National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for orm shelter emigran

  1. SHELTER3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tornadoes are common in Missouri. But the twister that killed 161 people and caused billions of dollars in damage in Joplin, Missouri, in May 2011 provided special motivation for the Crowder College and Drury University team’s Solar Decathlon 2015 project. The team hopes the design principles in its ShelteR3 house could help lessen the damage of future storms in a state that averages 27 tornadoes yearly.

  2. Rapid deployment shelter system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2006-10-10

    A shelter for the protection of for the protection of persons, animals, equipment, materials, property, and similar things of value from potentially damaging environmental conditions is disclosed. Various embodiments include the use of a frame structure and hinged panels which are unfolded to create the walls of the structure. Optionally flexible surfaces may be added to the ends of the shelter to at least partially close the end of the shelter.

  3. Earth shelter goes international

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1983-06-01

    Since the mid-1970's earth sheltered buildings in the US have become more numerous and important as a contemporary passive building concept. Further, an intense international interest has now developed, as evidenced by a number of important activities. One of these events is the 1983 International Conference on Energy Efficient Buildings with Earth Shelter Protection to be conducted during 1-6 August in Sydney, Australia. A review of past activities leading up to this event, as well as a brief review of the conference program, is the subject of this discussion.

  4. Earth sheltered housing phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1981-06-21

    Both national and international attention has recently been focused on earth sheltered construction as an emerging energy alternative. This is especially true for the High Plains region of the central United States. Traditionally, inhabitants of this region have been sensitized to the need for windstorm protection. However, the dramatic potentials for energy savings have served as a strong secondary inducement to the burgeoning construction activity in what is now viewed as a contemporary dwelling concept. The typical characteristics of such dwellings are reviewed as well as the educational challenge awaiting professional input to this developing boom in earth sheltered construction. 12 refs.

  5. Earth-sheltered apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germer, J.

    1984-12-01

    Earth-sheltered apartments for students at St. Johns University, Collegeville, MN are described. The intent was to provide energy-efficient, low maintenance housing in a neighborhood environment for the students. Students would learn about energy-conscious architecture from living in the buildings. The buildings have had few problems, but energy performance has not been up to expectations. The consumption of electricity exceeded predictions by 49%. The most likely answer to the problem is deviation from design. Several items of energy-efficient design were specified but deleted in order to cut costs.

  6. Earth sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1982-01-01

    The earth shelter concept has been utilized successfully around the world for thousands of years, but its use with contemporary mechanically conditioned buildings dates only from the oil embargo of the mid-1970s. This is an architectural innovation and a growing and viable response to the energy imperative. Most of the technical problems of earth shelters have been effectively addressed, but a systems design approach could further enhance overall energy savings. Although occupant lifestyle seems to be at a high level, areas that require further attention include site design, daylighting, and refined thermal design. The proper integration of passive solar heating and disaster protection represent opportunities for improved multifunctional aspects. With proper design, annual heating and cooling energy use reductions on the order of 80% can be anticipated. Research on energy design refinements and occupancy aspects necessary to achieve such levels of savings is presently under way at Oklahoma State University, the University of Minnesota, and other study centers throughout the nation and the world.

  7. ORISE: Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency | How...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency CDC, ORISE and NACCHO collaborate on guide for shelters A Guide to Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency cover A...

  8. Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology You are accessing a document from the Department of...

  9. Wood panel earth shelter construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J.R.; Loveless, J.G.; Senkow, W.

    1986-05-27

    An earth sheltered building is described including an arch structure, the structure including footings, a floor extending between the footings and arch means extending between the footings and having a base having lower ends on the footings for defining an enclosure which is covered with earth and open at opposite ends. The arch structure consists of: joined, curved wooden panel sections arranged in tandem in adjacent rows with more than two panel sections in a row, each of the sections including circumferentially extending wooden side members; wooden sheathing sections overlying the top skins of panel sections, the sheathing including a plurality of plywood sheets lapped over the joints between the panel sections and treated with a preservative; an adhesive joining the panel sections together within each row and to adjacent rows; waterproofing means on the sheathing for waterproofing the exterior surface of the arch means; connecting means engaging the base of the arch means at the footings and within the floor for tying the base together at its lower ends; and end walls and fastener means for joining the end walls to lateral edges of the arch means, the end walls dimensioned to extend above the arch means to retain earth placed on the arch means.

  10. Constructing earth sheltered housing with concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spears, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This manual provides a state - of - the - art review of the design and construction of an earth - sheltered house using cast - in - place concrete, precast concrete, and concrete masonry. Based on a literature survey, theoretical work, and discussions with researchers and engineers in the concrete industry, the text is designed for use by architects, engineers, and homebuilders. The features of concrete construction that are current accepted practice for the concrete products discussed are shown to be applicable with reasonable care to building a safe, dry, and comfortable earth - sheltered house. The main considerations underlying the recommendations were the use of the earth's mass and passive solar effects to minimize energy needs, the structural capacity of the separate concrete products and their construction methods, and drainage principles and waterproofing details. Shelter ranging from those with at least 2 feet of earth cover to those with an uncovered roof of usual construction are included. To be considered an earth - sheltered residential building, at least half of the exterior wall and roof area that is in direct contact with the conditioned living space must be sheltered from the environment by earth berm or earthfill. Siting considerations, the fundamentals of passive solar heating, planning considerations, and structural considerations are discussed. Detailed guidelines are provided on concrete masonry construction, joint details in walls and floors, waterproofing, formwork and form removal, concrete construction practices, concrete masonry, and surface finishes. Numerous illustrations, tables, and a list of 32 references are provided. (Author abstract modified).

  11. Rapid Deployment Shelter System, Application | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex Rapid Deployment Shelter ... Rapid Deployment Shelter System, Application The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 3:30 min. The RDSS provides humanitarian and disaster relief first responders with a versatile portable shelter that is rapidly deployed under adverse conditions

  12. Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design » Types of Homes » Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden If you are looking for a home with energy-efficient features that will provide a comfortable, tranquil, weather-resistant dwelling, an earth-sheltered

  13. Earth sheltered housing performance: a summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.; Fitzgerald, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    Oklahoma and the surrounding interior plains region is being studied with respect to the extensive development of earth sheltered housing. An understanding of the occupant responses to this rediscovered dwelling concept is being determined through extended questionnaires and telephone interviews. Statistical evaluation of these responses should suggest regional relationships between the interior human environment and the exterior environment as expressed by earth sheltered architecture. Habitability and passive energy design are the main topics of interest being investigated at Oklahoma State University. Initial results indicate that occupants are generally satisfied with such attributes as structural safety, thermal comfort, and acoustic environment; but have some reservations concerning daylighting, site design, privacy of family members, and energy design and performance. Despite reservations on energy performance, owners have still achieved significant savings in comparison to their previous homes. A most promising fact is that these savings have been realized with little decrease and often an increase in comfort and habitability aspects.

  14. Florida's Emergency Shelters Go Solar | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Information Resources » Florida's Emergency Shelters Go Solar Florida's Emergency Shelters Go Solar Florida has its fair share of dangerous weather conditions including hurricanes, tornados and floods. Florida legislature passed various laws and made revisions addressing disaster planning which required that the Department of Education, in consultation with school boards and county and state emergency management offices, develop design standards for public shelters to be incorporated into State

  15. Zoning for earth sheltered buildings. A guide for Minnesota communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Background information on earth sheltered buildings and the zoning issues related to this construction techniques is provided. Ways to develop goals and policies on earth sheltering and integrate them into existing planning documents are outlined. Ways to eliminate prohibitions and barriers to earth-sheltered buildings from zoning language are explained. Subdivision and planned unit development (PUD) regulations designed to facilitate and encourage new developments of earth sheltered homes are considered. Model language on planning, zoning, and subdivisions and planned unit developments and a summary of the various recommendations made throughout the guidebook are included. (MHR)

  16. Rapid Deployment Shelter System | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rapid Deployment Shelter ... Rapid Deployment Shelter System The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 5:03 min. Originally designed as a mobile surgical suite, the RDSS can also be converted and used for a command, control, logisitics, or operations center

  17. Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to be limited because of the position of the home's windows, and courtyard drainage and snow removal should be carefully thought through during design. Bermed Earth-Sheltered Homes...

  18. Two earth sheltered passive solar residences with photovoltaic electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strong, S.J.; Osten, R.J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The design and construction of two earth sheltered passive solar residence with photovoltaic electricity are described. The sizing and design of the P.V. system as well as the module fabrication and array integration are also discussed.

  19. Habitability and energy performance of earth sheltered dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.

    1980-12-01

    The High Plains region of the central United States has become host to an emerging dwelling concept which incorporates the use of earth shelter technologies. Traditionally, inhabitants of this region have been sensitized to the need for windstorm protection. More recently, dramatic potentials for energy savings have served as a strong secondary inducement to the exploration of earth sheltered housing as an energy alternative. Habitability and passive energy design of earth sheltered structures are key focal elements being investigated at Oklahoma State University. Habitability aspects have received little treatment elsewhere, and existing passive energy design strategies have generally not considered the passive cooling benefits of earth sheltered construction. Extended questionnaires were used to obtain earth sheltered occupant responses to both habitability and energy design aspects including measured energy usage. Preliminary analysis has been completed on about 80 (eighty) projects in the State of Oklahoma, and the study is being extended to 8 (eight) additional surrounding states. Initial results indicate that occupants are generally satisfied with such attributes as structural safety, thermal comfort, and acoustical environment; but have some reservations concerning daylighting, site design, and energy design and performance. Energy usage patterns tend to indicate that, in fact, sizeable savings are being realized by owners of current generation earth shelters. However, it is anticipated that with optimized passive systems design, the presently realized savings could be further increased by perhaps a factor of two. An appropriate design balance must be realized between passive heating and passive cooling needs.

  20. Suitable thin shell structural configurations for earth sheltered housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behr, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    An earth sheltered house is one whose building envelope is substantially in contact with soil, without necessarily being totally underground. Hence, it can provide the commonly sought attributes of a residence, including natural light, exterior views, and curb appeal. It also exhibits strong energy performance, lower maintenance, and good storm protection. Despite the longer-term life cycle cost advantages of earth sheltered buildings, a current hindrance to the mass market acceptance of earth sheltered housing is higher initial cost which is caused, in part, by the inability of conventional rectilinear structural systems to support economically the massive soil loads imposed on earth covered buildings. In deference to the premise that technical suitability is no guarantee of innovation acceptance in the housing industry, a survey of the nontechnical impediments to housing innovation was first undertaken. These impediment areas include: market inhibition; builder trepidations; industry constraints; and financing problems. As a result of an architectural design program written under contract for the Department of Energy, it was possible to include a rather extensive (but necessarily subjective) evaluation of the architectural potential for earth sheltered shell structures. Engineering suitability dimensions included structural effectiveness, constructability, and economy of construction for single- and double-curvature thin shell structures. Overall engineering suitability and architectural potential are deemed to be adequate, although non-engineering impediments to housing innovation appear to raise significant questions regarding the potential for mass market implementation of thin shell stuctures in earth sheltered housing.

  1. Two-dimensional heat transfer from earth-sheltered buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krarti, M. (Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (US)); Claridge, D.E. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-02-01

    This paper describes use of the interzone temperature profile estimation (or ITPE) technique, an analytical calculation procedure to predict heat transfer within earth in contact with a structure. The solutions governing steady-state and steady-periodic heat conduction are derived for rectangular earth-sheltered buildings. The procedure accepts continuously variable values of geometric dimensions, insulation levels, and constant soil thermal characteristics and considers the presence of a finite water table level. Soil temperature profiles are shown for both steady-state and steady periodic conditions. The effects of insulation and water table depth on the heat losses from an earth-sheltered building envelope are discussed.

  2. Objective and subjective perceptions of energy efficiency: the case of earth sheltered homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Consumer perceptions of earth sheltered homes are compared with perceptions of more traditional, nonsheltered homes. Despite general perceptions of earth sheltered homes as energy efficient with lower costs of maintenance and greater privacy, consumers do not favorably evaluate earth sheltered homes in terms of overall liking. Only a moderate amount of sheltering, as in bermed houses is preferred. Differences are particularly significant for male and female respondents. 8 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  3. ORISE: Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency | How ORISE is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Making a Difference Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency CDC, ORISE and NACCHO collaborate on guide for shelters A Guide to Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency cover A radiation emergency has the potential to displace a large population from the impacted area, creating a massive need for public shelters. To address this need, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Radiation Studies Branch teamed with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

  4. Sheltering in Place | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Sheltering in Place Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Sheltering in Place Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page If you are advised to shelter-in-place by local news or our website, please follow these instructions: Bring everyone inside (including pets). Close all doors and windows. Turn off and close all ventilation systems, including: Air conditioning Attic & exhaust fans Furnaces Fireplace

  5. Earth sheltered housing in the south central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grondzik, W.T. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater); Grondzik, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study of identified, occupied earth sheltered residences in the south central United States has been conducted by the Oklahoma State University. Selected results from this investigation of more than 150 residences in the states of Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas are presented, focusing upon the issues of habitability and energy performance of such structures.

  6. Civil defense shelters: a state-of-the-art assessment - 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1986-12-01

    The literature on the design, construction, testing, and cost of blast and fallout shelters was reviewed, and a bibliography of over 1000 documents was assembled. It was found that nuclear weapon effects and shelter design are well understood. The principal technical barrier to construction of permanent shelters is cost. Single-purpose blast shelters cost in the high hundreds to low thousands of dollars per space, depending on size, hardness, location, and whether the shelter is part of new construction or retrofit. The risk area population requiring blast protection is approximately 160 million. The very-low-cost options open to the U.S. Government, with its present civil defense budget, remain: (1) maintain the inventory on fallout shelter and identify space with some blast protection potential; (2) plan for crisis upgrading to improve existing space in a crisis, and (3) plan for construction of expedient shelter in a crisis. Fallout shelters might be mandated in appropriate new construction outside risk areas at little cost to the government. Options in the mid-range of expense, a few tens to a few hundreds of dollars per space include: (1) requiring modified limestone-mining practices, where appropriate, to generate useable shelter space near cities; (2) encouraging the construction of earth-sheltered housing and other buildings, and (3) requiring and/or subsidizing the construction of dual-use basement shelter in new construction.

  7. Architecture earth-sheltered buildings. Design manual 1. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    Design guidance is presented for use by experienced engineers and architects. The types of buildings within the scope of this manual include slab-on-grade, partially-buried (bermed) or fully-buried, and large (single-story or multistory) structures. New criteria unique to earth-sheltered design are included for the following disciplines: Planning, Landscape Design, Life-Cycle Analysis, Architectural, Structural, Mechanical (criteria include below-grade heat flux calculation procedures), and Electrical.

  8. Energy-efficient buildings with earth-shelter protection. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.; Sterling, R.L.; Baggs, S.A. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Climate and proximity to the equator as well as acceptance of the concept made Australia a logical place for an international conference on the energy-efficiency opportunities of earth-sheltered buildings. Papers presented at the conference are grouped under 10 general topics: earth environment, landscape/site, passive solar integration, hazard protection, design process, livability/acceptance, interior environment, energy conservation, performance simulation, and structural variations. Sixty-two papers were separately abstracted for the Department of Energy's Data Base.

  9. Civil defense shelters: A state-of-the-art assessment, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1987-02-01

    The literature on the design, construction, testing, and cost of blast and fallout shelters was reviewed, and a bibliography of over 1000 documents was assembled. It was found that nuclear weapon effects and shelter design are well understood. An important barrier to construction of permanent shelters is cost. Single-purpose shelters cost in the high hundreds to low thousands of dollars per occupant (or per space), depending on size, hardness, location, and whether the shelter is part of new construction or retrofit. Multiplied by a risk area population of approximately 160 million, the cost of a blast shelter construction program would rival that of a major strategic weapon system. Options in the mid-range of expense, a few tens to a few hundreds of dollars per space include (1) requiring modified limestone mining practices, where appropriate, to generate usable shelter space near cities; (2) encouraging the construction of earth-sheltered housing and other buildings; and (3) requiring and/or subsidizing the construction of dual-use basement shelter in new construction. A program using this approach would require an annual expenditure of approximately 1% of the annual defense budget for 10 or more years. 950 refs., 68 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Narrative on history of demonstration unit concept of E3 Corporation earth sheltered homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-06

    Problems and other experience involved in the building of earth sheltered homes are detailed. A design summary and final cost sheet of the demonstration home are presented. (MHR)

  11. Solar greenhouse as an integral part of an earth-sheltered home: the first two years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malott, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of a solar greenhouse as an integral part of an earth-sheltered home is discussed. The problems of building such a home are described.

  12. Ferrocement: a technique for passive solar earth sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Impson, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    A system of construction is discussed which allows for the least cost with the most return yet noted in any of the current publications. This system utilizes commonly available and relatively inexpensive materials. The use of unskilled labor is possible, thereby expanding one's labor pool. This system also allows more design freedom than do any of the other construction techniques now widely practiced. This system of construction is ferrocement, a technique which has been in use intermittently since 1847. A method of insulating Earth Shelters is also discussed, as well as air flow characteristics of domes.

  13. Earth-sheltered construction: thoughts on public policy issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    A number of public-policy issues related to the use of the subsurface have come to light as interest in underground-space development has grown. Issues of national importance include energy, urban transportation, defense, and natural resources. Many underground proponents are convinced of the economic and environmental benefits that can result from a lower consumption of hydrocarbon fuels through earth-sheltered, energy-efficient buildings. Public-policy issues of local significance include public demand, building regulation aesthetics, and public utilities. Those interested in underground development must articulate policy issues and responses that demonstrate its value and foster public interest in using the subsurface. 10 references.

  14. Radon in energy-efficient earth-sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.

    1983-05-01

    Exposure o the radioactive-decay products of radon 222 that are present in indoor air constitutes the most-significant radiation dose received by the general population in most countries. Indoor concentrations vary from one building to another, ranging from insignificant to very high levels that cause radiation doses higher than those experienced by uranium miners. This wide range of concentrations is attributable to variability in the rate at which radon enters buildings, and differences in the ventilation rate. Earth-sheltered dwellings, because they are more completely surrounded by earth material than other structures, have an as yet unquantified potential for having radon entry rates that are higher than typical for other houses in the region. Moreover, measures that save energy by reducing ventilation rates (for example by reducing infiltration) can also raise indoor radon concentrations. For these reasons a significant effort is needed to determine the potential for ventilation-reducing measures and earth sheltering to increase radon concentrations, especially in regions where they are already high. Where necessary, proper attention to specific design features that affect radon entry rates or residence time indoors should be adequate to avoid undue risk to the public.

  15. Earth-sheltered building yields energy savings for University of Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The design and energy efficiency of the Civil/Mineral Engineering Building at the University of Minnesota is discussed. The building combines relatively common energy-efficient surface building practices with earth-sheltered techniques already proven on the University Campus and innovative deep-earth sheltering.

