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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Unsatisfiability reasoning in ORM conceptual schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORM (Object-Role Modeling) is a rich and well-known conceptual modeling method. As ORM has a formal semantics, reasoning tasks such as satisfiability checking of an ORM schema naturally arise. Satisfiability checking allows a developer to automatically ...

Mustafa Jarrar; Stijn Heymans

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Teaching OR/MS to MBAs at Warwick Business School: A Turnaround Story  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OR/MS is under pressure in MBA programs in the United Kingdom as it is in the United States. To ensure its continuance, members of the operational research group at Warwick Business School redesigned the core OR/MS module. The first attempt at a redesign ... Keywords: Professional: or/ms education.

Stewart Robinson; Maureen Meadows; John Mingers; Frances A. O'Brien; Estelle A. Shale; Stephanie Stray

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

AEC GROUP SHELTER  

SciTech Connect

As a result of atomic shelter tests and field experiments condueted over the past nine years, it has been conclusively shown that shelters provide the only promising means of civilian protection in the event of a nuclear war. Design details are presented for a group shelter to accommodate 100 persons of all age groups and both sexes. The shelter structure is a multiplate corrugated- steel arch set on a concrete slab with end walls of bridge plate sheathing. The entire structure is covered with a minimum of 3 feet of earth. The shelter combines outstanding protection against radioactive fall-out with good protection against blast and thermal radiation. Drawings are included. General operating procedures are outlined. (C.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Shelter for the Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solemn ceremony in Slavutich Ukraine on April 26th 2007 marked the twenty-first anniversary of the most catastrophic accident in the history of commercial nuclear power. Significant progress has recently been made toward transformation of Chernobyl to an environmentally sound site. Many readers will recall that in only eight months following the 1986 accident, the Soviets constructed an enormous facility to contain the radioactive contamination in the remains of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit-4. Popularly known as the sarcophagus, but correctly referred to as the Object Shelter, it has deteriorated with time and is now in danger of collapse. STABILIZATION Several measures to structurally stabilize the Object Shelter and prevent its collapse have recently been completed. These measures are the largest construction projects undertaken in the local zone since the completion of the Object Shelter. The most significant risk reduction was accomplished by Measure-2 in December 2006. Stabilization

Schmieman, Eric A.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sheltering in Place at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sheltering in Place at LBNL Sheltering in Place at LBNL Speaker(s): Valerie Quiggley Date: November 2, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Lab employees could be instructed by Lab management to "Shelter in Place", rather than to evacuate during an emergency situation created by a wildland fire approaching the Lab, or other emergencies involving outside air quality such as a biological or chemical accident, or even a terrorist attack. Would you know what to do if instructed to shelter in place? How could staying inside the building be safe if fire is raging outside? And what about the air conditioning system which draws air from outside to circulate inside the building? How do we keep smoke or other toxins outside while we shelter inside? Bring all your questions and attend this seminar

6

Solar Eclipse Effect on Shelter Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decreases in shelter temperature during eclipse events were quantified on the basis of observations, numerical model simulations, and complements conceptual evaluations. Observations for the annular eclipse on 10 May 1994 over the United States ...

M. Segal; R. W. Turner; J. Prusa; R. J. Bitzer; S. V. Finley

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Sheltering in Place | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sheltering in Place Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Sheltering in Place Print...

8

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes June 24, 2013 - 4:59pm Addthis This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden If you are looking for a home with energy-efficient features that will provide a comfortable, tranquil, weather-resistant dwelling, an earth-sheltered house could be right for you. There are two basic types of earth-sheltered house designs-underground and bermed. Underground Earth-Sheltered Homes When an entire earth-sheltered house is built below grade or completely underground, it's called an underground structure. An atrium or courtyard

9

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes June 24, 2013 - 4:59pm Addthis This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden If you are looking for a home with energy-efficient features that will provide a comfortable, tranquil, weather-resistant dwelling, an earth-sheltered house could be right for you. There are two basic types of earth-sheltered house designs-underground and bermed. Underground Earth-Sheltered Homes When an entire earth-sheltered house is built below grade or completely underground, it's called an underground structure. An atrium or courtyard

10

Estimation of Shelter Temperatures from Operational Satellite Sounder Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a first step in the development of a technique for estimating daily maximum and minimum shelter temperatures for agricultural monitoring, this study made use of operational satellite sounder data to estimate shelter temperature. Linear ...

F. A. Davis; J. D. Tarpley

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Title Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sohn, Michael D., Richard G. Sextro, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(6) Pagination 1792-1796 Date Published Sept. 4-9, 2005 Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, airflow modeling, comis, countermeasures to chemical and biological threats, emergency response, exposure, indoor environment department, shelter-in-place Abstract An accidental or intentional outdoor release of pollutants can produce a hazardous plume, potentially contaminating large portions of a metropolitan area as it disperses downwind. To minimize health consequences on the populace, government and research organizations often recommend sheltering in place when evacuation is impractical. Some reports also recommend "hardening" an indoor shelter, for example by applying duct tape to prevent leakage into a bathroom. However, few studies have quantified the perceived beneficial effects of sheltering and hardening, or examined the limits of their applicability. In this paper, we examine how sheltering and hardening might reduce exposure levels under different building and meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction). We predict concentrations and exposure levels for several conditions, and discuss the net benefits from several sheltering and hardening options

12

If You Are Advised to Shelter-In-Place  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advised to Shelter-in-Place Advised to Shelter-in-Place Sheltering-in-place provides protection from potential airborne hazardous materials that may have been released. If you are asked to shelter-in-place at work or at home, follow these instructions: * Bring everyone inside (including pets). * Close all doors and windows. * Turn off or close all ventilation systems, including: * Air conditioning * Attic & exhaust fans * Furnaces * Fireplace dampers * Determine what sector you are in (see Evacuation Map & Routes). * Continue to shelter-in-place and listen to one of the EAS stations. * When the outside air is no longer dangerous, you will be instructed by the EAS that sheltering-in-place has ended and to open and ventilate your home or building. * Shelters may be opened for individuals who cannot return home because a shelter-in-place has been ordered for the area in which they live. If you are affected in this manner, please listen to EAS stations for announcements of shelters being opened or go to the home of a friend or relative that is outside the area of concern.

13

F.C.D.A. FAMILY SHELTER EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the effects of atomic explosions on small civil defense shelters for family use, 29 simple structures were built along an arc 1200 ft from the target point and exposed to Buster Bursts B, C, and D. The structures were of four basic types; covered-trench, metal-arch, wood-arch, and basement lean-to. Because of poor cohesive properties of the soil, much of the earth cover on the shelters was removed by the first shot. Since test procedures prevented restoration of structures and replacement of cover after each blast, test results were materially affected. Partly above-grade cover-trench shelters provided less protection against blast than belowgrade cover-trench shelters and were much less desirable as protection against gamma radiation. Metal-arch shelters set in concrete appeared to have good potentialities with minor design modifications. Wood-arch shelters as designed, proved to be unsuitable substitutes for metalarch shelters. No worthwhile information was obtained on basement lean-to shelters. Unusual conditions disclosed design deficiencies in entrance construction, front, and end sections, and effective earth cover. Small shelters are potentially capable of meeting requirements of civil defense. (auth)

Flynn, A.P.

1952-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Solar for Schools and Shelters (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar for Schools and Shelters (Florida) Solar for Schools and Shelters (Florida) Solar for Schools and Shelters (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Institutional Nonprofit Retail Supplier Schools Systems Integrator Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source U.S. Department of Energy State Florida Program Type Grant Program Provider Florida Solar Energy Center This program will support the installation of photovoltaic systems with battery back-up on strategically located schools and emergency shelters throughout the state. The Office of Energy will coordinate with the Florida Solar Energy Center to select 90 co-located schools and emergency shelters in Florida and install 10 kW and larger solar systems with data loggers on each site. The program will include operation and maintenance workshops for

15

THE SCATTERING OF THERMAL RADIATION INTO OPEN UNDERGROUND SHELTERS  

SciTech Connect

Animals placed in open underground shelters at the Nevada Test Site during an atomic weapon test suffered skin burns of an unknown origin. From a study of the burns it was concluded that the causative agent entered the shelter from outside. the causative agent was subject to rectilinear propagation near the entrance. and the causative agent required a relatively unobstructed opening to effect entrance. The two most likely agents for such burns are hot winds and/or hot wind-borne dust that are forced into the shelter as the shock front from the weapon passes the shelter entrances and radiant energy from the fireball that is scattered into the shelter. A study was made to evaluate the contribution made by radiant energy and, if this contributioo proved to be significant, to suggest means of eliminating it. Extensive measurements were made in the laboratory on a scale model of the shelter and direct measurements were made on an actual shelter to ensure the validity of the laboraiory results. A Photronic cell and a MacBeth Illuminometer were used to measure the entryway transmission of total radiant energy. The consistency of the results with extended and point sources for the model shelter and the agreement of these results with those from a point source and sunlight for the underground shelter at the Nevada Test Site lead to considerable confidence in the ability to predict the amount of radiant energy that would reach the animals from a weapon of known size. The energy calculated on the basis of these static measurements is about 1/200 of that required to produce the burns. Although transient effects caused by the rapid heating of the entryway walls could have resulted in a considerable increase in the entyway transmission. It is felt thai radiant important causative agent in producing burns within the shelters. Hot winds and/or hot wind-borne dust are now considered to be the most likely agents. (auth)

Davis, T.P.; Miller, N.D.; Ely, T.S.; Basso, J.A.; Pearse, H.E.

1959-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters July 15, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Recovery Act funds are being used to install solar hot water systems at 5 Phoenix shelters. The systems will save Phoenox 33,452 kWh of energy -- about $4,000 -- annually. The systems will reduce about 40,000 pounds of carbon emissions annually. "This project will save us a huge amount of money," says Paul Williams, House of Refuge Sunnyslope's Executive Director. Williams is referring to a recent partnership between the state of Arizona and House of Refuge Sunnyslope to install solar hot water systems at five Phoenix-area housing sites for homeless men, which will make an immediate difference at the

17

Morning Temporal Variations of Shelter-Level Specific Humidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temporal variation of specific humidity during morning hours was evaluated by analytic and numerical model scaling as well as by observational means. The scaling quantified (i) the gradual increase in the shelter increase humidity as the ...

M. Segal; G. Kallos; J. Brown; M. Mandel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Requirements engineering with ORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of IT project overspends and failures suggest that many IT projects do not conform to requirements. Despite decades of development the IT industry still seems to lack an effective method of ensuring that a project will be right first time. ...

Ken Evans

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Animal Shelter campus plan includes a new adoption center coupled with a dog adoption park, a wellness/veterinary technician education center, a show arena, and an addition to the existing shelter that will accommodate all animal control and sheltering for the Las Vegas Valley. The new facility will provide a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals to be adopted in an attempt to improve the public's perception of shelter animals. Additionally, the Regional Animal Campus will be a ''green building'', embodying a design intent on balancing environmental responsiveness, resource efficiency and cultural and community sensitivity. Designing an energy-efficient building helps reduce pollution from burning fossil fuels, reduce disturbance of natural habitats for the harvesting of resources and minimizes global warming. The project will be a leader in the use of renewable energy by relying on photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and solar collectors to produce a portion of the project's energy needs The building will operate more efficiently in comparison to a typical shelter through the use of monitoring and specialized cooling/heating equipment. Windows bringing in natural daylight will reduce the center's demand for electricity.

Randy Spitzmesser, AIA

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Animal Shelter campus plan includes a new adoption center coupled with a dog adoption park, a wellness/veterinary technician education center, a show arena, and an addition to the existing shelter that will accommodate all animal control and sheltering for the Las Vegas Valley. The new facility will provide a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals to be adopted in an attempt to improve the public's perception of shelter animals. Additionally, the Regional Animal Campus will be a ''green building'', embodying a design intent on balancing environmental responsiveness, resource efficiency and cultural and community sensitivity. Designing an energy-efficient building helps reduce pollution from burning fossil fuels, reduce disturbance of natural habitats for the harvesting of resources and minimizes global warming. The project will be a leader in the use of renewable energy by relying on photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and solar collectors to produce a portion of the project's energy needs The building will operate more efficiently in comparison to a typical shelter through the use of monitoring and specialized cooling/heating equipment. Windows bringing in natural daylight will reduce the center's demand for electricity.

Randy Spitzmesser, AIA

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EFFECTS OF AT ATOMIC EXPLOSION ON GROUP AND FAMILY TYPE SHELTERS  

SciTech Connect

Two underground shelters (50-man capacity), one open and one closed, were exposed to Apple I shot, and two were exposed to Apple H shot (at 1050 ft). Three basement exit shelters were exposed to Apple I shot at 1350 ft; four were exposed to Apple II shot, two at 1270 ft, and two at 1470 ft. Groups of three aboveground utility type shelters, one of masonry blocks, one of precast reinforced concrete, and one of poured-in-place reinforced concrete, were placed at concrete bathroom shelters were placed in rambler type houses at 2700 and 10500 ft from Apple II shot. Three types of basement shelters were constructed in two frame houses at 5500 and 7800 ft, and two types of basement shelters were constructed in two brick houses at 4700 and 10500 ft from the same burst. On neither shot was structural damage sustained by the large underground personnel shelters. Occupants of the closed shelter would not have been disturbed by blast, debris, or radiation. Damage to the basement exit shelters was inversely proportional to their distance from Ground Zero (GZ) and was directly proportional to the amount of opening in the entrance. The closed shelter at the greatest distance received the least damage but was not satisfactory as a personnel shelter at the lowest pressure tested. Utility shelters provided unsatisfactory protection from radiation. All indoor family type shelters were satisfactory as tested and would have provided adequate protection for occupants. (auth)

Vortman, L.J.

1955-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Atomic Shelters: Coping with Multi-core Fallout Zachary Ryan Anderson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Shelters: Coping with Multi-core Fallout Zachary Ryan Anderson David Gay Electrical permission. #12;Atomic Shelters: Coping with Multi-core Fallout Zachary Anderson University of California

Anderson, Zachary

23

EFFECTS OF OVERPRESSURES IN GROUP SHELTERS ON ANIMALS AND DUMMIES  

SciTech Connect

S>Relative biological hazards of blast were studied in two types of communal air-raid shelters during Shots 1 and 8. Dogs, restrained within the shelters during detonation, were studied pathologically and clinically for blast injuries. Two anthropometric dummies were test objects for displacement studies utilizing high-speed photography. Physical data included pressure vs time and air-drag determinations. During Shot 1, animals sustained marked blast damages (hemorrhages in lungs and abdominal organs), three dogs were ataxic. and the dummies were rather violently displaced. In Shot 8, however, no significant injuries were found in the animals, and the dummies were minimally displaced. Analysis of the physical data indicated that blast injuries and violent displacements may occur at much lower static overpressures than previously assumed from conventional explosion data. Furthermore, biological damage appeared to be related to the rate of rise of the overpressure and air drag, as well as the maximum overpressure values. (auth)

Roberts, J.E.; White, C.S.; Chiffelle, T.L.

1953-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Shelter Island, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Shelter Island, NY) (Redirected from Shelter Island, NY) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0681549°, -72.3386939° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0681549,"lon":-72.3386939,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Effectiveness of Urban Shelter-in-Place. III: Commercial Districts  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a toxic chemical release to the atmosphere, shelter-in-place (SIP) is an emergency response option available to protect public health. This paper is the last in a three-part series that examines the effectiveness of SIP at reducing adverse health effects in communities. We model a hypothetical chemical release in an urban area, and consider SIP effectiveness in protecting occupants of commercial buildings. Building air infiltration rates are predicted from empirical data using an existing model. We consider the distribution of building air infiltration rates both with mechanical ventilation systems turned off and with the systems operating. We also consider the effects of chemical sorption to indoor surfaces and nonlinear chemical dose-response relationships. We find that commercial buildings provide effective shelter when ventilation systems are off, but that any delay in turning off ventilation systems can greatly reduce SIP effectiveness. Using a two-zone model, we find that there can be substantial benefit by taking shelter in the inner parts of a building that do not experience direct air exchange with the outdoors. Air infiltration rates vary substantially among buildings and this variation is important in quantifying effectiveness for emergency response. Community-wide health metrics, introduced in the previous papers in this series, can be applied in pre-event planning and to guide real-time emergency response.

Chan, Wanyu R.; Chan, Wanyu R.; Nazaroff, William W.; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effectiveness of sheltering in buildings and vehicles for plutonium  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to collect and present current knowledge relevant to the protection offered by sheltering against exposure to plutonium particles released to the atmosphere during accidents. For those many contaminants for which effects are linear with the airborne concentration, it is convenient to define a Dose Reduction Factor (DRF). In the past, the DRF has been defined as the ratio of the radiological dose that may be incurred within the shelter to that in the outdoors. As such, it includes the dose through shine from plumes aloft and from material deposited on the surface. For this paper, which is concerned only with the inhalation pathway, the DRF is the ratio of the time-integrated concentration inside the shelter to that outdoors. It is important to note that the range over which effects are linear with concentration may be limited for many contaminants. Examples are when concentrations produce effects that are irreversible, or when concentrations are below effects threshold levels. 71 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Engelmann, R.J.

1990-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

EFFECTS OF AN ATOMIC EXPLOSION ON UNDERGROUND AND BASEMENT TYPES OF HOME SHELTERS  

SciTech Connect

Underground earth-covered shelters were exposed G to a 16.4-kt, 300-ft tower shot at ranges of 1230 ft (one), 1450 ft (one), 1860 ft (five), and 3506 ft (one). Two types of basement shelters were constructed in each of the test houses at 3500 and 7500 ft. Instrumentation was by gammaradiation badges, paraffin cubes, and nylon swatches. Attempts were made to measure permanent deflections of concrete roof slabs. Mannequins were placed in several shelters for purposes of demonstration and observation of blast-caused movement. A weighted mannequin in the underground shelter at 1230 it was broken in half; an unweighted one (child size) was thrown to the floor. All other mannequins remained in place, undamaged. Paraffin cubes and nylon swntches showed no evidence of thermal damage. Fallout conditions made it impossible to determine initial gamma-radiation quantities. There was no cracking or permanent deflection of the concrete roof slabs. Except for a wood-covered, trench type shelter, which partially failed because of faulty construction, the shelters showed no blast damage. Thermal energy entering the shelters probably would not have caused skin burns to human occupants. Adequacy of the shelters under full design loads could not be determined because pressures were lower than expected, but the shelter designs were structurally acceptable under test pressures received. (auth)

Byrnes, J.B.

1953-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: The North Carolina Civil Defense Agency and Fallout Shelters, 1961-1963.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??From 1961 to 1963, the administration of President John F. Kennedy attempted to create a vast network of public and private fallout shelters across the (more)

Blazich, Frank Arthur Jr.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy March 12, 2010 - 5:01pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this project do? A minimum of 90 Florida schools will receive a 10-kilowatt or larger solar system Teachers will incorporate the systems into their lesson plans, educating students about solar power and energy efficiency. Students will be able to log on to energywhiz.com to learn how much energy their school's solar shelter has created and how long electronic devices can be powered. Florida Energy Center Susan Schleith, SunSmart E-Shelters program manager at Florida Solar Energy Center, stands next to a 10kW photovoltaic system similar to ones that will be installed on

30

Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a Chicago nuclear detonation scenario.  

SciTech Connect

Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kt detonation in Chicago. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at selected exemplary points. For many Chicago neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a national capital region nuclear detonation scenario.  

SciTech Connect

Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kT detonation in the National Capital Region. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at one exemplary point. For most Washington, DC neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for an urban nuclear detonation scenario.  

SciTech Connect

Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. This study examines shelter-evacuate policies and effectiveness focusing on a 10 kt scenario in Los Angeles. The goal is to provide technical insights that can support development of urban response plans. Results indicate that extended shelter-in-place can offer the most robust protection when high quality shelter exists. Where less effective shelter is available and the fallout radiation intensity level is high, informed evacuation at the appropriate time can substantially reduce the overall dose to personnel. However, uncertainties in the characteristics of the fallout region and in the exit route can make evacuation a risky strategy. Analyses indicate that only a relatively small fraction of the total urban population may experience significant dose reduction benefits from even a well-informed evacuation plan.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Sustainable shelters for post disaster reconstruction : an integrated approach for reconstruction after the South Asia earthquake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A year after the South Asia earthquake, over 60% of the survivors are still vulnerable due to the lack of adequate shelter, the absence of basic facilities for water and sanitation and livelihood restoration. The harsh ...

Ali, Zehra (Zehra Hyder)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Appropriate technology water treatment processes for MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis recommends the use of horizontal-flow roughing filters to treat spring water of variable annual quality in MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand. The public drinking water system for 45,000 refugees is overseen by ...

Vater, Katherine Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Impact of Local Convective Cloud Systems on Summer Daytime Shelter Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential impact of daytime local summer convective cloud systems on shelter air temperature is illustrated by numerical modeling and observations. Prolonged reductions in surface solar irradiance due to cloudiness result in a noticeable ...

Moti Segal; Graham Feingold

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Solar heating of integrated greenhouse-animal shelter systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical procedure to determine the effectiveness of greenhouses as solar collectors was presented. This procedure was used to predict the effect of several construction parameters on solar radiation input to greenhouses. The orientation of the greenhouse was found to be the most effective construction parameter controlling solar radiation input to greenhouses. The effective albedo of the plant canopy was also found to be a significant factor. A new solar greenhouse design, suitable for high latitude regions was developed. The results showed that an internal solar collector could be incorporated as an integral part of the greenhouse design. The concept developed could be used as a free-standing greenhouse or in a combination with livestock building. The efficiency of the solar input was investigated for the conventional and the shed greenhouses, both as a free-standing unit and a greenhouse-animal shelter system, using computer simulation analyses. The results indicated that the efficiency of solar input is highly dependent on location; the effect of location on the shed type design is more profound. A typical case of a greenhouse-hog barn production system was investigated using computer simulation analyses. The results showed that such a food production system achieves a significant reduction in conventional fuel consumption due to both animal waste heat recovery and solar energy utilization.

Ben-Abdallah, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Development of a Fuel Containing Material Removal and Waste Management Strategy for the Chernobyl Unit 4 Shelter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to develop a strategy for the removal of fuel-containing material (FCM) from the Chernobyl Unit 4 Shelter and for the related waste management. This study was performed during Phase 1 of the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) and was funded by the Chernobyl Shelter Fund. The main objective for Phase 2 of the SIP is to stabilize the Shelter and to construct a New Confinement (NC) by the year 2007. In addition, the SIP includes studies on the strategy and on the conceptual design implications of the removal of FCM from the Shelter. This is considered essential for the ultimate goal, the transformation of the Shelter into an environmentally safe system.

Tokarevsky, V. V.; Shibetsky, Y. A.; Leister, P.; Davison, W. R.; Follin, J. F.; McNair, J.; Lins, W.; Edler, G.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Needs assessment for remote systems technology at the Chornobyl Unit 4 shelter  

SciTech Connect

The accident at Chornobyl Unit 4 on April 26, 1986, resulted in a series of unprecedented scientific and technical challenges. The reactor building was damaged extensively. Following the accident, immediate action was needed to seal off the gaping crater created by the accident, which was a continuing source of airborne contamination. Under extreme conditions, a structure called the {open_quotes}Shelter{close_quotes} was built over the remains of the reactor building. The Shelter, which was quickly completed in November 1986, was meant to provide immediate but temporary containment. Now, 11 years later, there are significant concerns about its structural integrity and projected life expectancy. The United States and other participating G-7 countries are supporting nuclear safety upgrade efforts in Eastern Europe with a primary focus on placing the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Unit 4 Shelter in a stable and environmentally acceptable condition. Application of remote systems technologies will play an important part in achieving the goals of this program. The G-7 nations have agreed to support these efforts, including the identification and development of remote system technologies for fuel removal. However at this time they have taken a firm stance against funding actual fuel removal activities. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology requested that a needs assessment be performed to evaluate the requirements for applying remote systems, including robotics, at the Shelter. This document is intended to be used to identify remote systems needs and requirements at the Shelter and to provide general information on the conditions in the Shelter that could impact the use of remote systems. This document is intended as a source of information to assist those who will be implementing the Shelter Implementation Plan tasks. The document provides background information and general guidance on the application of remote systems.

Carteret, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Holliday, M.A.; Jones, E.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Chernobyl shelter implementation plan -- project development and planning: Setting the stage for progress  

SciTech Connect

On April 26, 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) experienced a devastating accident. This accident left much of the plant and its safety systems destroyed with widespread radioactive waste contamination from the damaged nuclear fuel. In the 6 months following the accident, heroic measures were taken to stabilize the situation and erect a temporary confinement shelter over the damaged unit 4. Since that time the shelter and the contained radioactive materials and debris have begun to deteriorate. Lack of funding and staff has allowed only minor improvements to occur on-site, resulting in an existing shelter that is unstable and deteriorating. International aid has been provided to develop a comprehensive plan for the safe and environmentally sound conversion of the damaged Chernobyl reactor. These efforts are being performed in conjunction with US experts, European experts, and local Chernobyl NPP personnel. This plan is discussed here.

Johnson, W. [Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, Richland, WA (United States); Kreid, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); DeFranco, W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Response of dual-purpose reinforced-concrete mass shelter. Project 30. 2 of Operation Plumbbob  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reinforced-concrete dual-purpose underground parking garage and personnel shelter designed for a long-duration incident pressure of 40 psi was tested. The shelter was exposed to shot Priscilla, an approx. 37-kt 700-ft balloon burst (June 24, 1957), at a ground range of 1600 ft (predicted 35-psi peak incident-pressure level). The recorded peak incident pressure at the shelter was approximately 39 psi. Postshot soil borings were made to obtain undisturbed samples for determining soil characteristics. Preshot and postshot field surveys were made to determine the total lateral and vertical displacement of the structure. The test structure provided adequate protection from the effects of the test device at the test GZ distance. Despite failure of the door sealing gasket, a rise in pressure in the interior did not exceed 1.0 psi. The flat-slab roof and supporting structure were more than adequate to resist the 39-psi peak incident test loading.

Cohen, E.; Laing, E.; Bottenhofer, A.

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Attributes of Indoor Environmental Quality to Earth-sheltered Building Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the environmental attributes to underground building shape and configuration, materials, structures, use, maintenance, lighting, occupancy, and management. These criteria are hypothesized to be of more influences on the building environment in the cases of underground spaces than in the aboveground. The aim is to approach and link together the many recent architectural and engineering factors that affect indoor environmental quality (IEQ) as a contribution to the affordability and sustainability of present earth sheltered building design and development. To attain its goals, the study develops a conceptual micro-framework of healthy buildings' parameters and economic aspects for evaluating links between sustainable construction and outcomes of health, productivity, and affordability. The conclusion indicates the importance of integrating appropriate technologies into earth sheltered space design, while the recommendations conform with environmental organizations and policies' directives in both their short and long-term development plans to provide affordable and healthy earth sheltered interiors.

Sheta, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Estimating the Urban Bias of Surface Shelter Temperatures Using Upper-Air and Satellite Data. Part II: Estimation of the Urban Bias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology is presented for estimating the urban bias of surface shelter temperatures due to the effect of the urban heat island. Multiple regression techniques were used to predict surface shelter temperatures based on the time period 1986?89 ...

