Sample records for organisms synthetic biology

  1. Guest Editors' Introduction: Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densmore, Douglas

    + undergraduate participants from around the world. Synthetic Biology had a global market which gene- rated $233 Tufts University h SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY IS trending, as evidenced by the recent achievements in biofuels

  2. Synthetic biology and crop engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA–E

  3. 2003 Synthetic Biology study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endy, Drew

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology is a technology for processing information, materials, and energy. As a technology platform, biological systems provide access to artifacts and processes across a range of scales (e.g., the ribosome is a programmable ...

  4. Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

  5. Aspects of the political economy of development and synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellhausen, Rachel

    What implications might synthetic biology’s potential as a wholly new method of production have for the world economy, particularly developing countries? Theories of political economy predict that synthetic biology can ...

  6. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  7. What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Scott C.

    Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

  8. Directed evolution: an evolving and enabling synthetic biology tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Directed evolution: an evolving and enabling synthetic biology tool Ryan E Cobb1 , Tong Si1 remains a valuable tool for synthetic biology, enabling the identification of desired functionalities from biological entity with the intent of identifying those with desired proper- ties. While a powerful tool

  9. Dissecting Cell Signaling Using Synthetic Biology: New Methods...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dissecting Cell Signaling Using Synthetic Biology: New Methods for Engineered Control of Protein Kinases and Phosphatases Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility...

  10. Retroactivity, modularity, and insulation in synthetic biology circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Allen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A central concept in synthetic biology is the reuse of well-characterized modules. Modularity simplifies circuit design by allowing for the decomposition of systems into separate modules for individual construction. Complex ...

  11. The Evolutionary Systems Biology Team Synthetic Biology/Citizen Science Post-doctoral position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Evolutionary Systems Biology Team Synthetic Biology/Citizen Science Post-doctoral position We in citizen science projects.The post-doc will join the extended CRI lab that includes synthetic and systems-sourcing, DIY approaches and gamification as part of a new European- funded project, Citizen CyberLab - a three

  12. nature biotechnology volume 27 number 12 december 2009 1127 Recent patent applications in synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    for controlling cell function, as a raw material in synthetic biology for reconstructing a biomolecule relative to the expression in the first organism strain prior to its transformation. Advanced Biofuels element having a left inverted repeat region, a right inverted repeat region and a spacer region

  13. Synthetic biology and the conservation of biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redford, Kent H.; Adams, William; Carlson, Rob; Mace, Georgina M.; Ceccarelli, Bertina

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    reference to previous debates about land acquisition to grow biofuels, the production 202 of biologically-based chemicals and plastics, and the industrial burning of biomass. 203 Yet not all technologies are the same, nor are the people who use them...

  14. Bringing Standards to Life: Synthetic Biology Standards and Intellectual Property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrance, Andrew W.; Kahl, Linda

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ); Joachim Henckel & Stephen M. Maurer, The Economics of Synthetic Biology, MOL. SYST. BIOL., June 5, 2007, available at http://www.nature.com/msb/journal/v3/n1/full/msb4100161.html; David Cohn, Open-Source Biology Evolves, WIRED (Jan. 17, 2005), http... different genetic contexts.55 Other tools that help rationally Linton et al., Translocation of Green F luorescent Protein by Comparative Analysis with Multiple Signal Peptides, 7 BIOTECHNOL. J. 667 (2012); Raul Cuero, J. Lilly & David S. Mc...

  15. Controlled polymer synthesis--from biomimicry towards synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    . In particular, he develops competitive search methodologies and intelligent decision support systems over lengthscales ranging from a few nm to several microns is generating systems that not only begin and soft materials for synthetic biology. He is currently a research associate at IESL-FORTH, Heraklion

  16. Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions Harish Chandran1 of DNA manipulations achieved by protein enzymes be simulated via simple DNA hybridization chemistry? In this work, we develop a biochemical system which we call meta-DNA (abbreviated as mDNA), based on strands

  17. Defossiling Fuel: How Synthetic Biology Can Transform Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Defossiling Fuel: How Synthetic Biology Can Transform Biofuel Production David F. Savage , Jeffrey production is pre- dicted to peak soon, it is reason- able to assume that unconventional fossil fuel sources and economic energy volatility, and smoothing the transition from fossil fuels in the distant future

  18. Survey and Control of Synthetic Organics in Texas Water Supplies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batchelor, B.; Shannon, J. D.; Yang, P.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 109 1981 Survey and Control of Synthetic Organics in Texas Water Supplies B. Batchelor J.D. Shannon P. Yang Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  19. Renewable Energy from Synthetic Biology (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Keasling, Jay

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Jay Keasling, co-leader of Berkeley Lab's Helios Project, is a groundbreaking researcher in the new scientific field of synthetic biology. In Helios, he directs the biology program, incorporating a range of approaches to increasing the efficacy and economy of plants and cellulose-degrading microbes to make solar-based fuels. He is a UC Berkeley professor of Chemical and Bioengineering, and founder of Amyris Biotechnologies, a company that was honored as a Technology Pioneer for 2006 by the World Economic Forum. Keasling has succeeded in using synthetic biology to develop a yeast-based production scheme for precursors of the antimalarial drug artemisinin in work funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  20. Synthetic Control of Organic Semiconductor Excited States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clem, Tabitha Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecules for Organic Photovoltaics Abstract The synthesis,with a particular focus on photovoltaics. The first chapterfor Organic Photovoltaics Chapter 3: Cyclometalated Platinum