  16. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for an urban nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-05-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. This study examines shelter-evacuate policies and effectiveness focusing on a 10 kt scenario in Los Angeles. The goal is to provide technical insights that can support development of urban response plans. Results indicate that extended shelter-in-place can offer the most robust protection when high quality shelter exists. Where less effective shelter is available and the fallout radiation intensity level is high, informed evacuation at the appropriate time can substantially reduce the overall dose to personnel. However, uncertainties in the characteristics of the fallout region and in the exit route can make evacuation a risky strategy. Analyses indicate that only a relatively small fraction of the total urban population may experience significant dose reduction benefits from even a well-informed evacuation plan.

  17. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a Chicago nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2011-09-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kt detonation in Chicago. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at selected exemplary points. For many Chicago neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

  18. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a national capital region nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2011-12-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kT detonation in the National Capital Region. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at one exemplary point. For most Washington, DC neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

  19. Analysis of transient heat loss in earth-sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydlowski, R.F.

    1980-09-01

    The two-dimensional transient Fourier heat conduction equation has been solved in cartesian coordinates using an alternating direction implicit finite difference technique for several earth sheltered building configurations. The model has been computer coded and verified by comparing results with data taken from an instrumented conventional residence basement. The present model considers variable soil properties, different types of below grade configurations, and various types, thicknesses, and locations of insulation. The model has been used to analyze the thermal impact of varying levels of interior and exterior insulation on conventional basements, earth bermed walls, and earth covered structures. Local and integrated heat transfer through the exterior building envelope versus time of year are given as functions of construction materials, insulation, and soil geometry. Temperature distributions within the building envelope material and in the surrounding soil are presented versus time of year. An economic analysis is also given to indicate the cost effectiveness of the insulation levels analyzed.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Clinch, J.M.; Davis, F.H.; Hill, L.G.; Lynch, E.P.; Tanzman, E.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft/sup 2/ per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft/sup 2/ per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements.

  1. Earth-sheltered housing: an evaluation of energy-conservation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    The Innovative Structures Program (ISP) began an evaluation of the energy conservation potential of earth-sheltered houses in late 1979. Since that time, several projects have been undertaken as part of this evaluation. The findings of these projects, plus a discussion of the work of others in the field, form the body of this report. Although a comprehensive evaluation of earth-sheltered housing has not been completed, this report presents a compendium of knowledge on the subject. The conclusions are more qualitative than quantitative in nature because of the limited information on which to base projections. The major conclusions to date are as follows: Earth-sheltered houses are capable of very good energy performance. Earth-sheltered houses, as a passive means to conserve energy, perform significantly better in some climatic regins than in others. Earth-sheltered houses are not the optimum passive concept in several major housing growth regions of the country. Earth-sheltered houses, including their land and site improvements, will cost an estimated 10 to 35% more than comparable aboveground houses, and this additional cost may not be justified on a life cycle cost basis, given 1981 market conditions. The use of earth sheltering will probably grow in some parts of the country; however, broad-scale national or regional utilization is not likely to occur in the next 20 to 30 years.

  2. Construction details of an earth-sheltered passive solar thermosiphon air house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashelman, R.B.; Hagen, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    Construction details are presented for Sunrise, a passive solar, earth-sheltered house in eastern West Virginia. Particular attention is paid to the thermosiphon air system, as well as structural, waterproofing and insulation details.

  3. Earth-sheltered housing: the what and the why. Special report 100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCray, J.W.; Brubaker, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Four basic styles of earth-sheltered structures are illustrated and described. Benefits of earth-sheltered homes are cited, including energy savings potential, protection from natural elements and intruders, privacy, and owner pride. Construction-related considerations discussed include: layout, site, construction materials, moisture control systems, insulation, and building codes. Finally, the aspects of life-cycle costs and insurance costs and financing are discussed briefly. (LEW)

  4. Computer simulation of heat transfer from earth sheltered structures: A comparison of varying levels of earth sheltering in five different climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixel, G.D.

    1980-12-01

    Computer predictions of the HVAC energy consumption for single story office buildings with varying levels of earth-sheltering indicate that significant energy savings are possible with fully-bermed and bermed-and-covered configurations. As shown by the computer analysis, increased earth-sheltering reduced uncontrolled infiltration; improved the thermal performance of the walls, roof, and floor; and located the windows for more favorable passive solar gain. For example, 50% reductions in winter heating energy for Boston occurred with the fully-bermed and the bermed-and-covered configuration. Earth-sheltering also significantly reduced the predicted peak heating and cooling loads. The Boston heating season showed the most favorable response with the fully-covered office building having a peak heating load only 35% of that for the above-grade configuration. In Manila the predicted peak cooling load for the fully-covered building is 63% of that for the slab-on-grade configuration. Details of the impact of earth-sheltering on the single story office building model are presented for each of the five locations.

  5. Needs assessment for remote systems technology at the Chornobyl Unit 4 shelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carteret, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Holliday, M.A.; Jones, E.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    The accident at Chornobyl Unit 4 on April 26, 1986, resulted in a series of unprecedented scientific and technical challenges. The reactor building was damaged extensively. Following the accident, immediate action was needed to seal off the gaping crater created by the accident, which was a continuing source of airborne contamination. Under extreme conditions, a structure called the {open_quotes}Shelter{close_quotes} was built over the remains of the reactor building. The Shelter, which was quickly completed in November 1986, was meant to provide immediate but temporary containment. Now, 11 years later, there are significant concerns about its structural integrity and projected life expectancy. The United States and other participating G-7 countries are supporting nuclear safety upgrade efforts in Eastern Europe with a primary focus on placing the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Unit 4 Shelter in a stable and environmentally acceptable condition. Application of remote systems technologies will play an important part in achieving the goals of this program. The G-7 nations have agreed to support these efforts, including the identification and development of remote system technologies for fuel removal. However at this time they have taken a firm stance against funding actual fuel removal activities. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology requested that a needs assessment be performed to evaluate the requirements for applying remote systems, including robotics, at the Shelter. This document is intended to be used to identify remote systems needs and requirements at the Shelter and to provide general information on the conditions in the Shelter that could impact the use of remote systems. This document is intended as a source of information to assist those who will be implementing the Shelter Implementation Plan tasks. The document provides background information and general guidance on the application of remote systems.

  6. Improved structural systems for earth sheltered housing. Structural supplement to the design program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behr, R.

    1981-10-01

    Additional engineering information is provided with regard to the structural analysis and design of thin shell concrete structures. The design program has tentatively demonstrated the overall architectural and marketing feasibility of curved, thin shell structural systems for earth sheltered housing. This supplement will address the structural feasibility question by presenting a complete manual analysis and structural design of an earth sheltered dome/tension ring/wall structural system, and also by presenting the results of a parametric sensitivity study of the dome/ring/wall configuration with respect to variations in span and rise for a three foot soil loading condition. Double curvature dome configurations are emphasized in this structural supplement because their analysis is not extensively addressed in earth sheltered housing literature.

  7. Earth sheltering: the form of energy and the energy of form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenette, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Winners in a national competition illustrate the state of the art in earth-sheltered construction. The winners were chosen from student and professional entries in four categories: single-family residential, multi-family residential, non-residential, and research. The book presents architectural details, including construction plans, floor plans, landscaping ideas, and photographs of the 50 examples. The three research examples include a regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate, biotechnical earth-support systems, and evaluation of free-span earth-sheltered structure and its method of production. 199 figures. (DCK)

  8. E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy E-Shelters to Teach a Valuable Lesson on Energy March 12, 2010 - 5:01pm Addthis Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? A minimum of 90 Florida schools will receive a 10-kilowatt or larger solar system Teachers will incorporate the systems into their lesson plans, educating students about solar power and energy efficiency. Students will be able to log on to energywhiz.com to learn how

  9. The consumer's guide to earth sheltered housing: A step-by-step workbook for prospective owners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollwagen, M.

    1985-01-01

    Earth sheltered homes have captured the imagination of many homeowners seeking the cost and energy savings features they offer. This book provides the discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of such homes and includes illustrations showing interiors and exteriors with advise to owners on dealine with architects and contractors.

  10. The future potential of earth sheltered structures: cost, acceptability and planning considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, R.L.; Carmody, J.

    1980-12-01

    Earth sheltered structures have received an increasing amount of attention over the past few years. This has been primarily due to their typically low requirements for both heating and cooling energy. Their potential; however, not only lies in their energy performance but also in their ability to deal with a number of planning and design issues that must be faced in many locations. These issues include: noise protection, storm protection, saving a usable land area above the building and providing a minimum impact on the environment and ecology of a site. Against this promising potential must be weighed the factors which have made such structures undesirable from a designer's and user's point of view in the past. In addition, there are also a few new constraints which have arisen as the use of this building form has grown. This paper examines these issues and discusses the current acceptability and possible future potential of earth sheltered structures.

  11. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  12. Step-by-step cost-estimation guide for residential earth-shelter construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Designers and builders of earth-sheltered structures will find this guide to be a basic outline for estimating construction costs. It considers, besides the basic materials and costs of any construction project, the regional, experience, and other variables that affect underground construction costs. The guide format permits the user to tally individual estimates and derive a simple cost per square foot. Space is also provided to tally actual costs for comparison. (DCK)

  13. Earth sheltered bee wintering and solar honey house. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The construction and operation of an indoor wintering facility and a passive solar honey house are discussed. Goals for the project included both energy savings and financial savings for the beekeeping industry. The underground winter shelter provided a control temperature of approximately 46/sup 0/F in order to decrease both mortality rates and honey consumption rates of the bees. Three hundred square feet of glazing combined with wall insulation maintained comfortable work space temperatures for the ground level storage of honey. (BCS)

  14. Orme School Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Yankton School District Wind Project

  15. Consumer attitudes concerning construction features of an earth-sheltered dwelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKown, C. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock); Stewart, K.K.

    1980-01-01

    Consumer responses to construction features of earth-sheltered houses were collected from a volunteer sampling of visitors to an ''open house'' in South Carolina. Consumers reported they had not expected the exposed-front elevation, that skylights are needed in some of the darker areas, and that they were favorably impressed with the solar heating for space and water, the energy efficiency, and the low cost of construction and utilities. Savings of $3000 in initial costs and $300 in annual utility costs were specified as requirements for purchase by the majority. Responses were generally favorable, although only five percent had visted an earth-insulated or underground home before.

  16. Earth sheltered homes plans and designs: Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, D.; Ellison, T.; Sterling, R.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed construction information, plans, and energy data for 23 successful earth-sheltered homes throughout the US and Europe illustrate that such homes can be aesthetically pleasing as well as ecologically sound. Gross area, materials for construction, type of earth cover, method of insulation, and waterproofing techniques are all included in data sheets and charts that accompany a full description of each house. Comprehensive plans and over 250 photographs of both interior and exterior views demonstrate how attractive and comfortable the houses can be.

  17. Instrumented performance study of a passive solar heated earth sheltered residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarnell, R.C.; Yarnell, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a one year effort to gather performance data on an earth sheltered, passive solar house located in Carson City, Nevada. Automatic equipment logged insolation and temperature data for a one (1) year period commencing shortly after completion of construction of the structure and its occupancy by the owners. The use of a recording micrologger reflects an effort to obtain unbiased, factual data on the performance of the house and to reduce the impact of subjective perceptions of the occupants' comfort on the report. Raw data was gathered continuously. A pyranometer measured the amount of whole sky solar radiation. Results were recorded as Btu's per square foot. Thermistors measured temperatures of: (a) outdoor ambient air, (b) indoor living room ambient air, (c) indoor greenhouse ambient air, (d) dining room mass wall, (e) greenhouse mass wall, (f) perimeter earth-sheltered wall, and (g) solar heated DHW storage tank. An event counter recorded user operated insulating adjustments (raising and lowering of insulating of curtains) and auxiliary heating (building or stoking a fire in the wood burning stove).

  18. An analysis of different insulation strategies for earth-sheltered buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forowicz, T.Z. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Dept. of Architecture; [Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Fundamental Technological Research; [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Center for Energy Management

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of the energy performance of various insulation configurations for earth-sheltered buildings. It discusses the effectiveness of each insulation configuration in reducing the heating and cooling load. The long-term unsteady thermal processes between the building and the surrounding soil are considered. The mathematical model of the problem consists of a heat conduction equation with appropriate boundary and initial conditions. The variations in outside air temperature are driven by a harmonic function. The set of algebraic equations obtained by balancing the elementary heat flows into control elements is solved by an explicit scheme. The simulation program enables a two-dimensional thermal analysis in two cross sections for an underground building of any size situated at any depth. It predicts the heat flow between the building and the surrounding soil and through the ground`s surface. Internal building surface and soil temperatures are also calculated.

  19. Biogas from refuse via an earth-sheltered passive solar digester. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    As originally conceived, the project involved the design, construction and operation of a test-scale refuse digestion system and alternative energy technology, as an integral component of a planned comprehensive waste management system based on the concept of recycling and resource recovery. Specific technologies employed in the digestion system included aerobic composting and anaerobic fermentation. System inputs included non-recycleable organic refuse (paper, food wastes, etc.) and septage (septic tank sludge), both of which represent disposal problems for many North American communities, and heat. Anticipated system outputs were biogas (50 to 60% methane), a premium fuel, and compostable sludge, a potential soil amendment-fertilizer. Projected net energy output was enhanced by incorporating biological feedstock preheating, earth sheltering, passive solar heating, and sludge heat recovery into the project design. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the economic and environmental viability of this system versus competing waste-to-energy technologies. Due primarily to institutional barriers and related factors, the project did not progress to the point of enabling the stated purpose to be demonstrated.

  20. Passive energy design and habitability aspects of earth-sheltered housing in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.; Weber, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    Identified earth-sheltered houses in Oklahoma were examined through a detailed questionnaire during the first phase of a long-range funded project. Preliminary results of energy and habitability aspects are presented here. Saving energy is reported to be the primary incentive for building such structures. Habitability aspects have generally not received much study until recently. The results indicate that although a majority of the respondents feel their energy-savings expectations have been reached, over 40% feel that their energy consumption is much higher than they expected. Preliminary energy performance studies indicate that in a majority of the projects, the potential thermal mass of the structure has been decoupled by insulation and furred interior surface treatments. This situation can lead to a significant reduction in the amount of free earth cooling available during the summer months. Other factors, not yet studied, undoubtedly contribute additional adverse effects. The substantial energy savings that are realized have been achieved with little decrease, and often an increase, in comfort and habitability aspects. Most occupants are particularly satisfied with the safety of the structure and the arrangement of the rooms, which in most cases were custom designed by or for the occupants. However, daylighting and privacy of family members, for example, were not as highly rated. A number of other parameters are identified from the survey that present implications for design enhancement in this contemporary type of residential structure. 14 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  1. Financing earth-sheltered housing: a report on a project to facilitate the loan process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The problem of financing innovative energy-conserving dwellings is exacerbated by two key factors. The first is that borrowers (potential homebuilders) do not understand the mortgage process and needs of the lenders and are therefore unable to communicate effectively the various issues of interest to lenders. The second is that lenders do not have a familiarity with the concept and are therefore unable to evaluate the potential marketability should the borrower default. This situation is compounded by the fact that there are, in general, few or no earth-sheltered comparables on which to verify the market value. This borrower's guide is presented to explore the situation and with the help of financial agencies, to develop means to mitigate the problems. Information is presented on options available for short- and long-term financing; lenders' obligations and concerns; criteria lenders' use in deciding eligibility for a loan; shopping for a lending institution; and making the presentation to a lending institution for an earth-covered building. (MCW)

  2. Data from one-, two-, and three-dimensional temperature fields in the soil surrounding an earth-sheltered house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bligh, T.P.; Knoth, T.P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents data from one-, two-, and three-dimensional temperature fields in the soil surrounding an earth-sheltered house. The construction and installation of the temperature sensors is discussed, and the sources of error are evaluated. The precision of the measured temperatures is shown to be + or - 0.12/sup 0/C. Twenty-four hours of data from the one-dimensional temperature field in the roof soil are presented in the form of tautochrones. Data from cross-sections of the two- and three-dimensional temperature fields are presented as isotherms taken at approximately one-month intervals during winter and spring. The data show that extended roof insulation impedes heat flow to the ground surface in winter but allows heat to flow to the cool soil depths in summer.

  3. Barriers and incentives to the adoption of innovative, energy-efficient housing: Passive and active solar and earth-sheltered

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine intermediaries perceptions of barriers and incentives to innovative, energy-efficient housing in Iowa. Data were collected by two surveys. The questionnaire for the first survey collected data from 102 communities. The second questionnaire surveyed housing intermediaries drawn from the 102 communities included in the first survey. The sample consisted of 481 builders, building inspectors, realtors, lenders, and solar suppliers. Intermediary groups differed in their perceptions of barriers and incentives to innovative, energy-efficient housing. Significant differences were found among the intermediaries for whether state-mandated solar standards would reduce the risk of inspection of solar-energy houses and whether risky resale potential acts as a barrier to building solar energy housing. The major barriers were the first costs associated with building active solar and earth-sheltered housing and the lack of skills among subcontractors to build these types. There was not significant relationship between rate of adoption among communities and their location in the state. There was, however, a significant relationship between category of building official and rate of adoption among communities.

  4. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and energy demand even as housing density increases. Learn More STILE The aroma of Italian cooking will waft from STILE, the West Virginia University and University of Roma Tor...

  5. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Random | Alphabetical | Rating (High to Low) | Rating (Low to High) STILE The aroma of Italian cooking will waft from STILE, the West Virginia University and University of Roma Tor...

  6. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by embracing the city's sense of expansive greenery. Learn More STILE The aroma of Italian cooking will waft from STILE, the West Virginia University and University of Roma Tor...

  7. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    acronym for Diverse, Urban, Resilient, and Adaptable. Learn More STILE The aroma of Italian cooking will waft from STILE, the West Virginia University and University of Roma Tor...

  8. SHELTER3 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    blend in its Efficient, Affordable, Solar, Innovation--or EASI--House. Learn More AGGIE SOL The University of California, Davis, has strong pedigrees in both sustainable projects...

  9. Earth shelter performance and evaluation proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Papers from 16 states, plus New South Wales, Australia, Alberta, Canada, and the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were presented in the conference. About one-third of the papers are authored by architects, nearly one-half by engineers, and the remainder are mainly by building contractors. Slightly over half of the authors are associated with universities, of which 13 are represented. The scale of the projects discussed varies from domestic, to commercial, to institutional; with an increased emphasis on passive solar inputs and earth cooling. Of the 32 papers presented, 19 were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (JMT)

  10. Proceedings: earth sheltered building design innovations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts are prepared for 22 papers presented at the conference. One paper has previously appeared in the appropriate DOE Energy Data Base. (MCW)

  11. Sheltering in Place | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    everyone inside (including pets). Close all doors and windows. Turn off and close all ventilation systems, including: Air conditioning Attic & exhaust fans Furnaces Fireplace...