David L. Epperson; Jerry M. Davis; Peter Bloomfield; Thomas R. Karl; Alan L. McNab; Kevin P. Gallo

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hard to believe, but our first class of Shelter Medicine Interns complete their year of spe-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard to believe, but our first class of Shelter Medicine Interns complete their year of spe- specific legislation, and how they can part- ner with their dogs to educate the public about pit but are doing so now, contin- gent upon adopters taking part in the pro- gram. For more information, visit:: www

Keinan, Alon

44

GIS representation and assessment of water distribution system for Mae La Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ArcGIS is used to analyze water access in Mae La, Thailand, home to 45,000 residents living as refugees in a temporary camp. Drinking water for the shelter is supplied at public tap stands while water for hygienic purposes ...

Harding, Mary Pierce

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Model for the Correction of Surface Wind Data for Sheltering by Upwind Obstacles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wakes behind 2D fences and 3D obstacles are reviewed with special emphasis on reduced mean wind speeds and sheltering effects. Based partly on Perera's study of wakes behind 2D fences, and assuming a Gaussian spread for wakes behind 3D obstacles, ...

Peter A. Taylor; James R. Salmon

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.  

SciTech Connect

The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

MHK Projects/GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shelter Island NY US Shelter Island NY US < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0682,"lon":-72.3387,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

EVALUATION OF FCDA FAMILY SHELTER, MARK I, FOR PROTECTION AGAINST NUCLEAR WEAPONS. Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect

An underground reinforced-concrete family shelter designed for six persons was tested at three anticipated nuclear blast overpressures: 30, 48, and 65 psi. The structures were calculated to sustain a 30-psi long-duration overpressure. Postshot examination of all shelters lndicated there was little or no deflection in the reinforced-concrete members. Although the actual blast load was of short duration, the natural period for the structures was also shortp therefore it is felt that the structures would withstand similar overpressures from long-duration blast loadings. The average attenuation factor for gamma radiation varied from 3000 to 4500. Permanent damage was confined to the exposed portions of the ventilation pipes, which were bent to a nearly horizontal position. The steel-plate door at the 65-psi level was dished inward about 1 1/4 in., but it opened and closed easily. (authl

FitzSimons, N.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0453,"lon":-72.3748,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Thermal Study Proposal Sprint/Nextel Shelters With iDEN EBTS Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Race to Failure" Race to Failure" Energy Storage Program Sprint/Nextel Shelters With iDEN ® EBTS Systems Emerson Network Power Paul Misar Director of Wireless Solutions November 3, 2006 2 Emerson Confidential "Race to Failure" Problem Statement  Wireless communication fails rapidly after commercial power loss  Traditional energy storage (batteries) fail after several hours  Failure mode involves rapid build up of heat within wireless shelters and enclosures  Result: Temperature sensitive telecom electronics are forced to thermally shut down prior to depletion of on site energy storage  Solution must address the following at the Telecom Site: - Lack of thermal energy storage (cooling) - Lack of extended DC power back up (batteries) - Leverage existing energy storage at site

51

DRAFT-- DO NOT CITE Subsidized Housing, Emergency Shelters, and Homelessness: An Empirical Investigation Using Data from the 1990 Census  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper uses the S-Night counts of persons in homeless shelters and living on the streets from the 1990 Decennial census to study the causes of variation in rates of homelessness across metropolitan areas. The effects of several policies are explored. Specifically, we estimate the importance of emergency homeless shelters and federally subsidized housing as solutions to the problem of homelessness. The results suggest that the expansion of homeless shelters has led to an increase in the total number of homeless persons. Additional shelters induce some households to leave the worst traditional housing situations. We find no evidence in support of the notion that increasing the number of federally subsidized units would decrease the number of homeless. However, our estimates suggest that a city can lower the rate of homelessness by targeting subsidized housing toward the very poor. Considerable debate exists over which policies are the most successful at reducing the number of homeless. This study uses data from the 1990 decennial census to estimate the effectiveness of, among other things, the expansion of homeless shelters and the availability and targeting of subsidized housing. The results suggest that the introduction of emergency shelters for the homeless has led to an increase in the number of homeless in the U.S. No evidence is found to support the notion that a general increase in the number of subsidized units will decrease the total number of homeless. However, estimates suggest that federally subsidized housing targeted toward the poor reduces the rate of homelessness.

Dirk W. Early; Edgar O. Olsen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Effects of a standardized obedience program on approachability and problem behaviors in dogs from rescue shelters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved adoptability is a common goal among rescue shelters. Dogs are more likely to be adopted if they are friendly, mannerly, and approachable. The possibility of improving rescue shelter dogs' behavior through an obedience program has not been examined. We developed an approachability test to determine whether dogs became more approachable during and after a standardized 12-week obedience program. We also quantified jumping behavior and pulling on the leash to measure if these problematic behaviors also improved through training. The subjects consisted of 26 dogs donated to the Triple Crown School for Professional Dog Trainers for one of the 12-week sessions. The approach test was administered six times, at two-week intervals. The tests were videotaped and jumping and pulling behaviors were quantified after testing. Scores for approachability were based on the proximity between the tester and the dog at the end of each test. For the dogs that completed all 12 weeks of the study, contingency analyses were performed for each behavioral measure. Relative to the start of the 12-week training program, the dogs became more approachable (ptraining as a tool for increasing a rescue shelter dog's adoptability and permanence once placed in a home.

Hays, Lauren Denise

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PRESSURE PHENOMENA OCCURRING INSIDE PROTECTIVE SHELTERS FOLLOWING A NUCLEAR DETONATION  

SciTech Connect

In two series of experiments 277 experimental animals, including 66 dogs, 52 rabbits, 52 guinea pigs, 63 rats, and 44 mice, were exposed under selected conditions in six different general types of instrumented above- and belowground shelters to blast produced by nuclear explosions. The distance of the several structures from Ground Zero ranged from 1050 to 5500 ft. The most severe alterations in the pressure environment occurring inside the structures followed the detonation of a nuclear device with a yield approximately 50% greater than nominal. The highest overpressure to which animals were exposed was 85.8 psi, the rise time of which was 4 msec. The overpressure endured for about 570 msec. Overpressures ranged from this maximum downward in 15 other exposure situations to a minimum of 1.3 psi enduring for nearly 1346 msec but rising to a maximum in about 420 msec. The latter pressure occurred inside a reinforced concrete bathroom shelter, which was the only surviving part of a house otherwise totally destroyed, at 4700 ft where the outside incident pressure was about 5 psi. Following the nuclear explosions, all animals were recovered, examined, sacrificed, and subjected to gross and microscopic pathological study. All lesions were tabulated and described. The results of pressure-time data, documenting the variations on the pressure environment, are presented and analyzed, and an exploratory attempt is made to relate the alterations in the pressure environment to the associated pathology observed. A critical review of selected material from the blast and related literature is presented. All data are discussed, and the several problems related to the design and construction of protective shelters are noted and briefly, but analytically, assessed. The most outstanding contribution of the field experiments and the related study of the literature was the unequivocal demonstration that the provision of adequate protective structures can indeed be an effective means of sharply reducing casualties which would otherwise be associated with the detonation of modern large-scale explosive devices. (auth)

White, C.S.; Chiffelle, T.L.; Richmond, D.R.; Lockyear, W.H.; Bowen, I.G.; Goldizen, V.C.; Merideth, H.W.; Kilgore, D.E.; Longwell, B.B.; Parker, J.T.; Sherping, F.; Cribb, M.E.

1956-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Architectural Design Factors Of Domestic Violence Shelters That Affect Outcomes For Female Domestic Violence Victims: A Naturalistic Inquiry To Establish Grounded Theory For Future Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing domestic violence shelters for women must be considered from a feminist perspective, inclusive of theories of embodiment, as the female victim's emotional state (mind) is a critical component in determining her overall state (i.e., level of distress). The primary objective of this study (Specific Aim 1) was to identify the mental and emotional state of female domestic violence victims upon entry into a shelter as a means of establishing specific user needs which should directly impact the design of the shelter. The primary hypothesis (Hypothesis 1) was that upon entry into a shelter environment, victims are experiencing high levels of distress compared to normative controls. The secondary objective of this study (Specific Aim 2) was to identify shelter users? perceptions of the current shelter environment in which they lived as a foundation for matching specific design criteria with the specific needs of the female domestic violence victim (i.e., stress reduction) in an attempt to understand the relationship between user needs and individual design characteristics of the shelter. The secondary exploratory hypothesis (Hypothesis 2) was that anxiety or stress is reduced over time; therefore, the architectural design of a shelter that promotes independence will result in less distress among domestic violence victims utilizing the shelter. Thirty-three domestic violence victims in Fort Worth, Texas participated in focus groups and interviews conducted over a four-month period of time in 2009. Qualitative analysis of this data yielded four emergent themes: (1) loss of independence and control: the second layer of fear; (2) the search for security; (3) reconnecting to self; and (4) expressions of humanity. Quantitative analysis was utilized to measure participant stress levels at three intervals during their thirty day shelter program: (1) within the first twenty-four hours of shelter entry; (2) seven to ten days after shelter entry; and (3) fourteen or more days after shelter entry. Findings of this researcher have been utilized to generate design objectives that can be extrapolated to apply to other locations of shelters and could impact the design of new facilities as well as the redesign of current shelters.

Prestwood, Laura E.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The consumer's guide to earth sheltered housing: A step-by-step workbook for prospective owners  

SciTech Connect

Earth sheltered homes have captured the imagination of many homeowners seeking the cost and energy savings features they offer. This book provides the discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of such homes and includes illustrations showing interiors and exteriors with advise to owners on dealine with architects and contractors.

Rollwagen, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

On the role of the Jeffreys'sheltering mechanism in the sustain of extreme water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of the wind on the sustain of extreme water waves is investigated experimentally and numerically. A series of experiments conducted in the Large Air-Sea Interactions Facility (LASIF) showed that a wind blowing over a strongly nonlinear short wave group due to the linear focusing of a modulated wave train may increase the life time of the extreme wave event. The expriments suggested that the air flow separation that occurs on the leeward side of the steep crests may sustain longer the maximum of modulation of the focusing-defocusing cycle. Based on a Boundary-Integral Equation Method and a pressure distribution over the steep crests given by the Jeffreys'sheltering theory, similar numerical simulations have confirmed the experimental results

Giovanangeli, J P; Touboul, J; Giovanangeli, Jean-Paul; Kharif, Christian; Touboul, Julien

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

BLAST BIOLOGY--A STUDY OF THE PRIMARY AND TERTIARY EFFECTS OF BLAST IN OPEN UNDERGROUND PROTECTIVE SHELTERS  

SciTech Connect

Dogs, pigs, rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice were exposed to nuclear detonatiors in two open underground pantitioned shelters. The shelters were of similar constructions and each was exposed to separate detonations. Each inner chamber filled through its own orifice; thus four separate pressure enviromments were obtained. An aerodynamic mound was placed over the escape hatch of each structure to determine its effect on the pressurecurve shape inside the chamber. In one test a sieve plate bolted across the top of the mound was evaluated. Wind protective baffles of solid plate and of heavy wire screen were installed in the shelters to compare primary and tertiary blast effects on dogs. The shelters also contained static and dynamic pressure gages, radiation detectors, telemetering devices, and, in one test, air-temperature measuring instruments, dustcollecting trays, and eight pigs for the biological assessment of thermal effects. One dog was severely injured from tertiary blast effects associated with a maximal dynamic pressure (Q) of 10.5 psi, and one was undamaged with a maximal Q of 2 psi. Primary blast effects resulting from peak overpressures of 30.3, 25.5, 9.5. and 4.1 psi were minimal. The mortality was 19 per cent of the mice exposed to a peak pressure of 30.3 psi and 5 and 3 per cent of the guinea pigs and mice exposed to a peak pressure of 25.5 psi. Many of the rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice sustained slight lung hemorrhages at maximum pressures of 25.5 and 30.3 psi. Eardrum perforation data for all species, except mice, were recorded. Following shot 2, thermal effects were noted. Animals of the groups saved for observation have died from ionizing-radiation effects. (auth)

Ricmond, D.R.; Taborelli, R.V.; Bowen, I.G.; Chiffelle, T.L.; Hirsch, F.G.; Longwell, B.B.; Riley, J.G.; White, C.S.; Sherping, F.; Goldizen, V.C.; Ward, J.D.; Wetherbe, M.B.; Clare, V.R.; Kuhn, M.L.; Sanchez, R.T.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

VERTICAL MIGRATION OF RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VICINITY OF THE CHERNOBYL CONFINEMENT SHELTER  

SciTech Connect

Studies on vertical migration of Chernobyl-origin radionuclides in the 5-km zone of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) in the area of the Red Forest experimental site were completed. Measurements were made by gamma spectrometric methods using high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors with beryllium windows. Alpha-emitting isotopes of plutonium were determined by the measurement of the x-rays from their uranium progeny. The presence of {sup 60}Co, {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 154,155}Eu, and {sup 241}Am in all soil layers down to a depth of 30 cm was observed. The presence of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am were noted in the area containing automorphous soils to a depth of 60 cm. In addition, the upper soil layers at the test site were found to contain {sup 243}Am and {sup 243}Cm. Over the past ten years, the {sup 241}Am/{sup 137}Cs ratio in soil at the experimental site has increased by a factor of 3.4, nearly twice as much as would be predicted based solely on radioactive decay. This may be due to 'fresh' fallout emanating from the ChNPP Confinement Shelter.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Prevalence of Salmonella sp. in domestic cats in an animal shelter and the comparison of culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques as diagnostic tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies on the prevalence of Salmonella in cats have used a variety of culture methods producing a variety of results, but none have been compared to PCR. Using a double enrichment protocol developed at Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory the prevalence of Salmonella in shelter cat feces was determined in this current study. The culture protocol used included Xylose Lysine Tergitol 4 (XLT4) and MacConkey (MAC) agars with a primary enrichment in Tetrathionate broth (TTH) with iodine and a secondary enrichment in Rappoport-Vassilaidis R10 broth (RV). This study further modified an equine PCR technique and demonstrated its successful use in cats. When comparing the results of the two protocols, PCR and culture, it was found that the procedures are equally adequate at detecting the presence of Salmonella in cat feces. This study further confirmed that Salmonella is a potential hazard for families who adopt shelter cats.

Lee, Melinda J.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Blast biology: a study of the primary and tertiary effects of blast in open underground protective shelters. Project 33. 1 of Operation Plumbbob  

SciTech Connect

Dogs, pigs, rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice were exposed to nuclear detonations in two open underground partitioned shelters. The shelters were of similar construction, and each was exposed to separate detonations. Each inner chamber filled through its own orifice; thus four separate pressure environments were obtained. An aerodynamic mound was placed over the escape hatch of each structure to determine its effect on the pressure-curve shape inside the chamber. In one test a sieve plate bolted across the top of the mound was evaluated. Wind protective baffles of solid plate and of heavy wire screen were installed in the shelters to compare primary and tertiary blast effects on dogs. The shelters also contained static and dynamic pressure gages, radiation detectors, telemetering devices, and, in one test, air-temperature measuring instruments, dust-collecting trays, and eight pigs for the biological assessment of thermal effects. One dog was severely injured from tertiary blast effects associated with a maximal dynamic pressure (Q) of 10.5 psi, and one was undamaged with a maximal Q of 2 psi. Primary blast effects resulting from peak overpressures of 30.3, 25.5, 9.5, and 4.1 psi were minimal. The mortality was 19% of the mice exposed to a peak pressure of 30.3 psi and 5 and 3% of the guinea pigs and mice exposed to a peak pressure of 25.5 psi. Many of the rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice sustained slight lung hemorrhages at maximum pressues of 25.5 and 30.3 psi. Eardrum perforation data for all species, except mice, were recorded. Following shot 2, thermal effects were noted. Animals of the groups saved for observation have died from ionizing-radiation effects.

Ricmond, D.R.; Taborelli, R.V.; Bowen, I.G.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Searching for shelter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture is born out of a need for the re-definition and intensification of t he existing physical landscape. An architects services respond and re-define culture and can never be legitimized by the want of form. ...

Gutierrez, Frederick Martin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

www.elsevier.com/locate/orms The learning curve: a new perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the popularity of the ``learning' ' curve, it should be called the ``forecasting' ' curve. Given an industrial process, the traditional learning curve forecasts how costs are expected to decline (or other performance measures improve) in the future. Forecasting is certainly very useful. Nevertheless, the previous literature is notably mute on how the improvement or learning occurs. Without that information about how the process operates, the traditional learning curve cannot improve the rate of learning. This paper transforms the curve so that it not merely forecasts but rather actively creates the learning and knowledge. By extending work of the authors (Zangwill and Kantor, 1998), this paper constructs a new theoretical framework for learning and making improvements based upon learning cycles. This approach allows what is learned in one period to be intelligently applied to the next, improving the rate of learning right as production is occurring. Previous approaches could not do this. Because it should quickly increase the rate of learning, this approach might have important industrial

Willard I. Zangwill A; Paul B. Kantor B

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Modeling shelter-in-place including sorption on indoor surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

response option, especially in situations when evacuation is infeasible. Reasonably tight building envelopes provide protection against exposure to peak concentrations when...

64

Shelter Island, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

681549°, -72.3386939° 681549°, -72.3386939° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0681549,"lon":-72.3386939,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Shelter Island Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, New York: Energy Resources Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0839883°, -72.3559166° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0839883,"lon":-72.3559166,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

66

Oblique, Stratified Winds about a Shelter Fence. Part I: Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind statistics were measured using cup and sonic anemometers, placed upwind and downwind from a porous plastic windbreak fence (height h = 1.25 m, length Y = 114 m, resistance coefficient kr0 = 2.4, and porosity p = 0.45) standing on otherwise ...

John D. Wilson

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Taking Shelter: Estimating the Safety Benefits of Tornado Safe Rooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several decades, engineers have made significant progress in the design and construction of structures able to withstand tornadic winds and debris. The aftermath of the 3 May 1999 F5 tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, highlighted the ...

David Merrell; Kevin M. Simmons; Daniel Sutter

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The endocrine tumor summit 2008: appraising therapeutic approaches for acromegaly and carcinoid syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of 103 patients, Beauregard et al. found that patients1998 Orme 1998 Arita 2003 Beauregard 2003 Ayuk 2004 BlermaszOrme 1998 Arita 2003 Beauregard 2003 Blermasz 2004 Holdaway

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

"Shelter within my reach" : medium rise apartment housing for the middle income group in Karachi, Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis identifies the project development processes of medium rise (five storied or less) apartment housing built by the private formal sector, catering to the middle income groups in Karachi, Pakistan. Middle income ...

Mahmood, Saman, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermal Study Proposal Sprint/Nextel Shelters With iDEN EBTS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy storage Solution must address the following at the Telecom Site: - Lack of thermal energy storage (cooling) - Lack of extended DC power back up (batteries) - Leverage...

71

Model-Simulated Influences of Shelterbelt Shape on Wind-Sheltering Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report results of a numerical model used to simulate wind and turbulence fields for porous, living shelterbelts with seven different cross-sectional shapes. The simulations are consistent with results of Woodruff and Zingg whose wind-...

Hao Wang; E. S. Takle

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

After the Storm: Building a Safe Shelter for the School Children of Mulhall, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the elementary school in Mulhall, Oklahoma, was destroyed during the tornado outbreak of 3 May 1999, a great loss of young life was prevented by chance alone. The tornado hit after school was out of session. The weather scientists and ...

John W. Buckley

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The evolution of shelter: ecology and ethology of chimpanzee nest building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................................................................................................................... 106 Chapter 6 Thermoregulatory nest function: variation in nest characteristics, shape, and architecture in response to weather ................................................................................. 110 INTRODUCTION... ................................................................................................................................................ 117 RESULTS ................................................................................................................................................. 117 Weather conditions...

Stewart, Fiona Anne

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Picking up the pieces : transitional shelters for disaster relief in the northern mountainous regions of Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis seeks to tackle a complex problem - disaster housing relief - from the angle of architecture design discipline and attempts to find a logical approach to solve such a problem via an in depth examination of a ...

Lee, Weifeng Victoria

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Shelter Seeking Plans of Tuscaloosa Residents for a Future Tornado Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enhanced Fujita scale category 4 (EF4) Tuscaloosa, Alabama, tornado on 27 April 2011 produced 64 fatalities along its 130-km track. Hybrid survey/interviews were conducted with a sample of 211 Tuscaloosa-area residents to determine how the 27 ...

Jason C. Senkbeil; Meganne S. Rockman; John B. Mason

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sheltering in place : the limits of integrative bargaining following industrial accidents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study grew out of an interest in environmental justice and the unique problems faced by neighborhoods located near petrochemical facilities. It also focuses on negotiation theory and how it can be applied under an ...

Macey, Gregg P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cyclone shelters and cyclone resilient design in coastal areas of Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bangladesh is one of those countries that are most vulnerable to tropical cyclones. In recent decades, cyclone mitigations by the Government of Bangladesh and international organizations have greatly increased the coastal ...

Jia, Zheng, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Oblique, Stratified Winds about a Shelter Fence. Part II: Comparison of Measurements with Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate Reynolds-averaged NavierStokes (RANS) models of disturbed micrometeorological winds, steady-state computations using a second-order closure are compared with observations (see Part I) in which the surface layer wind was disturbed by ...

John D. Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Individual Radiation Exposure Dose Due to Support Activities at Safe Shelters in Fukushima Prefecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immediately after the accidents in the nuclear power stations in Fukushima on March 11, the Japanese Government ordered the evacuation of the residents within a 20-km radius from the station on March 12, and asked various institutions to monitor the contamination levels of the residents. Hirosaki University, which is located 355 km north of Fukushima City, decided to send support staff to Fukushima. This report summarizes the results of the exposure of 13 individual teams from March 15 to June 20. The support teams surveyed more than 5,000 people during this period. Almost all subjects had external contamination levels of less than 13 kcpm on Geiger-Mller (GM) survey meter, which is categorized as no contamination level. The 1 st team showed the highest external exposure dose, but the 4 th team onward showed no significant change. Subsequently, the internal radiation exposure was measured using a whole body counter that indicated undetectable levels in all staff members. Although the measured external radiation exposure dose cannot have serious biological effects on the health of an individual, a follow-up study of the residents in Fukushima and other regions where

Satoru Monzen; Masahiro Hosoda; Shinji Tokonami; Minoru Osanai; Hironori Yoshino; Mitsuaki A. Yoshida; Masatoshi Yamada; Yasushi Asari; Kei Satoh; Ikuo Kashiwakura

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Invaders from the South? Archaeological Discontinuities in the Northwestern Great Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Number of Specimens Source Hanging Rock Shelter Last SupperSupper Hanging Rock Last Supper Source Cave Shelter ShelterSOURCE DETERMINATIONS FOR PROJECTILE POINTS FROM HANGING ROCK

Layton, Thomas N

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

"Little Holes to Hide In": Civil Defense and the Public Backlash Against Home Fallout Shelters, 1957-1963.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Throughout the 1950s, U.S. policymakers actively encouraged Americans to participate in civil defense through a variety of policies. In 1958, amidst confusion concerning which (more)

Whitehurst, John R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Solceller som energiklla och solskydd fr tlt; Solar cells as power source and solar protection roof for shelters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This degree project is an investigation of solar cells and their ability to deliver electric power as well as reducing the need for cooling. (more)

Lnn, Viktoria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT - MARCH THROUGH MAY 1961  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. Morimoto, and A. Orme, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly1949, 55. P. R. Hammond, in Bio-Organic Chemistry QuarterlyPhysiol. Edward Markham, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly

Various

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data c o---ownership 2. Supporting l egal f ramework OGD 2 C onsumer: Today Read (API, Download) Notify (Email, f orms, upload) Write (update, upload) Heterogenous D...

85

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sherman, M.H. (2008). Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE62.2, ASHRAE Transactions, June 2008, Vol. 114, Pt. 2, pp.and Sustainable Buildings, ASHRAE. Orme, M. 1998. "Energy

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

s des sries de fractions rationnelles - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

x seer un ensemble d'dpaisseur circulaire I au point a, 2 sur une pleine dpaisseur ra- dime de sommet a. Le th6or~me I[ est une proposition d'Analysis Situs,...

87

Test of the MIPAS Retrieval Code with ATMOS Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Optimized Retrieval Model (ORM), developed for the level-2 analysis of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) experiment, is tested using spectra measured by atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS). The ...

C. Piccolo; B. Carli; S. Ceccherini

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Linear lattice modeling of the recycler ring at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Substantial differences are found in tunes and beta functions between the existing linear model and the real storage ring. They result in difficulties when tuning the machine to new lattice conditions. We are trying to correct the errors by matching the model into the real machine using Orbit Response Matrix (ORM) Fit method. The challenges with ORM particularly in the Recycler ring and the results are presented in this paper.

Xiao, Meiqin; Valishev, Alexander; Nagaslaev, Vladimir P.; /Fermilab; Sajaev, Vadim; /Argonne

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Disposition - All Non TRU Pad 1 Inventory. This project will provide personnel weather shelters (shelters, Mobile Mini) for personnel supporting the ARRA in E-Area while...

90

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes An underground or bermed earth-sheltered house can be weather resistant and energy efficient. http:energy.govenergysaverarticles...

91

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

shelters throughout the state. The Office of Energy will... http:energy.govsavingssolar-schools-and-shelters-florida Rebate Southwest Tennessee EMC- Residential Energy...

92

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) scope for TRU Waste Disposition - All Non TRU Pad 1 Inventory. This project will provide personnel weather shelters (shelters, Mobile Mini) for...

93

Selection and G x E: Advanced Topics One can hardly expect a single cultivar of a crop to flourish the world overm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Macroenvironment Housing Primary Enclosures Sheltered or Outdoor Housing Naturalistic Environments Space

Walsh, Bruce

94

Advanced Review Module-based complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Macroenvironment Housing Primary Enclosures Sheltered or Outdoor Housing Naturalistic Environments Space

Chuong, Cheng-Ming

95

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy Recovery Act funding is providing solar energy systems for more than 90 emergency shelters at Florida public schools. March...

96

Technical Investigation of the May 22, 2011, Tornado in Joplin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... shelters, full or partial basements, crawl spaces, the first floors of apartment complexes or duplexes, and internal locations within ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

NIOSH tests refuge chambers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A NIOSH report questions the viability of the shelters already certified by West Virginia. 1 tab., 6 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Center Late Opening or Early Closing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emergency Center Late Opening or Early Closing - Inclement Weather or Emergency Situation. ... Emergency Situation - "Shelter-in-Place" Plan. ...

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

Analytic properties of transition amplitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are vectors in Lorent z s pace . 10. Dirac y-mat r ' ces. It i s sually supposed that i ts precise f orm has no effe ct on the analytic pro~ rties of the integr , so t ha t i t suff i ces to t ake V = 1, al though under certain condit ions t his...

Landshoff, Peter Vincent

1962-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Query Explorativeness for Integrated Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider query systems which allow imprecise queries and define a new property called query explorativeness. This property characteri es the transf ormations perf ormed by a system in order to answer imprecise queries, i.e. the system's "work"f or mapping input queries into more precise target queries.

In Heterogeneous Data; Ra Domenig; Klaus R. Dittrich

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DATE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-09-002 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-09-002 SECTION A. Project Title: Smoking Shelters SECTION B. Project Description. Install up to three prefabricated outdoor shelters for smokers. Design and install a shelter base so that shelters can be movable. The base shall be designed to prevent shelters from moving or tipping over due to high winds. Specific location for shelters is to be determined, but the shelter bases will be placed atop existing concrete or asphalt such that no subsurface soil disturbance is expected. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact none SECTION D. Determine the Level of Environmental Review (or Documentation) and Reference(s): Identify the applicable categorical exclusion from 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B, give the appropriate justification, and the approval date..