  1. Synthetic biological membrane with self organizing properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Millicent A. (Elmhurst, IL); Tiede, David M. (Elmhurst, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixture is provided which manifests a gel phase at a temperature higher than that in which the mixture manifests a liquid phase. The mixture is a combination of a lipid, a polymer-grafted phospholipid and a surfactant. It is biomimetic in nature and changes phases when subjected to one or a plurality of environmental stimuli.

  2. Safe, secure and ethical? : assessing and regulating risks associated with synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regårdh, Pernilla C. (Pernilla Christina)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic biology is an emerging field, with a rapidly developing academic-industrial base and the promise of extensive product launches over the next few years. An intense debate over the risks and benefits of synthetic ...

  3. Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Sarah R. [J. Craig Venter Institute; Rodemeyer, Michael [University of Virginia; Garfinkel, Michele S. [EMBO; Friedman, Robert M [J. Craig Venter Institute

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options Sarah R. Carter, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute; Michael Rodemeyer, J.D., University of Virginia; Michele S. Garfinkel, Ph.D., EMBO; Robert M. Friedman, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute In recent years, a range of genetic engineering techniques referred to as “synthetic biology” has significantly expanded the tool kit available to scientists and engineers, providing them with far greater capabilities to engineer organisms than previous techniques allowed. The field of synthetic biology includes the relatively new ability to synthesize long pieces of DNA from chemicals, as well as improved methods for genetic manipulation and design of genetic pathways to achieve more precise control of biological systems. These advances will help usher in a new generation of genetically engineered microbes, plants, and animals. The JCVI Policy Center team, along with researchers at the University of Virginia and EMBO, examined how well the current U.S. regulatory system for genetically engineered products will handle the near-term introduction of organisms engineered using synthetic biology. In particular, the focus was on those organisms intended to be used or grown directly in the environment, outside of a contained facility. The study concludes that the U.S. regulatory agencies have adequate legal authority to address most, but not all, potential environmental, health and safety concerns posed by these organisms. Such near-term products are likely to represent incremental changes rather than a marked departure from previous genetically engineered organisms. However, the study also identified two key challenges for the regulatory system, which are detailed in the report. First, USDA’s authority over genetically engineered plants depends on the use of an older engineering technique that is no longer necessary for many applications. The shift to synthetic biology and other newer genetic engineering techniques will leave many engineered plants without any pre-market regulatory review. Second, the number and diversity of engineered microbes for commercial use will increase in the near future, challenging EPA’s resources, expertise, and perhaps authority to regulate them. For each of these challenges, the report sets out a series of options, including an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each option from a variety of perspectives, for policy makers to consider. Policy responses will depend on the trade-offs chosen among competing considerations. This report, funded by the Department of Energy with additional funds from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, is the result of a two-year process that included interviews, commissioned background papers, discussions, and two workshops that sought input from a wide range of experts, including U.S. federal agency regulators, legal and science policy experts, representatives from the biotechnology indus¬try, and non-governmental organiza¬tions. This cross-section of views informed this report, but the conclusions are solely those of the authors. An Executive Summary, full Report, and background papers are available at: http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/synthetic-biology-and-the-us-biotechnology-regulatory-system/overview/

  4. SciTech Connect: Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY synthetic biology, biotechnology...

  5. Uncertainty in synthetic biology for release and possibilities for regulation under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightfoot, Shlomiya

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emerging field of synthetic biology is developing rapidly and promises diverse applications. Many anticipated applications, particularly those involving release of engineered microbes into the environment or human ...

  6. Imperial College Institute of Systems and Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synthetic genomics: progress on construction of a synthetic bacterial cell 12.35 Discussion 12.55 Lunch Designing and Mining (Pathogen) Genome Databases 14.30 Plenary 3 Dr George Christophides, Imperial College

  7. Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Conclusion ·Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production. ·MgSO4 .7H2O is a required nutrient, but hydrogen production work should focus on minimizing the lag time in biological hydrogen production, by varying nutrient

  8. A Synthetic Biology Framework for Programming Eukaryotic Transcription Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, Ahmad S.

    Eukaryotic transcription factors (TFs) perform complex and combinatorial functions within transcriptional networks. Here, we present a synthetic framework for systematically constructing eukaryotic transcription functions ...

  9. Strategies for designing, testing and demonstrating safety : what synthetic biology can learn from retrospective cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeddanapudi, Neelima, 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technology field within the realm of genetic engineering, differing from traditional genetic engineering in that it focuses on the modularization of genetic parts and the creation of de ...