  12. Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (LLNL), Livermore, CA Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER...

  13. Earth-sheltered industrial utility park. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The potential to develop the Cumberland (Wisconsin) industrial park site using earth-integrated techniques is discussed. The concept feasibility study concerned the site, the land-use plan, and building types. An assessment of energy use in the Cumberland community for 1979 and 1980 was made by compiling sales data from the various suppliers of gasoline, diesel, electricity, natural gas, and other fuels. A resource and technology assessment of biomass feedstocks for a possible community scale bioenergy facility was made. Details of each element of the study are presented and conclusions are summarized. (MCW)

  14. Earth-sheltered compromise home saves on heating, cooling costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankhauser, T.

    1985-02-01

    Building a home into the side of a hill to take advantage of the earth's temperature-neutralizing qualities and facing it to the south will reduce heating and cooling costs. A home in North Dakota based on these principles has never had two unheated rooms freeze and needs no air conditioning. Mutli-zoned thermostats are located in the south-facing rooms. Other features are a five-foot overhang, lower ceilings, aluminum foil deflectors beneath carpets and above the plasterboard in the ceiling, and extra insulation. By eliminating an earth covering that would require sturdier support, construction costs were competitive with regular frame construction.

  15. Earth sheltered industrial/utility park. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    A proposed industrial park in Cumberland, Wisconsin is discussed. Planners identified 4 land use elements for the site. A concept feasibility study for the earth-covered industrial park, an analysis of energy flows within the Cumberland community, and a resource and technology assessment of biomass feedstocks for a possible community scale bioenergy facility are discussed. (MCW)

  16. Thermal performance of an earth-sheltered passive solar residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaVigne, A.B. (Puget Sound Power and Light Co., Bellevue, WA); Schuldt, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of the measured thermal performance of a direct gain, passive solar residence in the Pacific Northwest. The east, west, and north exterior walls of the house are bermed to within 12 inches (30 cm) of the ceiling; sliding interior insulated panels cover the double glazed, south facing windows when appropriate. The cost of the house construction was kept modest.

  17. MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  18. Earth shelter 2. 1979-1980 USC Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts are prepared for 22 papers presented at the conference and exhibition. One paper had previously appeared in the appropriate DOE Energy Data Base. (MCW)

  19. Employee Giving Campaign proceeds will help support animal shelters...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employee Giving Campaign Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 all issues All Issues ...

  20. Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Arizona and the House of Refuge Sunnyslope are partnering to install solar hot water systems at five Phoenix-area housing sites for homeless men.

  1. Marion County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marion County, Tennessee Jasper, Tennessee Kimball, Tennessee Monteagle, Tennessee New Hope, Tennessee Orme, Tennessee Powells Crossroads, Tennessee South Pittsburg, Tennessee...

  2. Potential of earth-sheltered and underground space: today's resource for tomorrow's space and energy viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holthusen, T.L. (ed.)

    1981-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for forty-one papers presented at the meeting. One paper had previously appeared in the appropriate data bases. Thirty-seven abstracts will appear in the Energy Analysis for Policy Abstracts. (MCW)

  3. Detailed thermal performance measurements and cost effectiveness of earth-sheltered construction: a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1985-09-01

    Earth-covering, solar gain, and massive construction are the design concepts successfully blended to produce an energy-efficient, durable, and comfortable building. Twenty-four-hour-quiet sleeping quarters and quality office space were the first design objectives of this building, these were successfully accomplished. The data acquisition system and a unique energy-balance analysis documents the thermal performance of each envelope component. Since the building's typical number of occupants, size, and internal electric loads are similar to those of a large residential building, the energy-performance data are extended to the residential marketplace. First-cost estimates for the whole building, earth-covered roof, and bermed wall are used with the detailed measured energy-use data to estimate cost effectiveness using residential economics criteria, such as 3% discount rate and 30-year life. The results from this analysis confirm the fact that earth, sun, and mass can save substantial amounts of annual and peak energy demand. However, further construction cost reductions are needed to produce more favorable cost effectiveness in the residential market arena. The overall thermal conductance value of this building is lower than the average values from the 300 low-energy residences as reported in the Building Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis, Part A (BECA-A), data base. However, the balance point of this building, with mechanical ventilation to ensure about 0.5 air change per hour, is substantially higher than those reported for low-energy residential buildings. This suggests that most of the energy-efficient homes either have an air-to-air heat exchanger or infiltration levels far below the generally accepted 0.5 air change per hour to ensure healthy indoor air quality. Reflective insulating blinds were installed in this building and have enhanced the daylighting and usability of the building. 9 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Passive solar/earth sheltered office/dormitory cooling season thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.

    1984-01-01

    Continuous detailed hourly thermal performance measurements have been taken since February 1982 in and around an occupied, underground, 4000 ft/sup 2/ office/dormitory building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This building has a number of energy saving features which have been analyzed relative to their performance in a southeastern US climate and with respect to overall commercial building performance. This analysis documents cooling season performance, as well as effects of earth contact, interior thermal mass, an economizer cycle and interface of an efficient building envelope with a central three-ton heat pump. The Joint Institute Dormitory obtains a cooling energy savings of about 30% compared with an energy-efficient, above-grade structure and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The proper installation of the overhand, interior thermal mass, massive supply duct system, and earth contact team up to prevent summertime overheating. From May through September, this building cost a total of $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate 24 hours per day. Besides thermal performance of the building envelope, extensive comfort data was taken illustrating that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time according to the PMV measurements.

  5. Cooling season performance of an earth-sheltered office/dormitory building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Detailed hourly measurements taken in and around an underground office-dormitory building for two summers document energy savings; whole building-component interface problems; and specific cooling contributions from earth contact, interior thermal mass, and an economizer. The Joint Institute Dormitory (JID) saves about 30% compared with well-built above-grade buildings in a climate typical of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The detailed measurements, which include extensive thermal comfort data, indicate that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time. The thermal performance measurements and analysis determine that the peak cooling requirement of this building is 50% less than that of well-built above-grade structures, permitting a cost savings on installed cooling capacity. The dominant building components contributing to the good thermal performance are the structural thermal mass, the earth-covered roof, and the earth contact provided by the bermed walls and slab floor. The 372-m/sup 2/ (4000 gross ft/sup 2/) building used about $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate from May through September. Eliminating a number of building design and construction anomalies could improve the whole-building performance and reduce the seasonal cooling cost another $85. Close examination of the thermal performance of this building revealed that a very efficient heat pump and thermally sound envelope do not necessarily produce otpimum performance without careful attention given to component interface details. 8 references, 24 figures, 12 tables.

  6. Underground and earth sheltered food storage: historical, geographic, and economic considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunkel, F.V.

    1985-01-01

    Storage structures now used for bulk grain and beans have been derived from a combination of scientific experiments and tradition. Recent generations of US farmers have grown up with the understanding that grain is best stored in round metal bins or wooden cribs aboveground. It is generally thought that natural wind movements in the crib structures and forced air flow from aeration fans in metal bins will keep grain and beans safe, i.e., free of moisture accumulation and the resulting insect and fungal growth, and protected from germination, all of which deteriorate the commodity. North American farmers further believe that the low temperature of northern winters combined with careful use of aerating fans will keep the grain dry or beans safe (less than 14% moisture content) for years of storage. Traditional forms of grain and bean storage in other parts of the world have evolved differently. With the exception of North America, the people of every continent in the world have developed underground structures for long-term storage of food. A review of the varieties of underground structures that have evolved throughout the world, and research related to underground storage of grain and beans is presented.

  7. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesGorlov Helical Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  8. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  9. Promoting and Advancing the Development of Healthy, Durable, and Sustainable Shelter for Alaskans and other Circumpolar People

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    www.cchrc.org CCHRC Cold Climate Housing Research Center CCHRC Research and Testing Facility LEED Platinum Runner-up Smartest Building in America www.cchrc.org CCHRC Cold Climate Housing Research Center Research Programs Building Envelopes & Materials Energy & Mechanical Systems Policy & Program Development www.cchrc.org CCHRC Cold Climate Housing Research Center Building Envelopes and Materials Leader in "Green Building Standards" Advancing Building Science CCHRC Cold

  10. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2008 Meetings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2008, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Location: Sheraton National Hotel, 900 South Orme Street, Arlington, Virginia 22204 Description: The Department of...

  11. MAY 20, 2008 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stuntz DATE Tuesday, May 20, 2008, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. LOCATION Sheraton National Hotel 900 South Orme Street Arlington, Virginia 22204 OVERVIEW The Department of Energy's...

  12. Record $3.1 million pledged during Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 17, 2012 LANL employee P.J. Timmerman outside the Espaola Valley Animal Shelter. LANL employee P.J. Timmerman outside the Espaola Valley Animal Shelter....

  13. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-09-002 SECTION A. Project Title: Smoking Shelters SECTION B. Project Description. Install up to three prefabricated outdoor shelters for smokers. Design and install a shelter base so that shelters can be movable. The base shall be designed to prevent shelters from moving or tipping over due to high winds. Specific location for shelters is to be determined, but the shelter bases will be placed atop existing concrete or asphalt such that no subsurface soil disturbance

  14. F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o f m omentum i s c omputed w ith t he second o rder fi nite differences i n t he fl ux f orm w ith k ine0c e nergy c onserva0on; * The e qua0on o f m o0ons a re i ntegrated u...

  15. NETL Emergency Preparedness and Contact Information by Location

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a shelter-in-place or evacuation instructions. Shelter-in-place means that you should stay in your home, shut all the windows and doors, and shut off any fans that bring air in...

  16. NIOSH tests refuge chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-04-15

    A NIOSH report questions the viability of the shelters already certified by West Virginia. 1 tab., 6 photos.

  17. Optional Partnering Form for Potential Applicants to DE-FOA-0001412, Area of Interest 3, Topics 1 and 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optional P artnering F orm f or P otential A pplicants t o DE---FOA---0001412, A rea o f I nterest 3 , T opics 1 a nd 2 This o ptional f orm i s i ntended t o p air u p p otential a pplicants f or A rea o f I nterest ( AOI) 3 : C onsortium Topics a s p art o f F unding O pportunity A nnouncement ( FOA) N umber D E---FOA---0001412. P otential partners a re i nvited t o s elf---identify t heir i nterest i n t eaming o n c onsortium t opics. T he i nformation provided i s s trictly v oluntary a nd

  18. 2014 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROJECT MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROJECT MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP 2014 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROJECT MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP What: 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop (Meeting the Challenge-Integrated Acquisition & Project Management) When: Tuesday and Wednesday, March 25 & 26 2014 Where: Sheraton Pentagon City Hotel, 900 South Orme Street, Arlington, VA 22204 *Lunch is not included in this year's program. Click here for local food options. Sheraton Restaurant Menu Click here Who: DOE FPDs/Staff,

  19. 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services » Project Management » 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop Workshop Details: What: 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop When: March 22-23, 2016. In addition, a select few will remain a third day for the Project Controls Workshop (March 24) to discuss ongoing initiatives to improve integration of project controls and earned value with project management. Where: Sheraton Pentagon City Hotel, 900 South Orme

  20. 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 DOE Project Management Workshop 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop What: 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop (Meeting the Challenge-Integrated Acquisition & Project Management) When: Tuesday and Wednesday, March 25 & 26 2014 Where: Sheraton Pentagon City Hotel, 900 South Orme Street, Arlington, VA 22204 *Lunch is not included in this year's program. Click here for local food options. Sheraton Restaurant Menu Click here Who: DOE FPDs/Staff, Program/Staff Office Reps, Contracting

  1. 2015 DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Workshop | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Workshop 2015 DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Workshop Workshop Details: What: 2015 DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Workshop When: March 24, 25, 26 2015 (Tue, Wed, Thu) Where: Sheraton Pentagon City Hotel, 900 South Orme Street, Arlington, VA 22204 (Lunch will not be included in this year's program) Who: DOE FPDs/Staff, Program/Staff Office Reps, and Contracting Officers supporting APM. (This year's combined

  2. Domed community and several alternatives for Winooski, Vermont: the environmental, organizational, and energy conservation issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The environmental, organizational, and energy conservation issues related to a domed structure enveloping Winooski, Vermont, are discussed. Alternative means of accomplishing energy conservation will be addressed. These include retrofitting of existing structures, replacement with state-of-the-art structures, the use of planting shelter-belts, redevelopment to an earth-sheltered community, and redevelopment to a composite domed neighborhood and earth-sheltered community. The assets and liabilities of each alternative are addressed.

  3. 2015 United Way Campaign Appeal & Kick off Picnic Announcement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the elderly, hospice care, job training for the less fortunate and even food and shelter are just some of the benefits that result from your donations. JLab's...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    heaters, a timered fresh air intake, high-efficiency HVAC, 100% LED lighting, a remote energy management system, and a storm shelter in the garage floor. PDF icon...

  5. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NIMFR (normal incidence multifilter radiometer). The solar tracker was connected to a laptop computer in the ARM instrument shelter and changes in heading were entered Tenth ARM...

  6. Thermal benefits and cost effectiveness of earth berming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speltz, J.; Haves, P.

    1980-01-01

    A number of advantages are claimed for earth sheltered buildings; the earth provides both insulation and thermal storage and also serves to reduce infiltration and noise. This paper seeks to quantify the thermal advantages of both earth sheltering and perimeter insulation by comparing the simulated thermal performance of an earth sheltered house, a house with perimeter insulation and a house with neither. The fuel savings are then compared to the estimated construction costs to determine cost-effectiveness. The major saving from an earth sheltered building is obtained in colder climates where the effective elevation of the frost line due to the earth berms considerably reduces the cost of the foundation.

  7. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (AMF), an array of instruments in a pair of movable shelters. The portable AMF will complement the more permanent ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites at the Southern...

  8. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: The San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona proposes to 1) conduct energy efficient building retrofits to the Shelter Care...

  9. Distributed Generation Study/Hudson Valley Community College...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    G3516, Caterpillar DM5498, Caterpillar DM7915 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer Siemens Building Technologies System Enclosure Dedicated Shelter...

  10. Eddy Correlation Systems Receive Upgrade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ANLERNL-02-05 Figure 1. ARM field technician Mike Rainwater (left) and ECOR instrument mentor Dr. Mikhail S. Pekour install new computer equipment in the ECOR shelter....

  11. CX-000280: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Smoking SheltersCX(s) Applied: B1.5Date: 11/09/2009Location(s): IdahoOffice(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2008 Facility News Mobile Facility Anchors Multi-site Aerosol Study in China Bookmark and Share The AMF installation in Shouxian includes the primary shelters and operations...

  13. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Glastonbury Housesmith...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... disaster-resistance features: a storm shelter constructed to FEMA standards has been constructed in the basement and all windows use tempered glass for forest- fire resistance. ...

  14. Property:Distributed Generation System Enclosure | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Outdoor + Distributed Generation StudyPatterson Farms CHP System Using Renewable Biogas + Dedicated Shelter + Distributed Generation StudySUNY Buffalo + Outdoor +...

  15. New England Energy Management Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: New England Energy Management Inc Address: 5 Shelter Rock Road Place: Danbury, Connecticut Zip: 06810 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  16. Underground Manufacturing Facility, Sterling, Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, R.M.

    1981-09-25

    The author set out to build an earth-sheltered light manufacturing plant (to produce expanded polystyrene insulation) and also an earth-sheltered passive solar residence. Results are presented of waterproofing, thermal monitoring, and life cycle study on the plant. It is concluded that the added cost of providing a support for carrying the earth deadload far outweighs the energy savings. (DLC)

  17. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office 2016 Better Buildings Summit Registration Now Open 2016 Better Buildings Summit Registration Now Open Read more Florida Installs Battery Backup Solar Power at Schools Designated as Emergency Shelters Florida Installs Battery Backup Solar Power at Schools Designated as Emergency Shelters Read more Weatherization Assistance Program National Evaluation Results Weatherization Assistance Program National Evaluation Results Read more Eleven States

  18. Cost and energy comparison study of above- and below-ground dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, H.B.; Cristy, G.A.; Brite, S.E.; Yost, M.B.

    1983-08-01

    Designs of earth-sheltered (ES) homes were examined and compared with identical aboveground (AG) homes. The homes are identical except where changes were necessitated by earth-sheltering and energy conservation. The study involved design, construction costing, energy analysis, and life-cycle costing (LCC). It was concluded from this study that under present market conditions, if aboveground and earth-sheltered dwellings of equal size and quality are built on similar lots, the construction cost of the earth-sheltered structure compares poorly with that of the aboveground structure. Lowered operation and maintenance costs, including the lower fuel bills of the earth-sheltered structure, are outweighed by the current high interest rates, which cause an increase in monthly payments. 24 references.

  19. Richard Gerber! NERSC User Services Next Steps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Steps --- 1 --- September 10, 2013 Explore the NERSC Web Site * "For U sers" S ec5on - Documenta-on - Announcements - Training - My N ERSC - Job L ogs a nd A naly-cs - Help * Live Status - MOTD, O utages, J ob Q ueues * Events --- 2 --- Help Desk * Online - hGps://help.nersc.gov/ - Submit, u pdate, a nd r eview t rouble - ckets - Submit q uota i ncrease f orms * Email - consult@nersc.gov - accounts@nersc.gov * Phone - 1---800---666---3772 ( 1---800---66---NERSC) - Consultants 8

  20. OO84O4c6sP HNF-SD-WM-II-740, Rev. OB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OO84O4c6sP HNF-SD-WM-II-740, Rev. OB Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes M. J. Kupfer, A. L. Boldt, K. M. Hodgson, 1. W. Shelton, B. C. Simpson, and R. A. Watrous (LMHC); M. D. LeClair (SAIC); G. L. Borsheini (BA); R. T. Winward (MA); B. A. Higley and R. M. Orme (NHC); N.. G. Colton (PNNL); S. L. Lambert and D. E. Place (SESC); and W. W. Schulz (W S) Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract

  1. HNF-SD-WM-TI-740, Rev. OC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84047 HNF-SD-WM-TI-740, Rev. OC Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes M. J. Kupfer, A. L. Boldt, K. N. Hodgson, L. W. Shelton, B. C. Simpson, and R. A. Watrous (LMHC); M. D. LeClair (SAIC); G. 1. Borsheim (BA); R. T. Winward (MA); B. A. Higley and R. M. Orme (NHC); N. G. Colton (PNNL); S. L. Lambert and D. E. Place (Cogema); and W. W. Schulz (112S) Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract

  2. MAY 20, 2008 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy MAY 20, 2008 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MAY 20, 2008 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE From Left to Right: The Honorable Mark Whitenton; The Honorable Kevin Kolevar, Chair; Linda Stuntz From Left to Right: The Honorable Mark Whitenton; The Honorable Kevin Kolevar, Chair; Linda Stuntz DATE Tuesday, May 20, 2008, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. LOCATION Sheraton National Hotel 900 South Orme Street Arlington, Virginia 22204 OVERVIEW The Department of Energy's

  3. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2008 Meetings | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 08 Meetings Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2008 Meetings MAY 20, 2008 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2008, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Location: Sheraton National Hotel, 900 South Orme Street, Arlington, Virginia 22204 Description: The Department of Energy's Electricity Advisory Committee held its first meeting Tuesday, May 20, 2008. Members of the public were invited on a first-come, first served basis (depending on the availability of meeting

  4. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Refi ner residual fuel oil prices and volumes Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refi ners'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." Source: U. U U S. S S S E E E Ene ne nerg rg rgy y y In n n nfo fo o orm rm rm mat at atio io io i n n n Ad Ad Ad d dministration, Form EIA-782A, "Refi ners'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly 28

  5. EPS2014_Koniges_V3.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mul$%Physics,Plasma,Modeling,for,a,Range,of,Applica$ons,on,HPC,Pla;orms! Alice&Koniges 1 ,&David&Eder 2 ,&Aaron&Fisher 2 ,&Wangyi&Lui 1 ,&Nathan&Masters 2 ,&John&Barnard 2 & 1 Lawrence&Berkeley&NaBonal&Laboratory,&Berkeley,&CA,&USA&&&&& 2 Lawrence&Livermore&NaBonal&Laboratory,&Livermore,&CA,&USA & 41 st

  6. Cost and code study of underground buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Various regulatory and financial implications for earth-sheltered houses and buildings are discussed. Earth-sheltered houses are covered in the most detail including discussions of building-code restrictions, HUD Minimum Property Standards, legal aspects, zoning restrictions, taxation, insurance, and home financing. Examples of the initial-cost elements in earth-sheltered houses together with projected life-cycle costs are given and compared to more-conventional energy-conserving houses. For larger-scale underground buildings, further information is given on building code, fire protection, and insurance provisions. Initial-cost information for five large underground buildings is presented together with energy-use information where available.