102

DATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-09-002 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-09-002 SECTION A. Project Title: Smoking Shelters SECTION B. Project Description. Install up to three prefabricated outdoor shelters for smokers. Design and install a shelter base so that shelters can be movable. The base shall be designed to prevent shelters from moving or tipping over due to high winds. Specific location for shelters is to be determined, but the shelter bases will be placed atop existing concrete or asphalt such that no subsurface soil disturbance is expected. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact none SECTION D. Determine the Level of Environmental Review (or Documentation) and Reference(s): Identify the applicable categorical exclusion from 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B, give the appropriate justification, and the approval date..

103

CX-000280: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Smoking SheltersCX(s) Applied: B1.5Date: 11/09/2009Location(s): IdahoOffice(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy

104

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Owensboro's Window, Bus Shelter, HVAC Retrofits Owensboro Kentucky Nov 9, 2009 Gary Hartman Print Form for Records Submit to Website Submit via Email Billie Newland Digitally...

105

Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Map for Hurricane Sandy Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds,...

106

Calls to Action -- Climate-Related Disasters: Humanitarian Challenges and Reconstruction Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in Disaster Response and Shelter Disastersis often a necessity in disaster response. The manufacturingfocused on disaster response and risk reduction.

Suarez, Pablo; Saunders, Graham; Mendler, Sandra; Lemaire, Isabelle; Karol, Jorge; Curtis, Laura

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

James T. Gallagher | Renewable Energy Group | Sustainable Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shelter Engineering Comp., Business Manager, 1976 - 1979 Brookhaven National Laboratory Sustainable Energy Technologies Department Bldg. 130 - P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000...

108

Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Publications Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... release within a facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on two ... Airtightness Evaluation of Shelter-in-Place Spaces for Protection Against Airborne ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Idaho - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Idaho's river valleys offered shelter and passage through rugged western mountains to early North American hunters, French trappers, and the Lewis and ...

111

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

http:energy.govsavingssdge-electric-residential-efficiency-rebate-program Rebate Solar for Schools and Shelters (Florida) This program will support the installation of...

112

NIST Investigation of Joplin, Mo., Tornado Details Proposed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Shelters, the report states, should be installed in new and existing multi-family residential and commercial buildings, schools and in buildings with ...

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

113

X-ray science taps bug biology to design better materials and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Reports Summer Science Writing Internship Caddiesflies spin an adhesive silk underwater to build nets to capture food and build protective shelter. Pictured is that silk...

114

Reusing Non-Wearable Textiles in Disaster Areas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes a design project of a shelter solution for disaster relief in cold climates with non-wearable textiles. KICI foundation is searching for applications (more)

Bolier, L.J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Emergency Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Early Dismissal (Early Closing) Due to Inclement Weather - Snow/Ice or Emergency Situation. ... Emergency Situation - "Shelter-in-Place" Plan. ...

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Available Technologies  

Cooking with solid fuels for camping or at emergency shelters and food stands; ADVANTAGES: Fuel efficient; reduces fuel wood consumption by up to 75%;

117

Session I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2010... developed for commercial markets, and are currently being pursued as thin shell, curvilinear architectural structures and emergency shelters.

118

Form Approval:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

home cooling or air-conditioning costs? c. Help with other home energy costs? d. Emergency supplies, such as blankets, fans, portable heaters, or temporary emergency shelter?...

119

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Passive fire protection needs to be evaluated for its ability to contain a fire ... For instance, a hospital may be a safe housing shelter for able-bodied ...

120

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

climate, and materials to minimize energy use. http:energy.govenergysaverarticlespassive-solar-home-design Article Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes An underground or bermed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Prehospital and Disaster Medicine http://pdm.medicine.wisc.edu Vol. 23, No. 1 ORIGINAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

525 East 68th Street New York, NY 10021 E-mail: apant@jhsph.edu Keywords: disaster; disaster response-term shelters for housing. Responsibility for sheltering those affected by disasters in the United States in this capacity in this paper. Faith-based organizations comprise a significant disaster response asset

Scharfstein, Daniel

122

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Sheraton National Hotel 900 South Orme Street Arlington, Virginia 8:36 a.m. to 12:37 p.m. Tuesday, May 20, 2008 2 C O N T E N T S Page Opening Remarks KEVIN KOLEVAR, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability.................3 LINDA STUNTZ, EAC Chair.......................5 FERC Presentation on the State of Electricity Markets............................59 NERC Presentation on its 2007 10-Year Outlook and 2008 Summer Assessment.............75 Discussion of Electricity Resource Adequacy....95

123

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radar Focus Group Zeroes in on Data Quality Radar Focus Group Zeroes in on Data Quality Bookmark and Share On the roof of the radar instrument shelter at the ARM Southern Great Plains site, antennas for the W-band ARM Cloud Radar (rectangular white box) and millimeter wavelength cloud radar (conical cylinder) send data to their respective computer systems inside the shelter. On the roof of the radar instrument shelter at the ARM Southern Great Plains site, antennas for the W-band ARM Cloud Radar (rectangular white box) and millimeter wavelength cloud radar (conical cylinder) send data to their respective computer systems inside the shelter. In 2007, ARM established a Radar Focus Group to address strategic needs related to the use of radars as a key component of the ARM instrument suite. Based on needs identified by this group, a smaller team of science,

124

The Use of Polar-orbiting Satellite Sounding Data to Estimate Rural Maximum and Minimum Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric sounding products from NOAA's polar-orbiting satellites were used to derive and test predictive equations of rural shelter-level maximum and minimum temperatures. Sounding data from both winter and summer months were combined with ...

Gregory L. Johnson; Jerry M. Davis; Thomas R. Karl; Alan L. McNab; J. Dan Tarpley; Peter Bloomfield

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Rituals of Charity and Abundance: Sicilian St. Joseph's Tables and Feeding the Poor in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tables can be viewed by pilgrims on the eve of March 19 andbe taken away by visiting pilgrims. On March 19 instead, St.and thereafter all pilgrims into ones home, sheltering and

Del Giudice, Luisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Time, energy & form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

McInnis, Martha Jane

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Manhattan Project: Facts About Fallout  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

FACTS ABOUT FALLOUT FACTS ABOUT FALLOUT Federal Civil Defense Administration, National Archives (1955) Resources > Library Below is Facts About Fallout, an eight-page civil defense pamphlet on fallout published by the Federal Civil Defense Administration in 1955. At the bottom of this page there are also three photographs of government-suggested fallout shelter designs and a "Fallout Shelter" sign. The pamphlet is courtesy the National Archives, as are the three photographs of the fallout shelters (courtesy the Federal Emergency Management Agency). The image of the "fallout shelter" sign is courtesy the Environmental Protection Agency. Facts About Fallout, p. 1 Facts About Fallout, p. 2 Facts About Fallout, p. 3 Facts About Fallout, p. 4 Facts About Fallout, p. 5

128

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in...

129

Analysis of Evaporation Data From Heated Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled field experiments have improved understanding of the role evaporation plays in the thermal performance and water consumption of utility cooling ponds. The data show significant effects of water surface temperature, fetch or wind direction, and pond sheltering.

1987-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

130

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is using several shelters for ground instruments, balloon operations, and office space, plus a truck for the radar. For the remote field campaign at Oliktok Point, the ALTOS team...

131

Microsoft Word - ED_ORNL_TM-2006_154 _NG_ _Nuisance_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will only be done in certain special cases under TWRA direction.) Any trapped feral cats should be taken to the animal shelter. * Do not feed resident wildlife and feral cats....

132

Estimating Urban Temperature Bias Using Polar-Orbiting Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban temperature bias, defined to be the difference between a shelter temperature reading of unknown but suspected urban influence and some appropriate rural reference temperature, is estimated through the use of polar-orbiting satellite data. ...

Gregory L. Johnson; Jerry M. Davis; Thomas R. Karl; Alan L. McNab; Kevin P. Gallo; J. Dan Tarpley; Peter R. Bloomfield

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The provision of low-income housing within the context of a new town in Lazard Cardenas - Las Truchas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is essentially the description of the shelter components of a World Bank co-financed urban development project in the new town of Lazaro Cardenas and its twin, the poor city of Guacamayas. The document presents ...

Lawrence, Juan Marcos

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Health and Hygiene in Evacuation Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

People who are staying in temporary shelters and evacuation centers may be at risk for diseases that spread in crowded conditions. Maintaining personal hygiene is one way to protect yourself. Keeping the facility clean is also very important.

Norman, Lisa

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

Some Perspectives on Recent In Situ Air Temperature Observations: Modeling the Microclimate inside the Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature measurement has inherent biases associated with the particular radiation shield and sensor deployed. The replacement of the Cotton Region Shelter (CRS) with the MaximumMinimum Temperature System (MMTS) and the introduction of ...

X. Lin; K. G. Hubbard; E. A. Walter-Shea; J. R. Brandle; G. E. Meyer

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Visitor Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25 29-E Main Control Center (MCC) 5 32-F Main Gate (Information Booth) 83 31-B Master Substation 16 30-F Medical (Room 11) 28 30-E Metal Stores Shelter 29 29-F Operations...

137

slac_nums  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25 29-E Main Control Center (MCC) 5 32-F Main Gate (Information Booth) 83 31-B Master Substation 16 30-F Medical (room 11) 28 30-E Metal Stores Shelter 29 29-F Operations...

138

Good Scientists Make Good Neighbors  

Office of Science (SC) Website

and arms, and wallets to their communities. PPPL served as a place of shelter, and internet surfing during the storm. Brookhaven Lab was a source of hot showers, cleaning...

139

Student Accomplishments Alumni Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with diesel engines could be ev en more ef f icient than hy brids f ueled by gasoline, though he noted's standards f or storm shelters. The Wind Science and Engineering Research Center testing was also described

Gelfond, Michael

140

Performance of Hot Plate for measuring Solid Precipitation in Complex Terrain during the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid precipitation intensity, snow density, wind speed, and temperature were collected from November 2009 to February 2010 at a naturally sheltered station located at an altitude of 1640 m ASL on Whistler Mountain in British Colombia, Canada. The ...

Faisal S. Boudala; Roy Rasmussen; George A. Isaac; Bill Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Massachusetts HomeBASE Program : lessons learned from a statewide housing-first policy for homeless families  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massachusetts is the only state in the US to maintain an emergency shelter entitlement for homeless families with its own dedicated line item in the state budget. However, in the last decade that line item has increased ...

Ward, Ellen Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hysteresis and urban rail : the effects of past urban rail on current residential and travel choices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cities are endowed with and accumulate assets based on their unique histories, which in turn define the choice set of the present. These assets range from the natural-sheltered ports, fertile land--to the constructed--concrete ...

Block-Schachter, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Harboring chaos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hurricane shelters have become the unknown point of last resort for many coastal communities. Harboring displaced populations during a hurricane and it's chaotic aftermath are no longer seen as a need in a coastal communities ...

Anderson, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey Arthur)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

SNOWMIP2: An Evaluation of Forest Snow Process Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Northern Hemisphere has large areas that are forested and seasonally snow covered. Compared with open areas, forest canopies strongly influence interactions between the atmosphere and snow on the ground by sheltering the snow from wind and ...

Richard Essery; Nick Rutter; John Pomeroy; Robert Baxter; Manfred Sthli; David Gustafsson; Alan Barr; Paul Bartlett; Kelly Elder

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Marsh Collapse Does Not Require Sea Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing nurseries for fish species and shelter and food for endangered birds. Salt marshes also mitigate the impacts of hurricanes and tsunamis, and sequester ...

Fagherazzi, Sergio

146

Effects of Long Waves on Wind-Generated Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed to explain the observation made in several laboratory experiments that short wind-generated waves are suppressed by a train of long, mechanically generated waves. A sheltering mechanism is responsible for generation of the ...

Gang Chen; Stephen E. Belcher

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

0 280 560 840 1,120 1,400140 NorthCourtStreet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'Bleness Hospital Bicentennial Park Lot CG Lot122 40 Southside Park Shelter Upper Campus Grounds Claire Ping Cottage Service Center Facilities Shops 3 O HP Electrical Substation Anderson Hall Transportation& Parking

Botte, Gerardine G.

148

Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by...

149

Evaluation of Two Gustiness Models for Exposure Correction Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gustiness models from Wieringa and Beljaars are evaluated. The models are used to relate the gustiness from wind speed records to the local roughness length. The roughness length is used to apply exposure corrections to sheltered wind stations. ...

J. W. Verkaik

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Designing for communication : from orientation to empathy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beyond shelter, communication is the essential act of architecture. The construction of a building is the result of a dialogue between people and the natural environment where a building rises because it is the physical ...

Fricke, Gretchen M., 1974-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W-Band Cloud Radar Added to ARM Mobile Facility in Africa W-Band Cloud Radar Added to ARM Mobile Facility in Africa Bookmark and Share Most of the WACR is mounted on top of one of the AMF shelters. The WACR computer and chiller (used to keep the WACR cool in temperatures up to 47 degrees C) are located in the shelter below the radar. Most of the WACR is mounted on top of one of the AMF shelters. The WACR computer and chiller (used to keep the WACR cool in temperatures up to 47 degrees C) are located in the shelter below the radar. A W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) recently joined the suite of baseline capabilities offered by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF). The term "W-band" refers to the specific radio frequency range of this radar, which is a 95 gigahertz pulse Doppler zenith pointing radar, providing profiles of cloud

152

Effects of Recent Thermometer Changes in the Cooperative Station Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past five years, the National Weather Service (NWS) has replaced over half of its liquid-in-glass maximum and minimum thermometers in wooden Cotton Region Shelters (CRSS) with thermistor-based Maximum-Minimum Temperature Systems (MMTSS)...

Robert G. Quayle; David R. Easterling; Thomas R. Karl; Pamela Y. Hughes

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ParaSITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paraSITE proposes the appropriation of exterior ventilation systems on existing architecture to inflate pneumatic shelters that are designed for homeless people. This project involves the production of a series of inflatable ...

Rakowitz, Michael

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Conceptual Design of the Chornobyl New Safe Confinement - an Overview  

SciTech Connect

The Object Shelter, constructed over the Chornobyl nuclear power plant that was destroyed by a 1986 accident, is at risk of collapse. The Consortium of Bechtel, Electricit De France, and Battelle, in cooperation with subcontractor ???, recently completed the conceptual design for a New Safe Confinement (NSC) building to reduce Shelter corrosion, to mitigate the consequences of potential collapse, and to enable the safe deconstruction of unstable structures. The arch-shaped NSC will be constructed at a distance from the Shelter to minimize radiation exposure to construction workers, and then slid into place over the Shelter. After sliding, cranes and other tools inside the NSC will be remotely operated for deconstruction of the Shelter. The NSC is designed for a 100-year life. Bechtel designed the arch structure and was responsible for project management functions. Electricit De France designed the foundations and designed deconstruction of the Object Shelter unstable elements. Battelle performed safety analyses and environmental impact assessment. ??? (a consortium of ?I?? [KIEP], ??I?? [NIISK], and ???? [ISTC]), as a working partner in all aspects of the design and analysis processes, was the Ukrainian licensed engineer for conceptual design. The design is currently being reviewed by Ukrainian regulatory authorities. An open international tender for detailed design and construction is anticipated to be announced by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in December, 2003, with two-stage bid evaluation beginning in April, 2004.

Kulishenko, Valery N.; Hogg, Charles; Schmieman, Eric A.; Wrona, Matthew W.; Convert, Philippe; Nemchinov, Yuriy I.; Shenderovich, Victor; Shcherbin, Vladimir; Belicard, Pascal; Durst, Bruce M.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Pump Shelter Kicks Off Upgrades to Aerosol Observing System New Pump Shelter Kicks Off Upgrades to Aerosol Observing System Bookmark and Share Representing the first of several planned improvements to the Aerosol Observing System (AOS) at the SGP site, the ARM Climate Research Facility operations staff completed installing a new pump shelter for the system in late September, followed by relocation of the pumps and connection of the electrical hookups in October. Though the enclosure was designed primarily to move the nine vacuum pumps out of the existing AOS trailer-thereby reducing the potential for damage to the AOS instruments from heat generated by the pumps-noise reduction in the AOS trailer was another desired outcome. Anticipated instrument additions were also considered in designing the new enclosure. The new pump shelter sits on a concrete pad near the south end of the AOS. Four adjustable, open-wire shelves run the width of the shelter, and can accommodate sixteen large pumps and associated ventilation equipment.

156

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 4750 of 29,416 results. 41 - 4750 of 29,416 results. Page Employment Opportunity Highlights http://energy.gov/jobs/career-opportunities/working-doe/employment-opportunity-highlights Article Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes An underground or bermed earth-sheltered house can be weather resistant and energy efficient. http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/efficient-earth-sheltered-homes Article Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System Installing a small wind electric system? Proper installation and maintenance are key to getting the most out of your system. http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/installing-and-maintaining-small-wind-electric-system Homepage Office of Environmental Management http://energy.gov/em/office-environmental-management Page Nuclear Materials Disposition

157

Sector X  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X X If there is an emergency at ETTP requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Oak Ridge High School 127 Providence Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Oak Ridge. Turn left onto Illinois Avenue (Highway 62). Turn right onto Oak Ridge Turnpike and turn left to Oak Ridge High School. If there is an emergency at ORNL requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Karns High School 2710 Byington Solway Road Knoxville, TN 37931 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Knoxville. Then take a left at Highway 62 (Oak Ridge Highway) eastbound to Knoxville. Take a right onto State Route 131 (Byington Beaver Ridge) to Karns High School. If there is an emergency at Y-12 requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at:

158

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 26580 of 31,917 results. 71 - 26580 of 31,917 results. Rebate Solar Energy Incentives State Loan Program Note: The deadline for the most recent solicitation under this program has now passed. The program is currently closed, pending revisions to the program guidelines. Please see the program web site... http://energy.gov/savings/solar-energy-incentives-state-loan-program Rebate Solar for Schools and Shelters (Florida) This program will support the installation of photovoltaic systems with battery back-up on strategically located schools and emergency shelters throughout the state. The Office of Energy will... http://energy.gov/savings/solar-schools-and-shelters-florida Download DOE-STD-1041-93 Guide to Good Practices for Shift Routines and Operating Practices Change Notice No. 1 (December 1998) | Reaffirmed 2001

159

High-availability power for MX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With modern computer-based analyses it was possible to optimize an extensive power transmission and distribution network for supplying power to MX missile shelter sites. This network would serve some 4600 of these sites, located in suitable contiguous areas, with the shelter sites spaced one mile apart. With a dedicated transmission network and underground distribution cables we were able to predict an average commercial power availability of 0.99993 at the shelters. However, standby diesel generator sets are required at distribution centers because power is required after an electromagnetic pulse from a high-altitude weapon burst. With this strengthened distribution network, the authors were able to predict a suitable power availability of 0.999 at each missile site with incoming power supplied to each of our distribution centers at a 0.99 availability or better by local public utilities.

Oman, H.; Bannon, C.F.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Operational results of National Solar Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Included in the National Solar Demonstration Program are examples of earth-sheltered, passive solar designs. The data obtained from these sites presents an interesting look at what is both technically and economically feasible. Data from four demonstration sites that are members of the National Solar Data Network are utilized to present an economic and technical analyses of a group of four sites. Three of these sites are earth sheltered residential structures, the fourth is a commercial passive structure. This sample of four demonstration sites is not intended to provide a statistical representation of passive earth sheltered structures, but rather, an example of the type of information available through the National Solar Data Program and how this information may be utilized.

Waite, E.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soluble N-Substituted Soluble N-Substituted Polybenzimidazoles by Post-Polymerization Modification John R. Klaehn Eric S. Peterson (INL) Mike G. Jones (INL) Thomas A. Luther (INL) Chris J. Orme (INL) Alan K. Wertsching (INL) Jennifer S. Young (LANL) Kathryn A. Berchtold (LANL) May 4, 2005 Alan R. Greenberg (CU) Vivek Khare (CU) Jim Acquaviva (Pall Corp.) Frank Onorato (Pall Corp.) Scott Hopkins (Pall Corp.) CO 2 Separation Using Thermally Optimized Membranes (DOE-Fossil Energy) * Purpose - Develop high-temperature membranes for more efficient separation of CO 2 from methane and nitrogen streams - Develop and test thin, dense film polymer membranes at temperatures of 100 to 400ºC to take advantage of enhanced gas diffusion - Develop polymer membranes that have tunable permeability at an optimum temperature range for

162

Alternative Energy Finance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finance Finance Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW11 8BU Sector Renewable Energy Product String representation "Alternative Ene ... orms of energy." is too long. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

163

TRENDS: TEMPERATURE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Graphics Digital Data J.R. Petit, D. Raynaud, and C. Lorius Laboratoire de Glaciogie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, CNRS, Saint Martin d'Hères Cedex, France J. Jouzel and G. Delaygue Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE), CEA/CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France N.I. Barkov Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, Beringa Street 38, 199397 St. Petersburg, Russia V.M. Kotlyakov Institute of Geography, Staromonetny, per 29, Moscow 109017, Russia DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.006 Period of Record 420,000 years BP-present Methods Because isotopic fractions of the heavier oxygen-18 (18O) and deuterium (D) in snowfall are temperature-dependent and a strong spatial correlation

164

Microsoft PowerPoint - CrayNersc_020110.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMD Opteron AMD Opteron TM Multicore P Processors Brian Waldecker | February 1, 2009 Brian Waldecker | February 1, 2009 Senior Member of Technical Staff System Optimization Engineering Group Processor Solutions Engineering, AMD Austin TX Pat Conway | Presenter Principal Member of Technical Staff Austin TX Unified North Bridge team Processor Solutions Engineering, AMD Sunnyvale, CA Outline AMD Roadmaps and Decoder Rings Hardware Overview Software Overview Software Overview Questions AMD Hex-Core Processors | Nersc/OLCF/NICS Cray XT5 Workshop| February 2010 2 Roadmap Roadmap (and Decoder Rings) AMD Hex-Core Processors | Nersc/OLCF/NICS Cray XT5 Workshop| February 2010 3 2006 Planned Server Platform Roadmap 2007 2010 2011 2008 2009 "Maranello" way prise orm Maranello Socket G34 with AMD SR56x0 and SP5100

165

DOE /EIA -020 6(86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOE /EIA -020 6(86 ) DOE /EIA -020 6(86 ) En erg y Inf orm ati on Ad mi nis tra tio n P e rf o rm a n ce P ro fil e s o f M a jo r E n e rg y P ro d u ce rs 1 9 8 6 -- I -A This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). Ordering infor mation and purchase of this and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the EIA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics shou.d be directed to the NEIC. Addresses and telephone numbers appear below. National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building Room IE-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800

166

Microsoft PowerPoint - DBhandari_GEGR_2013_CO2_NETL_Conference.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post Combustion CO 2 Capture DOE Award: DE-FE0007514 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting Project Team 2 * Teresa Grocela-Rocha * Joe Suriano * Paul Glaser * David Moore * Hongyi Zhou * Pat McCloskey * Surinder Singh * Kristi Narang * Balajee Ananthasayanam * Lauraine Denault * Jeff Manke * Paul Wilson * Paul Howson * Dhaval Bhandari (PI) * Chris Orme * John Klaehn * Fred Stewart (PL) * Ali Rownaghi * William Koros (PL) * Jerrod Doss Isaak * Tom Barton * Vijay Sethi (PL) Acknowledgment "The material described in the presentation is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) under award number DE-FE0007514." Disclaimer "This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the

167

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MI-County-Livingston MI-County-Livingston Location: County Livingston MI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Development of an energy efficiency and conservation strategy (CX-8/14/09); 2) retrofit of boiler systems for the Administration Building, Courthouse, and County Jail; 3) retrofit of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) control systems for the Administration Building, Courthouse, Animal Shelter, Law Center, Judicial Center, and County Jail; 4) provision of project management services for EECBG-funded projects, 5) retrofit of the HVAC systems for the Jail and Animal Shelter, 6) installation of lighting controls

168

Downloading or uploading? The information economy and Africa's current status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While Africa is confronted with the urgency to provide its citizens with the basic requirements of life such as peace, food, education, health, shelter, safe drinking water, etc., the rest of the world and the developed nations in particular are fast ...

Alemayehu Molla

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

GEER Program & Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-3 2.3 The Protective Action Guides 2-4 2.3.1 Evacuation and Sheltering 2-5 2.3.2 Thyroid and Skin to a 5 rem Thyroid Dose Equivalent from Inhalation of Radioiodine 5-15 5-3 Dose Conversion Factors (DCF plans include procedures for issuing stable iodine to reduce thyroid dose (FE-85), this may

Watson, Craig A.

170

ORP Providers ORP Employee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original Amended ORP Providers ORP Employee Voluntary Contribution Investment Providers Biweekly.14% (Tax Sheltered Annuities in addition to ORP) Enter as a dollar amount or a percent 4B ING 403(b) % 4P __________________ Date Processed _______________ University of Central Florida Voluntary Contributions for ORP

Foroosh, Hassan

171

Decision Based Uncertainty Propagation Using Adaptive Gaussian Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propagation, Expected Loss, Improved Forecast. I. Introduction Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (DM) toolbox. Based on these forecasts, decisions can be made on evacuating cities, sheltering into a threat level, such as the population density in a city. Thus the ability to propagate the uncertainty

Singh, Tarunraj

172

Innovation and the big builders : barriers to integrating sustainable design and construction practices into the production homebuilding industry : the case of Pulte Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The homebuilding industry has held a dominant presence in the U.S. economy over the past century. It has been a source of profit, shelter and jobs for countless Americans. In order to meet the needs of an ever-burgeoning ...

Pauly, Justin T. (Justin Talbott)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Decker Student Health Services Center PO Box 6000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or volunteered in any homeless shelter, prison/jail, hospital or drug rehabilitation unit? YES NO If so, where steroid (prednisone 15mg/d for more than 1 month)? YES NO f. Illicit intravenous drugs or crack cocaine China China, Hong Kong SAR China, Macao SAR Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, Democratic Republic of Costa

Suzuki, Masatsugu

174

University Health Service PO Box 6000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. NO Have you ever lived, worked, or volunteered in any homeless shelter, prison/jail, hospital or drug (prednisone 15mg/d for more than 1 month)? YESe. NO Illicit intravenous drugs or crack cocaine? YESf African Republic Chad Chile China China, Hong Kong SAR China, Macao SAR Colombia Comoros Congo Congo

Suzuki, Masatsugu

175

SWARTBERG INCLUDING GAMKASKLOOF near Prince Albert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-enthusiast, these mountains are your passport to rugged adventure, surrounded by the Klein Karoo splendour of the Klein Karoo Mountains) or do one of the many day hikes available.4x4 enthusiasts can follow the Zebra overnight shelter. ANySBERG near Laingsburg Isolation and rustic relaxation is key toAnysberg - a true Karoo

de Villiers, Marienne

176

Freeze-Thaw Days in the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A freeze-thaw day is defined as a weather observation day with a maximum temperature of 0C or above and a minimum temperature of ?2.2C or below recorded in an instrument shelter 1.5 m above the ground. The 30 winter during 195080 are examined ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin; Bernard E. Dethier; Keith L. Eggleston

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE MINUTES SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 2:00 PM 206 TAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Center Drive bus shelter. #12; New LED Signs ­ Solar-powered LED signs were donated to help control seeking approval for Programming Phase. The committee raised concerns about ADA spaces that must, Project Manager with Facilities Planning and Construction, sought approval of allowing the 45-space (10

Watson, Craig A.