  10. Landauer in the age of synthetic biology: energy consumption and information processing in biochemical networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to design sophisticated synthetic cellular circuits that can perform complex computations and information processing tasks in response to specific inputs. The tremendous advances in our ability to understand and manipulate cellular information processing networks raises several fundamental physics questions: How do the molecular components of cellular circuits exploit energy consumption to improve information processing? Can one utilize ideas from thermodynamics to improve the design of synthetic cellular circuits and modules? Here, we summarize recent theoretical work addressing these questions. Energy consumption in cellular circuits serves five basic purposes: (1) increasing specificity, (2) manipulating dynamics, (3) reducing variability, (4) amplifying signal, and (5) erasing memory. We demonstrate these ideas using several simple examples and discuss the implications of these theoretical ideas for the emerging field of synthetic biology. We conclude by discussing h...

  11. A Platform-Based Design Environment for Synthetic Biological Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densmore, Douglas

    in drug pro- duction, biofuels, and drug delivery vessels. In an attempt to standardize this process, and the notion of both "top down" and "bottom up" design styles. 1.1 Requirements In the world of biology one can

  12. IAP Statement on Realising Global Potential in Synthetic Biology: Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swain, Peter

    in the generation and optimal use of biofuels. Further ahead there are possible applications of this biological or a less radical, incremental advance. It is the purpose of the present IAP Statement, based on previous and ongoing academy activities, to emphasise that the advance of science must be connected to global policy

  13. Challenges and opportunities in synthetic biology for chemical engineers Yunzi Luo a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Challenges and opportunities in synthetic biology for chemical engineers Yunzi Luo a , Jung-Kul Lee c , Huimin Zhao a,b,n a Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, United States c Department of Chemical Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, South Korea H I G H

  14. Meta-DNA: Synthetic Biology via DNA Nanostructures and Hybridization Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Meta-DNA: Synthetic Biology via DNA Nanostructures and Hybridization Reactions Harish Chandran for desired functionality. The approach of this paper is to develop a biochemical system which we call meta-DNA (abbreviated as mDNA), based entirely on strands of DNA as the only component molecule. Our work leverages

  15. Materials from Renewable Resources Most synthetic organic materials and polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    initiative of the faculties of chemistry and pharmacy, physics, biology, didactics and the Straubing Center complete the activities o To support the resear didactics and the Straubing Center of Science

  16. New Design and Synthetic Strategies of Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Zhangwen

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    -sized linkers which would require complicated organic synthesis with traditional methods. A non-rigid MOF named as PCN-91 containing nano-sized metallo-linkers has been synthesized easily using a linear bipolar organic linker with carboxylate and pyrazolato...

  17. Part Mining for Synthetic Biology (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voigt, Chris [MIT

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chris Voigt from MIT delivers the opening keynote on "Part Mining for Synthetic Biology" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 26, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  18. Bridging gaps in synthetic biology oversight : iGEM as a testbed for proactive, adaptive risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNamara, Julie H. (Julie Hutton)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the surface, the emerging field of synthetic biology looks highly similar to that of genetic engineering. However, the two fields are based upon divergent underlying logic structures. Whereas genetic engineering affects ...

  19. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuk Lee, Sung; Chou, Howard; Ham, Timothy S.; Soon Lee, Taek; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to generate microorganisms that can produce biofuels similar to petroleum-based transportation fuels would allow the use of existing engines and infrastructure and would save an enormous amount of capital required for replacing the current infrastructure to accommodate biofuels that have properties significantly different from petroleum-based fuels. Several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of manipulating microbes to produce molecules similar to petroleum-derived products, albeit at relatively low productivity (e.g. maximum butanol production is around 20 g/L). For cost-effective production of biofuels, the fuel-producing hosts and pathways must be engineered and optimized. Advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for metabolic engineers to better understand how to rewire the cell in order to create the desired phenotypes for the production of economically viable biofuels.

  20. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  1. C H A P T E R F O U R T E E N Microfluidics for Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasty, Jeff

    C H A P T E R F O U R T E E N Microfluidics for Synthetic Biology: From Design to Execution M. S of a microfluidic chip 298 1.2. A parallel DAW device 322 1.3. Cell tracking 326 1.4. DAW hardware and software 334. coli 358 3.2. Method to set up a MDAW microfluidic experiment 364 Acknowledgments 371 References 371

  2. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

  3. Synthetic Metagenomics: Converting digital information back to Biology (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, Sam [DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sam Deutsch of the DOE JGI on "Synthetic Metagenomics: Converting digital information back to Biology" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  4. SYNFORMPeople, Trends and Views in Synthetic Organic Chemistry Direct Conversion of Arylamines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianbo

    the organic molecules which are essential components of drugs, materials, agrochemicals, and all the organic

  5. New Synthetic Methods for Hypericum Natural Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insik Jeon

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic chemistry has served as a solid foundation for interdisciplinary research areas, such as molecular biology and medicinal chemistry. An understanding of the biological activities and structural elucidations of natural products can lead to the development of clinically valuable therapeutic options. The advancements of modern synthetic methodologies allow for more elaborate and concise natural product syntheses. The theme of this study centers on the synthesis of natural products with particularly challenging structures and interesting biological activities. The synthetic expertise developed here will be applicable to analog syntheses and to other research problems.