  7. Linkage mapping of the aldo-2, Pax-5, Ambp, and D4H9S3E loci on mouse chromosome 4 in the region of homology with human chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilz, A.; Abbott, C. ); Fountain, J. ); Peters, J. )

    1993-12-01

    The genes for aldolase-B (ALDOB), the [alpha]-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (AMBP), the paired box gene PAX5, and the anonymous DNA marker D9S3 map to human chromosome 9 (HSA9). The authors have set out to map the mouse homologues of each of these genes. The mouse genes for Pax-5 and Ambp previously been shown to map to MMU4. They have used an interspecific backcross to confirm these localizations and to map the mouse homologues of ALDOB (Aldo-2) and D9S3 (D4H9S3E) to the same chromosome. These genes were mapped with respect to the four anchor loci for MMU4. In addition, the panel of backcross DNAs had previously been typed for [delta]-amino levulinate dehydratase (Lv), orosomucoid-1 (Orm-1), and hexabranchion (Hxb), the human homologues of which map to HSA9q. The recombination distances [+-] the standard error between each pair of loci are D4Nds4-1.6[+-]1.1-D4H9S3E-4.0[+-]1.7 (Galt) 0.8[+-]0.8-Pax-5-4.8[+-]1.9-Aldo-2-6.3[+-]2.2-(Lv, Orm-1, Ambp)-1.6[+-]1.1-Hxb-4.0[+-]1.7-Tyrp-1-4.8[+-]1.9-Ifa. The data from this study have extended the known region of conserved synteny between human chromosome 9 and mouse chromosome 4. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  8. CX-012322: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Storm Shelter Installation and Related Activities at the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B3.1 Date: 06/11/2014 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Legacy Management

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: 100 Resilient Cities: Sandia Challenge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small details can make a big difference; for example, in one actual city emergency, pallets of food would not fit through shelter doors, so the pallets had to be broken down in...

  10. Energy-Efficient Home Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    climatic and site conditions to provide heating in the winter and cooling in the summer. Earth-Sheltered, Straw Bale, Log, and Manufactured Homes If you live in or are planning to...

  11. Monitoring of thermal mass performance, Wathen residence, Aledo, Texas. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, W.S.

    1982-07-06

    The design, construction, and monitoring of an earth sheltered, passive-solar heated home with rock bed heat storage are described. Problems with the data recording equipment are detailed. (MHR)

  12. SGPNews_March2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    installed in its new home in the shelter on the right when it replaces the MMCR. antenna and transmitter-as the previous model. Although the user community must...

  13. Lodging Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    were then asked to place the building into the following more specific categories: a hotel a motel, inn, or resort a retirement home a shelter, orphanage, or children's home a...

  14. TOC_Section_J.13_Conformed_thru_Mod 138.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... WRPS 241SY275 Gas Monitoring Shelter (GMS-2) 200W WRPS 241SY276 DACS Uninterruptible Power Supply Skid 200W WRPS 241T361 Waste Settling Tank Underground 200W CHPRC 241T701 ...

  15. Mission Support Contract Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Section...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... WRPS 241SY275 Gas Monitoring Shelter (GMS-2) 200W WRPS 241SY276 DACS Uninterruptible Power Supply Skid 200W WRPS 241SYA Valve Pit with Flush Pit 200W WRPS 241SYB Valve Pit with ...

  16. Facility-J 13 Update Worksheet (16June14) Conformed (2).xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... WRPS 241SY275 Gas Monitoring Shelter (GMS-2) 200W WRPS 241SY276 DACS Uninterruptible Power Supply Skid 200W WRPS 241SYA Valve Pit with Flush Pit 200W WRPS 241SYB Valve Pit with ...

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 29, 2008 Facility News Radar Focus Group Zeroes in on Data Quality Bookmark and Share On the roof of the radar instrument shelter at the ARM Southern Great Plains site,...

  18. Support homeless youth through an upcoming fundraiser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    youth through an upcoming fundraiser Youth Shelters seeks to help the more than 100 children who are homeless every day in the city and beyond. August 1, 2012 dummy image Read...

  19. Disasters: Photovoltaics for Special Needs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper emphasizes on the needs to protect special needs people because of their health conditions and evaluates the approaches to prevent injury. Disaster resistant homes with a renewable energy source would reduce shelter efforts, emotional stress and recovery costs.

  20. Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds September 23, 2010 - 1:01pm Addthis Solar panels have been installed at a shelter ...

  1. Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sets the stage for the Corps of Engineers to restore hundreds of acres of historic wetlands in the next few years to provide food and shelter for salmon migrating to and from...

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is in place at its first field research site in scenic Point Reyes, California. The AMF, an array of instruments in a pair of movable shelters, will...

  3. DOE Emergency Exercise Feedback Form

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EMERGENCY EXERCISE EVALUATION Exercise Date/Time: .............................. Evaluator Name: .......................................... Room Number: ............................................ Phone Number: ........................................... Organization: ............................................... Emergency Assignment, e.g., Floor Warden, Room Monitor: ............................................ Type Exercise (check one): o Evacuation to Assembly Areas o Take shelter (in

  4. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-021.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asphalt parking lot; upgrade the electrical power supply to the new pre-fab shelter; and ... may be instances (power outages) where there is a need to be powered by a generator. ...

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Pump Shelter Kicks Off Upgrades to Aerosol Observing System Bookmark and Share Representing the first of several planned improvements to the Aerosol Observing System (AOS) at the SGP site, the ARM Climate Research Facility operations staff completed installing a new pump shelter for the system in late September, followed by relocation of the pumps and connection of the electrical hookups in October. Though the enclosure was designed primarily to move the nine vacuum pumps out of the existing

  6. Proposed Action Title: U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storm Shelter Construction Project Program or Field Office: Southwestern Power Administration Location(s) (City/County/State): Gore/Muskogee/Oklahoma; Jonesboro/Craighead/ Arkansas SWPAF 450.4 (Rev. 05/14) Proposed Action Description: Southwestern Power Administration proposes to construct aboveground storm shelters at at the Gore and Jonesboro Maintenance Facilities. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 10 CFR 1021, Appendix 8 to Subpart D, Part 82.3. Installation of, or improvements to, equipment

  7. Evacuation | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Evacuation Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Evacuation Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Evacuations are ordered if a hazardous release could affect people in a specific area. If you are directed by local news or our website to evacuate your home or workplace please follow these guidelines: Write down the evacuation route and designated shelter provided by an EAS station. Instructions will

  8. EECBG Success Story: Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds EECBG Success Story: Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds September 23, 2010 - 1:01pm Addthis Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. | Photo courtesy of Ulster County Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. | Photo courtesy of Ulster County Ulster County Fairgrounds in New York is using funding from the Energy

  9. Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Design Earth-sheltered homes, like the one pictured, are a unique option for efficiently designed homes. No matter the type of home you choose, energy efficient design strategies will save you money and energy. | Photo courtesy of Pamm McFadden/NREL. Earth-sheltered homes, like the one pictured, are a unique option for efficiently designed homes. No matter the type of home you choose, energy efficient design strategies will save you money and energy. | Photo courtesy of Pamm

  10. HPCToolsExperiences.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiences w ith T ools a t N ERSC Richard G erber NERSC User Services Programming w eather, c limate, a nd e arth---system m odels on h eterogeneous m ul>---core p la?orms September 7 , 2 011 a t t he N a>onal C enter f or A tmospheric R esearch i n B oulder, C olorado 2 * Thanks f or t he i nvita>on * My p rofessional g oal i s t o e nable s cien>sts t o u se H PC easily a nd e ffec>vely * Contribute t o i mportant d iscoveries a bout h ow o ur natural w orld w orks * Make a d

  11. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Refi ner wholesale petroleum product prices Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refi ners'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." So o our ur ur urce c c c : U. U S. S E Ene nerg rg g g gy y In Info fo o o orm rmat at t t tio ion n Ad Ad A A A mi mini ni n n st stra rati ti t t t on on, Fo Fo F F rm rm E EIA IA-7 -7 7 7 782 82A, A, , , , "Re Refi fi fi fine ners rs'/ / / / /Ga Gas s Pl Plan ant t t t Op Oper er e e at ator

  12. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  13. A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a bility t o p rint c onduc&ve m icroelectrodes i n planar a nd t hree---dimensional f orms o pens u p a n ew avenue in photovoltaics and electronics. Significance and Impact Visualiza&on o f t his p rin&ng t echnique i s c ri&cal a s the i nk o p&miza&on a nd p rin&ng e xper&se a ffect the quality of printed structures and devices. Research D etails - Visualized i nk s ynthesis a nd r heology c ontrol. - Visualized p rin5ng o f p lanar, s panning, a nd 3 D

  14. Microsoft Word - GreenScienceforPARC.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposal: G reen S cience, E vents & O ffices i n P ARC Purpose: E nergy C onsumption R eduction Rationale: A s a n E FRC w e a re o n t he c utting o f e dge o f r enewable e nergy r esearch. W e a re l eaders i n t he field. W ith t his p osition, w e c an b e b etter e xamples o f e nergy c onsumers i n o ur o wn p ractices. W e a ll recognize t hat t he s olutions t o g lobal e nergy n eeds c ome i n m any f orms; o ne o f w hich i s r educing o ur own e nergy c onsumption. Being s aid,

  15. Operational results of National Solar Demonstration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waite, E.V.

    1981-01-01

    Included in the National Solar Demonstration Program are examples of earth-sheltered, passive solar designs. The data obtained from these sites presents an interesting look at what is both technically and economically feasible. Data from four demonstration sites that are members of the National Solar Data Network are utilized to present an economic and technical analyses of a group of four sites. Three of these sites are earth sheltered residential structures, the fourth is a commercial passive structure. This sample of four demonstration sites is not intended to provide a statistical representation of passive earth sheltered structures, but rather, an example of the type of information available through the National Solar Data Program and how this information may be utilized.

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W-Band Cloud Radar Added to ARM Mobile Facility in Africa Bookmark and Share Most of the WACR is mounted on top of one of the AMF shelters. The WACR computer and chiller (used to keep the WACR cool in temperatures up to 47 degrees C) are located in the shelter below the radar. A W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) recently joined the suite of baseline capabilities offered by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF). The term "W-band" refers to the specific radio frequency range of this radar, which is

  17. Heavy loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The extreme pressures on the roof and walls of an earth-sheltered residential home are discussed and the need for careful planning is stressed. Pertinent terms are defined. Footings and wall structure (reinforced concrete walls and concrete block walls) are described. Roofing systems are discussed in detail and illustrated: (1) poured-in-place concrete roof slabs; (2) pre-cast concrete planks; and (3) heavy timber roofs. Insulation of earth-sheltered homes is reviewed in terms of using: (1) urethanes; (2) extruded polystyrene; and (3) expanded polystyrene. Advantages, disadvantages, R-factors, costs, and installation are discussed. (MJJ)

  18. Influence of civil defense on strategic countervalue fatalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, T.F.

    1982-04-28

    Two modeling studies were conducted to simulate the effect of fallout shelters on the outcome of a massive countervalue nuclear exchange between the Soviet Union and the United States. One was to determine the number of nuclear weapons required to mount an effective fallout attack against a country with dispersed population; the other was to determine the number of expected US fatalities resulting from a countervalue attack against US urban population centers. The results of these studies indicate that the number of weapons required to mount such an attack depends on the adequacy of the shelter system and that the evacuation of urban populations can substantially reduce expected fatality levels.

  19. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views MX Missle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MX Missile, Shelter, Launch Methods Undergo Testing Photo - MX Missle An experimental vertical shelter for the deployment of MX missiles was constructed at the Test Site. If the design had been adopted, the missile would have been placed in an 18-foot diameter, 130-foot-deep vertical silo. At launch the silo would have cut through a 40-foot layer of soil. The missile would then have been fired. Pan Am photo. The Nevada Test Site was selected for several Air Force Peacekeeper (MX) research and

  20. Lending a Hand | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lending a Hand Lending a Hand Y-12 volunteers at the Shelter Animal Rescue Group spent time bathing and grooming dogs. SARG is dedicated to giving animals from the Oak Ridge Animal Shelter a second chance at life. Each year, employees nominate projects for the Y-12 Day of Volunteering. Employees volunteer to lend a hand and Y-12 provides support. In 2012, more than 1,100 employees, their family members and other volunteers worked on 60 projects, marking the largest turnout in the 10 years of

  1. Florida's SunSmart Program Helps Provide Power to Schools When Storms

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strike | Department of Energy Florida's SunSmart Program Helps Provide Power to Schools When Storms Strike Florida's SunSmart Program Helps Provide Power to Schools When Storms Strike May 30, 2014 - 10:34am Addthis The SunSmart Program has installed solar power systems at schools designated as emergency shelters throughout Florida. | Photo by Amy Kidd The SunSmart Program has installed solar power systems at schools designated as emergency shelters throughout Florida. | Photo by Amy Kidd Amy

  2. SEP Success Story: Florida's SunSmart Program Helps Provide Power to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Schools When Storms Strike | Department of Energy Florida's SunSmart Program Helps Provide Power to Schools When Storms Strike SEP Success Story: Florida's SunSmart Program Helps Provide Power to Schools When Storms Strike May 30, 2014 - 10:19am Addthis The SunSmart Program has installed solar power systems at schools designated as emergency shelters throughout Florida. | Photo by Amy Kidd The SunSmart Program has installed solar power systems at schools designated as emergency shelters

  3. Sunspace Minnesota: passive solar design for winter resorts. Period covered, August 1979-October 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Minnesota winter resorts are discussed as to type, size, and use. Energy needs and conservation techniques are described by cabin type and problem areas. Existing cabins are analyzed for conservation opportunities and solar retrofit potential. New cabin designs and concepts are presented including earth sheltered buildings. (MHR)

  4. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are: a review of a greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered home, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution for solar greenhouses, and the future of solar greenhouses.

  5. Model conservation standards bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This bibliography is divided into sections dealing with building design (superinsulation, solar houses, earth sheltered houses, heat loss calculation, lighting, retrofitting); heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; windows; doors; walls; roofs; floors; air leakage/infiltration; insulation materials; indoor air quality; moisture; performance; codes, laws, standards; economics; and program description. (DLC)

  6. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are a review of greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered house, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution from solar greenhouses, and the future for solar greenhouses.

  7. Earth coupled cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grondzik, W.T.; Boyer, L.L.; Johnston, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    Earth coupled cooling is an important consideration for residential and commercial designers, owners, and builders in many regions of the country. The potential benefits which can be expected from passive earth contact cooling are reviewed. Recommendations for the design of earth sheltered structures incorporating earth coupled cooling strategies are also presented.

  8. LM 05-15 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5-15 LM 05-15 NEPA ID: LM 05-14 Determination: B1.15; B3.1 Short Title: Storm Shelter Installation and Related Activities at the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site PDF icon LM 05-14 More Documents & Publications CX-012322: Categorical Exclusion Determination LM 28-14 CX-012199: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  9. Risk assessment in international operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricklin, Daniela L.

    2008-11-15

    During international peace-keeping missions, a diverse number of non-battle hazards may be encountered, which range from heavily polluted areas, endemic disease, toxic industrial materials, local violence, traffic, and even psychological factors. Hence, elevated risk levels from a variety of sources are encountered during deployments. With the emphasis within the Swedish military moving from national defense towards prioritization of international missions in atypical environments, the risk of health consequences, including long term health effects, has received greater consideration. The Swedish military is interested in designing an optimal approach for assessment of health threats during deployments. The Medical Intelligence group at FOI CBRN Security and Defence in Umea has, on request from and in collaboration with the Swedish Armed Forces, reviewed a variety of international health threat and risk assessment models for military operations. Application of risk assessment methods used in different phases of military operations will be reviewed. An overview of different international approaches used in operational risk management (ORM) will be presented as well as a discussion of the specific needs and constraints for health risk assessment in military operations. This work highlights the specific challenges of risk assessment that are unique to the deployment setting such as the assessment of exposures to a variety of diverse hazards concurrently.

  10. Up and down: energy and cost comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, H.B.; Brite, S.E.; Yost, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    A study comparing cost and energy performance of equal aboveground and earth-sheltered homes is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five cities were selected to represent five regions of the US. A module of a basic 138 m/sup 2/ (1480-sq-ft) living unit was designed to adapt to both conventional, well-insulated housing and earth-sheltered (ES) housing. The homes were designed to represent the popular home on the market in the particular neighborhood. The designs vary to conform with regional requirements for heating and cooling loads as well as style, construction materials, finish, etc. Finished sets of detailed drawings were prepared for all the sites.