178

A REVIEW OF 137 Cs TRANSFER TO FUNGI AND CONSEQUENCES FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................................................... 43 #12;3 1. Introduction Since the Chernobyl incident in 1986, a great deal of research has been tablets, and sheltering, but, as shown by the experience after Chernobyl, consideration should also, May 1986, resulting from the Chernobyl incident. Spatial resolution is 5?5 km. #12;7 Cell-level data

Crout, Neil

179

Admissible release from the chernobyl new safe confinement  

SciTech Connect

Calculation of admissible releases at different exploitation stages of New Safe Confinement at the existing ChNPP ''Shelter'' object are given. Vain conclusions of calculations are given as well as recommendations for planning of activities connected with the New Safe Confinement construction.

Batiy, Valeriy; Paskevych, Sergei; Rudko, Vladimir; Sizov, Andrey; Shcherbin, Vladimir; Schmieman, Eric A.

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

A preliminary analysis of the optical properties of atmosphere in the Millard County region (Utah -USA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cameras that record the signal of two light bulbs placed near the ground during the night. The data the frames stored in the computer that managed the CCDs. The light bulbs localization on the site, as well, sheltered in a metallic box provided with a glass window. The apparatus (light bulbs, CCD cameras

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with diverse communities, but there are no cities, no buildings, no fields and no forests. You've probably Laboratory 2 Vibrio bacteria, Tina Carvalho, University of Hawaii at Manoa 3 G protein, Protein Data Bank 4 FAVORITE FOOD Chocolate PETS Two adopted shelter cats, Dolce and Gabbana FAVORITE CITY Athens, Greece

Bandettini, Peter A.

182

CLEANING OF MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATOR FLUE GAS IN EUROPE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/07/11 2015 Narcotics Violation Towers Hall A resident admitted to smoking marijuana and turned over arrested. 04/21/11 1417 04/21/11 1200- 1405 Theft Towers A credit card was stolen. Report taken. 04 The bus shelter was spray-painted on north and west sides. Report taken. 04/09/11 1047 04/09/11 1047

Columbia University

183

Effective 1/1/2012 2012 BENEFIT SUMMARY GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of month following one full month of employment Paid in full by the employee Retirement http://www.tiaa-cref.org http://www.fidelity.com TIAA-CREF Fidelity Investments Summary Plan Description Plan Modification Human Resources) No contribution by employee required Tax Sheltered Annuity(SRA) http://www.tiaa

Blais, Brian

184

Monthly Air Temperatures over Northern China Estimated by Integrating MODIS Data with GIS Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Three-North Shelter/Protective Forest Programme (TNSFP), the largest ecological afforestation program in the world, was launched in 1978 and will last until 2050 to improve ecological conditions in the Three-North regions of China. To manage ...

Xiao Zheng; Jiaojun Zhu; Qiaoling Yan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Description of Survey Data Regarding the Chemical Repackaging Plant Accident West Helena, Arkansas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shortly after 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 8, 1997, clouds of foul-smelling smoke began pouring from an herbicide and pesticide packaging plant in West Helena, Arkansas. An alert was sounded, employees evacuated, and the West Helena fire department was called. As three firefighters prepared to enter the plant, the chemical compounds exploded, collapsing a solid concrete block wall, and killing all three firefighters. As the odorous smoky cloud drifted away from the plant, authorities ordered residents in a 2-mile area downwind of the plant to evacuate and those in the 2- to 3-mile zone to shelter in place. This study examines and compares the responses to a mail survey of those ordered to evacuate and those told to shelter in place. Among the variables examined are compliance with official orders and perceived warnings, threat perception, time and source of first warning, response times, and behavior characteristics for both populations. The findings indicate that 90% of those that were told to evacuate did so but only 27% of those told to shelter-in-place did so, with 68% opting to evacuate instead. The implications of these findings for emergency managers is that people will likely choose to evacuate when both warnings to evacuate and warnings to shelter are issued to residents in close proximity to each other. The findings on warning times closely resemble other findings from evacuations when chemical accidents occur and route notification is used for warning residents.

Sorensen, J.H.; Vogt, B.M.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Crisis information concerns: Information needs of domestic violence survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The personal crisis of coping with or escaping from a violent relationship requires that survivors have accurate, current, appropriate, and contextually-useful information. Police and shelter staff, who are the governmental and private sector first-responders, ... Keywords: Domestic violence, ELIS model, Formal help information system, Human information behavior, Informal help information system, Intimate partner violence

Lynn Westbrook

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Uniondale atlasing expedition, 8-10 October 2010 Alan Lee (with photos by Wessel Rossouw)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-enthusiast, these mountains are your passport to rugged adventure, surrounded by the Klein Karoo splendour of the Klein Karoo Mountains) or do one of the many day hikes available.4x4 enthusiasts can follow the Zebra overnight shelter. ANySBERG near Laingsburg Isolation and rustic relaxation is key toAnysberg - a true Karoo

de Villiers, Marienne

188

Radioactive Waste Management and Environmental Contamination Issues at the Chernobyl Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The destruction of the Unit 4 reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant resulted in the generation of radioactive contamination and radioactive waste at the site and in the surrounding area (referred to as the Exclusion Zone). In the course of remediation activities, large volumes of radioactive waste were generated and placed in temporary near surface waste-storage and disposal facilities. Trench and landfill type facilities were created from 1986 to 1987 in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone at distances 0.5 to 15 km from the NPP site. This large number of facilities was established without proper design documentation, engineered barriers, or hydrogeological investigations and they do not meet contemporary waste-safety requirements. Immediately following the accident, a Shelter was constructed over the destroyed reactor; in addition to uncertainties in stability at the time of its construction, structural elements of the Shelter have degraded as a result of corrosion. The main potential hazard of the Shelter is a possible collapse of its top structures and release of radioactive dust into the environment. A New Safe Confinement (NSC) with a 100-years service life is planned to be built as a cover over the existing Shelter as a longer-term solution. The construction of the NSC will enable the dismantlement of the current Shelter, removal of highly radioactive, fuel-containing materials from Unit 4, and eventual decommissioning of the damaged reactor. More radioactive waste will be generated during NSC construction, possible Shelter dismantling, removal of fuel containing materials, and decommissioning of Unit 4. The future development of the Exclusion Zone depends on the future strategy for converting Unit 4 into an ecologically safe system, i.e., the development of the NSC, the dismantlement of the current Shelter, removal of fuel containing material, and eventual decommissioning of the accident site. To date, a broadly accepted strategy for radioactive waste management at the reactor site and in the Exclusion Zone, and especially for high-level and long-lived waste, has not been developed.

Napier, Bruce A.; Schmieman, Eric A.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A study of form-principles affording shielding from atomic fallout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Department of Defense-Office of Civil Defense has for several years trained architects and engineers in the design of structures to resist atomic blast and for the protection from gamma radiation (hereinafter called "fallout"). The D.O.D.-O.C.D. program, for the moat part, has placed emphasis on methods of calculating "attenuation", which is a measurement of the reduction of radiation through masses of shielding materials, through distance and other means. The calculations determine the amount of shielding afforded by a given structure or design situation; and thus assess that structure's acceptability as a fallout shelter. Thus far, this pragmatic approach has usually resulted in rather strict, utilitarian solutions in the design of shelters, many of which would tend to produce claustrophobia and panic. For example, in the one publication of the D.O.D.-O.C.D. to date showing case studies of shelters incorporated into hypothetical buildings, two out of four examples shown are basement shelters, and none of the four permit any natural light or natural ventilation. None succeed in making the space functional and inhabitable primarily for its normal day-to-day use without having foreboding shelter connotations. None of the four case studies permit any psychological outlets, several of which are possible, such as a) Occupants may be permitted secondary contact with the outside through indirect natural light and direct sound; b) Occupants may, by stepping around a corner, be able to see directly out with minor exposure; c) Occupants may even be permitted a complete exposure to the out-of-doors for a moment without endangering the other shelter occupants. All of this is feasible and desirable. It appears that designing for fallout will be an increasing factor in all types of structures in the foreseeable future. To assist architects with such design problems, this thesis is being written to investigate certain form-principles supplementing those generally used in shelter design. It also tests the validity of these form-principles through application of the D.O.D.-O.C.D. procedures to provide architects with positive design tools in this specialized field of design. Finally, it shows the incorporation of the form-principles into a hypothetical design.

Lanford, Samuel Taylor

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ARM - Facility News Article  

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October 6, 2010 [Facility News] October 6, 2010 [Facility News] New Raman Lidar En Route to Australia Bookmark and Share Since 1996, the ARM Southern Great Plains site has maintained one of the few operational Raman lidars in the world. Now, thanks to funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the ARM Tropical Western Pacific site is about to join that exclusive group. A new Raman lidar, built by Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, is on its way to Darwin, Australia. Optics contained inside the Raman lidar shelter guide backscattered laser radiation in order to measure signals collected by the telescope. Optics contained inside the Raman lidar shelter guide backscattered laser radiation in order to measure signals collected by the telescope. The Raman lidar (light detection and ranging) uses pulses of laser

191

ARM - Facility News Article  

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31, 2004 [Facility News] 31, 2004 [Facility News] New Technique Used to Measure Ice and Liquid in Clouds Bookmark and Share A mirror angled at 45 degrees inside the "winglet" viewing port deflects sunlight to the optical fiber and into the detector housed inside the "Great White" shelter at Barrow. A mirror angled at 45 degrees inside the "winglet" viewing port deflects sunlight to the optical fiber and into the detector housed inside the "Great White" shelter at Barrow. Difficulties in modeling the effects of clouds on climate arise largely from the insufficient number of observations needed to sufficiently understand cloud processes. Science collaborators at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations (NOAA) Aeronomy Laboratory have developed a

192

ARM - Facility News Article  

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August 31, 2006 [Facility News] August 31, 2006 [Facility News] New Lidars Installed at Tropical Western Pacific Site Bookmark and Share A representative from Sigma Space Corporation trains ARM operations staff in Darwin, Australia, on various components of the new micropulse lidar. The lidar, shown at left, will be placed in one of the outdoor instrument shelters, below a hole in the roof for the laser to pulse through. A representative from Sigma Space Corporation trains ARM operations staff in Darwin, Australia, on various components of the new micropulse lidar. The lidar, shown at left, will be placed in one of the outdoor instrument shelters, below a hole in the roof for the laser to pulse through. As reported in May, all the ARM sites are benefiting from new and upgraded micropulse lidars. This month, the new lidar was received in Darwin,

193

CX-000489: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

489: Categorical Exclusion Determination 489: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000489: Categorical Exclusion Determination Locating Mobile Mini Office Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Support component of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) scope for transuranic (TRU) Waste Disposition - All Non TRU Pad 1 Inventory. This project will provide personnel weather shelters (shelters, Mobile Mini) for personnel supporting the ARRA in E-Area while new facilities are being constructed. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000489.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-006389: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005109: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005843

194

ARM - Facility News Article  

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Battle With Bugs Nearly Over Thanks to New Radar Battle With Bugs Nearly Over Thanks to New Radar Bookmark and Share The new W-band ARM cloud radar, or WACR, provides improved sensitivity for detecting tiny objects in the atmosphere to an altitude of 5 km. The instrument's antenna is located adjacent to the millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) antenna on top of the MMCR shelter; the rest of the unit is located inside (inset). The new W-band ARM cloud radar, or WACR, provides improved sensitivity for detecting tiny objects in the atmosphere to an altitude of 5 km. The instrument's antenna is located adjacent to the millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) antenna on top of the MMCR shelter; the rest of the unit is located inside (inset). The main purpose of the millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) is to

195

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program AZ-TRIBE-SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE Location: Tribe AZ-TRIBE-SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE AZ American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: The San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona proposes to 1) conduct energy efficient building retrofits to the Shelter Care Building which includes replacing current lighting with compact fluorescent lights, installing attic insulation, sealing and insulating around vents and pipes, and conducting simple weatherization activities; and 2) installing an approximate 17 kW solar photovoltaic system on the Shelter Care Building. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1, B5.16 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

196

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Microwave Radiometer Makes Water Vapor Measurements in the Arid Cold a New Microwave Radiometer Makes Water Vapor Measurements in the Arid Cold a Snap Bookmark and Share The 183 GHz radiometer, protected inside an insulated enclosure (inset), is installed on the roof of the primary instrument shelter at Barrow. To prevent snow from accumulating on the mylar window, a blower mounted beneath the radiometer directs air through a duct to a standard Y-shaped fitting mounted on top of the radiometer. The 183 GHz radiometer, protected inside an insulated enclosure (inset), is installed on the roof of the primary instrument shelter at Barrow. To prevent snow from accumulating on the mylar window, a blower mounted beneath the radiometer directs air through a duct to a standard Y-shaped fitting mounted on top of the radiometer.

197

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 31, 2008 [Facility News] August 31, 2008 [Facility News] Phase 2 of Orbiting Carbon Observatory Field Campaign Begins Bookmark and Share A camera, weather station, and sun tracker with a protective dome are located on the roof of the fully automated FTS mobile laboratory. Inside the shelter, the spectrometer receives the reflected solar beam from the sun tracker, while the main computer system operates all the instruments and acquires the data. A camera, weather station, and sun tracker with a protective dome are located on the roof of the fully automated FTS mobile laboratory. Inside the shelter, the spectrometer receives the reflected solar beam from the sun tracker, while the main computer system operates all the instruments and acquires the data. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory, or OCO, is a National Aeronautics and

198

CX-008186: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008186: Categorical Exclusion Determination Arizona TRIBE-SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1, B5.16 Date: 04/03/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant. The San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona proposes to 1) conduct energy efficient building retrofits to the Shelter Care Building which includes replacing current lighting with compact fluorescent lights, installing attic insulation, sealing and insulating around vents and pipes, and conducting simple weatherization activities; and 2) installing an approximate 17 kilowatt solar photovoltaic system on the Shelter Care Building. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form

199

CX-000046: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Categorical Exclusion Determination 46: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000046: Categorical Exclusion Determination Owensboro's Window, Bus Shelter, Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9, A11 Date: 11/09/2009 Location(s): Owensboro, Kentucky Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Administration costs related to energy efficiency and conservation strategy implementation; 2) Replacement of windows in City Public Works Administrative Building; 3) Install bus shelters to encourage and increase ridership on public transit system; 4) retrofit and install variable refrigerant volume (VRV) heating and cooling system in City Public Works Administrative Building. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

200

CX-001843: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Categorical Exclusion Determination 43: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001843: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-County-Livingston CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): Livingston County, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) for: 1) Development of an energy efficiency and conservation strategy (Categorical Exclusion?8/14/09); 2) retrofit of boiler systems for the Administration Building, Courthouse, and County Jail; 3) retrofit of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) control systems for the Administration Building, Courthouse, Animal Shelter, Law Center, Judicial Center, and County Jail; 4) provision of project management services for EECBG-funded projects, 5) retrofit of the HVAC systems for the Jail and Animal Shelter,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 16, 2005 [Facility News] February 16, 2005 [Facility News] Mobile Facility Arrives Safe and Sound in Point Reyes Bookmark and Share Image - The ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California Image - The ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California Safe and sound at Point Reyes, the ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is set up on the roof of a shelter until a fence is installed to keep out the curious local cattle. On February 9, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) withstood an accident on the way to its deployment location at Point Reyes, California. About an hour from its destination, the truck carrying the two AMF shelters packed with instrumentation and associated equipment swerved to avoid another vehicle and slid off the road and down a steep embankment. Emergency personnel soon

202

X-ray science taps bug biology to design better materials and reduce  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Experts Guide Media Contacts Social Media Photos Videos Fact Sheets, Brochures and Reports Summer Science Writing Internship Caddiesflies spin an adhesive silk underwater to build nets to capture food and build protective shelter. Pictured is that silk magnified. Courtesy: Bennett Addison. Click to enlarge. Caddiesflies spin an adhesive silk underwater to build nets to capture food and build protective shelter. Pictured is that silk magnified. Courtesy: Bennett Addison. Click to enlarge. "(Caddisfly silk) is really not much stronger than super glue, but try to put super glue in your bathtub without it ever getting a chance to dry," says Jeff Yarger, professor of chemistry, biochemistry and physics at Arizona State University. Courtesy: Bennett Addison. Click to enlarge.

203

Vecinos Volunteer Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Commitment » Community Commitment » Vecinos Volunteer Program Vecinos Volunteer Program Vecinos is Spanish for neighbors. Our good neighbor pledge includes active employee engagement in our communities through volunteering. More than 3,000 current and retired Lab employees have logged more than 1.3 million volunteer hours since 2006. June 28, 2012 LANL employee volunteers at Española Valley Animal Shelter LANL employee P. J. Timmerman volunteers at the Española Valley Animal Shelter. Contact Giving Campaigns & Volunteering Debbi Wersonick Community Programs Office (505) 667-7870 Email Giving the gift of service The LANL Vecinos Volunteer Program encourages LANL employees and retirees to get involved by giving of their time, talent and energy to community efforts. Using VolunteerMatch, a national web-based system, and the Retired

204

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE - Lightning Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE - Lightning Safety Lightning: What You Need to Know * NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area!! * If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. * When you hear thunder, immediately move to safe shelter: a substantial building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up. * Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder. Indoor Lightning Safety * Stay off corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity. * Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets. * Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches. * Do not lie on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls.

205

Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds September 23, 2010 - 1:01pm Addthis Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. | Photo courtesy of Ulster County Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. | Photo courtesy of Ulster County Kevin Craft What are the key facts? This project is expected to save local taxpayers $4,000 a year. All supplies and labor came from local, private contractors. Fairs, food festivals -- and solar panels. Every year, thousands of people attend events at the Ulster County Fairgrounds in New York State. This year visitors to the fairgrounds will get a first-hand look at two solar energy installations that are saving

206

Evacuation | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evacuation Evacuation Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Evacuation Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Evacuations are ordered if a hazardous release could affect people in a specific area. If you are directed by local news or our website to evacuate your home or workplace please follow these guidelines: Write down the evacuation route and designated shelter provided by an EAS station. Instructions will depend on the sector you are currently in (see Evacuation Map & Routes .pdf file (5.4MB)) and the specific site involved in the emergency. If you do not have transportation, call a neighbor or co-worker for assistance. DO NOT CALL 911. If you are at home, gather items you will need for an extended

207

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Data Stream Available from Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar New Data Stream Available from Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar Bookmark and Share Inside the instrument shelter, the MMCR data system collects radar spectral data and processes these into reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral width. Inside the instrument shelter, the MMCR data system collects radar spectral data and processes these into reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral width. As a result of upgrades to the Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) processors (see http://www.arm.gov/acrf/updates051504.stm#nsammcr) at the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locales, two MMCR data streams-mmcrcalC1.a1 (calibration data) and mmcrmomentsC1.a1 (spectral "moments" data)-have been combined

208

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: W-Band ARM Cloud Radar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W-Band ARM Cloud Radar System W-Band ARM Cloud Radar System Mead, James ProSensing Inc. Widener, Kevin Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The W-Band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) is a dual polarization 95 GHz radar that will be deployed at the SGP CART site in the spring of 2005. The WACR system will be installed in the existing MMCR shelter, and will provide continuous zenith pointing measurements of clouds to compliment measurements provided by MMCR. Built by ProSensing Inc. of Amherst, MA, the WACR system include a high peak power (1.5 kW) EIKA transmitter, low noise receiver, and PC-based digital receiver. In addition to an internal calibration procedure, an electronically controlled deflector plate mounted on the roof of the MMCR shelter will be used to periodically illuminate a

209

ARM - Facility News Article  

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March 31, 2007 [Facility News] March 31, 2007 [Facility News] Radiometers Operate in Low Water Vapor Conditions in Barrow, Alaska Bookmark and Share A researcher checks the GVR antennae on a cold, crisp day at the ARM site in Barrow, Alaska. The radiometer is inside the insulated box beneath the antenna; the data is collected and displayed on the computer inside the instrument shelter. A researcher checks the GVR antennae on a cold, crisp day at the ARM site in Barrow, Alaska. The radiometer is inside the insulated box beneath the antenna; the data is collected and displayed on the computer inside the instrument shelter. To provide more accurate ground-based measurements of water vapor in extremely arid environments, three types of 183.3-GHz radiometers operated simultaneously in February and March at the ARM North Slope of Alaska site

210

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

ASSESSMENT OF THE RADIONUCLIDE COMPOSITION OF "HOT PARTICLES" SAMPLED IN THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOURTH REACTOR UNIT  

SciTech Connect

Fuel-containing materials sampled from within the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) 4th Reactor Unit Confinement Shelter were spectroscopically studied for gamma and alpha content. Isotopic ratios for cesium, europium, plutonium, americium, and curium were identified and the fuel burnup in these samples was determined. A systematic deviation in the burnup values based on the cesium isotopes, in comparison with other radionuclides, was observed. The conducted studies were the first ever performed to demonstrate the presence of significant quantities of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 243}Cm. It was determined that there was a systematic underestimation of activities of transuranic radionuclides in fuel samples from inside of the ChNPP Confinement Shelter, starting from {sup 241}Am (and going higher), in comparison with the theoretical calculations.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Property:Distributed Generation System Enclosure | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Enclosure System Enclosure Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Indoor Outdoor Dedicated Shelter Pages using the property "Distributed Generation System Enclosure" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Indoor + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + Outdoor + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Outdoor + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Outdoor + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Outdoor + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Indoor + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Dedicated Shelter + Distributed Generation Study/Floyd Bennett + Outdoor +

213

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 3, 2011 [Facility News] January 3, 2011 [Facility News] Cloud Radar Overhauled and Renamed Bookmark and Share The KAZR (left) is being tested with a 2-meter antenna used with MMCRs at other ARM sites. This pre-operational test will help uncover any data anomalies prior to the KAZR being installed in its new home in the shelter on the right when it replaces the MMCR. The KAZR (left) is being tested with a 2-meter antenna used with MMCRs at other ARM sites. This pre-operational test will help uncover any data anomalies prior to the KAZR being installed in its new home in the shelter on the right when it replaces the MMCR. In mid-December 2010, a new Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) began a two-week pre-operational test alongside the ARM millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) at the Southern Great Plains site. This ushers in a new era

214

DOE Emergency Exercise Feedback Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGENCY EXERCISE EVALUATION EMERGENCY EXERCISE EVALUATION Exercise Date/Time: .............................. Evaluator Name: .......................................... Room Number: ............................................ Phone Number: ........................................... Organization: ............................................... Emergency Assignment, e.g., Floor Warden, Room Monitor: ............................................ Type Exercise (check one): o Evacuation to Assembly Areas o Take shelter (in building) o Relocation (outside building to new location) o Other (Please specify) ______________________ Please answer the following applicable questions: Y/N Were the emergency alarms, notifications, and directions clearly heard and

215

A Device for Search of Gamma-Radiation Intensive Sources at the Radiation Accident Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The procedure designed for measuring angular distributions of gamma radiation and for search of gamma radiation intensive sources is described. It is based on application of the original multidetector device ShD-1, for measuring an angular distribution in a complete solid angle (4 pi). The calibration results and data on the angular distributions of intensity of gamma radiation at the roof of Chornobyl NPP ''Shelter'' are presented.

Batiy, Valeriy; Klyuchnykov, A; Kochnev, N; Rudko, Vladimir; shcherbin, vladimir; Yegorov, V; Schmieman, Eric A.

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Eagles nest performs for skiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The building named Niu de l'Aliga, located in the Pyrenees at an altitude of 2530 meters, has performed satisfactorily since its completion in the summer of 1985. During the cold and dry winter months, this restaurant and refuge has enjoyed hot and cold running water and constant electrical supply, as well as an acceptable indoor temperature. And all this has been achieved using only the natural resources of sun, wind and snow or rain. The performance of that shelter is discussed.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Rob Roy`s earthwood home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a 2,000 square foot house near the Canadian border, heated for $75 during the winter and maintaining a steady temperature. Among the design characteristics discussed are the following: round shape; earth sheltering; cordwood masonry; insulation and thermal mass; solar orientation; masonry stove; burning waste wood; floating slab foundation; surface bonded blocks; post and beam octoagon; waterproofing walls; drainage; earth roof.

Roy, R. [Earthwood Building School, West Chazy, NY (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Waste Management Programmes in Response to Large Disasters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a ...the re-use of materials salvaged from damaged buildings should be promoted where feasible, either as primary construction materials (bricks or stone masonry, roof timber, roof tiles, etc.) or as secondary material (rubble for foundations or levelling roads, etc.). SPHERE Handbook, Shelter and Settlement, Standard 5: Construction, Guidance note 1, 2004 ...the production and supply of construction material and the building process minimises the long-term depletion of natural resources.

Joseph Ashmore; Maoya Bassiouni; Martin Bjerregard; Tom Corsellis; Igor Fedotov; Heiner Gloor

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

HPCToolsExperiences.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences w ith T ools a t N ERSC Richard G erber NERSC User Services Programming w eather, c limate, a nd e arth---system m odels on h eterogeneous m ul>---core p la?orms September 7 , 2 011 a t t he N a>onal C enter f or A tmospheric R esearch i n B oulder, C olorado 2 * Thanks f or t he i nvita>on * My p rofessional g oal i s t o e nable s cien>sts t o u se H PC easily a nd e ffec>vely * Contribute t o i mportant d iscoveries a bout h ow o ur natural w orld w orks * Make a d ifference * So i t i s a n h onor & m eaningful t o m e t o p ar>cipate i n this c onference * One o f m y p rimary r oles i s a s d eputy o n o ur n ext procurement t eam & w e a re e xtremely i nterested i n learning a bout y our e xperiences w ith h ybrid s ystems and p rogramming 3 * Recent e xperiences p roviding t ools *

222

Atmospheric CO2 Record from In Situ Measurements at Amsterdam Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amsterdam Island Amsterdam Island Atmospheric CO2 Record from In Situ Measurements at Amsterdam Island graphics Graphics data Data Investigators A. Gaudry, V. Kazan, and P. Monfray Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, Laboratoire de Modélisation du Climat et de l'Environnement, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, Bâtiment 709, Orme des Merisiers, 91191-Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France Period of Record 1980-95 Methods Until 1993 air samples were collected continuously through an air intake located at the top of a tower, 9 m above ground and 65 m above mean sea level. Since 1994, the intake has been situated 20 m above ground and 76 m above mean sea level. The tower is located at the north-northwest end of the island on the edge of a 55 m cliff. The air is dried by means of a cryogenic water trap at -60°C. Until 1990, determinations of CO2 were made

223

SCI-Arc/Caltech Solar Decathlon 2011 Project Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHIP CHIP 2 011 SCI---ARC / C altech S olar D ecathlon 2 011 As---Built P roject M anual 1 D.O.E. S olar D ecathlon 2 011 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2011 Team SCI-Arc/Caltech CHIP COMPACT HYPER_INSULATED PROTOTYPE Project Manual August 11,2011 Project Manager (Design and Construction): Reed Finlay (reed_finlay@sciarc.edu) Project Manager (PR and Development): Elisabeth Neigert (elisabeth_neigert@sciarc.edu) CHIP 2 011 SCI---ARC / C altech S olar D ecathlon 2 011 As---Built P roject M anual 2 D.O.E. S olar D ecathlon 2 011 Table o f C ontents Summary o f C hanges 2 Rules C ompliance C hecklist 3 Structural C alculations 6 Detailed W ater B udget 7 Summary o f U nlisted E lectrical C omponents 9 Summary o f R econfigurable F eatures 10 Interconnection A pplication F orm 11 Energy A nalysis R esults a nd D iscussion

224

El Roque de Los Muchachos Site Characteristics. II. Analysis of Wind, Relative Humidity and Air Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present an analysis of wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity and air pressure taken at TNG, CAMC and NOT at Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos, in the Canary Islands. Data are compared in order to check local variations and both long term and short term trends of the microclimate. Furthermore, influence of wind speed on the astronomical seeing is estimated to the aim to better understand the influence of wide scale parameters on local meteorological data. The three telescopes show different prevailing wind direction, wind speed, relative humidity and air pressure confirming differences in local microclimate. We found that seeing deteriorates when wind speed is lower than 3.3 m/s. Comparison in terms of wind speed and high relative humidity (> 90%) shows that TNG seems to have optimal observational conditions with respect to CAMC and NOT. Air pressure analysis shows that ORM is dominated by high pressure. Short time variations of pressure anticipate temperature variations tipically by 2-3 hours, this property vanishes in time scales higher than some hours and disappear in longer time scales.