  6. Single nanopore transport of synthetic and biological polyelectrolytes in three-dimensional hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    King, Travis L.; Gatimu, Enid N.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of electrokinetic transport in single nanopores integrated into vertically-stacked three-dimensional hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic structures. In these devices single nanopores, created by focused ion beam (FIB) milling in thin polymer films, provide fluidic connection between two vertically separated, perpendicular microfluidic channels. Experiments address both systems in which the nanoporous membrane is composed of the same (homojunction) or different (heterojunction) polymer as the microfluidic channels. These devices are then used to study the electrokinetic transport properties of synthetic (i.e., polystyrene sulfonate and polyallylamine) and biological (i.e.,DNA) polyelectrolytes across these nanopores. Single nanopore transport of polyelectrolytes across these nanoporesmore »using both electrical current measurements and confocal microscopy. Both optical and electrical measurements indicate that electroosmotic transport is predominant over electrophoresis in single nanopores with d > 180 nm, consistent with results obtained under similar conditions for nanocapillary array membranes.« less

  7. Single nanopore transport of synthetic and biological polyelectrolytes in three-dimensional hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    King, Travis L. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Univ. of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Gatimu, Enid N. [Univ. of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Bohn, Paul W. [Univ. of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of electrokinetic transport in single nanopores integrated into vertically-stacked three-dimensional hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic structures. In these devices single nanopores, created by focused ion beam (FIB) milling in thin polymer films, provide fluidic connection between two vertically separated, perpendicular microfluidic channels. Experiments address both systems in which the nanoporous membrane is composed of the same (homojunction) or different (heterojunction) polymer as the microfluidic channels. These devices are then used to study the electrokinetic transport properties of synthetic (i.e., polystyrene sulfonate and polyallylamine) and biological (i.e.,DNA) polyelectrolytes across these nanopores. Single nanopore transport of polyelectrolytes across these nanopores using both electrical current measurements and confocal microscopy. Both optical and electrical measurements indicate that electroosmotic transport is predominant over electrophoresis in single nanopores with d > 180 nm, consistent with results obtained under similar conditions for nanocapillary array membranes.

  8. Application of novel methods using synthetic biology tools to investigate solvent toxicity in bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Eugene Kobina Arhin

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxicity of organic solvents to microbial hosts is a major consideration in the economical production of biofuels such as ethanol and especially butanol, with low product concentrations leading to high recovery costs. ...

  9. An Imaging Roadmap for Biology Education: From Nanoparticles to Whole Organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Article An Imaging Roadmap for Biology Education: From Nanoparticles to Whole Organisms Daniel J in the biology curriculum. Guided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap initiatives, we incorporated of an introductory course on ways of knowing biology. Activities were derived from NIH Roadmap initiatives

  10. The removal kinetics of industrial organic compounds in natural and synthetic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrasek, Albert Charles

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the value of the 1ndependent variable, and those data in which the dependent variable 1s a function of the 1ndependent variable. This program has wide appl1cation whenever data analysis is necessary, and the volume dictates more rapid', processing.... Lineprinter 'listing of dissolved oxygen unit rate curve parameters. 131 xii LI. ST OF TABLES (CONTINUED) Table Ul-10. Computer listing of NLSS values computed from the approximation function. UI-ll. List of computed total organic carbon concentrations...

  11. Nanomechanical properties of hydrated organic thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jae Hyeok

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrated organic thin films are biological or synthetic molecularly thin coatings which impart a particular functionality to an underlying substrate and which have discrete water molecules associated with them. Such films ...

  12. What is compost? Composting refers to biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    What is compost? Composting refers to biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under aerobic conditions (in the presence of oxygen). During the composting is production of good-quality compost that is biologically stable, relatively uniform in appearance, free

  13. Theory: Biological systems organize to maximize entropy production subject to information and biophysicochemical constraints.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Theory: Biological systems organize to maximize entropy production subject to information the fitness landscape is as dynamic as the organisms themselves. The theory of MEP under biophysicochemical, 2005b) presented a provisional proof on the theory of maximum entropy production (MEP), which posits

  14. BIOL/MATH 393 Synthetic Biology Professors: Dr. Kristin O'Brien, kmobrien@alaska.edu, 474-5311

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    : Microbes that convert corn into plastic; a microbial fuel cell that generates electricity; E. coli bacteria that synthesize hemoglobin used for blood transfusions; E. coli that sense and destroy cancer cells- all. They will work together to design a synthetic microbe, construct the microbe and present results to the class

  15. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO); Maness, Pin-Ching (Golden, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer.

  16. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, P.F.; Pinching Maness.

    1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer. 3 figures.

  17. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292­2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza´ c ova´ a,b,Ã, Hana Hrs elova´ a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  18. Metal?organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, Phoebe K.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M. Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Megson, Ian L.; Chapman, Karena W.; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E. (St Andrews)

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

  19. Publications, Personnel and Government Organizations Related to the Limnology, Aquatic Biology and Ichthyology of the Inland Waters of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W.J.