  11. Y-12 and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park … a grand partnership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partnership Since 1996, hundreds of Y-12 employees and their friends and family as well as many Oak Ridge National Laboratory employees, family and friends have routinely spent a Saturday in the mountains in support of Y-12's Help the Smokies program. The teams have worked at least one Saturday a year and sometimes more to improve picnic areas and campsites, including making sites more accessible to those with disabilities. Improvements include constructing a shelter and greenhouse, installing

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Microwave Radiometer Makes Water Vapor Measurements in the Arid Cold a Snap Bookmark and Share The 183 GHz radiometer, protected inside an insulated enclosure (inset), is installed on the roof of the primary instrument shelter at Barrow. To prevent snow from accumulating on the mylar window, a blower mounted beneath the radiometer directs air through a duct to a standard Y-shaped fitting mounted on top of the radiometer. Scientific research increasingly shows evidence of climate change first

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Data Stream Available from Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar Bookmark and Share Inside the instrument shelter, the MMCR data system collects radar spectral data and processes these into reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral width. As a result of upgrades to the Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) processors (see http://www.arm.gov/acrf/updates051504.stm#nsammcr) at the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locales, two MMCR data

  14. Decision process for the retrofit of municipal buildings with solar energy systems: a technical guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Licciardello, Michael R.; Wood, Brian; Dozier, Warner; Braly, Mark; Yates, Alan

    1980-11-01

    As a background for solar applications, the following topics are covered: solar systems and components for retrofit installations; cost, performance, and quality considerations; and financing alternatives for local government. The retrofit decision process is discussed as follows: pre-screening of buildings, building data requirements, the energy conservation audit, solar system sizing and economics, comparison of alternatives, and implementation. Sample studies are presented for the West Valley Animal Shelter and the Hollywood Police Station. (MHR)

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 31, 2008 [Facility News] Phase 2 of Orbiting Carbon Observatory Field Campaign Begins Bookmark and Share A camera, weather station, and sun tracker with a protective dome are located on the roof of the fully automated FTS mobile laboratory. Inside the shelter, the spectrometer receives the reflected solar beam from the sun tracker, while the main computer system operates all the instruments and acquires the data. A camera, weather station, and sun tracker with a protective dome are

  16. Thermal insulation for Buildings. September 1982-September 1988 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1982-September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (This updated bibliography contains 244 citations, 92 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  17. Apparatus for collecting solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wildenrotter, K.

    1981-08-18

    Apparatus is described for collecting solar energy comprises a collector having a solar-energy collector surface. The collector is mounted on a support and is pivotable between an exposed position in which the collector surface faces the sun and a substantially horizontal sheltered position in which the collector surface faces the earth, thereby protecting the collector surface from the elements and facilitating access thereto for maintenance.

  18. Thermal insulation for buildings. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Thermal insulation for buildings. September 1982-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1982-May 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (This updated bibliography contains 299 citations, 55 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  20. Eight underground designs: underground plans Book No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.; Wells, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different designs are given for earth-sheltered houses. Each design is depicted thoroughly, with floor plans, cross sections, views from the several sides, and some general comments. The plans are intended as a planning tool to be adapted to individual needs, budgets, sites and local ordinances. Each plan expresses a different idea, with terrain varying from flat land to south and north slopes. Conventional and novel construction and design methods are demonstrated.

  1. Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2014 Inside this Update: 2014 LM All-Hands Training, LM to Meet Energy Metering Goals, Anatomy of a Groundwater Uranium Plume, DOE Submits Its Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress, Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications, Scientists Assess Damage Caused by Earthquake near Amchitka, DOE Weldon Spring Site Seeks Shelter, Reindustrialization Workshop Held at Mound Site, Chariot Remediation Work Completed on Schedule, Groundwater

  2. Manhattan Project: Postscript--The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Government-suggested fallout shelter design, 1950s POSTSCRIPT--THE NUCLEAR AGE (1945-Present) Events Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Joe

  3. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  4. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  5. Emergency Information Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Emergency Information Home Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Oak Ridge conducts world-leading research that is advancing our nation's energy and national security portfolios. These activities are vital to securing America's future, but they can also pose potential risks. To help protect against possible incidents, the Emergency Management division works daily

  6. Emergency Vocabulary | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Emergency Vocabulary Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Emergency Vocabulary Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page In the event of an emergency on the Oak Ridge Reservation, you will hear one of the following terms during public announcements. Each term indicates the magnitude of the event and will help you understand any necessary protective actions. Operational Emergency: an event that does not

  7. Public Notifications | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Public Notifications Emergency Information Emergency Information Home Public Notifications Emergency Vocabulary Sheltering in Place Evacuation ISC Home Public Notifications Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Warning sirens are placed around Oak Ridge's three major sites -- the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Y-12 National Security Complex, and East Tennessee Technology Park. In the unlikely event of an off-site emergency, sirens will sound to alert area residents. If you hear the sirens,

  8. Evacuation | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evacuation Evacuation Evacuations are ordered if a hazardous release could affect people in a specific area. If you are directed by local news to evacuate your home or workplace please follow these guidelines: Write down the evacuation route and designated shelter provided by an Emergency Alert System station. Instructions will depend on the sector you are currently in (see Evacuation Map & Routes) and the specific site involved in the emergency. If you do not have transportation, call a

  9. ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list

  10. ORISE: Health Communication and Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multimedia Applications Health Promotion and Outreach How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview "Can I Eat This?" Mobile App Wins Award of Excellence from NAGC Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency Training Tools for Healthy Schools ORISE to Support CDC Infectious Disease Initiative ORISE Supports CDC's Know:BRCA Education Initiative CDC Travelers' Health Team Receives Innovation Award for Website Redesign CDC Travelers' Health Mobile App, Designed by ORISE, Gains

  11. ORISE: Training and Education

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instructional Design and Development Training and Qualification Programs Human Subjects Protection Multimedia Applications Health Promotion and Outreach How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency Training Tools for Healthy Schools ORISE to Support CDC Infectious Disease Initiative ORISE Supports CDC's Know:BRCA Education Initiative CDC Travelers' Health Team Receives Innovation Award for Website Redesign CDC Travelers' Health Mobile App,

  12. A Good Neighbor: Community Involvement | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Good Neighbor: Community Involvement At NREL, we are dedicated environmental stewards and are committed to making positive contributions in our community. NREL's main campus is a model for environmental protection and sustainable building practices. Photo of a volunteer at the Foothills Animal Shelter. Charitable Contributions Employees are very involved in the community, giving their time, money, and energy. As staff levels have grown, so have contributions, making NREL Jefferson County's

  13. Forest Products Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Products Industry Profile Forest Products Industry Profile Wood and paper products meet the everyday needs of consumers and businesses. They provide materials essential for communication, education, packaging, construction, shelter, sanitation, and protection. The U.S. forest products industry is based on a renewable and sustainable raw material: wood. It practices recovery and recycling in its operations. Its forests help the global carbon balance by taking up carbon dioxide from the

  14. Chemicals Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemicals Industry Profile Chemicals Industry Profile Chemical products are essential to the production of a myriad of manufactured products. More than 96% of all manufactured goods are directly touched by the chemicals industry.1 The industry greatly influences our safe water supply, food, shelter, clothing, health care, computer technology, transportation, and almost every other facet of modern life. Economic The United States is the top chemical producer in the world, accounting for nearly

  15. Department of Energy (DOE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cover photos, top to bottom, left to right: * Electric meters at each extraction-well house at the Fernald Preserve help LM hit its metering goals. * LM Chariot site manager discusses the contamination removal process with community members from Point Hope, Alaska. * A stand-alone storm shelter, capable of withstanding winds up to 250 miles per hour, is installed adjacent to the Interpretive Center at the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. * An LM scientist discusses geologic and groundwater

  16. Microsoft Word - EOC#2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Emergency Communications August 4, 2015 Updated Information  At approximately 6 p.m. MT, Radiological Control Technicians detected minute levels of radiation on the filter at Station B where air is exhausted from the WIPP underground.  As a precaution, WIPP personnel were directed to shelter in place.  Radiological control technicians have NOT received any indication of a release underground.  There is no indication of any kind of radiological release leaving the WIPP site. 

  17. Feds feed Families

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Representatives of the Office of Enterprise Assessments delivered more than 1,600 pounds of non-perishable food to the Manna Food Center on September 2, 2014 as part of the 2014 Feds Feed Families campaign. Manna feeds about 3,300 needy families in Montgomery County. Manna also provides food to 48 Montgomery County soup kitchens, food pantries, group homes, and emergency shelters.

  18. FEMP Director's Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FEMP Director's Blog FEMP Director's Blog RSS Federal Energy Management Program Director Timothy Unruh shares his thoughts on topics related to energy management. November 30, 2015 FEMP Director's Blog Making a Difference: Federal Energy Management Down on the Farm Support from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has helped the USDA develop shelters for agricultural equipment that are also generate solar power. The "Solar Shaded AgPort" is a model of interagency cooperation

  19. Making a Difference: Federal Energy Management Down on the Farm |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Down on the Farm Making a Difference: Federal Energy Management Down on the Farm November 30, 2015 - 10:15am Addthis Making a Difference: Federal Energy Management Down on the Farm Timothy Unruh Timothy Unruh FEMP Director Above: design of Solar Shaded AgPort, showing sheltered area under photovoltaic-covered rooftop. Image courtesy of Gerald Robinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory The Energy Department's Federal Energy Management

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Visitors Center

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ohio > Fernald > Visitors Center > Visitors Center Fernald Preserve, Ohio Visitors Center Fernald Visitors Center Visitors Center Directions Event Calendar Community Meeting Room, Program Shelter, and Resource Room Program/Speaker Request Brochures Fact Sheets Technical Papers BioBlitz Geocaching Pets Policy The Fernald Preserve Visitors Center is a 10,000-square-foot green building that celebrates the rich and varied history of the Fernald site. Information on the site's natural,

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other

  3. Advances in geotectural design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    Although the price of oil dropped well below $20 US earlier this year from a previous high above $35 US, the interest and participation shown in this conference does not seem to have been materially affected. Perhaps energy, although not unimportant, is no longer the driving force behind the continuing development and exploration of the earth shelter idiom in architecture. Rather, the thrust of most papers seems to seek an understanding of the adaptation of earth shelter into varied types of settings, especially urban applications, and also the understanding of the physical phenomenon of how an earth shelter works. The paper have been grouped into three basic categories with several subsections in each category. First, vernacular approaches are documented from the viewpoint of habitation, and followed by other types of utilization. Then, recent theoretical developments are reviewed in terms of materials, occupant studies, and heat transfer and air flow analyses. The final section deals with contemporary practice, where design concepts and case studies are presented, followed by building systems and urban planning aspects. All 54 papers have been abstracted separately for inclusion on the Energy Data Base.

  4. Passive solar heated energy conserving biosphere home. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarski, R.

    1985-01-01

    ''Warm Gold'' is an original design of a passive solar heated energy conserving biosphere home. It has been owner-built with financial help from the US Department of Energy through its Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program of 1980. The home incorporates the six major components of passive solar design: appropriate geometry and orientation, glazing, light levels and reflective surfaces, ventilation, thermal storage, and insulation. Warm Gold is an earth-sheltered home with earth cover on the roof as well as on the two opaque north leg walls. It is of durable and efficient masonry construction which included stone masonry with on-site materials and cement block and ready mix concrete. Excavation, backfill, and drainage were necessary aspects of earth sheltered construction together with the all-important Bentonite waterproofing system. Warm Gold is a house which meets all the national building code standards of HUD. The home has two bedrooms, one bathroom, living room, dining room-kitchen, greenhouse, and utility annex, all of which are incorporated with the earth-sheltered, passive solar systems to be a comfortable, energy-efficient living environment.

  5. Yampa River Valley sub-area contingency plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The Yampa River Valley sub-area contingency plan (Contingency Plan) has been prepared for two counties in northwestern Colorado: Moffat County and Routt County. The Contingency Plan is provided in two parts, the Contingency Plan and the Emergency Response Action Plan (ERAP). The Contingency Plan provides information that should be helpful in planning to minimize the impact of an oil spill or hazardous material incident. It contains discussions of planning and response role, hazards identification, vulnerability analysis, risk analysis, cleanup, cost recovery, training, and health and safety. It includes information on the incident command system, notifications, response capabilities, emergency response organizations, evacuation and shelter-in-place, and immediate actions.

  6. BWX TYmes, November 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2003 Volume 3, Number 11 A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex In a public ceremony Nov. 4, BWXT Y-12 unveiled a significant new technology for the future treatment of wounded soldiers. The Future Medical Shelter System is a highly mobile two-table operating room that can be set up virtually anywhere and perform trauma surgery in a matter of minutes. Duane Bias is the project manager, and Lee Bzorgi is the lead engineer. While currently

  7. The MX Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MX Factor Test films played a strategic-planning role in the debates of the late 1970s and early 1980s about where and how to deploy the MX intercontinental ballistic missile (LGM-118 Peacekeeper). The deployment would have to ensure that the missiles could survive a first strike by an adversary. Military planners were considering placing the missiles in clusters of hardened concrete shelters in the hot, dry Great Basin Desert of Nevada and Utah. Films of atmospheric tests at the Nevada Test

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battle With Bugs Nearly Over Thanks to New Radar Bookmark and Share The new W-band ARM cloud radar, or WACR, provides improved sensitivity for detecting tiny objects in the atmosphere to an altitude of 5 km. The instrument's antenna is located adjacent to the [/instruments/instrument.php?id=mmcr][millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR)] antenna on top of the MMCR shelter; the rest of the unit is located inside (inset). The main purpose of the millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) is to measure

  9. War against water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitz-Hugh, S.

    1982-01-01

    It is stressed that waterproofing should be the most important concern in an earth-sheltered home, starting with the design and continuing throughout the construction. Damage which may be caused by water leakage is discussed. Proper site selection is most important and the need for outside professionals and consultants is emphasized. The ideal waterproofing system is discussed and illustrated. Waterproofing agents are discussed in detail. They are: (1) sodium bentonite; (2) elastomers, such as isobutylene isoprene (butyl rubber), EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer), and liquid elastomers (polyurethanes); and (3) rubberized asphalt. Availability, sheet sizes and application of these waterproofing agents are discussed. (MJJ)

  10. $50 and up underground house book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehler, M.

    1981-01-01

    Earth-sheltered housing can be livable, compatible with nature, and inexpensive. Plans and designs for low-cost houses that are integrated with their environment make up most of this book. The author begins by outlining 23 advantages of underground housing and describing the histories of several unconventional buildings in the $50 to $500 price range. He also suggests where building materials can be bought and scrounged, describes construction techniques, and explains how to cope with building codes. Sketches, floorplans, and photographs illustrate the text. 8 references, 4 tables. (DCK)

  11. Experimental plan for investigating building-earth heat transfer at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1980-11-01

    An experimental plan is presented for investigating heat transfer between below-grade portions of building envelopes and the surrounding soil. Included is a detailing of data to be collected at an earth-sheltered structure (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building) to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The attributes of the required data collection instrumentation are defined and a program to assure the accuracy of the collected data is discussed. The experimental plan is intended to be used as a guide to selection, installation, and maintenance of instrumentation as well as in data collection and verification.

  12. Evaluation of the Parameters of Radioactive Contamination of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panasyuk M.I.; Skorbun A.D.; Klyuchnikov O.O.

    2002-02-26

    After Chornobyl NPP (ChNPP) accident the territory near destroyed Unit 4 (that now with the special confinement has the name the ''Shelter'' object) is contaminated of fuel fallouts. During liquidation of the accident consequences this territory was covered with pure earth, concrete, etc. As a result a contaminated anthropogenic layer of the soil on the depth up to 10 m was formed. Now the problem of contamination estimation and the soils management arose. For this tasks a gamma logging method was modified conformably to ChNPP conditions. The methods for necessary coefficients receiving and log treatment have been suggested.

  13. Underground house book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S.

    1980-01-01

    Aesthetics, attitudes, and acceptance of earth-covered buildings are examined initially, followed by an examination of land, money, water, earth, design, heat, and interior factors. Contributions made by architect Frank Lloyd Wright are discussed and reviewed. Contemporary persons, mostly designers, who contribute from their experiences with underground structures are Andy Davis; Rob Roy; Malcolm Wells; John Barnard, Jr.; Jeff Sikora; and Don Metz. A case study to select the site, design, and prepare to construct Earthtech 6 is described. Information is given in appendices on earth-protected buildings and existing basements; financing earth-sheltered housing; heating-load calculations and life-cycle costing; and designer names and addresses. (MCW)

  14. Builders go underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The appeal of earth-sheltered housing increased last year when 1000 new underground houses brought the national total to about 5000. Innovative construction and management techniques help, such as the Terra-Dome's moldset and equipment, which the company sells to builders under a license arrangement. Attention is given to aesthetic appeal as well as to energy savings. The Everstrong company builds all-wood underground houses to cut down on humidity and increase resistance to natural disasters. Tight mortgage money has been a serious problem for underground as well as conventional builders. (DCK)

  15. Low-energy structures concepts. Final report October 1977-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odello, R.J.

    1980-12-01

    This report has discussed various concepts for energy conservation in Navy shore facilities which can be achieved through architectural and structural design decisions. These concepts include earth-sheltered structures, thermal mass concepts, passive solar designs, and exploitation of existing technology. Advantages and disadvantages of the systems were discussed in qualitative terms. Where possible, specific data and equations were presented to show how the benefits could be evaluated for specific designs. Sufficient information is available here and in the references to permit a designer to evaluate any of the concepts for applicability to a specific design case.

  16. Microclimate Corrosion Effects in Coastal Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.

    1996-03-24

    The Albany Research Center is conducting atmospheric corrosion research in coastal environments to improve the performance of materials in the Nation's infrastructure. The corrosion of bare metals, and of painted, thermal-sprayed, and galvanized steels are presented for one-year exposures at sites located on bridges and utility poles along the Oregon coast. The effects of microclimates (for example distance from the ocean, high wind zones, and salt-fog prone regions) are examined in conjunction with sample orientation and sheltered/unsheltered comparisons. An atmospheric corrosion model examines the growth and dissolution of corrosion product layers to arrive at a steady-state thickness and corrosion rate.

  17. 2010SR05.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Big Top Tent Keeps TRU Waste Trucks, Tanks Dry before Inspection and Shipping Big Top Aids Solid Waste Management in Shipping Protocol Aiken, S.C. - Important projects for the Recovery Act - and not a circus act - are being performed under the Big Top at Solid Waste Management facility at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The jumbo-size vinyl tent with a metal frame measuring 160 feet long, 24 feet wide, and 20 feet high is used in the Site's E Area to shelter trucks

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 3, 2011 [Facility News] Cloud Radar Overhauled and Renamed Bookmark and Share The KAZR (left) is being tested with a 2-meter antenna used with MMCRs at other ARM sites. This pre-operational test will help uncover any data anomalies prior to the KAZR being installed in its new home in the shelter on the right when it replaces the MMCR. The KAZR (left) is being tested with a 2-meter antenna used with MMCRs at other ARM sites. This pre-operational test will help uncover any data anomalies

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to deactivate and demolish structural components on 13 support facilities at the Paducah Site. The support buildings are aging and are no longer needed. The 13 support buildings are as follows: an office building (C-212), security structures (C-212-A, C-215, C-216, and C-229), storage facilities (C-601-D, C-616-G, C-746-A, C-746-B, and C-746-M), and ancillary facilities (C-408 Truck Scale, C-633-6 Filter Building, and C-801 Bus Shelter). Facilities would be

  20. Bluebirds

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluebirds Friday, March 4, 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Learn how to attract bluebirds by providing the preferred food, water, shelter, and nesting sites. The bluebird's color, musical warbling song, and insectivorous diet make them welcome guests to any backyard! Salamander Meander Saturday, March 5, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Salamanders spend the majority of their lives hidden under forest soils and leaf litter. However, this time of year they are moving from their wintering sites to wetlands where

  1. Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts November 2, 2012 - 2:57pm Addthis The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by Google.org. To find your location, either enter your location in the box in the upper left corner or click and drag the map. Use the "Layers" button to select

  2. Technical, environmental, and economic evaluation of Plastic Media Blasting for paint stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.; Wilmoth, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency and the U.S. EPA Water Engineering Research Laboratory cooperated to investigate the feasibility of Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) as a paint-removal technique for aluminum military shelters. The PMB process was compared in field tests with sandblasting and with chemical stripping to determine relative cost, effectiveness, efficiency, and environmental consequence. The PMB process was judged superior to the chemical-stripping process and marginally better than sandblasting based upon the evaluation criteria.