G. Lombardi; V. Zitelli; S. Ortolani; M. Pedani

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Cambridge CFD Grid for Large Scale Distributed CFD Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

}u)m#1;eAp!nItw#5;u)me)~!h#25;ikfcDf_cI?!?w#2;f!l_cI?!!;w#2;y#1;yCh u)l0cDf!? n@o S1T J(U#19;$6#25; LVLOUWO2FV5XFYZKNR#23;J#1;A[\\K]V_^#`G'a0b'V#24;c?LR#5; deG?\\XQG#17;I#23;JLK K]M#16; KNOU#QPHLR#19;gf#14;h S1T... J(U#19;$#5;JLKNViG?9Q[jd_G?kO%FV.XQG#17;I#23;JLK K]M#16; KNOU#QPHLR#19;#19;h S1T J(U#19;$FR#5;_J#1; RlKNm? KNIeOnc?#5;Jffi.X T J(U?$FK]OU#QPHLR#5;oh S1T J(U#19;$FVffiK]OqpgOrm4#7;bqJLK]MHkMH6#7;b]sX! gfih S f T J...

Yang, Xiaobo; Hayes, Mark; Jenkins, K; Cant, Stewart R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Microsoft Word - Panel 5 Disposal Operations Complete.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th th re s c th W se lo o s e U.S. D Carls Waste P.O. B Carls CARL hat disposa epository ar hipment wa "All T redit for this heir dedicat Waste Mana The W even dispo ong and can f the 6.2 m igned in 19 With d quivalent o Department bad Field Of e Isolation P Box 3090 bad, New M DOE in P LSBAD, N.M al operation re complete as emplace RU waste m s accomplis tion to perfo agement Pr WIPP unde sal rooms. n hold appr illion cubic 992, has be disposal op of about fou of Energy ffice Pilot Plant Mexico 88221 Fo E Comp anel 5 M., August 1 s in Panel 5 e. Last mo ed in the pa manageme shment," N orming thei rogram con rground is c Each disp roximately 1 feet of TRU en dispose perations in r football fie 1 or Immed pletes D of the W 15, 2011 - T 5 of the Wa nth, the fina nel, which t ent employe ational TRU

227

Overwintering survival and role of moisture in diapause termination and subsequent emergence of sorghum midge, (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time of emergence from overwintering and abundance of sorghum midge, Stenodiplosis sorghicola (Coquillett), that initiate the first spring generation dictate the seasonal abundance and subsequent severity of damage the insect causes later in the growing season to sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench. Prediction models of sorghum midge overwintering emergence would be more accurate if effects of moisture and information on rate of survival of overwintering sorghum midges in relation to crop residue destruction treatments were included. An average of 170 sorghum midges, equivalent to 80,408 per ha, emerged between 1 1 April and 19 June 1995 from nonsheltered, sheltered (no water), sheltered (water added) soil moisture treatments. Peak emergence occurred on 3 May. Among treatments there were no significant differences (F = 0.22, P = 0.81) in the number of sorghum midges to emerge from overwintering diapause because efforts to keep dry the soil under the sheltered treatments failed when rainfall totals > 1.27 cm. However, @9-12 d following a rainfall event of >-1.27 cm, a greater than normal amount of sorghum midges emerged, The number of sorghum midge larvae estimated to have entered diapause per square meter of soil was 1,324. There were no significant differences in numbers of sorghum midges (mean of 2.1) in the top, middle, and bottom thirds of panicies. Percent overwintering survival of sorghum midges was more than twice as high from sorghum residue shredded and disked, 0.87%, than from residue shredded, disked, and deep-plowed treatment, 0.39%. Percent survival in the shredded only treatment, 0.56%, was intermediate to the others. Percent overwintering survival was x 1 00-fold greater for sorghum midges in a greenhouse (88%) than for sorghum midges that overwintered in shredded and disked sorghum residue in a field (0.87%). Percent overwintering survival was 6% for sorghum midges to emerge from panicies placed in a field in late winter.

Mott, Dale Allen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Waste Feed Delivery System Phase 1 Preliminary RAM Analysis [SEC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the updated results of the preliminary reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analysis of selected waste feed delivery (WFD) operations to be performed by the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) during Phase I activities in support of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For planning purposes, waste feed tanks are being divided into five classes in accordance with the type of waste in each tank and the activities required to retrieve, qualify, and transfer waste feed. This report reflects the baseline design and operating concept, as of the beginning of Fiscal Year 2000, for the delivery of feed from three of these classes, represented by source tanks 241-AN-102, 241-AZ-101 and 241-AN-105. The preliminary RAM analysis quantifies the potential schedule delay associated with operations and maintenance (OBM) field activities needed to accomplish these operations. The RAM analysis is preliminary because the system design, process definition, and activity planning are in a state of evolution. The results are being used to support the continuing development of an O&M Concept tailored to the unique requirements of the WFD Program, which is being documented in various volumes of the Waste Feed Delivery Technical Basis (Carlson. 1999, Rasmussen 1999, and Orme 2000). The waste feed provided to the WTP must: (1) meet limits for chemical and radioactive constituents based on pre-established compositional envelopes (i.e., feed quality); (2) be in acceptable quantities within a prescribed sequence to meet feed quantities; and (3) meet schedule requirements (i.e., feed timing). In the absence of new criteria related to acceptable schedule performance due to the termination of the TWRS Privatization Contract, the original criteria from the Tank Waste Remediation System (77443s) Privatization Contract (DOE 1998) will continue to be used for this analysis.

DYKES, A.A.

2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2012 2, 2012 The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by Google.org. To find your location, either enter your location in the box in the upper left corner or click and drag the map. Use the "Layers" button to select which data to display. Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Get information on Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts. November 2, 2012

230

Winter and Holiday Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons HOME HOME HOME HOME Do not drink and decorate. Inspect, properly set up, and position ladders. Use a step stool instead of furniture. Be mindful of rearranged furniture. Minimize clutter. LUGGAGE LUGGAGE LUGGAGE LUGGAGE Pack light. Use proper lifting techniques. Do not rush when lifting or carrying heavy suitcases or packages. Take care when placing luggage in overhead compartments. WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS Warm up muscles. Wear appropriate protective gear. Know and abide by winter sports rules. Keep equipment in good working condition and use properly. If you or someone else experiences hypothermia, immediately seek shelter and medical attention.

231

CX-000170: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: Categorical Exclusion Determination 70: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000170: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska State Energy Office CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/02/2009 Location(s): Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant for: Energy Efficiency Rating and Labeling, Administration of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants program, Energy Efficiency Education Program, Energy Efficiency Conservation Municipal Grants, Energy Efficiency End Use Data Collection, Building Energy Efficiency Standard, Waste Heat Recovery From Village Power Plants, Technical Energy Advisory Committee, Sustainable Northern Shelter. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000170.pdf More Documents & Publications

232

Programmatic environmental assessment of the DOE Solar Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program's potential environmental impacts are evaluated to ensure that environmental issues are considered at the earliest meaningful point in the decision-making process. The existing environment is studied for the following: grain drying; crop drying; livestock shelter heating; food processing; textile products; lumber and wood products; paper products; chemicals; petroleum refining; stone, clay, and glass products; and primary metals industries. Environmental impacts of the proposed action on the following are studied: air quality, water quality, ecosystems, health and safety, land use, esthetics, and social and institutional impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

EOC requirements at state and local levels. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part One of this report analyzes Emergency Operating Center functions and requirements at local, area, and sub-State or State levels. EOC roles in times of normalcy, in natural disasters with and without warning, and in the crisis, in-shelter, and postattack phases of nuclear war are examined and compared. In Part Two, three approaches to a backbone nationwide direction and control network are reviewed. A sub-State system based on existing State highway department districts, facilities, and equipment is proposed and correlations with two other sub-State concepts (MIDAS and RAOC) are evaluated.

Paxton, K.F.; Goshe, F.; Rainey, C.T.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Preliminary: Not for Citation. Comments Welcomed. State Fiscal Substitution between the Federal Food Stamp program and AFDC, Medicaid, and SSI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for excellent research assistance. I would also like to thank Carole Trippe of Mathematic PolicyResearch for providing me with data on the Food Stamp shelter cost deduction. Introduction. This paper addresses the fiscal behavior of states in response to the Federal Food Stamp program (FSP). The effectiveness of the Food Stamp Program in increasing the economic well-being of recipients is dependent, in part, on the fiscal behavior of states. Because most Food Stamp recipients are also eligible for other transfer programs, and Food Stamps is a nationally funded program, states

Howard Chernick

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Memories of Tshurphu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to describe what I can. Although I have heard no definite news of the fate of Tshurphu in the "Cultural Revolution ", I fear that the past tense must be used. The monastery stood in the shelter of a scrub-covered hill on the north side of a high, bare... the great historian Tsuglag Threogwa. I was also shown many fine gilded images including one of the Ninth Zha-mar-pa (Red Hat) Lama said always to radiate noticeable warmth: als0 one of Lama Zhang who at one time created difficulties Many gilded images...

Richardson, Hugh E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Lodging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lodging Lodging Jump to: navigation, search Building Type Lodging Definition Buildings used to offer multiple accommodations for short-term or long-term residents, including skilled nursing and other residential care buildings. Sub Categories motel or inn; hotel; dormitory, fraternity, or sorority; retirement home; nursing home, assisted living, or other residential care; convent or monastery; shelter, orphanage, or children's home; halfway house References EIA CBECS Building Types [1] References ↑ EIA CBECS Building Types U.S. Energy Information Administration (Oct 2008) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lodging&oldid=270114" Category: CBECS Building Types What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

237

PADS FY 2010 Annual Reports FY 2010 Obligations to Facilities Management Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C4N - SHELTERED WORKSHOP 1 831,263 C4N - SHELTERED WORKSHOP 1 831,263 C0L - LOCAL GOVT/MUNICIPALITY 2 125,000 B22 - LARGE BUSINESS 979 2,388,060,659 C3N - NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION 24 282,357,286 I0E - EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION 9 4,970,555 A00 - SMALL BUSINESS 1,890 1,921,241,548 C0F - FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 478 388,669,688 E1N - FOREIGN CONTRACTOR 1 -16,921,324 8 UNIQUE VALUES 3,384 4,969,334,675 Geographic Distribution of FY 2010 Obligations to Non-Facilities Management Awards STATE NUMBER OF AWARDS FY 2010 OBLIGATIONS NORTH DAKOTA (ND) 28 2,832,957 ILLINOIS (IL) 68 25,598,750 ARIZONA (AZ) 96 8,732,671 WISCONSIN (WI) 6 831,049 GEORGIA (GA) 34 5,300,948 NORTH CAROLINA (NC) 17 10,995,700 RHODE ISLAND (RI) 2 660,000 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (DC) 770 524,559,400 PENNSYLVANIA (PA) 132 84,970,982

238

Manhattan Project: Postscript--The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Government-suggested fallout shelter design, 1950s POSTSCRIPT--THE NUCLEAR AGE Government-suggested fallout shelter design, 1950s POSTSCRIPT--THE NUCLEAR AGE (1945-Present) Events Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Joe 1, the first Soviet atomic test, August 29, 1949. The end of the Second World War brought with it a whole new set of issues and problems, not least of which was the dilemma of what to do with the nuclear genie now that he had been let out of the bottle. In the United States, and around the world, news of the atomic bomb created among the public a sense of shock and awe. Manhattan Engineer District officials took certain obvious steps such as slowing down the program from its wartime pace, but the assembly of additional nuclear weapons did quietly continue.

239

High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

AQUATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AND ITS REMEDIATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This modeling study evaluated aquatic environment affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Study results indicate that radionuclide concentrations in the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers were well above the drinking water limits immediately after the Chernobyl accident, but have decreased significantly in subsequent years due to flashing, burying, and decay. Because high concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs, the major radionuclides affecting human health through aquatic pathways, are associated with flooding, an earthen dike was constructed along the Pripyat River in its most contaminated floodplain. The dike was successful in reducing the 90Sr influx to the river by half. A 100-m-high movable dome called the New Safe Confinement is planned to cover the Chernobyl Shelter (formally called the sarcophagus) that was erected shortly after the accident. The NSC will reduce radionuclide contamination further in these rivers and nearby groundwater; however, even if the Chernobyl Shelter collapses before the NSC is built, the resulting peak concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in the Dnieper River would still be below the drinking water limits.

Onishi, Yasuo; Kivva, Sergey L.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Chernobyl Deconstruction ALARA Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an ALARA analysis was performed for deconstruction of the major, unstable elements of the Shelter Object over the destroyed Unit 4 of the reactor complex. The major elements addressed in the analysis included the current roof sections and the major beams supporting the roof sections. The analysis was based on the existing configuration of the Shelter Object, the developing conceptual design of the NSC arch structure, the developing conceptual design of the facilities within and associated with the NSC (including handling and processing of deconstructed elements, and waste management), and existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium) is a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium and performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that ALARA could be achieved with appropriate implementation of existing Ukrainian regulations and procedures, and developing conceptual design criteria and features.

Shipler, Dillard B.; Batiy, Valeriy; Povlovsky, Leonid; Schmidt, John P.; Schmieman, Eric A.

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Protection from Potential Exposure for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed developing the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an analysis was performed to determine the degree of protection to be provided during the construction and 100-year operation period for expected upsets and lower-probability events that would occur from errors, procedures, other human factors, and equipment failures, i.e., ''potential exposures'' other than normal operations. The analysis was based on results of the Preliminary Hazards Analysis. The potential exposure analysis was performed in accordance with existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures in place at the Shelter Object. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium), a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium, performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that potential exposures, outside of those expected during normal operations, would be acceptable and that design criteria and features, and preventative and mitigative measures currently in place at the Shelter would be sufficient to meet operating exposure limits.

Shipler, Dillard B.; Rudko, Vladimir; Batiy, Valeriy; Timmins, Douglas C.; Brothers, Alan J.; Schmidt, John P.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Schmieman, Eric A.

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

Strategic considerations in planning a counterevacuation  

SciTech Connect

The Soviet Union has highly developed plans to evacuate their population centers in a nuclear confrontation. Their plans include construction of expedient shelters in the outlying areas and continued operation of their essential industry by commuting workers. If they should successfully implement their plan, a subsequent nuclear exchange with the United States would cost them far fewer casualties than they suffered in World War II. Without a corresponding evacuation, the US could lose from 50 to 70 percent of its population. This asymmetry in vulnerability, if allowed to persist, would seriously weaken the bargaining position of the US President. To restore the balance, a great reduction in vulnerability can be achieved most economically by planning a US counterevacuation as a response to a Soviet evacuation. Russian historical experience with murderous invaders, most recently in World War II, has made authoritarian defense measures involving civilians and property in peacetime quite acceptable in their culture. In the US, widescale use of private property and civilian participation in defense activity are not feasible until the development of a grave crisis. Hence US evacuation plans must differ in several important respects from the Soviet plans. However, this preliminary study indicates that the US has ample material resources to move and shelter its population at least as effectively as the Soviet Union. Perhaps the most critical disadvantage of the US is in morale, as evidenced by the widespread misconception that effective survival measures are not possible. (auth)

Chester, C.V.; Cristy, G.A.; Haaland, C.M.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

On Integrating Theories of International Economics in the Strategic Planning of Global Supply Chains and Dynamic Supply Chain Reconfiguration with Capacity Expansion and Contraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses two independent topics. The first part of the dissertation relates three theories of international economics (comparative advantage, competitive advantage, and competitiveness), and formulates the thesis that incorporating them in the form of readily available individual competitiveness indicators in OR/MS models offers promise to enhance decision-support for the strategic planning of global supply chains in general, and for locating facilities in particular. The objectives of this research were to relate each of these theories and to describe their interrelationships; to describe measures provided by two well-known annual competitiveness reports; and to illustrate application of the theories as a means of supporting the thesis of the research, and justifying the research questions we pose for future research. While this research discusses topics relative to the broader background of global supply chain design, it illustrates applications associated with facility location, a component of the global supply chain design. In the last chapter of the first part of the dissertation, we provide a vision to foster future research that will enhance the profitability of international enterprises under NAFTA. The second part of the dissertation deals with the DSCR model with capacity expansion and contraction. The strategic dynamic supply chain reconfiguration (DSCR) problem is to prescribe the location and capacity of each facility, select links used for transportation, and plan material flows through the supply chain, including production, inventory, backorder, and outsourcing levels. The objective is to minimize total cost. The configuration must be dynamically redesigned over time to accommodate changing trends in demand and/or costs by opening facilities, expanding and/or contracting their capacities, and closing facilities. The problem involves a multi-period, multi-product, multi-echelon supply chain. Research objectives are alternative formulations of DSCR and tests that identify the computational characteristics of each model to determine if one offers superior solvability in comparison with the others. To achieve the first objective, we present an initial MIP model, a refined model that relates decision variables according to a convenient structure, and branch and price (B&P) schemes for the refined model. We found that the network-based formulation offered superior solvability compared to the traditional formulation.

Lee, Chaehwa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Estimates of Refrigerator Loads in Public Housing Based on Metered Consumption Data  

SciTech Connect

The New York Power Authority (NYPA), the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), and the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Energy (DOE) have joined in a project to replace refrigerators in New York City public housing with new, highly energy-efficient models. This project laid the ground work for the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) and DOE to enable housing authorities throughout the United States to bulk-purchase energy-efficient appliances. DOE helped develop and plan the program through the ENERGY STAR@ Partnerships program conducted by its Pacific Nofiwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL was subsequently asked to conduct the savings evahations for 1996 and 1997. PNNL designed the metering protocol and occupant survey, supplied and calibrated the metering equipment, and managed and analyzed the data. The 1996 metering study of refrigerator energy usage in New York City public housing (Pratt and Miller 1997) established the need and justification for a regression-model-based approach to an energy savings estimate. The need originated in logistical difficulties associated with sampling the population and pen?orming a stratified analysis. Commonly, refrigerators[a) with high representation in the popula- tion were missed in the sampling schedule, leaving significant holes in the sample and difficulties for the stratified anrdysis. The just{jfcation was found in the fact that strata (distinct groups of identical refrigerators) were not statistically distinct in terms of their label ratio (ratio of metered consumption to label rating). This finding suggested a general regression model could be used to represent the consumption of all refrigerators in the population. In 1996 a simple two-coefficient regression model, a function of only the refrigerator label rating, was developed and used to represent the existing population of refrigerators. A key concept used in the 1997 study grew from findings in a small number of apartments metered in 1996 with a detailed protocol. Fifteen-minute time-series data of ambient and compartment temperatures and refrigerator power were analyzed and demonstrated the potential for reducing power records into three components. This motivated the development of an analysis process to divide the metered consumption into baseline load, occupant-associated load, and defrosting load. The baseline load is the consumption that would occur if the refrigerator were on but had no occupant usage load (no door- opening events) and the defrosting mechanism was disabled. The motivation behind this component reduction process was the hope that components could be more effectively modeled than the total. We reasoned that the components would lead to abetter (more general and more significant) understanding of the relationships between consumption, the characteristics of the refrigerator, and its operating environment.

JD Miller; RG Pratt

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

246

Building Green in Greensburg: The Peoples Bank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Peoples Bank The Peoples Bank The Peoples Bank building opened its doors to the public on December 21, 2009. With its vault and an adjoining room designed to serve as a storm shelter, the 2,100-square-foot building is about 300 square feet larger than the pre-tornado facility. Its innovative design incorporates a variety of sustainable features that will save energy and money. The building is situated on the lot to take full advantage of the sun and features large, tinted-glass doors on its south side that provide passive solar heating in winter months; south-facing overhangs reduce the need for air-conditioning when the summer sun is at its hottest. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * Building orientation takes advantage of southern exposure to reduce heating loads,

247

ARM Mobile Facility - Design and Schedule for Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Facility - Design and Schedule for Integration Mobile Facility - Design and Schedule for Integration K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Abstract The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has a need for an ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that can be deployed anywhere in the world for up to 12 months at a time. This system shall be modular so that it can meet the needs of ARM science objectives of each individual deployment. The design phase for developing the AMF has begun. A design review was held for the AMF in December 2002. The design of the shelters, instrumentation, and data system along with the schedule for integration will be presented. Introduction Early in the development of the ARM Program, the need to be able to make atmospheric measurements

248

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's energy conservation standards for single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps as a separate equipment class since 2008. Before 2010, this equipment was regulated under the broader scope of commercial air conditioning and heating equipment. Single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps are commercial air conditioning and heating equipment with its main components arranged in a vertical fashion. They are mainly used in modular classrooms, modular office buildings, telecom shelters, and hotels, and are typically installed on the outside of an exterior wall or in a closet against an exterior wall but inside the building.

249

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

250

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

251

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

252

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2009 9, 2009 CX-000177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio County Franklin CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/09/2009 Location(s): Franklin County, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 9, 2009 CX-000280: Categorical Exclusion Determination Smoking Shelters CX(s) Applied: B1.5 Date: 11/09/2009 Location(s): Idaho Office(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy November 9, 2009 CX-000047: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tempe's Consultants and Studies, Revolving Loan Program, Lighting/Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning/Streetlight Retrofits, Audits, and Solar Photovoltaic CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B1.32, B2.5, A9, A11 Date: 11/09/2009 Location(s): Tempe, Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

253

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27, 2010 27, 2010 A worker synchronizes a traffic light on State Road A1A in St. Augustine, FL. | Energy Department Photo | Florida County Seeks to Reduce Emissions and Improve Traffic St. Johns County, Florida is tackling its traffic-timing problem with a little help from an Energy Department Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block grant. The county will use the grant to improve traffic flow by re-synchronizing signals at five major road segments. In total, 23 traffic signals will be retimed and synchronized, resulting in lower fuel consumption, shorter travel times, increased travel speed, less stopping and less engine idling. September 23, 2010 Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. | Photo courtesy of Ulster County

254

Life in a Tree Hole  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tree Hole Tree Hole Nature Bulletin No. 581 November 21, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H Thompson, Senior Naturalist LIFE IN A TREE HOLE A forest is much more than just trees. It includes all of the underbrush, wildflowers and other vegetation that grow beneath these trees; as well as all of its animal life, both large and small. Sunshine, rain, wind, soil, and the leaf litter on the ground are part of it, too. A forest is a community -- a fabric in which the lives of its inhabitants are woven together and into their surroundings by a complex web of interrelations. Tree holes -- together with the birds, mammals and small life which they shelter -- furnish an important binding force in this forest community.

255

Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Cooling residential buildings in milder climates contributes significantly to peak demand mainly because of poor load factors. Peak cooling load determines the size of equipment and the cooling source. Several measures reduce cooling-system size and allow the use of lower-energy cooling sources; they include incorporating exterior walls or other elements that effectively shelter interiors from outside heat and cold, and providing thermal mass, to cool interior spaces during the day by absorbing heat and warm them at night as the mass discharges its heat. Thermal mass features may be used for storage only or serve as structural elements. Concrete, steel, adobe, stone, and brick all satisfy requirements

256

BNL | Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) The Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) is a platform and instrument suite for Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) to conduct in situ measurements of aerosols and their precursors. MAOS is part of the ARM Climate Research Facility. Physically MAOS is contained in two 20' SeaTainers custom adapted to provide a sheltered laboratory environment for operators and instruments even under harsh conditions. The two structures are designated MAOS-A and MAOS-C for Aerosol and Chemistry respectively. Although independent, with separate data systems, inlets and power distribution, the two structures are normally a single operating unit. The two enclosures comprising MAOS are designed for rapid deployment. All components (except for the Radar Wind Profiler) are transported internally

257

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

deployment (fiber) deployment (fiber) 9.20-25.2006, 10.25.2006-1.15.2007 Communication: in the field similar to above: instrument to computer via optical fiber Original location: ~250m SE of Great White Sample data: A Total Precipitation Sensor at the Barrow ACRF Site ABSTRACT A Yankee Environmental TPS-3100 Total Precipitation Sensor was installed near the Barrow ARM Climate Research Facility (south of the NOAA facility and east of the Great White shelter) in September 2006. Data ingest software was completed by the end of 2006. Precipitation data from the TPS-3100 are being collected and archived at present. The sensor head of the TPS-3100, the "hotplate" sensor, consists of two heated plates about five inches in diameter. The plates are oriented parallel to the ground, one facing

258

Visiting Brookhaven National Laboratory | Dark Interactions: Perspectives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Brookhaven Visiting Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located in Suffolk County on Long Island, a 120-mile-long island directly east of New York City. The Lab's 5,265-acre site is near the island's geographic center. The Lab is located in the township of Brookhaven, and has its own post office designation, Upton. The zip code is 11973-5000. From above, Long Island looks like a giant fish, with a forked tail on the "East End" -- the North Fork is rural, and the South Fork has many famous "Hamptons" resort towns. The Peconic Bay and Shelter Island are between the forks. Brookhaven is 15 miles to the west of the forks, and about 60 miles east of New York City. Aerial view of BNL - The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (top, center) is 2.4 miles in circumference, and dominates Brookhaven's

259

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

260

Distributed Generation Study/Patterson Farms CHP System Using Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farms CHP System Using Renewable Farms CHP System Using Renewable Biogas < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Auburn, New York Site Description Agricultural Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Caterpillar G379 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Biogas System Installer Martin Machinery System Enclosure Dedicated Shelter System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 200 kW0.2 MW 200,000 W 200,000,000 mW 2.0e-4 GW 2.0e-7 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 1366072 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller 3rd Party Custom Made Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2007/05/02 Monitoring Termination Date 2007/05/26

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

William J. Clinton, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 26 / Administration of William J. Clinton, 2000 We intend to establish ecological reserves in the most fragile areas to keep them off- limits to fishing, drilling, and other damaging uses. I'm also directing the EPA to strength- en water quality standards all along our coasts and provide stronger protections for the most vulnerable ocean waters, to reduce pollution of beaches, coasts, and oceans. Second, I'm announcing today our com- mitment to permanently protect coral reefs of the northwest Hawaiian Islands. If you've ever been there, you know why we should. These eight islands are not, all of them, so well-known, but they stretch over 1,200 miles. They shelter more than 60 percent of America's coral reefs. They're home to plants and animals found nowhere else on Earth

262

The Life Span of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Span of Animals Span of Animals Nature Bulletin No. 486-A March 24, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE LIFE SPAN OF ANIMALS Signs of senility, or extreme old age, are seldom seen in the wild. Animals living under natural conditions rarely approach their maximum possible age because of very high death rates due to infant mortality, diseases, predators, bad weather, accidents, or competition for food and shelter. For this reason, most of the reliable information about the length of the life span comes from zoos, where accurate records are kept and animals live under conditions almost ideally suited to prolong life. A mouse whose life is measured in months in the wild can survive years of captivity.