    TR- 5 1966 Publications, Personnel and Government Organizations Related to Limnology, Aquatic Biology and Ichthyology of the Inland Waters of Texas W.J. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute...

  20. Attribute Cr. Course Name Prereq 4 BIOL 220 (204) Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology, Evolution Plus Lab and discussion (Fall)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    Attribute Cr. Course Name Prereqs Prereq 4 BIOL 220 (204) Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology Foundations of Learning and Memory (Fall, Spr) Beh. Elec. 3 PSYC 317 Sensation and Perception (Fall) Beh

  1. Synthetic aircraft turbine oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaffe, R.

    1982-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic lubricating oil composition having improved oxidation stability comprising a major portion of an aliphatic ester base oil having lubricating properties, formed by the reaction of pentaerythritol and an organic monocarboxylic acid and containing a phenylnaphthylamine, a dialkyldiphenylamine, a polyhydroxy anthraquinone, a hydrocarbyl phosphate ester and a dialkyldisulfide.

  2. Cellular delivery and site-specific targeting of organic fluorophores for super-resolution imaging in living cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uttamapinant, Chayasith

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy have pushed the spatial resolution of biological imaging down to a few nanometers. The key element to the development of such imaging modality is synthetic organic ...

  3. Computers are from Mars, Organisms are from Venus: Interrelationship guide to Biology and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Junhyong

    . In recent years one active area of interdisciplinary merger has been biology and computer science. The noise youthful sciences? There is a kind of a natural affinity between biology and computer science. E is to "get over the mythical idea of an expert." Biology meets Computer Science: Computational Biology

  4. future science group 9ISSN 1759-726910.4155/BFS.11.151 2012 Future Science Ltd Synthetic biology approaches to biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasty, Jeff

    approaches to biofuel production Editorial Biofuels (2012) 3(1), 9­12 "...it is important for synthetic there is a tendency, par- ticularly in the algae biofuel space, to prioritize high yields without sufficient regard large enough volumes of biofuels at a low enough cost to make this significant leap in the national

  5. Synthetic morphogenesis : space, time, and deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, Micah Z. (Micah Zev)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic biology has presented engineers with a fascinating opportunity: can we understand the principles of our origins { animal embryonic development - by re-engineering it in the laboratory? I investigate, from an ...

  6. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiological andU.S.Biology

  7. Synthetic chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal function of the chloroplast is to capture solar quanta and to store them in some stable form. We are in the process of trying to construct a totally synthetic system that would simulate some of the reactions of the two photosystems which occur in natural chloroplasts. Toward this end, we have demonstrated a number of the reactions required in separated systems. We have shown that it is possible to transfer electrons across an insulating membrane barrier with a surfactant photosensitizer. Others have shown, and we have confirmed, that it is possible to collect the two electrons necessary for the generation of molecular hydrogen on a heterogeneous catalyst suspended in water and similarly to collect the four holes on another heterogeneous catalyst suspended in water for the generation of molecular oxygen. A synthesis of some of these molecular catalysts for both these purposes is underway, with some partial success. When these partial reactions are assembled in a system, the resulting synthetic chloroplasts will not resemble the natural entity in detailed construction as they will contain no protein.

  8. Biologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis H. Kauffman

    2002-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers >protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  9. Organic Matter Composition, Recycling Susceptibility, and the Effectiveness of the Biological Pump – An Evaluation Using NMR Spectra of Marine Plankton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paytan, Adina [UCSC] [UCSC

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon (C) sequestration through fertilization of phytoplankton with micronutrients and enhancement of the absorption and retention of atmospheric C by ocean biota heavily depends on the efficiency of the “biological pump”. The long-term effectiveness of this strategy depends on a net transfer of C from the upper ocean-atmosphere system to the deep ocean where the C is removed from contact with the atmosphere for an extended period of time. This C removal can be equated to the amount of C fixation by phytoplankton minus the C cycling and regeneration in the euphotic zone. If the regeneration efficiency is increased, then despite increased C fixation, no net loss (sequestration) of C will result. A reduction in cycling efficiency in the euphotic zone, on the other hand, will increase the effectiveness of the “biological pump” and thus C sequestration. The degree of organic matter biodegradation and recycling depends on the “reactivity” of compounds synthesized by the biota, which in turn, is controlled by the structural characteristic of these compounds. There is considerable evidence that different phytoplankton taxa differ substantially in their biogeochemical characteristics and it is likely that the relative abundance of different compounds synthesized by these distinct taxa, and even within each group at different growth conditions, will differ too. This variability in biosynthesis and thus abundance of a wide range of organic compounds in the water column would lend itself to different susceptibility for biodegradation and regeneration. Knowledge of the distribution of various organic matter structural groups synthesized by distinct taxa, the dependence of the organic matter compound classes on different growth conditions (temperature, light, nutrients) and the selective susceptibility of these compound to regeneration is crucial for estimating the potential for rapid regeneration in the euphotic zone, and thus the effectiveness of the “biological pump”.