  3. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neylan, A.J.

    1986-10-01

    The MHTGR is an advanced reactor concept being developed in the USA under a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry and the utilities. The design utilizes basic HTGR features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant and a graphite moderator. However the specific size and configuration are selected to utilize the inherently safe characteristics associated with these standard features coupled with passive safety systems to provide a significantly higher margin of safety and investment protection than current generation reactors. Evacuation or sheltering of the public is not required. The major components of the nuclear steam supply, with special emphasis on the core, are described. Safety assessments of the concept are discussed.

  4. Operation Sandstone. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1948. Annex 8. Gamma-ray measurements. Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Sandstone report No. 29

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonka, F.R.; Pawlicki, G.S.

    1985-09-01

    Curves of absorption of gamma rays in boron carbide and a few points on the absorption curve in lead were obtained during the three atomic explosions of Operation Sandstone. Radiation was detected by integrating ionization chambers and by photographic emulsions. A few recording-type ionization chambers were used to give intensities as a function of time. Radiation detectors were located inside of shelters which protected them from blast and shielded them from scattered radiation. Because of geometry, scattered radiation was negligible and the analysis of absorption curves yields the true total absorption coefficient for the radiation.

  5. Solar Decathlon 2015: Meet the Teams | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meet the Teams Solar Decathlon 2015: Meet the Teams August 27, 2015 - 10:31am Addthis Solar Decathlon 2015: Meet the Teams Matt Dozier Matt Dozier Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs From storm-resistant shelters to breezy dwellings that open like a flower, the solar-powered houses in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2015 are as diverse and creative as the teams behind them. Each was inspired by the unique cultures, experiences and landscapes of its creators, who

  6. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate in switchgrass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somleva, Mariya N.; Snell, Kristi D.; Beaulieu, Julie; Peoples, Oliver P.; Garrison, Bradley; Patterson, Nii

    2013-07-16

    Transgenic plants, plant material, and plant cells for synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates, preferably poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (also referred to a as PHB) are provided. Preferred plants that can be genetically engineered to produce PHB include plants that do not normally produce storage products such as oils and carbohydrates, and plants that have a C.sub.4 NAD-malic enzyme photosynthetic pathway. Such plants also advantageously produce lignocellulosic biomass that can be converted into biofuels. An exemplary plant that can be genetically engineered to produce PHB and produce lignocellulosic biomass is switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L. A preferred cultivar of switchgrass is Alamo. Other suitable cultivars of switchgrass include but are not limited to Blackwell, Kanlow, Nebraska 28, Pathfinder, Cave-in-Rock, Shelter and Trailblazer.

  7. Energy development and demonstration program: year-end report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, B.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the Energy Development and Demonstration Program is to support projects for the development and demonstration of alternative energy sources available in Wisconsin and of energy conservation methods appropriate for Wisconsin. In September, eleven projects were selected for support in the program. Programs proposed include: monitoring an earth-sheltered dwelling; demonstrating a residential wood pellet eating system; energy management and control system on a dairy farm; three wind energy demonstrations; live-in solar collector; timber utilization project; continuous burn, induced-draft, condensing, modulating natural gas furnace; passive solar prototype for commercial-scale greenhouse; and high performance heat exchange device applied to fuel alcohol distillation processing. The benefits of the projects are briefly summarized. The location of the projects in Wisconsin is identified.

  8. Materials and society -- Impacts and responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwood, A.R.C.

    1995-11-01

    The needs of today`s advanced societies have moved well beyond the requirements for food and shelter, etc., and now are focused on such concerns as international peace and domestic security, affordable health care, the swift and secure transmission of information, the conservation of resources, and a clean environment. Progress in materials science and engineering is impacting each of these concerns. This paper will present some examples of how this is occurring, and then comment on ethical dilemmas that can arise as a consequence of technological advances. The need for engineers to participate more fully in the development of public policies that help resolve such dilemmas, and so promote the benefits of advancing technology to society, will be discussed.

  9. Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

  10. Recent ooids from Mesopotamian shallow shelf, northwest Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aqrawi, A.A.M.; Sadooni, F.N.

    1987-05-01

    Petrographic and mineralogical analyses of available oolitic samples from Khor Abdulla and Khor Al-Umaya, Mesopotamian shallow shelf of the northwest Arabian Gulf, showed that the ooids exhibit extensive variations in their forms according to their nuclei shapes. The ooids cortices are usually of radial structure and are formed mainly of high magnesium calcite. The sediment distribution of the studied area revealed the existence of an oolitic zone extending NW-SE from east of Bubiyan Island toward the open sea. It is believed that these ooids are usually formed in sheltered environments by direct precipitation of high magnesium-calcite around any available nuclei. Then they are concentrated by agitation on small shoal-margins located to the east of Bubiyan Island. At these shoals they attained their final shapes and then dispersed through the studied area. It is thought that these ooids represent a peculiar example of ooid formation in quiet shallow-water environments.

  11. Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBtu) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBtu) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 Btu/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollowcore floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

  12. Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges Residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBTU) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBTU) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 BTU/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollow-core floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

  13. Solarnorth '81 by Tymura Solardesigns: diverse residential, commercial and industrial projects at and above the 48th parallel in Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tymura, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Solar Energy Heating Applications are On the Rise in and above the Northwestern City of Thunder Bay, on the northern shore of Lake Superior. Unique in their diversifications, the architectural commissions range from pure passive residential design thru hybrid systems; residential Greenhouse-Solarium active swimming pool and commercial hotel pool to inexpensive hybrid system for Canada's First Commercial Solar Lumber Drying Kiln; as well as combined earth sheltered with solar system design for a dormitory complex and shopping center. By May 1981, 7 buildings designed by Tymura Solardesigns in the Thunder Bay area will have been subjected to the Extreme Canadian climate (10,500/sup 0/F degree days, yearly temperature maximums from -41/sup 0/F to 90/sup 0/F, and solar fractions vary from 50% to 75%, with economic payback periods ranging between 7 and 10 years.

  14. Chautauqua radio workshop project. Final report, July 1, 1980-October 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-25

    Chautauqua is a daily call-in radio show (260 hour-long shows) broadcast over Public Radio Station WOUB fm, Athens, Ohio. This radio series covers a wide range of topics such as: energy conservation, developing small scale alternative energy sources (like windpower, solar energy, wood heat, alcohol production, earth-sheltered home construction, etc.), backyard vegetable production, and food preservation. The program's information is generated by the guests, listeners, and the show's host. An outline of the proposed steps to accomplish the proliferation of the Chautauqua radio concept throughout the US is presented. The Final Report from the Chautauqua Radio Workshop Project is presented along with the Chautauqua Notebook: appropriate technology on radio. (MCW)

  15. Economical wind protection - underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesling, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    Earth-sheltered buildings inherently posess near-absolute occupant protection from severe winds. They should sustain no structural damage and only minimal facial damage. Assuming that the lower-hazard risk attendant to this type of construction results in reduced insurance-premium rates, the owner accrues economic benefits from the time of construction. Improvements to aboveground buildings, in contrast, may not yield early economic benefits in spite of a favorable benefit-to-cost ratio. This, in addition to sensitivity to initial costs, traditionalism in residential construction, and lack of professional input to design, impede the widespread use of underground improvements and the subsequent economic losses from severe winds. Going underground could reverse the trend. 7 references.

  16. Three-dimensional modeling of heat transfer from slab floors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1989-07-01

    Earth-coupled heat-transfer processes have been recognized in recent years as a potential source of significant energy savings in both conventional and earth-sheltered designs, Because of the complexity of the building/soil/atmosphere interaction, however, important aspects of earth-coupled heat transfer are not well understood. There is a particular lack of three-dimensional foundation heat-loss data. In this study, a detailed three-dimensional finite-difference model of a slab floor was used to generate 93 annual simulations in parametric groups focusing on effects of size and shape, soil properties, boundary conditions, climate, insulation, and building shadow. These results indicate that soil thermal conductivity, ground surface conditions, foundation design, and floor shape/size are essential elements of a general change in heat-transfer rate.

  17. Monitored performance of new, low-energy homes: updated results from the BECA-A data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, J.F.; Meier, A.K.

    1986-03-01

    We compiled and analyzed energy consumption data, construction details, and operating characteristics for over three hundred new, low-energy homes. Over two thirds of the buildings incorporated solar features. A sequence of standardization procedures were developed to compare the energy performance of the buildings. The procedures adjusted the reported heating energy consumption for variations in the climate, floor area, internal gains, and reported indoor temperature. Two indicators of thermal performance were developed, the balance temperature and a k-value, which roughly corresponds to the overall UA of the building but also includes the ability of the house to exploit solar gains and thermal mass. The buildings in the data base have an average balance temperature of 12/sup 0/C and a k-value of 114 W//sup 0/C. Earth-sheltered buildings perform best, but only slightly better than passive solar and superinsulated buildings.

  18. Thurston Energy Outreach Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, P.; Young, M.

    1984-09-01

    In Olympia, the Washington Energy Extension Service program is provided by the Olympic Renewable Resources Association's Energy Outreach Center. The Center has provided Thurston County residents with consistent and reliable information on energy conservation and renewable resources since 1980. During those four years, a seasonal pattern of activities has developed which reflects strong shifts in class attendance and inquiries by EOC users over the course of the year. Classes include: design of superinsulated passive solar and earth sheltered homes; sunspace design, coldframe construction and tax credits for solar energy systems; caulking, weatherstripping, storm windows and chimney cleaning; and solar and wood hot water systems. All are scheduled according to dictates of seasonal needs and interests.

  19. Simulation and design of passive processes. Progress report for 1st and 2nd quarters, August 15, 1981-February 15, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-26

    Two major parts of the research reported concern (1) modeling and design of passive processes, and (2) study of meteorological data to make it useful in evaluating and designing passive processes. Results of the first two quarters of this work include: development and exercise of a sunspace model, and conduct of a first sensitivity study of sunspace design factors; development of a subroutine for calculating effects of ground coupling on performance of basements, earth sheltered buildings and buried tanks; publication of preprocessed meteorological data useful in calculation of passive heating performance by anti theta methods; and development of correlations for degree days for various base temperatures and times of day from monthly average temperatures and solar radiation.

  20. Economic comparison of passively conditioned underground houses. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy, H.L.

    1981-05-01

    The availability of cheap energy sources and the perfection of inexpensive, convenient heating and cooling systems has made the 'climate controlled' environment an integral and irreversible part of American life. However, the current shortage and high cost of fuel is threatening the quality and perhaps the availability of the climate-controlled environment. To prolong the life of the climate controlled environment, the national policy has been one of promoting conservation of the fuels that are available and promoting alternative energy systems that are often of high technology or of energy intensive materials. Fortunately, a grass roots response to the lack of energy has been an increase in the interest and construction of underground or earth-sheltered housing. The underground house, featuring a covering of earth on walls and roof, offers a high degree of energy conservation through low technology construction and the use of low energy intensive materials.

  1. Going underground. [Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Underground space is increasingly used for energy-saving and secure storage that is often less expensive and more aesthetically pleasing than conventional facilities. Petroleum, pumped hydro, water, and sewage are among the large-scale needs that can be met by underground storage. Individual buildings can store chilled water underground for summer cooling. Windowless aboveground buildings are suitable and even more efficient if they are underground. The discovery of ancient underground cities indicates that the concept can be reapplied to relieve urban centers and save energy as is already done to a large extent in China and elsewhere. A national commitment to solar energy will benefit from increased use of underground space. Kansas City is among several cities which are developing the subsurface with success, businesses and schools having found the underground environment to have many benefits. More construction experience is needed, however, to help US lenders overcome their reluctance to finance earth-sheltered projects. (DCK)

  2. Passive cooling and heating program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, H.B.; Kaplan, S.I.; Chester, C.V.

    1981-01-01

    Construction was completed of an earth-sheltered, passively solar heated office-dormitory, the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, designed at ORNL. Instrumentation of the building was designed, procured, and installed. Building performance will be monitored and compared with predictions of the DOE-2 code. A study of the incorporation of vegetation on architecture was conducted by the Harvard School of Design. A final report was issued which is a prototype handbook for the use of vegetation to reduce cooling loads in structures. An experiment to reduce the cooling requirement of mobile homes by shading with fast-growing vines was begun: a maintenance-oriented trellis was constructed and vines were planted. An RFP for the production of a prototype set of reflective insulating blinds was issued.

  3. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  4. Innovative conservation housing. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuttle, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new passive solar thermal storage brick was developed and tested. A new insulating curtain concept was developed to assist in passive solar heating and cooling. A steel truss was designed to replace the wood truss in solar attic applications where the wood truss typically suffers some 50% loss of structural strength. Improvements were made of the dry composting toilet and grey water recycling for homes. An algae cultivation system was created for production of food, feed, fertilizer, or biomass as needed for home, farm, or industry. New concepts were explored in the areas of economy shelter, solar hot water heating, home generation of electricity, edible landscapes and other home food production, growing of fiber crops for cottage industry, storage, insulation, solar cooking, and solar refrigeration. (LEW)

  5. Characterization of plasma sprayed and explosively consolidated simulated lunar soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, S.J.; Inal, O.T.; Smith, M.F.

    1997-06-01

    Two methods for the use of lunar materials for the construction of shelters on the Moon are being proposed: explosive consolidation of the soil into structural components and plasma spraying of the soil to join components. The plasma-sprayed coating would also provide protection from the intense radiation. In this work, a mare simulant was plasma-sprayed onto a stainless steel substrate. Deposition of a 0.020 inch coating using power inputs of 23, 25, 27 and 29 kW were compared. Hardness of the coatings increased with each increase of power to the system, while porosity at the interface decreased. All coatings exhibited good adhesion. Simultaneously, an explosively consolidated sample was similarly characterized to afford a comparison of structural features associated with each mode of proposed use.

  6. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  7. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  8. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

  9. Air Quality Scoping Study for Sarcobatus Flat, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

  10. Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

  11. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  12. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  13. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  14. DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  15. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  16. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  17. Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kav, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

  18. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  19. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    A quality assurance plan (QAP) is a documented description or a listing of the controls to be implemented to assure that an operation or activity is accomplished in a consistent manner and in accordance with requirements. Federal, state, and local governments require emergency planning for facilities that may affect the public in the event of an accidental release of nuclear or hazardous materials. One of the purposes of this EG G Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) Analysis of Offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) project is to identify the EPZs where actions could be necessary to protect public health. The RFP EPZ project is developing an interim basis for potential sheltering and evacuation recommendations in the event of an accidental release of radionuclides to the atmosphere from this facility. Also, RFP is developing EPZs for accidental releases of major nonradiological hazardous substances to the atmosphere, and will analyze the impacts of an unplanned surface water release from the facility.

  20. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brixner, B.

    1992-09-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are sill classified.

  1. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brixner, B.

    1992-01-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are sill classified.

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    13 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Northeast Midwest South West United States Energy (1) 2,554 1,975 1,970 1,655 2,003 Shelter (2) 11,144 8,727 7,931 12,545 9,744 Food 7,187 6,367 6,076 7,015 6,563 Telephone, water and other public services 1,434 1,475 1,627 1,667 1,565 Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) 2,408 2,598 2,456 3,146 2,631 Transportation (4) 8,556 8,579 8,842 11,141 9,233 Healthcare 2,856 3,144 2,884 2,929 2,948 Education 1,535 1,104

  3. Web Operational Status Boards

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-04-16

    Web Operational Status Boards (WebOSB)is a web-based application designed to acquire, display, and update highly dynamic status information between multiple users and jurisdictions. WebOSB is able to disseminate real-time status information—support the timely sharing of information—with constant, dynamic updates via personal computers and the Internet between emergency operations centers (EOCs), incident command centers, and to users outside the EOC who need to know the information (hospitals, shelters, schools). The WebOSB application far exceeds outdated information-sharingmore » methods used by emergency workers: whiteboards, Word and Excel documents, or even locality-specific Web sites. WebOSB’s capabilities include the following elements: - Secure access. Multiple users can access information on WebOSB from any personal computer with Internet access and a secure ID. Privileges are use to control access and distribution of status information and to identify users who are authorized to add or edit information. - Simultaneous update. WebOSB provides options for users to add, display, and update dynamic information simultaneously at all locations involved in the emergency management effort, A single status board can be updated from multiple locations enabling shelters and hospitals to post bed availability or list decontamination capability. - On-the-fly modification. Allowing the definition of an existing status board to be modified on-the-fly can be an asset during an emergency, where information requirements can change quickly. The status board designer feature allows an administrator to quickly define, modi,, add to, and implement new status boards in minutes without needing the help of Web designers and computer programmers. - Publisher/subscriber notification. As a subscriber, each user automatically receives notification of any new information relating to specific status boards. The publisher/subscriber feature automatically notified each user of any new information relating to specific status boards. WebOSB can be installed to fit the specific needs of an emergency management community. Because it was originally developed to concurrently support multiple EOCs at the local, county, and state level, it can also support multi-user environments for other types of projects.« less

  4. Web Operational Status Boards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-04-16

    Web Operational Status Boards (WebOSB)is a web-based application designed to acquire, display, and update highly dynamic status information between multiple users and jurisdictions. WebOSB is able to disseminate real-time status information?support the timely sharing of information?with constant, dynamic updates via personal computers and the Internet between emergency operations centers (EOCs), incident command centers, and to users outside the EOC who need to know the information (hospitals, shelters, schools). The WebOSB application far exceeds outdated information-sharing methods used by emergency workers: whiteboards, Word and Excel documents, or even locality-specific Web sites. WebOSB?s capabilities include the following elements: - Secure access. Multiple users can access information on WebOSB from any personal computer with Internet access and a secure ID. Privileges are use to control access and distribution of status information and to identify users who are authorized to add or edit information. - Simultaneous update. WebOSB provides options for users to add, display, and update dynamic information simultaneously at all locations involved in the emergency management effort, A single status board can be updated from multiple locations enabling shelters and hospitals to post bed availability or list decontamination capability. - On-the-fly modification. Allowing the definition of an existing status board to be modified on-the-fly can be an asset during an emergency, where information requirements can change quickly. The status board designer feature allows an administrator to quickly define, modi,, add to, and implement new status boards in minutes without needing the help of Web designers and computer programmers. - Publisher/subscriber notification. As a subscriber, each user automatically receives notification of any new information relating to specific status boards. The publisher/subscriber feature automatically notified each user of any new information relating to specific status boards. WebOSB can be installed to fit the specific needs of an emergency management community. Because it was originally developed to concurrently support multiple EOCs at the local, county, and state level, it can also support multi-user environments for other types of projects.