263

Distributed Generation Study/Modern Landfill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Landfill < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Model City, New York Site Description Other Utility Study Type Long-term Monitoring Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Caterpillar G3516 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Biogas System Installer Innovative Energy Systems System Enclosure Dedicated Shelter System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 7 Stand-alone Capability Seamless Power Rating 5600 kW5.6 MW 5,600,000 W 5,600,000,000 mW 0.0056 GW 5.6e-6 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 28000000 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller 3rd Party Off-the-Shelf Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2004/12/31 Monitoring Termination Date 1969/12/31

264

The challenge of emergency response dispersion models on the meso-gamma urban scale: A case study of the July 26, 1993 Oleum tank car spill in Richmond, California  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a recent case study that illustrates the difficulty of modeling accidental toxic releases in urban area. On the morning of July 26, 1993, oleum was accidentally released from a railroad tank car in Richmond, California. State and local agencies requested real-time modeling from the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Although the ARAC`s with the US Department of Energy is for nuclear materials, the team responded to the accident under an Agreement in Principle with the State of California. ARAC provided model plots describing the location and progress of the toxic cloud to the agencies managing the response. The primary protective action for the public was to shelter in place. Highways, rail lines and public transportation were blocked. The incident was significant, enough that over 24,000 people sought medical attention within the week following the release.

Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W.; Pobanz, B.M. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Foster, C.S.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges Residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBTU) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBTU) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 BTU/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollow-core floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

Hodges, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

New York | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2010 28, 2010 Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Huntington, New York, wanted to make sure changes saved residents money. September 23, 2010 Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. | Photo courtesy of Ulster County Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds Every year, thousands of people attend events at the Ulster County Fairgrounds in New York State. This year visitors to the fairgrounds will get a first-hand look at two solar energy installations that are saving Ulster County taxpayers money and supporting local companies that manufacture green technologies. September 22, 2010 CX-003994: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integrated Power for Microsystems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/22/2010

268

Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts November 2, 2012 - 2:57pm Addthis The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by Google.org. To find your location, either enter your location in the box in the upper left corner or click and drag the map. Use the "Layers" button to select which data to display. Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov The Obama Administration is working around the clock to support the impacted states and utilities. To keep up to date with the Federal Government's response efforts, visit some of the site listed below.

269

European Wind Atlas: France | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Wind Atlas: France European Wind Atlas: France Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: European Wind Atlas: France Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: 130.226.17.201/extra/web_docs/windmaps/france.jpg Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/european-wind-atlas-france,http://cle Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This wind resource map shows resources at 50 meters above ground level for four different topographic conditions, including sheltered terrain, open plain, coastal and hills and ridges. The greatest resources appear to be near the Mediterranean Sea coast, and the second greatest resources are near the English Channel and northern Atlantic coast.

270

CX-004542: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Categorical Exclusion Determination 42: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004542: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ground Mount Photovoltaic Installations at City of Albuquerque Fire Academy CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/24/2010 Location(s): Albuquerque, New Mexico Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The City of Albuquerque proposes to use $1,349,562.50 of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to install an approximately 200 kilowatts of ground mounted solar photovoltaic at the City of Albuquerque Fire training Academy complex. The photovoltaic array will provide alternative energy to the Academy and the adjacent City owned facilities of City of Albuquerque West-side Animal Shelter and the City of Albuquerque Air Quality District Administration buildings.

271

Emergency Information Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Emergency Emergency Information Home Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Oak Ridge conducts world-leading research that is advancing our nation's energy and national security portfolios. These activities are vital to securing America's future, but they can also pose potential risks. To help protect against possible incidents, the Emergency Management division works daily to keep safe workplaces and educated communities. Although incidents are rare, we want you to be informed and prepared. Emergency information posted on this page is relevant to all local residents and employees, such as what to do when sirens sound and when to

272

Emergency Vocabulary | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Emergency Vocabulary Emergency Vocabulary Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Emergency Vocabulary Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page In the event of an emergency on the Oak Ridge Reservation, you will hear one of the following terms during public announcements. Each term indicates the magnitude of the event and will help you understand any necessary protective actions. Operational Emergency: an event that does not involve a release of hazardous material, but may require a response by the site (such as calling the fire department). Events resulting in the airborne release of hazardous materials are classified into three levels of severity. Alert: harmful levels of a material were released, but have not left

273

AMF Deployment, Point Reyes National Seashore, California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California Point Reyes Deployment AMF Home Point Reyes Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Experiment Planning MASRAD Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Outreach Posters Climate Research at Point Reyes National Seashore (horizontal) Climate Research at Point Reyes National Seashore (vertical) News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Point Reyes National Seashore, California Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco. Shelters: 38° 5' 30.51" N, 122° 57' 19.90" W Instrument Field: 38° 5' 27.6" N, 122° 57' 25.80" W Altitude: 8 meters Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, was the location of the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The ARM

274

Sep06netlog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The September 2006 NETL Newsletter The September 2006 NETL Newsletter nEtL Collaborates to Solve Humvee Rollover Problem NETL researchers are part of a team that is studying modifications to Humvees to prevent them from overturning during combat maneuvering. Other members of the research team include the Army Research Laboratory, Picatinny Arsenal, vehicle manufacturers, and a titanium powder producer. The Humvee-or, in military nomenclature, the High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle-is a versatile four-wheel drive military vehicle that can be configured to become a troop carrier, armament carrier, shelter carrier, ambulance, missile carrier, or a scout vehicle. The vehicle's armored turret provides protection for the crew but it makes the Humvee top-heavy. Paul Turner, of NETL's Process

275

DOE Co-Spnsors Earth Day Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Co-Sponsors Earth Day Activities DOE Co-Sponsors Earth Day Activities Free trees and native plants are available to the first participants at the Idaho Falls Earth Day festivities in Tautphaus Park. There are a number of educational and environmentally-oriented activities for children at the Earth Day celebration. This year's Earth Day in April marks the 38th celebration of its kind since former Senator Gaylord Nelson first set aside the day in 1970 to honor the environment in which we live. Now Earth Day has expanded across the globe as nearly over a billion people celebrate with events, both large and small, in nearly 200 hundred different countries. Idaho Falls will join the celebration on Saturday, April 26 at the Tautphaus Park Zoo and Hockey Shelter. The Idaho Falls Earth Day Celebration will be held from 10 a.m. to

276

Habitat Management -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Habitat Management Some of the documents on this page are in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is covered with mostly contiguous native eastern deciduous hardwood forest. Within that framework are found many ecological communities (e.g., cedar barrens, river bluffs, wetlands) with unique biota, often including rare species. Many research park habitats are managed to protect their ecosystem values, furnish food and shelter for wildlife, and provide sites for research and monitoring. Habitats that receive special attention include prairies, forests, and wetlands and riparian areas.

277

Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emerling Farm Emerling Farm < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Perry, New York Site Description Agricultural Study Type Long-term Monitoring Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Caterpillar G379 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Biogas System Installer RCM Digesters System Enclosure Dedicated Shelter System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability Seamless Power Rating 200 kW0.2 MW 200,000 W 200,000,000 mW 2.0e-4 GW 2.0e-7 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 2000000 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller Manufacturer-Integrated Component Integration Factory Integrated Start Date 2006/06/07 Monitoring Termination Date 1969/12/31 Primary Power Application Based Load

278

GCK Technology Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name GCK Technology Inc Place San Antonio, Texas Zip 78205 Sector Hydro, Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Designer and manufacturer of marine turbine technology. Has patented the Gorlov Helical Turbine (GHT), designed for hydroelectric applications in free flowing low head water courses. References GCK Technology Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: GCK Technology Amazon River Brazil GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US GCK Technology Merrimack River Amesbury MA US GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US GCK Technology Uldolmok Strait South Korea GCK Technology Vinalhaven ME US

279

Distributed Generation Study/Hudson Valley Community College | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Community College Valley Community College < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Troy, New York Site Description Institutional-School/University Study Type Long-term Monitoring Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Caterpillar G3516, Caterpillar DM5498, Caterpillar DM7915 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer Siemens Building Technologies System Enclosure Dedicated Shelter System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 6 Stand-alone Capability Seamless Power Rating 7845 kW7.845 MW 7,845,000 W 7,845,000,000 mW 0.00785 GW 7.845e-6 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 32500000 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller 3rd Party Custom Made Component Integration Factory Integrated

280

Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts November 2, 2012 - 2:57pm Addthis The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by Google.org. To find your location, either enter your location in the box in the upper left corner or click and drag the map. Use the "Layers" button to select which data to display. Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov The Obama Administration is working around the clock to support the impacted states and utilities. To keep up to date with the Federal Government's response efforts, visit some of the site listed below.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 20350 of 28,560 results. 41 - 20350 of 28,560 results. Download CX-000280: Categorical Exclusion Determination Smoking Shelters CX(s) Applied: B1.5 Date: 11/09/2009 Location(s): Idaho Office(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000280-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oregon - Tribe - Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/26/2010 Location(s): Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006355-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3, A9 Date: 04/29/2010

282

Tucson's Solar Experience: Developing PV with RFPs and PPAs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tucson's Solar Experience: Tucson's Solar Experience: Developing PV with RFPs and PPAs Bruce Plenk Solar Coordinator City of Tucson Office of Conservation and Sustainable Development DOE EERE- January 15, 2013 Developing PV Projects with RFPs and PPAs Tucson's Solar Investment (1999- 2008) * $960,000 cumulative solar investment with City general funds. * Over $200,000 leveraged from solar grants & utility rebates. * Bus shelter solar funded through advertising. * System size range: 3 kW- 64 kW (plus some solar hot water systems). * 220 kW total installed on 8 City sites. DOE EERE- January 15, 2013 Developing PV Projects with RFPs and PPAs Pre-RFP Decisions: site selection Plan A * Property owner selects sites; vendor determines details and

283

CX-006028: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

028: Categorical Exclusion Determination 028: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006028: Categorical Exclusion Determination Community Solar Financing Through Municipal Utility CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/24/2011 Location(s): Seattle, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The City of Seattle, Seattle City Light Program, proposes to use federal funding to install ground mounted solar arrays within Seattle's Jefferson Park. Three systems will serve a dual purpose as a picnic shelter. These arrays will total 24 kilowatts. This National Environmental Policy Act review is a continuation of National Environmental Policy Act review GFO-10-288 in which funding was withheld pending further information regarding specific site location and design information.

284

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AWDABPT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AWDABPT AWDABPT AWDABPT logo Provides dynamic temperature simulation of 1- to 15- room buildings, shelters, and cabinets over the course of 20 days. Useful for accommodation of heat dissipating equipment. Cooling or power plant failure and later restoration can be simulated. Includes indicative external bush/forest fire mode. Screen Shots Keywords building temperature simulation, thermal performance Validation/Testing The Help document includes graphs that show estimated versus measured temperatures. It is freely available for download via the Website. Expertise Required Understanding of building thermal characteristics, conductivity, U-value, heat capacity, latent heat. Users Old DOS version - several. Current version - one, in Australia. Audience Building designers requiring estimates of room temperatures within

285

Conservation and Outdoor Education in the Schools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education in the Schools Education in the Schools Nature Bulletin No. 374-A March 21, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CONSERVATION AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION IN THE SCHOOLS Given a favorable climate, two things make and keep a nation great: its people and its natural resources. The well-being of our nation depends upon the wise use of those resources. They provide our basic requirements -- food, clothing and shelter. There is ample evidence that a very large portion of all teachers recognize the need for conservation and the importance of environmental education. Leading educators say that teachers realize the why of conservation but need help with the what, when, where and how -- how to teach the topic so that it hooks onto the personal lives of their students and is translated into behavior -- how to bring conservation home to all pupils in terms of day-to-day living.

286

Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future A Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements A reinvented community to meet untapped customer needs for shelter and transportation with minimal environmental impacts, stable energy costs, and a sense of belonging N. Carlisle, J. Elling, and T. Penney Technical Report NREL/TP-540-42774 January 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

287

Keith Lewin | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keith Lewin Keith Lewin Senior Research Engineer Keith Lewin has spent his career at Brookhaven investigating the effects of pollutants and climate change on crops and natural ecosystems. His areas of expertise are developing equipment and facilities to apply and quantify experimental treatments and environmental conditions and the management of field research facilities. In the early 1980's Keith designed a rainfall exclusion shelter and artificial rain delivery system used at BNL, the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, and Penn State University to study Acid Rain effects on agricultural crops. Keith Lewin was lead engineer on the 1985 BNL initiative that developed the first Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) facility. The BNL FACE facility was the first manipulative experiment to reliably maintain elevated levels of carbon

288

New England Energy Management Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Management Inc Management Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name New England Energy Management Inc Address 5 Shelter Rock Road Place Danbury, Connecticut Zip 06810 Sector Efficiency Product Energy management through Innovative Lighting retrofit solutions and Intelligent Lighting Design Website http://www.newenglandenergy.co Coordinates 41.3895448°, -73.4331537° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3895448,"lon":-73.4331537,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

289

City of Loveland, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loveland, Colorado (Utility Company) Loveland, Colorado (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Loveland Place Colorado Utility Id 11256 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lighting Lighting Flat Rate, Bus Shelters Commercial Flat Rate, Signal Amplifiers Commercial Flat Rate, Sprinkler Commercial Interruptible 115 kV Transmission Voltage Industrial

290

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2010 [Facility News] January 15, 2010 [Facility News] Radiometer Powered Up Down Under for Field Campaign at Gunn Point Bookmark and Share Near the tip of Australia's Northern Territory, Gunn Point is the location for the Darwin ARM Representativeness Experiment, or DARE. This offsite field campaign is obtaining measurements of solar and thermal energy and cloud properties, to compare against similar measurements collected at the permanent ARM site in Darwin, about 25 kilometers to the southwest of Gunn Point. Data collected by instruments at both sites will be compared to help scientists quantify local influences and variability that affect how representative measurements at the Darwin site are compared to the wider area. Radiometers (right) mounted on the roof of a shelter near the C-POL radar (left) confirmed loss of data due to shadowing effects.

291

NETL: Features - October 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

08 08 Sustainable Strategies: Ensuring Our Nation's Energy Future by Carl O. Bauer Carl Bauer America's energy bounty drives our economy. Energy powers our cities, fuels our vehicles, and provides us with food and shelter. It makes modern medicine possible and permits us to communicate in ways that were unforeseen a generation ago. For more than 200 years, this "capacity to do work" has built our nation into a sophisticated society in which we enjoy one of the world's highest standards of living and a position of global leadership. Today, however, America's energy security is threatened by rising prices, declining supplies, and the impact of energy use on the environment. Increased competition for global energy supplies is leading to constrained

292

W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status PopStefanija, Ivan ProSensing, Inc. Mead, James ProSensing Inc. Widener, Kevin Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Instruments Two W-band ARM Cloud Radars (WACR) have been developed for the SGP and the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) by ProSensing. The SGP WACR was successfully deployed in the same shelter as the MMCR in 2005. It is currently collecting co-polarization and cross-polarization spectral moments (reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and spectral width) along with spectra data. The AMF WACR will be deployed with the AMF in Niamey, Niger early in 2006. We will present ingested WACR data formats available from the ARM Archive, a selected comparisons of WACR and MMCR data at SGP, and data from

293

CX-003263: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: Categorical Exclusion Determination 63: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003263: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana-Tribe-Blackfeet Tribe CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The Blackfeet Tribe of Montana proposes to install energy demonstration projects on three tribally-owned buildings (the Tribal Government Office, the Blackfeet Nursing Home, and the Medicine Bear Homeless Shelter) that serve Blackfeet tribal members. Wind turbines (approximately 20 kilowatts) would be installed on 60-foot tilt towers. The wind turbines would be net metered using the net metering policies of the local utility, Glacier Electric Cooperative. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

294

Public Notifications | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Notifications Public Notifications Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Public Notifications Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Warning sirens are placed around Oak Ridge's three major sites -- the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Y-12 National Security Complex, and East Tennessee Technology Park. In the unlikely event of an off-site emergency, sirens will sound to alert area residents. If you hear the sirens, immediately enter a building or vehicle, turn on a television or radio, and listen for specific instructions from the Emergency Alert System (EAS). It is very important to stay tuned to a local station for the latest updates until the event is over. During an emergency situation on the Oak Ridge Reservation, periodic

295

Visiting Brookhaven National Laboratory | The Approach to Equilibrium in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Brookhaven Visiting Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located in Suffolk County on Long Island, a 120-mile-long island directly east of New York City. The Lab's 5,265-acre site is near the island's geographic center. The Lab is located in the township of Brookhaven, and has its own post office designation, Upton. The zip code is 11973-5000. From above, Long Island looks like a giant fish, with a forked tail on the "East End" -- the North Fork is rural, and the South Fork has many famous "Hamptons" resort towns. The Peconic Bay and Shelter Island are between the forks. Brookhaven is 15 miles to the west of the forks, and about 60 miles east of New York City. Aerial view of BNL - The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (top, center) is 2.4 miles in circumference, and dominates Brookhaven's

296

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KY-City-Owensboro KY-City-Owensboro Location: City Owensboro KY American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Administration costs related to energy efficiency and conservation strategy implementation, 2) replacement of windows in City Public Works Administration Building, 3) install bus shelters to encourage and increase ridership on public transit system, and 4) remove and replace light ballasts and lamps in City Hall Building. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

297

Volunteer Day | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volunteer Day Volunteer Day Volunteer Day Posted: February 11, 2013 - 3:48pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 For 10 years, Y-12 employees and their friends and family members have donated lots of sweat equity and talent to improve their communities through an annual Day of Volunteering. From caring for llamas to sprucing up playgrounds and picnic areas to stocking donated food items, employees are willing to roll up their T-shirt sleeves and lend a hand. Libraries, animal shelters, food pantries, elder care facilities and schools are among the nonprofit organizations served. By the numbers 400+ Charitable Projects Worked 6,000+ Employee and Family Member Volunteers 9 Counties Served "I was taught by my mother to crochet when I was a little girl, and it excites me to be able to use the skill taught to me as a child to help a

298

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife Challenges Lead to Wireless Solutions Wildlife Challenges Lead to Wireless Solutions Bookmark and Share As reported in late 2006, a total precipitation sensor (TPS) was installed near the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, to provide measurements of boundary layer (surface to 1000-m altitude) environmental conditions. After falling victim to curious and possibly hungry lemmings and other wildlife in the area, the fiber optic cable used to transfer data from the sensor to the Great White instrument shelter was recently replaced with a wireless data acquisition system and virtual access port. This not only negates the possibility of further cable damage from our furry friends, but reduces the potential for water-related damage during peak melting season and allows remote access for monitoring the data.

299

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 23, 2010 July 23, 2010 Energy Efficient Appliance Sales Soar in North Carolina It took just eight days for retailers to rack up $64 million in sales of appliances through the state's Appliance Rebate Program. July 21, 2010 Rebate Program Serves Alaskans with Disabilities Alaska uses an State Appliance Rebate Program funds to help bolster an existing rebate program. July 20, 2010 Hired and Helping with Heating in North Dakota The story of a North Dakota father who went from juggling jobs to steady work in weatherization. July 15, 2010 Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters The state of Arizona and the House of Refuge Sunnyslope are partnering to install solar hot water systems at five Phoenix-area housing sites for homeless men. July 15, 2010 UQM will manufacture electric vehicle propulsion systems like this at its new facility in Longmont, Colo. | Photo courtesy of UQ

300

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KY-City-Owensboro KY-City-Owensboro Location: City Owensboro KY American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Administration costs related to energy efficiency and conservation strategy implementation, 2) replacement of windows in City Hall Building, and 3) install bus shelters to encourage and increase ridership on public transit system. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

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301

Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These individuals made themselves available for assistance and direction on all aspects of the project discussed in this report. Key contributions to this work come from the work of Michael Dillon from LLNL and Ann S. Yoshimura of Sandia National Laboratories for the assessment of shelter and evacuation strategies following an urban nuclear detonation; Kevin Kramer, Joe Madrigal, Daniela Stricklin, and Paul Weber; Applied Research Associates, for their contributions in radiation transport, public health, and NucFast blast analysis. The authors also gratefully acknowledge the insights and contributions of the Modeling and Analysis Coordination Working Group, a technical working group collaborating on key aspects of nuclear effects modeling. Participants in this working group included:

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Air Quality Scoping Study for Sarcobatus Flat, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Walls and Windows  

SciTech Connect

Energy travels in and out of a building through the walls and windows by means of conduction, convection, and radiation. The walls and windows, complex systems in themselves, are part of the overall building system. A wall system is composed of multiple layers that work in concert to provide shelter from the exterior weather. Wall systems vary in the degree to which they provide thermal resistance, moisture resistance, durability, and thermal storage. High tech windows are now available that can resist radiation heat transfer while still providing light and visibility. The combination of walls and windows within the building system can be adapted to meet a wide range of environmental conditions, recognizing that the best building envelope system for one climate may not be the first choice for another location.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Innovative conservation housing. Final progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new passive solar thermal storage brick was developed and tested. A new insulating curtain concept was developed to assist in passive solar heating and cooling. A steel truss was designed to replace the wood truss in solar attic applications where the wood truss typically suffers some 50% loss of structural strength. Improvements were made of the dry composting toilet and grey water recycling for homes. An algae cultivation system was created for production of food, feed, fertilizer, or biomass as needed for home, farm, or industry. New concepts were explored in the areas of economy shelter, solar hot water heating, home generation of electricity, edible landscapes and other home food production, growing of fiber crops for cottage industry, storage, insulation, solar cooking, and solar refrigeration. (LEW)

Nuttle, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

309

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE FALLOUT RADIATION PROTECTION PROVIDED BY SELECTED STRUCTURES IN THE LOS ANGELES AREA  

SciTech Connect

A study designed to provide a basis for estimating protection against fallout radiation was conducted on four diversified structures in the Los Angeles, Calif., area. A fallout radiation field was simulated by a single radioactive Co/sup 60/ source, which was pumped at a uniform speed through a long length of tubing evenly distributed over the area of interest. Measurements of the radiation levels at selected points inside the structures were made with highly sensitive ionization-chamber detectors. Protection factors ranged from 10 to 2000 in a laboratory building, up to 10,000 in a family fallout shelter, from 50 to 150 in a police building, and from less than 10 to approximately 20 in a high school classroom. (auth)

Burson, Z.G.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

313

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

314

DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

EOC requirements at state and local levels. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency Operating Center functions and requirements at local, area, sub-State, and State levels are analyzed. EOC roles in times of normalcy, in natural disasters with and without warning, and in the crisis, in-shelter, and postattack phases of nuclear war are examined and compared. Three approaches to a backbone nationwide direction and control network are reviewed. A sub-State system based on existing State Highway department districts is proposed and correlations with other backbone concepts evaluated. In a companion manual, a guide to developing an EOC standard operating procedure is presented, based on the foregoing EOC requirements analysis. The manual includes a sample EOC Standard Operating Procedure for a county.

Paxton, K.F.; Goshe, F.; Rainey, C.T.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MT-TRIBE-BLACKFEET TRIBE MT-TRIBE-BLACKFEET TRIBE Location: Tribe MT-TRIBE- MT BLACKFEET TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Blackfeet Tribe of Montana proposes to install energy demonstration projects on three tribally-owned buildings (the Tribal Government Office, the Blackfeet Nursing Home, and the Medicine Bear Homeless Shelter) that serve Blackfeet tribal members . Wind turbines (approximately 20 kW) would be installed on 60-ft tilt towers. The wind turbines would be net metered using the net metering policies of the loca utility, Glacier Electric Cooperative. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

319

Radiant Apparatus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apparatus Apparatus Jump to: navigation, search Name Radiant Apparatus Place Fairfax, Virginia Zip 22038-3333 Sector Solar Product Radiant Apparatus develops multi-functional, portable solar energy-harnessing systems, as well as potable water systems and emergency shelters. Coordinates 38.841574°, -77.308132° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.841574,"lon":-77.308132,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

CX-000826: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000826: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install 18 New Office Trailers in the E-Area Rock Yard CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 10/20/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Isolate the following facilities from the Site electrical grid: Buildings 773-62A thru -71A (10 buildings), Buildings 701-20A, 719-1A, -3A, -13A thru -18A, 742-1A, -2A, -3A, 752-79A, -81A and -84A (15 buildings) and, Buildings 752-9A and -85A (2 buildings). Revision 1 adds the following to the scope of this Environmental Evaluation Checklist (EEC): add a sheltered vending machines area, as well as, sidewalks and established erosion control runoff features required for the E-Area Trailer Complex.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CX-002922: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002922: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kentucky-City-Owensboro CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06/30/2010 Location(s): Owensboro, Kentucky Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Administration costs related to energy efficiency and conservation strategy implementation, 2) replacement of windows in City Public Works Administration Building, 3) install bus shelters to encourage and increase ridership on public transit system, and 4) remove and replace light ballasts and lamps in City Hall Building. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002922.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007527: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000046: Categorical Exclusion Determination

322

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 3650 of 28,560 results. 41 - 3650 of 28,560 results. Page Employment Opportunity Highlights http://energy.gov/jobs/career-opportunities/working-doe/employment-opportunity-highlights Download Microsoft Word- Employee Concerns Program Contacts NEW.docx http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/microsoft-word-employee-concerns-program-contacts-newdocx Download DOE-HDBK-1014/1-92 DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Mathematics Volume 1 of 2 Reaffirmed 1999 The Mathematics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of mathematics and its application to facility operation. http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/doe-hdbk-10141-92 Article Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes

323

Categorical Exclusion 4596: High Contamination Area (HCA) Cleanup Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detennination Form Detennination Form PropQsed Action Tit!~: High Contamination Area (HCA) C!e;;Jnup Project (4596) Pro~ram or Field Offif.s: Y-12 Site OffiCe Locmion(s) (City/CountvLState): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Prot?Oscd Action Description: PAGE 02/04 l,:·:~:.s:~.t?)fuiW6v:: ~ 4fB~ir:::8~1 The proposed action is to disposition the materiels and equipment stored in a radiological high contamination area (HCA). This area is paved and fenced with no roof or shelter. Tile HCA was used as an accumulation area for rad contaminated materials and equipment from operations. Categorical Exclusion(s) Avoli!¢l: 81.3- ~outine maintenance For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulnti011s regaruing categorical exclusions, including the full text of each

324

MHK Technologies/Gorlov Helical Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

< MHK Technologies < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Gorlov Helical Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization GCK Technology Inc Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/GCK Technology Amazon River Brazil *MHK Projects/GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US *MHK Projects/GCK Technology Merrimack River Amesbury MA US *MHK Projects/GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US *MHK Projects/GCK Technology Uldolmok Strait South Korea *MHK Projects/GCK Technology Vinalhaven ME US *MHK Projects/General Sullivan and Little Bay BRI Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering

325

Materials and society -- Impacts and responsibilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The needs of today`s advanced societies have moved well beyond the requirements for food and shelter, etc., and now are focused on such concerns as international peace and domestic security, affordable health care, the swift and secure transmission of information, the conservation of resources, and a clean environment. Progress in materials science and engineering is impacting each of these concerns. This paper will present some examples of how this is occurring, and then comment on ethical dilemmas that can arise as a consequence of technological advances. The need for engineers to participate more fully in the development of public policies that help resolve such dilemmas, and so promote the benefits of advancing technology to society, will be discussed.