  10. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  11. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater : structure, cycling, and the role of biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan, Tracy M. (Tracy Michelle), 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate three different areas relating to the characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): further determination of the chemical compounds present in high molecular weight DOM ...

  12. Modular Design of Artificial Tissue Homeostasis: Robust Control through Synthetic Cellular Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Miles Aaron

    Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present ...

  13. Introduction to Bioinformatics A Systems Biology Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    Introduction to Bioinformatics A Systems Biology Approach Luis M. Rocha Complex Systems Modeling Computational Biology to Bioinformatics Course Layout: March 11-15, 2002 #12;P Systems Biology P Synthetic, Multi- Disciplinary Approach

  14. Development and Applications Of Photosensitive Device Systems To Studies Of Biological And Organic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruner, Sol

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary focus of the grant is the development of new x-ray detectors for biological and materials work at synchrotron sources, especially Pixel Array Detectors (PADs), and the training of students via research applications to problems in biophysics and materials science using novel x-ray methods. This Final Progress Report provides a high-level overview of the most important accomplishments. These major areas of accomplishment include: (1) Development and application of x-ray Pixel Array Detectors; (2) Development and application of methods of high pressure x-ray crystallography as applied to proteins; (3) Studies on the synthesis and structure of novel mesophase materials derived from block co-polymers.

  15. A mutation in ?-tubulin alters microtubule dynamics and organization and is synthetically lethal with the kinesin-like protein Pkl1p

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluh, Janet L.; Nogales, Eva; Oakley, Berl R.; McDonald, Kent; Pidoux, Alison; Cande, W.Z.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 1999). Human g-tubulin can replace the endogenous protein in fission yeast (Horio and Oakley, 1994), suggesting that key aspects of g-tubulin function are broadly conserved. Microtubule motors play important roles in spindle as- sembly and dynamics. A.... The following strains and plasmids were kind gifts: mad22 strain (h2 ade6-M210, leu1-32, ura4-D18, mad2::ura41) from Dr. Shelly Sazar (Verna and Marrs McLean Departments of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; He et al., 1997...

  16. acid synthetic p17: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    within bacteria in order to fine-tune the expression of BioBrick parts and devices. Fortuna, Patrick 2010-12-04 55 Synthesizing Law for Synthetic Biology University of Kansas -...

  17. applied synthetic auxin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    within bacteria in order to fine-tune the expression of BioBrick parts and devices. Fortuna, Patrick 2010-12-04 112 Synthesizing Law for Synthetic Biology University of Kansas -...

  18. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography: reconstruction by synthetic aperture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Dazi

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have applied the synthetic-aperture method to linear-scanning microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography in biological tissues. A non-focused ultrasonic transducer was used to receive thermoacoustic signals, to which the delay-and-sum algorithm...

  19. Information Technology for Synthetic Biology Masami Hagiya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagiya, Masami

    bacteria that can produce biofuel much more efficiently than natural bacteria, or bacteria that can live universities all #12;over the world meet to present their ideas and findings about artificial cells [iGEM2009

  20. AN INTEGRATIVE APPROACH TO SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Danh

    /18/2011UCDavis 18 #12;PLASMID CONSTRUCTION FROM STANDARD PARTS 4/18/2011UCDavis 19 #12;SCREENING FOR MUTANTS 4

  1. Synthetic biology approach to cellulose degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhundi, Sahreena Saleem

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on earth, is composed of ? – 1,4 – linked glucose units, which in turn form a highly ordered crystalline structure that is insoluble and recalcitrant to degradation. It is the ...

  2. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  3. Synthetic creation of a chemotactic system via utilization of magnetically actuated microrobotic walkers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steimel, Joshua Paul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemotaxis is a fundamental biological process that plays an important role in disease, reproduction, and most biological functions. Here, we present a radically novel method to create the first synthetic chemotactic system ...

  4. Saga of synthetic rubber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solo, R.A.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposal to establish an Energy Mobilization Board and a synthetic fuels industry is reminiscent of World War II efforts to produce synthetic rubber. To avoid the mistakes made in the earlier effort, Mr. Solo suggests that the synthetic-fuel program should (1) use a more-successful technological development project as a model; (2) commit public funding and not rely on profit-oriented private enterprise; and (3) avoid entrusting social planning to single-purpose entities that have not been sensitive to social values. (DCK)

  5. DISTRIBUTED AND COLLABORATIVE SYNTHETIC ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    1 DISTRIBUTED AND COLLABORATIVE SYNTHETIC ENVIRONMENTS Chandrajit L. Bajaj and Fausto Bernardini with synthetic environments1,2,3,4,5,6 . A synthetic environment system is generally characterized and the synthetic environment generated by the computer. Several degrees of immersion are possible, ranging from

  6. Synthetic Control of Organic Semiconductor Excited States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clem, Tabitha Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled Keithley 236 SMU. References Thompson, B. ;controlled Keithley 236 SMU. References Markov, D. E. ;controlled Keithley 236 SMU. Polymer mobility was measured