  5. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by appropriate responses by local responders and the general population within the hazard zones, regional planning is essential to success. The remainder of this Executive Summary provides summary guidance for response planning in three areas: (1) Public Protection Strategy details the importance of early, adequate shelter followed by informed evacuation. (2) Responder Priorities identify how to protect response personnel, perform regional situational assessment, and support public safety. (3) Key Planning Considerations refute common myths and provide important information on planning how to respond in the aftermath of nuclear terrorism.

  6. Analysis of dose consequences arising from the release of spent nuclear fuel from dry storage casks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The resulting dose consequences from releases of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) residing in a dry storage casks are examined parametrically. The dose consequences are characterized by developing dose versus distance curves using simplified bounding assumptions. The dispersion calculations are performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS2) code. Constant weather and generic system parameters were chosen to ensure that the results in this report are comparable with each other and to determine the relative impact on dose of each variable. Actual analyses of site releases would need to accommodate local weather and geographic data. These calculations assume a range of fuel burnups, release fractions (RFs), three exposure scenarios (2 hrs and evacuate, 2 hrs and shelter, and 24 hrs exposure), two meteorological conditions (D-4 and F-2), and three release heights (ground level - 1 meter (m), 10 m, and 100 m). This information was developed to support a policy paper being developed by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff on an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and monitored retrievable storage installation (MRS) security rulemaking.

  7. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  8. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) report. Fort Des Moines, Des Moines, Iowa. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, B.; Rausch, K.; Kang, J.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation conducted by The Earth Technology Corporation (TETC) at the Fort Des Moines, a U.S. Government property selected for closure by the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission. Under CERFA Federal agencies are required to identify real property that can be immediately reused and redeveloped. Satisfying this objective requires the identification of real property where no hazardous substances or petroleum products, regulated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed. Fort Des Moines is a 53.28-acre site located in Polk County, Iowa, within the city limits of Des Moines. The installation's primary mission is to provide support and shelter for the U.S. Army Reserve. Activities associated with the property that have environmental significance are photographic processing, vehicle maintenance, printing, and fuel storage. TETC reviewed existing investigation documents; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), State, and county regulatory records; environmental data bases; and title documents pertaining to Fort Des Moines during this investigation. In addition, TETC conducted interviews and visual inspections of Fort Des Moines as well as visual inspections and data base searches for the surrounding properties. Information in this CERFA Report was current as of April 1994.

  9. Investigation of transient, two-dimensional coupled heat and moisture flow in soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, L.S.W.

    1986-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite difference numerical model has been developed to study coupled heat and moisture flow in the soil surrounding an earth-sheltered construction. The model is based on a mechanistic approach formulated by Milly and developed from the work of Philip and deVries. Using soil temperatures and matric potentials as the dependent variables, the model is capable of simulating unsaturated/saturated flow conditions in heterogeneous soil domains. The model is a fully implicit, integrated finite difference approach based on the Patankar Spalding method. The numerical modeling of the governing heat and moisture equations was validated against a number of analytical and quasi-analytical solutions. An axisymmetric, two-dimensional experiment was then defined to which the numerical model could be compared. The experimental apparatus was composed of a cylinder filled with a dredged Mississippi River sand. A series of one and two dimensional heat and moisture flow experiments were run, using boundary conditions consistent with those that occur in the soil surrounding a building. Soil properties used in the model were either calculated from theoretical models or measured experimentally. Agreement between the model and experiments were good, with an error of 10-15% obtained for the two-dimensional coupled heat and moisture flow experiment.

  10. Paleoclimatic implications of glacial and postglacial refugia for Pinus pumila in western Beringia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, P M; Lozhkin, A V; Solomatkina, T B; Brown, T A

    2010-02-05

    Palynological results from Julietta Lake currently provide the most direct evidence to support the existence of a glacial refugium for Pinus pumila in mountains of southwestern Beringia. Both percentages and accumulation rates indicate the evergreen shrub survived until at least {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. in the Upper Kolyma region. Percentage data suggest numbers dwindled into the late glaciation, whereas pollen accumulation rates point towards a more rapid demise shortly after {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. Pinus pumila did not re-establish in any great numbers until {approx}8100 14C yr B.P., despite the local presence {approx}9800 14C yr B.P. of Larix dahurica, which shares similar summer temperature requirements. The postglacial thermal maximum (in Beringia {approx}11,000-9000 14C yr B.P.) provided Pinus pumila shrubs with equally harsh albeit different conditions for survival than those present during the LGM. Regional records indicate that in this time of maximum warmth Pinus pumila likely sheltered in a second, lower-elevation refugium. Paleoclimatic models and modern ecology suggest that shifts in the nature of seasonal transitions and not only seasonal extremes have played important roles in the history of Pinus pumila over the last {approx}21,000 14C yr B.P.

  11. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  12. 1982 Oregon energy resource manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, R.; Ebert, J. (eds.)

    1982-01-01

    This manual is divided into three distinct sections. Part one contains 40 passive solar home plans designed for the Pacific Northwest by Oregon architects and designers. Floor plans and exterior renderings of multi-family and single-family dwellings, earth sheltered and bermed designs, and light commercial structures are included. The degree of solar contribution each residence achieves is graphically presented for ease of understanding. Part two, renewable-energy-resource guide, is primarily designed as a locator to indepth publications that explain specific energy resources in detail. It contains illustrated book reviews of pertinent private and government publications available. Various tables, forms, diagrams, energy system evaluation criteria, an illustrated glossary, BPA energy programs, utility programs, financial outlooks and non-profit organizations are included. The product locator index makes up part three. This indexed directory contains the listings of businesses, including the address, phone number, contact person and a 30 to 50 word description of the product or services currently offered. These renewable energy companies range from architectural and engineering services to research and development firms.

  13. Solar optics: light as energy; energy as light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.J.; Eijadi, D.A.

    1980-05-01

    a prominent characteristic of earth-sheltered and underground buildings, as well as buildings designed to accommodate more uses within the same perimeters, is the prominence of interior space without direct access to natural light and view opportunities. Solar Optics, a technique for illuminating interior spaces with natural light, offers a way to satisfy the well-documented human affinity for natural light. The system, which uses a heliostat to track the sun and lenses and mirrors to direct the light to remote interior spaces, is more efficient than converting solar radiation into electricity. Through the use of cold mirrors, it is also possible to separate the infrared portion of the spectrum from visible light, thereby creating a cool light source that can reduce a building's space cooling demand. Solar Optics also offers energy savings by transmitting light through a small aperture, as opposed to a large window. Several design problems must still be addressed. The system will be demonstrated in a new building at the University of Minnesota. Because this is a limited demonstration, it does not include the integration of a natural light system with a central source light system...another promising application of Solar Optics.

  14. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  15. Effectiveness of solar heating and lighting in an underground concrete and glass dwelling high in the Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Div. of Design Technology)

    1993-01-01

    Solar heating and daylighting are two primary design features which can have a major impact on occupant perceptions of an underground living environment. A quantitative design analysis and evaluation of these features has been conducted for an energy conserving earth covered dwelling in a cold climate at high altitude in the Rocky Mountains. For this example, because of the solar contribution, a heating load reduction greater than 45 percent has been calculated and demonstrated on an operational basis, compared to the same earth sheltered construction without solar. The building envelope also has an effective time lag of several months which further increases the annual effectiveness. Also, depending on the sky conditions, the portion of exterior daylight reaching deep into the interior spaces easily exceeds 10 percent in the winter and can reach up to 50 percent or more. Thus, both heating and lighting by natural means are shown to be available in ample quantities in this cave-like structure. Pertinent design features to enhance such performance are highlighted.

  16. Energy-efficient housing alternatives: a predictive model of factors affecting household perceptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreckengost, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The major purpose of this investigation was to assess the impact of household socio-economic factors, dwelling characteristics, energy conservation behavior, and energy attitudes on the perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Perceptions of passive solar, active solar, earth sheltered, and retrofitted housing were examined. Data used were from the Southern Regional Research Project, S-141, Housing for Low and Moderate Income Families. Responses from 1804 households living in seven southern states were analyzed. A conceptual model was proposed to test the hypothesized relationships which were examined by path analysis. Perceptions of energy efficient housing alternatives were found to be a function of selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, household economic factors, and household conservation behavior. Age and education of the respondent, family size, housing-income ratio, utility income ratio, energy attitude, and size of the dwelling unit were found to have direct and indirect effects on perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Energy conservation behavior made a significant direct impact with behavioral energy conservation changes having the most profound influence. Conservation behavior was influenced by selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, and household economic factors.

  17. Why build below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlings, R.

    1982-01-01

    Building homes underground is a rapidly growing concept. From less than 200 in 1977 to about 6000 homes at present, this trend is discussed in detail. Although dirt is a poor insulator, its temperature moderating properties offer advantages. The need for insulating an underground house is discussed as well as the advantages of this type of home: (1) security advantages (fewer entrances); (2) storm resistance; (3) protection against fire; (4) lower maintenance costs; (5) space for lawn and garden is greater; and (6) these homes are quieter. The three principle types of underground homes are discussed in detail and illustrated with drawings and floor plans. These are: (1) the elevational type (most popular) with all doors and windows on one wall with other walls and roof completely covered; (2) penetrational homes with windows and doors on more than one side; and (3) the atrium home which is built around an open courtyard or atrium. Problems associated with earth-sheltered homes (underground water, structural strength requirements, building codes, indoor air pollution, costs, and financing) are discussed and suggestions are made for cutting costs. 4 references. (MJJ)

  18. Structure of trigger factor binding domain in biologically homologous complex with eubacterial ribosome reveals its chaperone action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baram, David; Pyetan, Erez; Sittner, Assa; Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada (WIS-I)

    2010-07-13

    Trigger factor (TF), the first chaperone in eubacteria to encounter the emerging nascent chain, binds to the large ribosomal subunit in the vicinity of the protein exit tunnel opening and forms a sheltered folding space. Here, we present the 3.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the physiological complex of the large ribosomal subunit from the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with the N-terminal domain of TF (TFa) from the same organism. For anchoring, TFa exploits a small ribosomal surface area in the vicinity of proteins L23 and L29, by using its 'signature motif' as well as additional structural elements. The molecular details of TFa interactions reveal that L23 is essential for the association of TF with the ribosome and may serve as a channel of communication with the nascent chain progressing in the tunnel. L29 appears to induce a conformational change in TFa, which results in the exposure of TFa hydrophobic patches to the opening of the ribosomal exit tunnel, thus increasing its affinity for hydrophobic segments of the emerging nascent polypeptide. This observation implies that, in addition to creating a protected folding space for the emerging nascent chain, TF association with the ribosome prevents aggregation by providing a competing hydrophobic environment and may be critical for attaining the functional conformation necessary for chaperone activity.

  19. Switchgrass Cultivar/Ecotype Selection and Management for Biofuels in the Upper Southeast USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lemus, Rocky; Parrish, David J.; Wolf, Dale D.

    2014-01-01

    Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.), a perennial warm-season grass indigenous to the eastern USA, has potential as a biofuels feedstock. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of upland and lowland switchgrass cultivars under different environments and management treatments. Four cultivars of switchgrass were evaluated from 2000 to 2001 under two management regimes in plots established in 1992 at eight locations in the upper southeastern USA. Two management treatments included 1) a single annual harvest (in late October to early November) and a single application of 50 kg N/ha/yr and 2) two annual harvests (in midsummer andmore » November) and a split application of 100 kg N/ha/yr. Biomass yields averaged 15 Mg/ha/yr and ranged from 10 to 22 Mg/ha/yr across cultivars, managements, locations, and years. There was no yield advantage in taking two harvests of the lowland cultivars (Alamo and Kanlow). When harvested twice, upland cultivars (Cave-in-Rock and Shelter) provided yields equivalent to the lowland ecotypes. Tiller density was 36% lower in stands cutting only once per year, but the stands appeared vigorous after nine years of such management. Lowland cultivars and a one-cutting management (after the tops have senesced) using low rates of applied N (50 kg/ha) are recommended.« less

  20. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentz, A

    2008-07-31

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

  1. Investigation of Spatial Variation of Sea States Offshore of Humboldt Bay CA Using a Hindcast Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    Spatial variability of sea states is an important consideration when performing wave resource assessments and wave resource characterization studies for wave energy converter (WEC) test sites and commercial WEC deployments. This report examines the spatial variation of sea states offshore of Humboldt Bay, CA, using the wave model SWAN . The effect of depth and shoaling on bulk wave parameters is well resolved using the model SWAN with a 200 m grid. At this site, the degree of spatial variation of these bulk wave parameters, with shoaling generally perpendicular to the depth contours, is found to depend on the season. The variation in wave height , for example, was higher in the summer due to the wind and wave sheltering from the protruding land on the coastline north of the model domain. Ho wever, the spatial variation within an area of a potential Tier 1 WEC test site at 45 m depth and 1 square nautical mile is almost negligible; at most about 0.1 m in both winter and summer. The six wave characterization parameters recommended by the IEC 6 2600 - 101 TS were compared at several points along a line perpendicular to shore from the WEC test site . As expected, these parameters varied based on depth , but showed very similar seasonal trends.

  2. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  3. Microwave heating apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew J. (Boulder, CO); Petersen, Robert D. (Thornton, CO); Swanson, Stephen D. (Brighton, CO)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for heating and melting materials using microwave energy, and for permitting them to solidify. The apparatus includes a microwave energy source, a resonant cavity having an opening in its floor, a microwave energy choke encompassing the opening in the floor of the cavity, a metal container to hold the materials to be heated and melted, a turntable, and a lift-table. During operation, the combined action of the turntable and the lift-table position the metal container so that the top of the container is level with the floor of the cavity, is in substantial registration with the floor opening, and is encompassed by the microwave energy choke; thus, during operation, the interior of the container defines part of the resonant cavity. Additionally, a screw feeder, extending into the cavity and sheltered from microwave energy by a conveyor choke, may convey the materials to be heated to the container. Also, preferably, the floor of the resonant cavity may include perforatins, so that the offgases and dust generated in the apparatus may be removed from the resonant cavity by pulling outside air between the container choke and the exterior wall of the container into the resonant cavity and out from the cavity through the perforations.

  4. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.; Armstrong, C.; Daugherty, N.M.; Foppe, T.L.; Petrocchi, A.J.; Southward, B.

    1990-05-01

    This project plan for Phase II summarizes the design of a project to complete analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Federal, state, and local governments develop emergency plans for facilities that may affect the public in the event of an accidental release of nuclear or hazardous materials. One of the purposes of these plans is to identify EPZs where actions might be necessary to protect public health. Public protective actions include sheltering, evacuation, and relocation. Agencies use EPZs to develop response plans and to determine needed resources. The State of Colorado, with support from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Rocky Flats contractors, has developed emergency plans and EPZs for the Rocky Flats Plant periodically beginning in 1980. In Phase II, Interim Emergency Planning Zones Analysis, Maximum Credible Accident'' we will utilize the current Rocky Flats maximum credible accident (MCA), existing dispersion methodologies, and upgraded dosimetry methodologies to update the radiological EPZs. Additionally, we will develop recommendations for EPZs for nonradiological hazardous materials releases and evaluate potential surface water releases from the facility. This project will allow EG G Rocky Flats to meet current commitments to the state of Colorado and make steady, tangible improvements in our understanding of risk to offsite populations during potential emergencies at the Rocky Flats Plant. 8 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. MACCS version 1.5.11.1: A maintenance release of the code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanin, D.; Foster, J.; Rollstin, J.; Miller, L.

    1993-10-01

    A new version of the MACCS code (version 1.5.11.1) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories under sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. MACCS was developed to support evaluations of the off-site consequences from hypothetical severe accidents at commercial power plants. MACCS is the only current public domain code in the US that embodies all of the following modeling capabilities: (1) weather sampling using a year of recorded weather data; (2) mitigative actions such as evacuation, sheltering, relocation, decontamination, and interdiction; (3) economic costs of mitigative actions; (4) cloudshine, groundshine, and inhalation pathways as well as food and water ingestion; (5) calculation of both individual and societal doses to various organs; and (6) calculation of both acute (nonstochastic) and latent (stochastic) health effects and risks of health effects. All of the consequence measures may be fun generated in the form of a complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF). The current version implements a revised cancer model consistent with recent reports such as BEIR V and ICRP 60. In addition, a number of error corrections and portability enhancements have been implemented. This report describes only the changes made in creating the new version. Users of the code will need to obtain the code`s original documentation, NUREG/CR-4691.

  6. Bottom-up, decision support system development : a wetlandsalinity management application in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-05-10

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin ofCalifornia's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratorywildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during theannual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetland contain saltwhich, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdownperiod, negatively impacts downstream agricultural riparian waterdiverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinityto the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-pointsources, now addresses return flows from seasonally managed wetlands.Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means ofmatching wetland return flows to the assimilative capacity of the SanJoaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring anddecision support systems to implement this concept have failed forreasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed inthe context of more general challenges facing the successfulimplementation of environmental monitoring, modelling and decisionsupport systems. The paper then provides details of a current researchand development project which will ultimately provide wetland managerswith the means of matching salt exports with the available assimilativecapacity of the San Joaquin River, when fully implemented. Manipulationof the traditional wetland drawdown comes at a potential cost to thesustainability of optimal wetland moist soil plant habitat in thesewetlands - hence the project provides appropriate data and a feedback andresponse mechanism for wetland managers to balance improvements to SanJoaquin River quality with internally-generated information on the healthof the wetland resource. The author concludes the paper by arguing thatthe architecture of the current project decision support system, whencoupled with recent advances in environmental data acquisition, dataprocessing and information dissemination technology, holds significantpromise to address some of the problems described earlier in the paperthat have limited past efforts to improve Basin water qualitymanagement.

  7. Efficiency, equity and the environment: Institutional challenges in the restructuring of the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeri, M.H.

