historic site 26NY14795 (the Smoky military trenches) is eligible for listing under Criteria A, C, and D. Several items have been identified for removal by the CAU 550 investigation. However, none of them is associated with the Smoky atmospheric test, but with later activities in the area. The military trenches are not part of CAU 550 and no actions are planned there. A proposed closure of the Smoky test area with restrictions will limit access and contribute to the preservation of the cultural resources. It is recommended that the Smoky historic district and sites be included in the NNSS cultural resources monitoring program.

  20. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO2 particle fuel up to about 10% FIMA and 1150°C, UO2 fuel is known to have limitations because of CO formation and kernel migration at the high burnups, power densities, temperatures, and temperature gradients that may be encountered in the prismatic modular HTGRs. With uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel, the kernel composition is engineered to prevent CO formation and kernel migration, which are key threats to fuel integrity at higher burnups, temperatures, and temperature gradients. Furthermore, the recent poor fuel performance of UO2 TRISO fuel pebbles measured in Chinese irradiation testing in Russia and in German pebbles irradiated at 1250°C, and historic data on poorer fuel performance in safety testing of German pebbles that experienced burnups in excess of 10% FIMA [1] have each raised concern about the use of UO2 TRISO above 10% FIMA and 1150°C and the degree of margin available in the fuel system. This continues to be an active area of study internationally.