  7. Synthetic Control of Organic Semiconductor Excited States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clem, Tabitha Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties and Photovoltaic Performance. Abstract Theproperties, and photovoltaic performance of a small moleculeproperties, and photovoltaic performance of a small molecule

  8. Synthetic Control of Organic Semiconductor Excited States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clem, Tabitha Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obtained (J sc or short-circuit current density) and thephotocurrent, the short circuit current density in the Pt-

  9. Environmental effects of dredging. Interim results: The relationship between sediment organic carbon and biological uptake of contaminants. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, J.M.; Price, C.B.; Reilly, F.J.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes testing conducted to determine the partitioning of contaminants between sediment organic carbon and sediment interstitial water, assess the effects of sediment organic carbon upon bioaccumulation of a selected polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) by two organisms, and investigate the accuracy of the apparent preference factor as a predictive tool by comparing predicted uptake with actual uptake.

  10. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  11. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA) [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H. (Castro Valley, CA) [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  12. Publications, Personnel and Government Organizations Related to the Limnology, Aquatic Biology and Ichthyology of the Inland Waters of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W.J.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the result of a growing concern about the rate at which development of the water resources of Texas is outstripping biological and ecological knowledge of the aquatic environments concerned. Most Texas ...

  13. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  14. High temperature synthetic cement retarder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eoff, L.S.; Buster, D.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic cement retarder which provides excellent retardation and compressive strength development has been synthesized. The response properties and temperature ranges of the synthetic retarder far exceed those of commonly used retarders such as lignosulfonates. The chemical nature of the new retarder is discussed and compared to another synthetic retarder.

  15. WHAT IS COMPOST? Composting refers to the biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    , good quality compost is produced that is biologically stable, relatively uniform in appearance, free as 10 to 20 times greater than that from agricultural lands. Research reports from academia, the EPA or topsoil blend to improve soil structure. Both practices help establish a protective vegetation cover

  16. Biology 494 Biology Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    Biology 494 Biology Internship Guidelines The Biology Program encourages students to seek out and participate in internship opportunities that have a clear biological focus. Internships may be arranged may receive credit in Biology 494 (Biology Internship) for participation in internships, regardless

  17. Mitigation of resource competition in synthetic genetic circuits through feedback regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    Mitigation of resource competition in synthetic genetic circuits through feedback regulation expression. In particular, we analyze and compare the ability of several inhibitory feedback regulation that arise in synthetic biology. Questions of how feedback regulation may be employed by biochemical systems

  18. A platform for rapid prototyping of synthetic gene networks in mammalian cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wroblewska, Liliana

    Mammalian synthetic biology may provide novel therapeutic strategies, help decipher new paths for drug discovery and facilitate synthesis of valuable molecules. Yet, our capacity to genetically program cells is currently ...

  19. Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...SuccessSurprisingSynchrotrons ExplorephenoxylSynthetic

  20. Process Manual Biological & Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    · · · · ·t t ·t ·t t t ·t . ~ t · · Process· Manual Biological & Agricultural Engineering MANUAL FOR THE BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TexasA&MUniversity Article I. NAME The name ofthis organization shall be the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (abbreviated

  1. Dissolution of Uranium-Bearing Minerals and Mobilization of Uranium by Organic Ligands in a Biologically Reduced Sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability and mobility of uranium (U) is a concern following its reductive precipitation or immobilization by techniques such as bioremediation at contaminated sites. In this study, the influences of complexing organic ligands such as citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) on the mobilization of U were investigated in both batch and column flow systems using a contaminated and bioreduced sediment. Results indicate that both reduced U(IV) and oxidized U(VI) in the sediment can be effectively mobilized with the addition of EDTA or citrate under anaerobic conditions. The dissolution and mobilization of U appear to be correlated to the dissolution of iron (Fe)- or aluminum (Al)-bearing minerals, with EDTA being more effective (with R2 0.89) than citrate (R2 <0.60) in dissolving these minerals. The column flow experiments confirm that U, Fe, and Al can be mobilized by these ligands under anoxic conditions, although the cumulative amounts of U removal constituted ~0.1% of total U present in this sediment following a limited period of leaching. This study concludes that the presence of complexing organic ligands may pose a long-term concern by slowly dissolving U-bearing minerals and mobilizing U even under a strict anaerobic environment.

  2. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  3. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  4. DTU Synthetic Promoter Library Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortuna, Patrick

    2010-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this RFC is to outline a method for generating a BioBrick compatible Synthetic Promoter Library (SPL) within bacteria in order to fine-tune the expression of BioBrick parts and devices.

  5. SYNTHETIC SLING FAILURE - EVALUATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MACKEY TC; HENDERSON CS

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall industry safety.