Westwood, A.R.C.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Prepared for Revisiting Rental Housing: A National Policy Summit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including notice, is given to the source. Any opinions expressed are those of the author and not those of the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard This paper considers what the appropriate design of government policies towards rental housing subsidies would be in the absence of the long and mixed legacy of public intervention in housing markets. The fundamental housing problem facing low-income households is the high cost of rental housing and the high rent burdens these households face. This is best addressed by an entitlement program for shelter subsidies modeled after the food stamp program or the Earned Income Tax Credit Program. A universal program would remove glaring inequities in the current treatment of identically situated low-income households, and it would eliminate most of the inefficiencies in the current mixed program of supply and demand subsidies for rental households.

John M. Quigley

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Late Holocene and modern pollen records from three sites in Shannon and Carter Counties, southeast Missouri Ozarks  

SciTech Connect

Palynological investigations of a small sinkhole bog (Buttonbush Bog) and two archaeological sites (Round Spring Shelter, Round Spring Site 23SH19 and Gooseneck Site 23CT54) located in Shannon and Carter counties, Missouri provide a 3,100 year record of vegetational change. Bryophytic polsters and surface samples were also collected in Shannon and Carter counties in the southeast Missouri Ozarks to determine modern pollen rain. A 302-cm core retrieved from Buttonbush Bog has a basal data of 3,130 [+-] 100 yr B.P. and a date of 1,400 [+-] 100 yr B.P. at 52--56 cm. The Buttonbush Bog pollen sequence is divided into three pollen-assemblage zones. The pollen spectra from Buttonbush Bog indicate that pine did not become well established in the southeast Missouri Ozarks until after 3,100 yr B.P. Zone 1 (the oldest) represents a mixed oak forest with minor components of pine and hickory. In Zone 2, pine values increase, indicating a shift to a pine-oak forest. The pollen sequence from Round Spring Shelter is divided into two pollen-assemblage zones. The lower zone (Zone 1) suggests the presence of a pine-oak forest in the vicinity of Round Spring prior to an Ambrosia rise at the top of the sequence in Zone 2. Regional pollen rain and variation in the local pollen rain are reflected by modern pollen spectra extracted from the bryophytic polsters surface samples. In this area the average regional pollen rain is dominated by pine, oak, hickory, and Ambrosia. The data are consistent with the mosaic of pine-oak and oak-hickory-pine forests characteristic of this region.

Huber, J.K. (Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Archaeometry Lab.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by appropriate responses by local responders and the general population within the hazard zones, regional planning is essential to success. The remainder of this Executive Summary provides summary guidance for response planning in three areas: (1) Public Protection Strategy details the importance of early, adequate shelter followed by informed evacuation. (2) Responder Priorities identify how to protect response personnel, perform regional situational assessment, and support public safety. (3) Key Planning Considerations refute common myths and provide important information on planning how to respond in the aftermath of nuclear terrorism.

Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, UT from May 17 to June 10, 2002 Title Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, UT from May 17 to June 10, 2002 Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Black, Douglas R., Tracy L. Thatcher, William W. Delp, Elisabeth A. Derby, Sheng-Chieh Chang, and Richard G. Sextro Abstract Under some circumstances, it may be desirable to provide all or part of a building with collective- protection against harmful chemical or biological (CB) agents. Collective-protection, as opposed to individual protection, uses the building -- its architecture, ventilation system, and control components -- to safeguard the health of the building occupants in the event of an indoor or outdoor release of toxic agents. In this study, we investigate the movement of tracer gases within a six-story building. The building was retrofitted to provide collective-protection on the upper two floors. To achieve this protection, the upper floors were over-pressurized using outside air that had passed through military specification carbon canisters and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The four lower floors were outside the collective-protection area and had a ventilation system that was retrofitted to provide response modes in the event of a CB release. These response modes (e.g. building flush and shelter in place) were designed to reduce the exposure of occupants on the lower floors without compromising the collective-protection zones. Over the course of four weeks, 16 tracer gas experiments were conducted to evaluate the collective- protection system (CPS) of the building's upper two floors and the ventilation response modes of the lower floors. Tracer gas concentrations were measured at a rate of 50 Hz in up to 30 locations in each experiment, which provided data with very high spatial and temporal resolution. Differential pressure and temperature measurements were also made throughout the building. Experiments showed that the CPS maintained a positive pressure differential between the upper two floors and the lower floors with various meteorological conditions and within specified settings of the HVAC fans serving the lower floors. However, the tracer experiments did show that a CB agent could enter the first zone of the decontamination areas on each CPS floor. Tracer gas analysis also showed that the shelter in place HVAC mode provided protection of lower floor occupants from an outdoor release by significantly lowering the air exchange rates on those floors. It was also determined that the efficacy of a flush mode triggered by an agent sensor depends greatly on the location of the sensor

330

 

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

13 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) 13 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Northeast Midwest South West United States Energy (1) 2,554 1,975 1,970 1,655 2,003 Shelter (2) 11,144 8,727 7,931 12,545 9,744 Food 7,187 6,367 6,076 7,015 6,563 Telephone, water and other public services 1,434 1,475 1,627 1,667 1,565 Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) 2,408 2,598 2,456 3,146 2,631 Transportation (4) 8,556 8,579 8,842 11,141 9,233 Healthcare 2,856 3,144 2,884 2,929 2,948 Education 1,535 1,104 746 1,025 1,040 Personal taxes (5) 2,390 2,574 2,506 3,251 2,665 Other expenditures 13,178 13,238 12,009 14,242 13,008 Average Annual Income 69,790 62,640 58,993 72,966 64,970

331

Hair, Hides and Tallow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hair, Hides and Tallow Hair, Hides and Tallow Nature Bulletin No. 589-A January 31, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation HAIR, HIDES AND TALLOW Since prehistoric times, especially in cold and temperate climates, mankind has depended upon hairy mammals for food and for materials to fashion clothing, shelters, weapons, implements and ornaments. Some of our American Indians had not progressed much beyond that when the white man came. They were Stone Age people. For example, the Dakota or Sioux were nomads who roamed the Great Plains, attempted no agriculture, and depended entirely upon the millions of bison. (See Bulletin No. 324-A). Their only domestic animal and beast of burden was the dog. Their portable tipi (See No. 555-A) was a conical framework of slender poles covered with hides of the buffalo. Its flesh was their chief food. Surplus meat was dried into "jerky" to be eaten in emergencies, or -- pulverized and mixed with tallow, marrow, and berries -- to make pemmican. (See No. 257-A). They used every part of the animal, including its horns, bones, sinews and hoofs. Brains and tallow were used in preparing skins for robes, shirts, moccasins, leggings, pouches, parfleches, etc. Raw hides were stretched over the frames of shields, saddles, and the tub-like bullboats for crossing streams. Buffalo droppings or "chips" were the only fuel on those treeless plains.

332

Probabilistic consequence model of accidenal or intentional chemical releases.  

SciTech Connect

In this work, general methodologies for evaluating the impacts of large-scale toxic chemical releases are proposed. The potential numbers of injuries and fatalities, the numbers of hospital beds, and the geographical areas rendered unusable during and some time after the occurrence and passage of a toxic plume are estimated on a probabilistic basis. To arrive at these estimates, historical accidental release data, maximum stored volumes, and meteorological data were used as inputs into the SLAB accidental chemical release model. Toxic gas footprints from the model were overlaid onto detailed population and hospital distribution data for a given region to estimate potential impacts. Output results are in the form of a generic statistical distribution of injuries and fatalities associated with specific toxic chemicals and regions of the United States. In addition, indoor hazards were estimated, so the model can provide contingency plans for either shelter-in-place or evacuation when an accident occurs. The stochastic distributions of injuries and fatalities are being used in a U.S. Department of Homeland Security-sponsored decision support system as source terms for a Monte Carlo simulation that evaluates potential measures for mitigating terrorist threats. This information can also be used to support the formulation of evacuation plans and to estimate damage and cleanup costs.

Chang, Y.-S.; Samsa, M. E.; Folga, S. M.; Hartmann, H. M.

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nocturnal Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nocturnal Animals Nocturnal Animals Nature Bulletin No. 151 April 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation NOCTURNAL ANIMALS When the sun goes down and dusk steals over the land, the animals of the day grow drowsy and seek some sheltered spot to await another dawn. Birds slip quietly to their nests or favorite roosts. The chattering squirrel curls up in his hollow tree or a summer nest of leaves. Butterflies fold their wings and bees creep into their quiet hives. Bats and whip-poor-wills and nighthawks zigzag expertly through the air to feast on flying insects. Then darkness comes. Then the land becomes alive again as the animals of the night take over -- the hunted and the hunters. The cottontail rabbits come out to play and gorge themselves on fresh young clover and tender grass -- welcome food after nibbling all winter on the bark of hawthorn, willow, sumac and wild rose. Millions of mice scurry about. Muskrats emerge from the underwater entrances to their lodges and bank tunnels to swim and splash as they feed on tender shoots of cattails and sedges. Wild ducks and some of the shore birds feed regularly at night.

334

Cattail Chemurgy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cattail Chemurgy Cattail Chemurgy Nature Bulletin No. 416-A April 24, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CATTAIL CHEMURGY One of the remarkable things about the primitive American Indians was their use of innumerable plants for food, clothing, shelter, medicines and implements. The early settlers learned a lot from them but, as civilization progressed, much of that knowledge was abandoned and forgotten. Now a new science, called "chemurgy", is discovering that some of our abundant but neglected plants have undreamed-of possibilities. One of these is the common Cattail. This is the familiar plant with erect strap-like leaves from 4 to 8 feet tall and, above them on a slender stalk, the cylindrical flower-head which is green and velvety in early summer when it resembles a cat's tail. The upper part contains the male flowers which drop off after they have bloomed and shed their pollen. The larger lower part contains the female flowers which develop into a brown plushy compact mass of as many as 300,000 very tiny seeds, each with a tuft of fine white hairs, that are spread by winds when the head opens in autumn.

335

PADS FY 2010 Annual Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A00 - SMALL BUSINESS 1,890 1,921,241,548 A00 - SMALL BUSINESS 1,890 1,921,241,548 B22 - LARGE BUSINESS 979 2,388,060,659 C0F - FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 478 388,669,688 C0L - LOCAL GOVT/MUNICIPALITY 2 125,000 C3N - NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION 24 282,357,286 C4N - SHELTERED WORKSHOP 1 831,263 E1N - FOREIGN CONTRACTOR 1 -16,921,324 I0E - EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION 9 4,970,555 8 UNIQUE VALUES 3,384 4,969,334,675 Geographic Distribution of FY 2010 Obligations to Non-Facilities Management Awards STATE NUMBER OF AWARDS FY 2010 OBLIGATIONS ALABAMA (AL) 12 2,445,191 ALASKA (AK) 5 3,073,629 ARIZONA (AZ) 96 8,732,671 ARKANSAS (AR) 17 3,142,515 CALIFORNIA (CA) 174 102,574,020 COLORADO (CO) 233 155,184,318 CONNECTICUT (CT) 24 3,663,352 DELAWARE (DE) 3 136,752 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (DC) 770 524,559,400

336

Data:470e37f1-43a0-4668-b524-94f89d0b3cc9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e37f1-43a0-4668-b524-94f89d0b3cc9 e37f1-43a0-4668-b524-94f89d0b3cc9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Prairie Land Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2010/01/14 End date if known: Rate name: MUNICIPAL SERVICE Sector: Commercial Description: 115 volts (or 115/230 volt), single phase, 60 cycle, alternating current. This schedule is available for the use of the municipality only, for all lighting purposes in city buildings, shelter houses, shops, traffic lights and so forth operated by the municipality but not including street lighting. Sports field may be lighted under this schedule but the Cooperative will not be required to furnish transformers for sports field lighting.

337

First Joint Mission- Yemen Pilot Program for Climate Resilience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vulnerability Context: Yemen has already been experiencing significant climatic change. The historical records since the 1970s indicate continuous warming over time. The trends show more rapid increase in summer temperature (+0.2C/decade) than in winter temperature (+0.15C/decade). In terms of rainfall, while there does not seem to be an obvious trend of total annual precipitation, 1 the extreme events are increasingly becoming a source of concern. On October 25, 2008 2, flash floods have claimed the lives of more than 140 persons and left more than 20,000 without shelter in the Hadramout and Maharah provinces. Further changes are expected in the future, with considerable impacts on freshwater availability in the country, and hence on the nations critical economic sectors (including water, agriculture and health). According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 4 th Assessment Report, Yemen is expected to warm by 3-4C by 2080s under the A1B SRES simulation scenariowhich is roughly 1.5 times the global mean response. The outlook for precipitation is less obvious. There is no clear pattern of consensus amongst the 21 Global Circulation Models (GCMs) by IPCC AR4 about the sign of the projected changes in winter, summer or annual rainfall over Yemen. The projected distribution of precipitation in Yemen will also be more erratic, with

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research  

SciTech Connect

While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

Bentz, A

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Demand or Request: Will Load Behave?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power planning engineers are trained to design an electric system that satisfies predicted electrical demand under stringent conditions of availability and power quality. Like responsible custodians, we plan for the provision of electrical sustenance and shelter to those in whose care regulators have given us the responsibility to serve. Though most customers accept this nurturing gladly, a growing number are concerned with the economic costs and environmental impacts of service at a time when technology (particularly distributed generation, storage, automation, and information networks) offers alternatives for localized control and competitive service. As customers and their systems mature, a new relationship with the electricity provider is emerging. Demand response is perhaps the first unsteady step where the customer participates as a partner in system operations. This paper explores issues system planners need to consider as demand response matures to significant levels beyond direct load control and toward a situation where service is requested and bargains are reached with the electricity provider based on desired load behavior. On one hand, predicting load growth and behavior appears more daunting than ever. On the other, for the first time load becomes a new resource whose behavior can be influenced during system operations to balance system conditions.

Widergren, Steven E.

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Corrosion monitoring in the UF{sub 6} cylinder yards at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site: FY 1994 report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at the U.S. Department of Energy`s K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been stored in large steel cylinders that have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover UF{sub 6} cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, TOW sensors, and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors, and thermocouples. Long-term (16-year) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to be intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed, and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described.

Rao, M. [Midwest Technical Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adamski, R.; Broders, J.; Ellis, A.; Freels, D.; Kelley, D.; Phillips, B. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "orm shelter emigran" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Financial barriers to the use of solar-industrial-process heat  

SciTech Connect

Industry concerns about solar process heat, attitudes toward investment in solar process heat, and decision processes and factors are reported. Four cases were selected from among 30 potential solar process heat installations that had been carried through the design stage, and case was analyzed using discounted cash flow to determine what internal rate of return would be earned under current tax laws over 10 years. No case showed any significant rate of return from capital invested in the solar installation. Several possible changes in the cost of solar equipment, its tax treatment or methods of financing were tested through computer simulation. A heavy load of extra tax incentives can improve the return on an investment, but such action is not recommended because they are not found to induce adoption of solar process heat, and if they were effective, capital may be drawn away from applications such as conservation were the potential to improve the nation's energy dilemma is greater. Tax shelter financing through limited partnership may be available. (LEW)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory  

SciTech Connect

Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Among American Indians/Alaskan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Category 3). It made multiple landfalls throughout the Caribbean, including Antigua, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Hispaniola, and Cuba. On September 25, Hurricane Georges struck the U.S. mainland near Key West, Florida, and made final landfall on September 27 in Biloxi, Mississippi, as a Category 2 hurricane. This report presents preliminary data about deaths resulting from the hurricane in Puerto Rico. On September 23, all 78 civil divisions in Puerto Rico reported damage to homes, and 416 government-run shelters were housing approximately 28,000 persons. Approximately 700,000 persons were without water, and 1 million had no electricity. The medical examiner (ME) at the Institute of Forensic Sciences provided information about the number and causes of deaths associated with Hurricane Georges. The ME determined whether a death was hurricane-related, including deaths during the impact phase of the storm (i.e., associated with high winds, storm surge, or flash flooding), and during the post-impact phase (i.e., associated with hurricane-related effects such as structural damage, power outages, and injuries incurred during cleanup).

Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As is becoming increasingly clear, the human species evolvedin the East African savannah. Details of the precise evolutionary chainremain unresolved however it appears that the process lasted severalmillion years, culminating with the emergence of modern Homo sapiensroughly 200,000 years ago. Following that final evolutionary developmentmodern Homo sapiens relatively quickly populated the entire world.Clearly modern Homo sapiens is a successful, resourceful and adaptablespecies. In the developed societies, modern humans live an existence farremoved from our evolutionary ancestors. As we have learned over the lastcentury, this "new" lifestyle can often result in unintendedconsequences. Clearly, our modern access to food, shelter, transportationand healthcare has resulted in greatly expanded expected lifespan butthis new lifestyle can also result in the emergence of different kinds ofdiseases and health problems. The environment in modern buildings haslittle resemblance to the environment of the savannah. We strive tocreate environments with little temperature, air movement and lightvariation. Building occupants often express great dissatisfaction withthese modern created environments and a significant fraction even developsomething akin to allergies to specific buildings (sick buildingsyndrome). Are the indoor environments we are creating fundamentallyunhealthy -- when examined from an evolutionary perspective?

Stoops, John L.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Dispersal and fallout simulations for urban consequences management (u)  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous chemical, biological, or radioactive releases from leaks, spills, fires, or blasts, may occur (intentionally or accidentally) in urban environments during warfare or as part of terrorist attacks on military bases or other facilities. The associated contaminant dispersion is complex and semi-chaotic. Urban predictive simulation capabilities can have direct impact in many threat-reduction areas of interest, including, urban sensor placement and threat analysis, contaminant transport (CT) effects on surrounding civilian population (dosages, evacuation, shelter-in-place), education and training of rescue teams and services. Detailed simulations for the various processes involved are in principle possible, but generally not fast. Predicting urban airflow accompanied by CT presents extremely challenging requirements. Crucial technical issues include, simulating turbulent fluid and particulate transport, initial and boundary condition modeling incorporating a consistent stratified urban boundary layer with realistic wind fluctuations, and post-processing of the simulation results for practical consequences management. Relevant fluid dynamic processes to be simulated include, detailed energetic and contaminant sources, complex building vortex shedding and flows in recirculation zones, and modeling of particle distributions, including particulate fallout, as well as deposition, re-suspension and evaporation. Other issues include, modeling building damage effects due to eventual blasts, addressing appropriate regional and atmospheric data reduction.

Grinstein, Fernando F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wachtor, Adam J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patnik, Gopal [US NAVAL RESEARCH LAB.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

MACCS version 1.5.11.1: A maintenance release of the code  

SciTech Connect

A new version of the MACCS code (version 1.5.11.1) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories under sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. MACCS was developed to support evaluations of the off-site consequences from hypothetical severe accidents at commercial power plants. MACCS is the only current public domain code in the US that embodies all of the following modeling capabilities: (1) weather sampling using a year of recorded weather data; (2) mitigative actions such as evacuation, sheltering, relocation, decontamination, and interdiction; (3) economic costs of mitigative actions; (4) cloudshine, groundshine, and inhalation pathways as well as food and water ingestion; (5) calculation of both individual and societal doses to various organs; and (6) calculation of both acute (nonstochastic) and latent (stochastic) health effects and risks of health effects. All of the consequence measures may be fun generated in the form of a complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF). The current version implements a revised cancer model consistent with recent reports such as BEIR V and ICRP 60. In addition, a number of error corrections and portability enhancements have been implemented. This report describes only the changes made in creating the new version. Users of the code will need to obtain the code`s original documentation, NUREG/CR-4691.

Chanin, D.; Foster, J. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rollstin, J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Analysis of dose consequences arising from the release of spent nuclear fuel from dry storage casks.  

SciTech Connect

The resulting dose consequences from releases of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) residing in a dry storage casks are examined parametrically. The dose consequences are characterized by developing dose versus distance curves using simplified bounding assumptions. The dispersion calculations are performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS2) code. Constant weather and generic system parameters were chosen to ensure that the results in this report are comparable with each other and to determine the relative impact on dose of each variable. Actual analyses of site releases would need to accommodate local weather and geographic data. These calculations assume a range of fuel burnups, release fractions (RFs), three exposure scenarios (2 hrs and evacuate, 2 hrs and shelter, and 24 hrs exposure), two meteorological conditions (D-4 and F-2), and three release heights (ground level - 1 meter (m), 10 m, and 100 m). This information was developed to support a policy paper being developed by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff on an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and monitored retrievable storage installation (MRS) security rulemaking.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Morrow, Charles W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Discrete Optimization and Agent-Based Simulation for Regional Evacuation Network Design Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural disasters and extreme events are often characterized by their violence and unpredictability, resulting in consequences that in severe cases result in devastating physical and ecological damage as well as countless fatalities. In August 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit the Southern coast of the United States wielding serious weather and storm surges. The brunt of Katrinas force was felt in Louisiana, where the hurricane has been estimated to total more than $108 billion in damage and over 1,800 casualties. Hurricane Rita followed Katrina in September 2005 and further contributed $12 billion in damage and 7 fatalities to the coastal communities of Louisiana and Texas. Prior to making landfall, residents of New Orleans received a voluntary, and then a mandatory, evacuation order in an attempt to encourage people to move themselves out of Hurricane Katrinas predicted destructive path. Consistent with current practice in nearly all states, this evacuation order did not include or convey any information to individuals regarding route selection, shelter availability and assignment, or evacuation timing. This practice leaves the general population free to determine their own routes, destinations and evacuation times independently. Such freedom often results in inefficient and chaotic utilization of the roadways within an evacuation region, quickly creating bottlenecks along evacuation routes that can slow individual egress and lead to significant and potentially dangerous exposure of the evacuees to the impending storm. One way to assist the over-burdened and over-exposed population during extreme event evacuation is to provide an evacuation strategy that gives specific information on individual route selection, evacuation timing and shelter destination assignment derived from effective, strategic pre-planning. For this purpose, we present a mixed integer linear program to devise effective and controlled evacuation networks to be utilized during extreme event egress. To solve our proposed model, we develop a solution methodology based on Benders Decomposition and test its performance through an experimental design using the Central Texas region as our case study area. We show that our solution methods are efficient for large-scale instances of realistic size and that our methods surpass the size and computational limitations currently imposed by more traditional approaches such as branch-and-cut. To further test our model under conditions of uncertain individual choice/behavior, we create an agent-based simulation capable of modeling varying levels of evacuee compliance to the suggested optimal routes and varying degrees of communication between evacuees and between evacuees and the evacuation authority. By providing evacuees with information on when to evacuate, where to evacuate and how to get to their prescribed destination, we are able to observe significant cost and time increases for our case study evacuation scenarios while reducing the potential exposure of evacuees to the hurricane through more efficient network usage. We provide discussion on scenario performance and show the trade-offs and benefits of alternative batch-time evacuation strategies using global and individual effectiveness measures. Through these experiments and the developed methodology, we are able to further motivate the need for a more coordinated and informative approach to extreme event evacuation.

Wang, Xinghua

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Solar-energy-system performance evaluation, April-August 1982, University of Minnesota Bookstore, Minneapolis, Minnesota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar system at the University of Minnesota Bookstore provided a total of 5% of the combined space heating and cooling load of 825 million Btu. The solar savings ratio, which accounts for operating energy used to collect solar energy, was 0.02. The fossil energy savings were 154.6 million Btu, equivalent to nine tons of coal, but there was an electrical energy expense of 19.2 million Btu (5620 kwh). The system had a net energy savings of $49.09 based on energy costs of $41.36 per ton of coal and 5.75 cents per kwh. Major energy flows to the heating and cooling subsystems are presented in the Energy Flow Diagram. In terms of solar energy utilization, the space cooling subsystem used 82 million Btu compared to 10.7 million Btu used in the space heating subsystem. The active solar energy system was retrofitted in 1979 on a relatively new earth-sheltered building which houses a bookstore, admissions and records facility. The building is 95% below ground for energy conservation and to preserve open space on the campus. Other energy conservation features are triple glazing on the windows, clerestories for daylighting and passive solar energy collection in winter, and a warm-air heat recovery system on the ventilation air. Due to the energy conservation features, the solar collection subsystem could be downsized and still provide large solar fractions. The solar collector array is comprised of six stationary units of 10 movable reflectors, each about 110 feet long and one foot wide. These glass mirrors concentrate sunlight onto a copper absorber tube receiver. Solar heated water from the storage tank or the collector array and water heated with auxiliary steam via a heat exchanger are delivered to a 147-ton absorption chiller for space cooling or to the heating coils for space heating.

Logee, T.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges  

SciTech Connect

This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges  

SciTech Connect

This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

Pushover, Response Spectrum and Time History Analyses of Safe Rooms in a Poor Performance Masonry Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea of safe room has been developed for decreasing the earthquake casualties in masonry buildings. The information obtained from the previous ground motions occurring in seismic zones expresses the lack of enough safety of these buildings against earthquakes. For this reason, an attempt has been made to create some safe areas inside the existing masonry buildings, which are called safe rooms. The practical method for making these safe areas is to install some prefabricated steel frames in some parts of the existing structure. These frames do not carry any service loads before an earthquake. However, if a devastating earthquake happens and the load bearing walls of the building are destroyed, some parts of the floors, which are in the safe areas, will fall on the roof of the installed frames and the occupants who have sheltered there will survive. This paper presents the performance of these frames located in a destroying three storey masonry building with favorable conclusions. In fact, the experimental pushover diagram of the safe room located at the ground-floor level of this building is compared with the analytical results and it is concluded that pushover analysis is a good method for seismic performance evaluation of safe rooms. For time history analysis the 1940 El Centro, the 2003 Bam, and the 1990 Manjil earthquake records with the maximum peak accelerations of 0.35g were utilized. Also the design spectrum of Iranian Standard No. 2800-05 for the ground kind 2 is used for response spectrum analysis. The results of time history, response spectrum and pushover analyses show that the strength and displacement capacity of the steel frames are adequate to accommodate the distortions generated by seismic loads and aftershocks properly.