    1998-07-01

    In the electric power industry, fundamental changes are underway in Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand and, more recently, in Asia. Rooted in increased deregulation and competition, these changes are likely to radically alter the structure of the industry. Liberalization of electric power markets in the United Kingdom is, for the most part, complete. The generation market in the United States began opening to competition following the 1987 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 set the stage for a much more dramatic change in the industry. The most far-reaching provision of the Act was its electricity title, which opened access to the electric transmission grid. With legal barriers now removed, the traditionally sheltered US electric utility market is becoming increasingly open to entry and competition. A number of important legislative, regulatory and governmental policy initiatives are underway in the Philippines that will have a profound effect on the electric power industry. In Thailand, the National Energy Planning Organization (NEPO) has undertaken a thorough investigation of industry restructuring. This paper summarizes recent international developments in the deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets in the U.K., U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. It focuses on the relevance of these experiences to development underway in the Philippines and Thailand, and presents alternative possible structures likely to emerge in these countries, drawing heavily on the authors' recent experiences in Thailand and the Philippines. The impact of these changes on the business environment for power generation and marketing will be discussed in detail, as will the opportunities these changes create for investment among private power producers.

  8. Long-term monitoring of reef corals at the Flower Garden Banks (northwest Gulf of Mexico): Reef coral population changes and historical incorporation of barium in Montastrea annularis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deslarzes, K.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reef coral populations were monitored from 1988 to 1991 at the Flower Garden Banks located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The status of reef coral populations, and natural or man-made factors potentially affecting their well-being were determined. Man-made chronic disturbances are degrading coral reef resources on a global scale. Yet, the Flower Garden coral reefs seem to have been sheltered from the effects of regional stresses generated by population growth and increased industrial activity. Since 1974, reef coral population levels have remained unchanged in the Montastrea-Diploria Zones at the Flower Garden Banks. Live coral cover ranges between 46 and 46.5%. Montastrea annularis and Diploria strigosa comprise 80% of the coral cover on either bank. The remainder of the cover is mostly shared by eight other taxa. Coral taxa appear to be more homogeneously distributed on the West Bank. The relatively greater number of Agaricia spp., Madracis decastis, and P. astreoides colonies on the East Bank may be the source of a decreased evenness. The health of reef corals was assessed using repetitive and non-repetitive photographic methods, and accretionary growth measurements of M. annularis. Reef corals have undergone small scale changes at the Flower Gardens probably reflecting natural disturbance, predation, disease, and inter-specific competition. White mat disease (ridge disease) is shown to generate more tissue loss than any of the three bleaching events that took place at the Flower Gardens (1989, 1990, and 1991). Advance to retreat linear ratios of encrusting growth revealed a net tissue gain on the East Bank and a net tissue loss on the West Bank. Growth rates of M. annularis were highly variable. The annual barium content from 1910 in 1989 in a M. annularis colony from the West Flower Garden did not reveal trends associated with the extensive oil and gas exploration in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Comprehensive characterization report on Winter Quarters Bay, McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, A.B.; White, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Winter Quarters Bay is a small embayment located adjacent to the United States largest base in Antarctica, McMurdo Station. McMurdo Station, which is managed by the National Science Foundation`s Office of Polar Programs, was constructed in 1955, has been in constant use since that time, and has a population of about 1,000 persons during the summer and about 250 people for the winter. The bay offers shelter for ships and an ice dock is used during January and February to off load fuel and cargo. During earlier times, trash from the McMurdo Station was piled on the steep shoreline of the bay, doused with several thousand gallons of fuel and ignited. That practice has ceased and the site has been regraded to cover the waste. The bottom of the bay is littered with drums, equipment, tanks, tires, all sorts of metal objects, cables, etc., especially the southeastern side where dumping took place. The sediments are gravel in some places yet fine and fluid at other sites with coarse particles intermixed. The original benthic community is not well recorded but significant ecological changes have occurred. Sediments are contaminated with PCBs, metals, and hydrocarbon fuels. This report summarizes available information on Winter Quarters Bay and was originally intended to be used by workshop participants to become familiar with the bay prior to becoming updated with unpublished data by various Antarctic investigators. The proposed workshop was to assist the National Science Foundation in determining whether and how the bay should be remediated and to develop an integrated research plan if additional data were needed. However, plans changed, the workshop was never conducted, but the briefing report was prepared. Most of this report reviews and summarizes other published data. The only new data are those from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory`s investigation into the distribution of organic contaminants in the bay and sediment toxicity testing.

  10. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  11. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  12. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  13. DESIGN AND TEST OF AN INSTRUMENT FOR MEASURING MICROTHERMAL SEEING ON THE MAGDALENA RIDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Klinglesmith, D. A.; Speights, J.; Clements, A.; Patel, J.

    2009-05-15

    We have constructed and operated an automated instrument for measuring ground-level microthermal seeing at the Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO). The MRO is located at an altitude of 10500' in the Cibola National Forest in New Mexico, USA. It is the planned site for the MRO Optical Interferometer (MROI) planned for up to 10 collecting elements, each with a diameter of 1.4 m, and baselines eventually up to approximately 400 m. As part of the preparation for construction we deployed a system to characterize the ground-level seeing across the observatory site. The instrument is built largely of off-the-shelf components, with only the sensor head and power supply requiring electronic board assembly. Even in those cases the board architecture is very simple. The first proof-of-concept system was deployed for several weeks in the autumn of 2004, and has since undergone several iterations. The latest configuration operates entirely off batteries, incorporates wireless data acquisition, and is thus able to operate in an area with no shelter, power, or communications. In this paper we present the design of the instrument, and show initial data. The microthermal tower has four sensor pairs at heights from 0.8 to 4.41 m, significantly lower than other microthermal experiments, because of the need to characterize the seeing near the ground. We find significant variation in the contribution of this range of heights to the seeing, contributing up to 0.''3 of the seeing at some times and only 0.''02 at other times. The individual sensor power spectra have a slope in the range of 1.4--1.5, which is lower than the 1.67 slope predicted by Kolmogorov turbulence theory. We measure the well known effect of improved seeing immediately around sunset. While we find significant variation in the microthermal seeing, we did not find a pattern of corresponding variations in weather conditions, suggesting that a complicated set of factors control microthermal turbulence.

  14. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  15. Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Henry C.; Han, Taewon; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Tschudi, William F.

    2011-07-17

    There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: closed and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percent age of the recirculation air is make-up air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both closed and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups: (1) Outside - coupons sheltered, located near or at the supply air inlet, but located before any filtering, (2) Supply - starting just after initial air filtering continuing inside the plenums and ducts feeding the data center rooms, and (3) Inside located inside the data center rooms near the IT equipment. Each coupon was exposed for thirty days and then sent to a laboratory for a corrosion rate measurement analysis. The goal of this research was to investigate whether gaseous contamination is a concern for U.S. data center operators as it relates to the reliability of IT equipment. More specifically, should there be an increased concern if outside air for IT equipment cooling is used To begin to answer this question limited exploratory measurements of corrosion rates in operating data centers in various locations were undertaken. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What is the precision of the measurements (2) What are the approximate statistical distributions of copper and silver corrosion rates in the sampled data centers(3) To what extent are copper and silver corrosion measurements related (4) What is the relationship of corrosion rate measurements between outside-air cooled data centers compared to closed data centers (5) How do corrosivity measurements relate to IT equipment failure rates The data from our limited sample size suggests that most United States data center operators should not be concerned with environmental gaseous contamination causing high IT equipment failure rates even when using outside-air cooling. The research team recommends additional basic research on how environmental conditions, specifically gaseous contamination, affect electronic equipment reliability.

  16. Interim Storage of Plutonium in Existing Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmall, T.D.

    1999-05-10

    'In this era of nuclear weapons disarmament and nonproliferation treaties, among many problems being faced by the Department of Energy is the safe disposal of plutonium. There is a large stockpile of plutonium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Center and it remains politically and environmentally strategic to relocate the inventory closer to a processing facility. Savannah River Site has been chosen as the final storage location, and the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF) is currently under construction for this purpose. With the ability of APSF to receive Rocky Flats material an estimated ten years away, DOE has decided to use the existing reactor building in K-Area of SRS as temporary storage to accelerate the removal of plutonium from Rocky Flats. There are enormous cost savings to the government that serve as incentive to start this removal as soon as possible, and the KAMS project is scheduled to receive the first shipment of plutonium in January 2000. The reactor building in K-Area was chosen for its hardened structure and upgraded seismic qualification, both resulting from an effort to restart the reactor in 1991. The KAMS project has faced unique challenges from Authorization Basis and Safety Analysis perspectives. Although modifying a reactor building from a production facility to a storage shelter is not technically difficult, the nature of plutonium has caused design and safety analysis engineers to make certain that the design of systems, structures and components included will protect the public, SRS workers, and the environment. A basic overview of the KAMS project follows. Plutonium will be measured and loaded into DOT Type-B shipping packages at Rocky Flats. The packages are 35-gallon stainless steel drums with multiple internal containment boundaries. DOE transportation vehicles will be used to ship the drums to the KAMS facility at SRS. They will then be unloaded, stacked and stored in specific locations throughout the reactor building. The storage life is projected to be ten years to allow the preparation of APSF. DOE has stipulated that there be no credible release during storage, since there are no design features in place to mitigate a release of plutonium (i.e. HEPA filters, facility containment boundaries, etc.). This mandate has presented most of the significant challenges to the safety analysis team. The shipping packages are designed to withstand certain accidents and conditions, but in order to take credit for these the storage environment must be strictly controlled. Damages to the packages from exposure to fire, dropping, crushing and other impact accidents have been analyzed, and appropriate preventative design features have been incorporated. Other efforts include the extension of the shipping life (roughly two years) to a suitable storage life of ten years. These issues include the effects of internal pressure increases, seal degradation and the presence of impurities. A process known as the Container Qualification Program has been conducted to address these issues. The KAMS project will be ready to receive the first shipment from Rocky Flats in January 2000. No credible design basis scenarios resulting in the release of plutonium exist. This work has been useful in the effort to provide a safer disposition of plutonium, but also the lessons learned and techniques established by the team will help with the analysis of future facility modifications.'

  17. A Cultural Resources Inventory and Historical Evaluation of the Smoky Atmospheric Nuclear Test, Areas 8, 9, and 10, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Robert C.; King, Maureen L.; Beck, Colleen M.; Falvey, Lauren W.; Menocal, Tatianna M.

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the results of a National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 cultural resources inventory and historical evaluation of the 1957 Smoky atmospheric test location on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Desert Research Institute (DRI) was tasked to conduct a cultural resources study of the Smoky test area as a result of a proposed undertaking by the Department of Energy Environmental Management. This undertaking involves investigating Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 for potential contaminants of concern as delineated in a Corrective Action Investigation Plan. CAU 550 is an area that spatially overlaps portions of the Smoky test location. Smoky, T-2c, was a 44 kt atmospheric nuclear test detonated at 5:30 am on August 31, 1957, on top of a 213.4 m (700 ft) 200 ton tower (T-2c) in Area 8 of the NNSS. Smoky was a weapons related test of the Plumbbob series (number 19) and part of the Department of Defense Exercise Desert Rock VII and VIII. The cultural resources effort involved the development of a historic context based on archival documents and engineering records, the inventory of the cultural resources in the Smoky test area and an associated military trench location in Areas 9 and 10, and an evaluation of the National Register eligibility of the cultural resources. The inventory of the Smoky test area resulted in the identification of structures, features, and artifacts related to the physical development of the test location and the post-test remains. The Smoky test area was designated historic district D104 and coincides with a historic archaeological site recorded as 26NY14794 and the military trenches designed for troop observation, site 26NY14795. Sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795 are spatially discrete with the trenches located 4.3 km (2.7 mi) southeast of the Smoky ground zero. As a result, historic district D104 is discontiguous and in total it covers 151.4 hectares (374 acres). The Smoky test location, recorded as historic district D104 and historic sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795, is the best preserved post-shot atmospheric nuclear tower test at the NNSS and possibly in the world. It is of local, national, and international importance due to nuclear testing’s pivotal role in the Cold War between the United States and the former Soviet Union. The district and sites are linked to the historic theme of atmospheric nuclear testing. D104 retains aspects of the engineering plan and design for the Smoky tower, instrument stations used to measure test effects, German and French personnel shelters, and military trenches. A total of 33 structures contribute to the significance of D104. Artifacts and features provide significant post-test information. Historic district D104 (discontiguous) and historic site 26NY14794 (the Smoky test area) are eligible for listing on the NRHP under Criteria A, B, C, and D. The historic site 26NY14795 (the Smoky military trenches) is eligible for listing under Criteria A, C, and D. Several items have been identified for removal by the CAU 550 investigation. However, none of them is associated with the Smoky atmospheric test, but with later activities in the area. The military trenches are not part of CAU 550 and no actions are planned there. A proposed closure of the Smoky test area with restrictions will limit access and contribute to the preservation of the cultural resources. It is recommended that the Smoky historic district and sites be included in the NNSS cultural resources monitoring program.

  18. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO2 particle fuel up to about 10% FIMA and 1150C, UO2 fuel is known to have limitations because of CO formation and kernel migration at the high burnups, power densities, temperatures, and temperature gradients that may be encountered in the prismatic modular HTGRs. With uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel, the kernel composition is engineered to prevent CO formation and kernel migration, which are key threats to fuel integrity at higher burnups, temperatures, and temperature gradients. Furthermore, the recent poor fuel performance of UO2 TRISO fuel pebbles measured in Chinese irradiation testing in Russia and in German pebbles irradiated at 1250C, and historic data on poorer fuel performance in safety testing of German pebbles that experienced burnups in excess of 10% FIMA [1] have each raised concern about the use of UO2 TRISO above 10% FIMA and 1150C and the degree of margin available in the fuel system. This continues to be an active area of study internationally.

  19. Wind Energy Resource Assessment of the Caribbean and Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Elliott; CI Aspliden; GL Gower; CG Holladay, MN Schwartz

    1987-04-01

    A wind energy resource assessment of the Caribbean and Central America has identified many areas with good to outstanding wind resource potential for wind turbine applications. Annual average wind resource maps and summary tables have been developed for 35 island/country areas throughout the Caribbean and Central America region. The wind resource maps highlight the locations of major resource areas and provide estimates of the wind energy resource potential for typical well-exposed sites in these areas. The average energy in the wind flowing in the layer near the ground is expressed as a wind power class: the greater the average wind energy, the higher the wind power class. The summary tables that are included with each of the 35 island/country wind energy maps provide information on the frequency distribution of the wind speeds (expressed as estimates of the Weibull shape factor, k) and seasonal variations in the wind resource for the major wind resource areas identified on the maps. A new wind power class legend has been developed for relating the wind power classes to values of mean wind power density, mean wind speed, and Weibull k. Guidelines are presented on how to adjust these values to various heights above ground for different roughness and terrain characteristics. Information evaluated in preparing the assessment included existing meteorological data from airports and other weather stations, and from ships and buoys in offshore and coastal areas. In addition, new data from recent measurement sites established for wind energy siting studies were obtained for a few areas of the Caribbean. Other types of information evaluated in the assessment were climatological data and maps on winds aloft, surface pressure, air flow, and topography. The various data were screened and evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. Much of the surface data from airports and other land-based weather stations were determined to be from sheltered sites and were thus not very useful in assessing the wind resource at locations that are well exposed to the winds. Ship data were determined to be the most useful for estimating the large-scale wind flow and assessing the spatial distribution of the wind resource throughout the region. Techniques were developed for analyzing and correcting ship wind data and extrapolating these data to coastal and inland areas by considering terrain influences on the large-scale wind flow. In areas where extrapolation of ship wind data was not entirely feasible, such as interior areas of Central America, other techniques were developed for estimating the wind flow and distribution of the wind resource. Through the application of the various innovative techniques developed for assessing the wind resource throughout the Caribbean and Central America region, many areas with potentially good to outstanding wind resource were identified that had not been previously recognized. In areas where existing site data were available from exposed locations, the measured wind resource was compared with the estimated wind resource that was derived using the assessment techniques. In most cases, there was good agreement between the measured wind resource and the estimated wind resource. This assessment project supported activities being pursued by the U.S. Committee for Renewable Energy Commerce and Trade (CORECT), the U.S. government's interagency program to assist in overseas marketing and promote renewable energy exports. An overall goal of the program is to improve U.S. competitiveness in the world renewable energy market. The Caribbean and Central America assessment, which is the first of several possible follow-on international wind energy resource assessments, provides valuable information needed by the U.S. wind energy industry to identify suitable wind resource areas and concentrate their efforts on these areas.

  20. Special population planner, version 4.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

    2007-03-26

    Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

  1. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01

    Radioecology is the study of the fate and transport and potential effects of radionuclides and associated contaminants in the environment. In short, it is the science that describes the fundamental connection between environmental health and human health risks. As such, radioecology can and has provided the credible, consistent and defensible basis for the successful and cost-effective environmental cleanup and closure of nuclear production and waste sites. In addition, radioecology also provides the technical basis for making timely and reliable decisions on cleanup in the aftermath of nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. The 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident resulted in catastrophic health, social, and economic consequences in many countries, predominantly, Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. The extent of radioactive contamination, levels and forms of contamination, and diversity of the ecosystems affected by the accident did not have any precedent and provided unique opportunities for environmental scientists around the world. Following the natural course of their development, populations of species and their communities found themselves in conditions of chronic radiation exposure that exceeded the natural background by factors of hundreds and thousands. Anything similar would have been extremely difficult if not impossible to recreate in a scientific laboratory. Consequently, since the first few years after the accident, many teams of scientists have visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The knowledge gained by studying the consequences of this accident has tremendous importance. The concept of an international research and technical center to address the problems involving nuclear and radiological accidents became a reality with the establishment of the International Chernobyl Center (ICC). In May 1995, the US and Ukraine signed a Protocol of Intent on establishment of the ICC, and the government of Ukraine appealed to the international scientific community to support ICC and join its activities (Chernobyl Center 2006). In December 1995, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on the ChNPP closure was signed by the government of Ukraine, all of the G7 governments, and the European Commission. The ICC foundation was considered critical to ensure the safe decommissioning of the ChNPP reactor units and improvement of the safety of the Chernobyl Containment Shelter. On the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident (26 April 1996), Mr. Viktor Yushchenko, the President of Ukraine, issued a decree to establish the Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology (Chernobyl Center). On the same day, a MOU involving the US participation in Chernobyl Center activities was signed by the US and Ukraine (Chernobyl Center 2006). In July 1998, the US and Ukraine signed an agreement to establish the International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) as part of the Chernobyl Center. The creation of IRL was a logical continuation of previous programs to conduct scientific research in radioecology and provide Ukraine and the rest of the world with the necessary infrastructure and scientific basis to conduct research in radioecology, radiobiology, dosimetry, and environmental protection in the ChEZ (Chernobyl Center 2006). A recent collaborative effort with IRL has been implemented through a project titled 'Long-term impacts from radiation/contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone' (Farfan et al. 2008; Gerdes et al. 2009; Marra et al. 2010). This collaboration had the following objectives: (1) Assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure within the ChEZ; (2) Provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories based on the results of long-term field monitoring, analytical measurements, and numerical modeling of soils and groundwater radioactive contamination; and (3) Recommend the development and testing of effective cleanup technologies to reduce environmental and health risks. Based on this work, a large amount of data are now available for publication, some of which are presented in this Special Issue of the Health Physics Journal.