Mazloom, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Shahid Rajaee University, P.O. Box 16785-163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1 and No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, CAU 214 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters; 11-22-03, Drum; 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage; 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials; 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-99-18, Storage Area; 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); and 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker). These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). The suspected contaminants and critical analyte s for CAU 214 include oil (total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics [TPH-DRO], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]), pesticides (chlordane, heptachlor, 4,4-DDT), barium, cadmium, chronium, lubricants (TPH-DRO, TPH-gasoline-range organics [GRO]), and fly ash (arsenic). The land-use zones where CAU 214 CASs are located dictate that future land uses will be limited to nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

Shoreline erosion and wetland loss in Mississippi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Set within a geologic framework that includes Pleistocene and Holocene barrier complexes, estuarine bays, and fluvio-deltaic tidal wetlands, coastal Mississippi shares environmental problems of shoreline erosion and wetland loss with her neighboring Gulf Coast states. The mainland coast consists of several Pleistocene headlands and barrier complexes interspersed with the St. Louis Bay and Back Bay of Biloxi estuaries. Tidal wetlands are found in the protected bays and tributary streams, as well as in the Pleistocene/Holocene deltaic environments associated with the Escatawpa, Pascagoula, Pearl, and Mississippi fluvial systems. Four barrier islands, formed by erosion and modification of a late Pleistocene/Holocene beach ridge, lie 6 to 12 mi offshore. Historically, these islands with a combined length of 30 mi have both migrated westward in response to prevailing longshore currents and also transgressed across the shallow platform of Mississippi Sound. Wave erosion, both normal and storm-induced, has historically caused shoreline retreat on both the barrier islands and on the mainland. Erosion rates in excess of 30 ft/yr have been measured at the updrift ends of the barrier islands while accretion has characterized the downdrift ends. Net shoreline retreat rates of 6 ft/yr have been measured on the Gulf side of the islands, although the Sound side rates are nearly as high. Since the earliest accurate maps were made in 1848, Mississippi's barrier islands have experienced a 20% reduction in area, amounting to about 2,000 acres (800 ha). Mainland shoreline retreat rates are similarly high, except for along the more stable and now artificially nourished beaches of Harrison County. Erosion rates exceeding 10 ft/yr since 1940 have been noted at the Point aux Chenes headland and the Grand Batture Islands. These islands, which formerly sheltered valuable oyster grounds and protected fragile marshes, have been reduced to shoals over the last several decades.

Meyer-Arendt, K.J. (Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State (USA)); Gazzier, C.A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model  

SciTech Connect

To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Title Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bennett, Deborah H., William J. Fisk, Michael G. Apte, X. Wu, Amber L. Trout, David Faulkner, and Douglas P. Sullivan Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 4 Pagination 309-20 Abstract This field study of 37 small and medium commercial buildings throughout California obtained information on ventilation rate, temperature, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics. The study included seven retail establishments; five restaurants; eight offices; two each of gas stations, hair salons, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, dental offices, and fitness centers; and five other buildings. Fourteen (38%) of the buildings either could not or did not provide outdoor air through the HVAC system. The air exchange rate averaged 1.6 (s.d. = 1.7) exchanges per hour and was similar between buildings with and without outdoor air supplied through the HVAC system, indicating that some buildings have significant leakage or ventilation through open windows and doors. Not all buildings had sufficient air exchange to meet ASHRAE 62.1 Standards, including buildings used for fitness centers, hair salons, offices, and retail establishments. The majority of the time, buildings were within the ASHRAE temperature comfort range. Offices were frequently overcooled in the summer. All of the buildings had filters, but over half the buildings had a filter with a minimum efficiency reporting value rating of 4 or lower, which are not very effective for removing fine particles. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Most U.S. commercial buildings (96%) are small- to medium-sized, using nearly 18% of the country's energy, and sheltering a large population daily. Little is known about the ventilation systems in these buildings. This study found a wide variety of ventilation conditions, with many buildings failing to meet relevant ventilation standards. Regulators may want to consider implementing more complete building inspections at commissioning and point of sale.

357

Expedition to the 30-km Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and the Utilization of its Experience in Education and Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between May 28 - June 4, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (HYGN) - which operates within the framework of the HNS - a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the surrounding exclusion zone. The participants were young Hungarian nuclear professionals supervised by more experienced experts. The main scientific goals of the expedition were the followings: Get personal experiences in a direct way about the current status of the Chernobyl Power Plant and its surroundings, the contamination of the environment and about the doses. Gather information about the state of the shut down power plant and the shelter built above the damaged 4. unit. Training of young nuclear experts by performing on site measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives by performing wide-range of environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. Within the 30-km exclusion zone the influence of the accident occurred 20 years ago still could be measured clearly; however the level of the radioactivity is manageable in most places. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure occurred among the members of the expedition. The analysis of samples has been started at the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. During the expedition not only environmental sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out but it was also well documented with photos and video recordings for educational, training and PR purposes. A documentary TV film was recorded during the expedition. The first-hand knowledge acquired during the expedition helps the authentic communication of the accident and its present-day consequences, which is especially important in 2006, 20 years after the Chernobyl accident. Since Ukraine and Hungary are neighbor countries the media constantly discuss the accident, the consequences and the risks of using nuclear energy. In addition in November 2005 Hungary's parliament approved plans to extend the lifetime of the country's four-unit nuclear power plant. In order to have the crucial public support for nuclear energy it is very important to dispel unrealistic dismay and misbelieves regarding these questions. Thus it is extremely beneficial to have a film on this topic created by nuclear professionals especially for the public audience. In 2005 a book on the Chernobyl accident was published in Hungary that covers this expedition in a full chapter [2]. We plan to present the film to the audience of the conference. (authors)

Aszodi, Attila; Yamaji, Bogdan [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Silye, Judit [Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety Directorate, H-1539 Budapest, P.O. Box 676 (Hungary); Pazmandi, Tamas [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: closed and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percent age of the recirculation air is make-up air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both closed and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups: (1) Outside - coupons sheltered, located near or at the supply air inlet, but located before any filtering, (2) Supply - starting just after initial air filtering continuing inside the plenums and ducts feeding the data center rooms, and (3) Inside located inside the data center rooms near the IT equipment. Each coupon was exposed for thirty days and then sent to a laboratory for a corrosion rate measurement analysis. The goal of this research was to investigate whether gaseous contamination is a concern for U.S. data center operators as it relates to the reliability of IT equipment. More specifically, should there be an increased concern if outside air for IT equipment cooling is used To begin to answer this question limited exploratory measurements of corrosion rates in operating data centers in various locations were undertaken. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What is the precision of the measurements (2) What are the approximate statistical distributions of copper and silver corrosion rates in the sampled data centers(3) To what extent are copper and silver corrosion measurements related (4) What is the relationship of corrosion rate measurements between outside-air cooled data centers compared to closed data centers (5) How do corrosivity measurements relate to IT equipment failure rates The data from our limited sample size suggests that most United States data center operators should not be concerned with environmental gaseous contamination causing high IT equipment failure rates even when using outside-air cooling. The research team recommends additional basic research on how environmental conditions, specifically gaseous contamination, affect electronic equipment reliability.

Coles, Henry C.; Han, Taewon; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Tschudi, William F.

2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

On the Fundamental Unsteady Fluid Dynamics of Shock-Induced Flows through Ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsteady shock wave propagation through ducts has many applications, ranging from blast wave shelter design to advanced high-speed propulsion systems. The research objective of this study was improved fundamental understanding of the transient flow structures during unsteady shock wave propagation through rectangular ducts with varying cross-sectional area. This research focused on the fluid dynamics of the unsteady shock-induced flow fields, with an emphasis placed on understanding and characterizing the mechanisms behind flow compression (wave structures), flow induction (via shock waves), and enhanced mixing (via shock-induced viscous shear layers). A theoretical and numerical (CFD) parametric study was performed, in which the effects of these parameters on the unsteady flow fields were examined: incident shock strength, area ratio, and viscous mode (inviscid, laminar, and turbulent). Two geometries were considered: the backward-facing step (BFS) geometry, which provided a benchmark and conceptual framework, and the splitter plate (SP) geometry, which was a canonical representation of the engine flow path. The theoretical analysis was inviscid, quasi-1D and quasi-steady; and the computational analysis was fully 2D, time-accurate, and viscous. The theory provided the wave patterns and primary wave strengths for the BFS geometry, and the simulations verified the wave patterns and quantified the effects of geometry and viscosity. It was shown that the theoretical wave patterns on the BFS geometry can be used to systematically analyze the transient, 2D, viscous flows on the SP geometry. This work also highlighted the importance and the role of oscillating shock and expansion waves in the development of these unsteady flows. The potential for both upstream and downstream flow induction was addressed. Positive upstream flow induction was not found in this study due to the persistent formation of an upstream-moving shock wave. Enhanced mixing was addressed by examining the evolution of the unsteady shear layer, its instability, and their effects on the flow field. The instability always appeared after the reflected shock interaction, and was exacerbated in the laminar cases and damped out in the turbulent cases. This research provided new understanding of the long-term evolution of these confined flows. Lastly, the turbulent work is one of the few turbulent studies on these flows.

Mendoza, Nicole Renee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

An external dose reconstruction involving a radiological dispersal device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent events have underscored the need for the United States government to provide streamlined emergency response procedures and subsequent dose estimations for personnel responding to incidents involving radioactive material. Indeed, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 138 (NCRP 2001) indicates that exposures received by first responders will be important for a number of reasons, including planning for the appropriate use of key personnel in an extended emergency situation. In response, the Department of Homeland Security has published Protective Action Guides (DHS 2006) to help minimize these exposures and associated risks. This research attempts to provide some additional radiological exposure knowledge so that an Incident Commander, with limited or no information, can make more informed decisions about evacuation, sheltering-in-place, relocation of the public, turn-back levels, defining radiation hazard boundaries, and in-field radiological dose assessments of the radiation workers, responders, and members of the public. A method to provide such insight begins with providing a model that describes the physics of radiation interactions, radiation source and geometry, collection of field measurements, and interpretation of the collected data. A Monte Carlo simulation of the model is performed so that calculated results can be compared to measured values. The results of this investigation indicate that measured organ absorbed doses inside a tissue equivalent phantom compared favorably to the derived organ absorbed doses measured by the Panasonic thermoluminescence dosimeters and with Monte Carlo â??Nâ?? Particle modeled results. Additionally, a Victoreen 450P pressurized ion chamber measured the integrated dose and these results compared well with the Panasonic right lateral TLD. This comparison indicates that the Victoreen 450P ionization chamber could potentially serve as an estimator of real-time effective dose and organ absorbed dose, if energy and angular dependence corrections could be taken into account. Finally, the data obtained in this investigation indicate that the MCNP model provided a reasonable method to determine organ absorbed dose and effective dose of a simulated Radiological Dispersal Device in an Inferior-Superior geometry with Na99mTcO4 as the source of radioactive material.

Hearnsberger, David Wayne

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 is located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CAU 214 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as ''Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas,'' and is comprised of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): {sm_bullet} CAS 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters {sm_bullet} CAS 11-22-03, Drum {sm_bullet} CAS 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials {sm_bullet} CAS 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage {sm_bullet} CAS 25-99-18, Storage Area The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 11-22-03, 25-34-03, 25-34-04, 25-34-05, 25-99-12, and 25-99-18 is No Further Action. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of the fly ash and surrounding wooden structure at CAS 25-99-12 as a best management practice The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CAS 05-99-01 in CAU 214 is Clean Closure. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of soil contaminated with the pesticide dieldrin The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 25-23-01 and 25-23-19 is Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of soil contaminated with chromium and soil impacted with the pesticides chlordane and heptachlor {sm_bullet} Implementing use restrictions (UR) at both CASs as detailed in the CAU 214 Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2005) {sm_bullet} Posting UR warning signs around CASs 25-23-01 and 25-23-19 on the existing chain link fence

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Radioecology is the study of the fate and transport and potential effects of radionuclides and associated contaminants in the environment. In short, it is the science that describes the fundamental connection between environmental health and human health risks. As such, radioecology can and has provided the credible, consistent and defensible basis for the successful and cost-effective environmental cleanup and closure of nuclear production and waste sites. In addition, radioecology also provides the technical basis for making timely and reliable decisions on cleanup in the aftermath of nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. The 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident resulted in catastrophic health, social, and economic consequences in many countries, predominantly, Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. The extent of radioactive contamination, levels and forms of contamination, and diversity of the ecosystems affected by the accident did not have any precedent and provided unique opportunities for environmental scientists around the world. Following the natural course of their development, populations of species and their communities found themselves in conditions of chronic radiation exposure that exceeded the natural background by factors of hundreds and thousands. Anything similar would have been extremely difficult if not impossible to recreate in a scientific laboratory. Consequently, since the first few years after the accident, many teams of scientists have visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The knowledge gained by studying the consequences of this accident has tremendous importance. The concept of an international research and technical center to address the problems involving nuclear and radiological accidents became a reality with the establishment of the International Chernobyl Center (ICC). In May 1995, the US and Ukraine signed a Protocol of Intent on establishment of the ICC, and the government of Ukraine appealed to the international scientific community to support ICC and join its activities (Chernobyl Center 2006). In December 1995, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on the ChNPP closure was signed by the government of Ukraine, all of the G7 governments, and the European Commission. The ICC foundation was considered critical to ensure the safe decommissioning of the ChNPP reactor units and improvement of the safety of the Chernobyl Containment Shelter. On the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident (26 April 1996), Mr. Viktor Yushchenko, the President of Ukraine, issued a decree to establish the Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology (Chernobyl Center). On the same day, a MOU involving the US participation in Chernobyl Center activities was signed by the US and Ukraine (Chernobyl Center 2006). In July 1998, the US and Ukraine signed an agreement to establish the International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) as part of the Chernobyl Center. The creation of IRL was a logical continuation of previous programs to conduct scientific research in radioecology and provide Ukraine and the rest of the world with the necessary infrastructure and scientific basis to conduct research in radioecology, radiobiology, dosimetry, and environmental protection in the ChEZ (Chernobyl Center 2006). A recent collaborative effort with IRL has been implemented through a project titled 'Long-term impacts from radiation/contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone' (Farfan et al. 2008; Gerdes et al. 2009; Marra et al. 2010). This collaboration had the following objectives: (1) Assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure within the ChEZ; (2) Provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories based on the results of long-term field monitoring, analytical measurements, and numerical modeling of soils and groundwater radioactive contamination; and (3) Recommend the development and testing of effective cleanup technologies to reduce environmental and health risks. Based o

Farfan, E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Proceedings of the Plutonium Futures ? The Science 2006 Conference  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium Futures--The Science 2006 provided opportunities to examine present knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of plutonium and other actinides in complex media and materials; to discuss the current and emerging science (chemistry, physics, materials science, nuclear science, and environmental effects) of plutonium and actinides relevant to enhancing global nuclear security; and to exchange ideas. This international conference also provided a forum for illustrating and enhancing capabilities and interests, and assessing issues in these areas. U.S. and international scientists, engineers, faculty, and students from universities, national laboratories, and DOE's nuclear complex were encouraged to participate and make technical contributions. The Conference ran from Sunday, July 9th through Thursday, July 13th. A popular aspect of the conference was the opening tutorial session on Sunday afternoon intended for students and scientists new to the area of plutonium research. The tutorial was well attended by novices and veterans alike, and featured such diverse topics as; plutonium metallurgy, plutonium in the environment, and international arms control and nonproliferation. Two plenary lectures began each morning and each afternoon session and highlighted the breakout sessions on coordination/organometallic chemistry, solid-state physics, environmental chemistry, materials science, separations and reprocessing, advanced fuels and waste forms, phase transformations, solution and gas-phase chemistry, compounds and complexes, electronic structure and physical properties, and more. Chemistry Highlights--Among the many chemistry highlights presented in this proceedings are the overview of concepts and philosophies on inert nuclear fuel matrices and concerns about the ever-increasing amounts of minor actinides and plutonium generated in the fuel cycle. The various ideas involve multiple reduction schemes for these materials, suggesting fuels for 'burning' or 'cradle-to-grave' accountability for various reactor types. Related work is presented on identification of the unique reaction mechanisms and identification of the intermediate products, including Pu(III), at the end of the PUREX process. In the important area of nuclear forensics, actual scenarios of nuclear materials confiscation and the successes of applying forensics protocols to determine attribution and possible intention are provided. In the area of reactor incidents, there is no other place on Earth like the Chernobyl Site Object Shelter and radioactive aerosol particle characterization studies reflect an important effort described herein. An additional report from another unique environmental site presents results on radionuclide monitoring, fate, and transport in the ecosystem of the Yenisei River in the Krasoyarsk region. In the area of nuclear waste disposal, a study of the ion irradiation damage to pyrochlore compounds with varying amounts of host elements and actinide dopants is presented. Papers on both the aqueous and nonaqueous chemistry of plutonium and other actinides are presented including anhydrous coordination chemistry and redox behavior in the presence of humic materials and the their sorption on common minerals in the environment. Also published herein are reports on the field of anhydrous coordination chemistry of the transuranic elements where there is scarce information. Solid-State and Materials Highlights--Plutonium solid-state and materials research is represented in these proceedings by a wealth of leading edge discovery class research. The breadth of this research is reflected in the topics covered: solid-state; materials science; superconductivity; phase changes, phonons, and entropy; electronic structure and physical properties; surface science and corrosion; and radiation effects, defects, impurities, and property changes. Indeed the scientific challenge and excitement of plutonium can best be highlighted by quoting the tutorial prospectus of Drs. Sarrao and Schwartz. 'Plutonium has long been re

Fluss, M; Hobart, D; Allan, P; Jarvinen, G

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

Curriculum development of a wildlife habitat gardening Golden Ray Series [sm] for the Junior Master Gardener [sm] Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of the Backyard Buddies Golden Ray Series curriculum for the Junior Master Gardener Program is a labor-intensive and ongoing project requiring consideration of numerous factors relating not only to the habitat gardening subject matter of the curriculum but to educational, economic, political, and other concerns as well. This paper summarizes the steps in the development of this curriculum. A first necessary step in developing the Backyard Buddies curriculum was understanding the Junior Master Gardener Program for which it was intended. JMG began as a 4-H gardening program in Texas and has since spread to 25 states and 2 countries. The program stresses "hands-on" learning in an effort to make the program fun for participants. JMG curricula are also oriented toward "whole-child" education, where both emotional and intellectual fulfillment are goals. JMG groups can consist of anyone, needing only an adult leader and a minimum of 5 youth participants. The only other requirement for a JMG group is that they register their group through the Texas Agricultural Extension Service and that they buy the necessary curriculum materials. However while anyone can form a JMG group and while the curriculum is applicable to groups of any kind, the curriculum is geared toward the needs of schools in an effort to gain a wider participation in the program. For this reason, JMG curriculum is typically designed to fulfil the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) requirements for schools. Likewise, JMG curricula are also often designed to be compatible with the materials typically found on standardized tests like the TAAS test. A Golden Ray Series, such as Backyard Buddies, is an outgrowth of JMG'S basic curriculum. Each Golden Ray Series focuses upon a specific concern related to gardening. A previous GRS, for instance, dealt with Health and Nutrition in the Garden while Backyard Buddies focuses specifically upon habitat gardening. In developing the Backyard Buddies curriculum, JMG guidelines had to be followed while also developing a curriculum that would teach youth how to create and maintain a habitat garden. Because the final goal of this curriculum was to give learners an understanding of how to attract wildlife to a garden and to instill an appreciation of wildlife in learners, a Backwards Design approach to curriculum development was used. Finally, basic research had to be conducted in order to insure that all activities were factually-accurate as well as age-appropriate. Beginning with lessons on what habitats are, Backyard Buddies first section guarantees that learners have the necessary vocabulary and the necessary scientific understanding of wildlife needs to begin a habitat garden. This basic education continues with the next section on elements, such as food, water, and shelter, that are essential to the survival of wildlife in a garden setting. Following these sections come sections on birds, mammals, insects, and reptiles/amphibians. These sections deal with specific needs and concerns relating to habitat gardening and these particular animal groups. Next comes a problem-solving section in which learners deal with potential problems related to wildlife habitat gardening. Finally, the concluding section consists of life skill and career exploration lessons related to habitat gardening. The Backyard Buddies curriculum is currently awaiting review. Following review and any necessary revisions, the curriculum will be pilot tested and, again, will undergo any necessary revisions. Then, artwork, graphics, and layout will be designed prior to the curriculum's publication and implementation.

Meche, Michelle S

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Wind Energy Resource Assessment of the Caribbean and Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wind energy resource assessment of the Caribbean and Central America has identified many areas with good to outstanding wind resource potential for wind turbine applications. Annual average wind resource maps and summary tables have been developed for 35 island/country areas throughout the Caribbean and Central America region. The wind resource maps highlight the locations of major resource areas and provide estimates of the wind energy resource potential for typical well-exposed sites in these areas. The average energy in the wind flowing in the layer near the ground is expressed as a wind power class: the greater the average wind energy, the higher the wind power class. The summary tables that are included with each of the 35 island/country wind energy maps provide information on the frequency distribution of the wind speeds (expressed as estimates of the Weibull shape factor, k) and seasonal variations in the wind resource for the major wind resource areas identified on the maps. A new wind power class legend has been developed for relating the wind power classes to values of mean wind power density, mean wind speed, and Weibull k. Guidelines are presented on how to adjust these values to various heights above ground for different roughness and terrain characteristics. Information evaluated in preparing the assessment included existing meteorological data from airports and other weather stations, and from ships and buoys in offshore and coastal areas. In addition, new data from recent measurement sites established for wind energy siting studies were obtained for a few areas of the Caribbean. Other types of information evaluated in the assessment were climatological data and maps on winds aloft, surface pressure, air flow, and topography. The various data were screened and evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. Much of the surface data from airports and other land-based weather stations were determined to be from sheltered sites and were thus not very useful in assessing the wind resource at locations that are well exposed to the winds. Ship data were determined to be the most useful for estimating the large-scale wind flow and assessing the spatial distribution of the wind resource throughout the region. Techniques were developed for analyzing and correcting ship wind data and extrapolating these data to coastal and inland areas by considering terrain influences on the large-scale wind flow. In areas where extrapolation of ship wind data was not entirely feasible, such as interior areas of Central America, other techniques were developed for estimating the wind flow and distribution of the wind resource. Through the application of the various innovative techniques developed for assessing the wind resource throughout the Caribbean and Central America region, many areas with potentially good to outstanding wind resource were identified that had not been previously recognized. In areas where existing site data were available from exposed locations, the measured wind resource was compared with the estimated wind resource that was derived using the assessment techniques. In most cases, there was good agreement between the measured wind resource and the estimated wind resource. This assessment project supported activities being pursued by the U.S. Committee for Renewable Energy Commerce and Trade (CORECT), the U.S. government's interagency program to assist in overseas marketing and promote renewable energy exports. An overall goal of the program is to improve U.S. competitiveness in the world renewable energy market. The Caribbean and Central America assessment, which is the first of several possible follow-on international wind energy resource assessments, provides valuable information needed by the U.S. wind energy industry to identify suitable wind resource areas and concentrate their efforts on these areas.

DL Elliott; CI Aspliden; GL Gower; CG Holladay, MN Schwartz

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Special population planner, version 4.0.  

SciTech Connect

Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development and Testing of the Berkeley Darfur Stove  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Testing of the Berkeley Darfur Stove Development and Testing of the Berkeley Darfur Stove Title Development and Testing of the Berkeley Darfur Stove Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-116E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Amrose, Susan, G. Theodore Kisch, Charles Kirubi, Jesse Woo, and Ashok J. Gadgil Date Published 03/2008 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Darfur, one of the poorest regions in Sudan, has been in the midst of a complicated and bloody conflict since 2003 that has resulted in the displacement of 2.2 million citizens. The displaced, known as Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), are crowded into refugee camps scattered across the region with low fuelwood productivity and no alternative means of fuel. Unsustainable harvesting has led to increasing zones of total denudation around the camps, now extending several kilometers in all directions from the camp boundaries. Women who leave the camp to fetch fuelwood are subject to rape and mutilation due to the continuing conflict.In November of 2005, a team of scientists from LBNL visited Darfur to assess the potential of fuel-efficient stoves ("FES") as a means to mitigate the fuelwood shortage. In addition to conducting a systematic informal survey, the team found that a metal FES, known as the Tara, required 50% less fuelwood to cook an IDP meal than the inefficient three-stone-fire used by 90% of the IDPs. The LBNL team emerged from the triprecommending a metal FES based on the Tara, but with two specific design modifications to make it suitable for conditions in Darfur. These included improving the mechanical stability of the stove during vigorous stirring, and maintaining or improving performance during a breeze. In Spring 2006, an interdisciplinary team of four Berkeley students (3 graduate and 1 senior undergraduate) took on the project of designing, fabricating, and testing the recommended modifications as part of a UC-Berkeley course entitled Design forSustainable Communities. Under the guidance of Prof. Ashok Gadgil, the students designed several modifications to improve stove performance in windy weather, including a wind-shield around the upper stove body, and the addition of a metal ring to prevent direct air flow through the stove body. Stakes were also added to the stove body to improve stability during vigorous stirring. The students fabricated a prototype fortesting, known as the "Berkeley Darfur Stove," or BDS. Since no existing stove test was relevant to the conditions of Darfur, a new protocol, known as the Darfur Cooking Test (DCT), was developed by the students to compare the fuel efficiency of two stoves. This protocol is specific to the conditions in Darfur, incorporating both windy and non-windy conditions, along with the cooking pots, food preparation methods, and meals employed by IDPs. The complete DCT protocol is presented in Appendices 1 and 2. The BDS prototype was tested against the original Tara stove using the newly developed DCT along with a simple tipping test (to compare stability). Fuelwood usage by the BDS was found to be consistently less than that of the Tara stove under all tested conditions. Compared to the Tara, the BDS was found to save 56% (with wind) and 40% (without wind) of the fuelwood required to cook sauce-like mulah (one of two staple IDP foods)and to save 74% (with wind) and 8% (without wind) of the fuelwood required to cook the dough-like assida (the other staple food). Using these numbers, the BDS was found to have a net annual fuelwood savings of 72% over the three-stone-fire in Darfur. The 4 stability of the BDS during stirring was also found to be much better than the Tara, requiring > 117 N of lateral force to tip compared to just 22 N. Implications of full adoption of the BDS throughout Darfur include saving 370 million kg of fuelwood per year, along with a monetary savings of US $222 per family per year for IDPs who buy fuelwood or a savings of 18 hours of labor effort per week for IDPs who currently collect fuelwood. Annual avoided CO2 emissions would come to 6 million tonnes per year worth $12 million annually assuming the lowest market price of $3 per tonne1 of CO2. Most significantly, the risk of rape and mutilation for those who collect fuelwood would be reduced by three-quarters. Additional expected benefits include substantial reduction in the inhalation of harmful wood-smoke by IDP women and girls, and significant reduction in the risk of fire to the IDP shelters because the BDS fully encloses the open flames.

368

Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and ability to control units centrally during a shelter-in-place event. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be controlled under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (3) Cool roof. Savings estimates for the measure were applied to all roofs scheduled for replacement in the LLNL deficiency list. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building. (4) Window shading. Savings estimates for the measure were applied to all non-north facing windows. Although the simple payback is not a good for this measure, it should be considered for the associated benefits on thermal comfort and to alleviate some of the zoning and thermostat placement issues. (5) HVAC upgrade at normal replacement. Savings estimates for the measure were applied to all HVAC units scheduled for replacement on the LLNL deficiency list. A total of 642 units (about 55% of the total) are on the replacement list, so this represents a major opportunity. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (6) Indirect/direct evaporative cooling. Savings estimates for the measure were applied to all HVAC units scheduled for replacement on the LLNL deficiency list. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. Due to the magnitude of the potential energy savings, this measure should be considered as the new generation IDEC systems become commercially available. (7) Super T-8's. Savings estimates for this measure were applied to all buildings in the study, assuming that the new generation lamps will be rotated in during normal lamp replacement operations. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building. (8) Occupancy sensors. Savings estimates for this measure were applied to buildings surveyed as candidates for occupancy sensors during the Level 1 audits. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building. (9) Remaining Lighting. Savings for this measure were calculated for each eligible fixture identified during the Lev

Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z