  6. Structural Characteristics of Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, F. Marc; MacDonald, Jason; Feng, Jian; Phillips, Brian L.; Ehm, Lars; Tarabrella, Cathy; Parise, John B.; Reeder, Richard J. (SBU)

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an important phase involved in calcification by a wide variety of invertebrate organisms and is of technological interest in the development of functional materials. Despite widespread scientific interest in this phase a full characterization of structure is lacking. This is mainly due to its metastability and difficulties in evaluating structure using conventional structure determination methods. Here we present new findings from the application of two techniques, pair distribution function analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provide new insight to structural aspects of synthetic ACC. Several important results have emerged from this study of ACC formed in vitro using two common preparation methods: (1) ACC exhibits no structural coherence over distances > 15 {angstrom} and is truly amorphous; (2) most of the hydrogen in ACC is present as structural H{sub 2}O, about half of which undergoes restricted motion on the millisecond time scale near room temperature; (3) the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC shows no distinct match to any known structure in the calcium carbonate system; and (4) most of the carbonate in ACC is monodentate making it distinctly different from monohydrocalcite. Although the structure of synthetic ACC is still not fully understood, the results presented provide an important baseline for future experiments evaluating biogenic ACC and samples containing certain additives that may play a role in stabilization of ACC, crystallization kinetics, and final polymorph selection.

  7. Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryback, M. G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels...

  8. Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryback, M. G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels...

  9. Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceAnalysisTheTechnicalUniversityofDenmarkDTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ussery, David W.

    Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceAnalysisTheTechnicalUniversityofDenmarkDTU Minimal genomes in bacterial Genera Dave Ussery European Conference on Synthetic Biology: Design 2007 #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group Centerfor

  10. Flow control via synthetic jet actuation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Adam Cole

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to determine the ability of Synthetic Jet Actuators to control the aerodynamic properties of a wing. The Synthetic Jet Actuator (SJA) was placed at two separate positions on ...

  11. Synthetic Biology and reshaping plant form Jim Haseloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Lula

    Industrial Revolution: based on innovations in coal, iron, steam and mechanical engineering #12; Steam power machines.This enabled rapid development of e cient semi-automated factories Iron founding - Coke replaced

  12. Synthetic Metabolism: Engineering Biology at the Protein and Pathway Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Collin H.

    Biocatalysis has become a powerful tool for the synthesis of high-value compounds, particularly so in the case of highly functionalized and/or stereoactive products. Nature has supplied thousands of enzymes and assembled ...

  13. Reprogramming alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus : synthetic biology in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runguphan, Weerawat

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The medicinal plant Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) produces over 130 monoterpene indole alkaloid (MIA) natural products. Many of these compounds have pharmaceutical value, such as the anticancer agents vinblastine ...

  14. Biochemical Process Improvements & Synthetic Biology Validation Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil Deployment in the

  15. Synthetic Biology Offers New Hope For Malaria Victims

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(Insert Directive NumberPortalScience Beat

  16. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA); Nikanjam, Mina (Richmond, CA)

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  17. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  18. Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Hopkins, Patrick; Reinke, Charles; Kim, Bongsang

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals can simultaneously have a large Seebeck coefficient, high electrical conductivity, and low thermal conductivity. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials can enable improved thermoelectric devices, such as thermoelectric generators and coolers, with improved performance. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials and devices can be fabricated using techniques that are compatible with standard microelectronics.

  19. Phenanthropiperidine Alkaloids: Methodology Development, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niphakis, Micah James

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is directed towards the development of safe phenanthropiperidines for the treatment of cancer. It focuses on synthetic methodologies that facilitate their preparation and biological studies to better understand ...

  20. Organized By : Supercomputing Facility for Bioinformatics &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    Organized By : Supercomputing Facility for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, IIT Delhi Phone Facility for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, 3rd Floor, Synergy Building, Indian Institute the 10th Anniversary of Supercomputer Facility for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, IIT Delhi

  1. Synthetic Genomics: Options for Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfinkel, Michele

    2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gene and genome synthesis, that is, constructing long stretches of DNA from constituent chemicals, provides scientists with new and unparalleled capabilities both for understanding biology and for using it for beneficial ...

  2. Meta-DNA: A DNA-Based Approach to Synthetic Harish Chandran1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Meta-DNA: A DNA-Based Approach to Synthetic Biology Harish Chandran1 harish@cs.duke.edu Nikhil taken here is to develop a biochemical system which we call meta-DNA (abbre- viated as mDNA), based entirely on strands of DNA as the only component molecules. Our work leverages prior work

  3. Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the use of a three compartment electrolytic cell in the production of synthetic carbonaceous fuels and chemical feedstocks such as gasoline, methane and methanol by electrolyzing an aqueous sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solution, obtained from scrubbing atmospheric carbon dioxide with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, whereby the hydrogen generated at the cathode and the carbon dioxide liberated in the center compartment are combined thermocatalytically into methanol and gasoline blends. The oxygen generated at the anode is preferably vented into the atmosphere, and the regenerated sodium hydroxide produced at the cathode is reused for scrubbing the CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere.

  4. Doan Thu et al. published in European Journal of Soil Biology The earthworm species Metaphire posthuma modulates the effect of organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    amendment offers a good way to substantially improve soil quality and therefore agricultural sustainability and biochemical processes in soils are important for the management of farming systems [54]. The utilizationDoan Thu et al. published in European Journal of Soil Biology 1 The earthworm species Metaphire

  5. Synthetic Running Coupling of QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksey I. Alekseev

    2006-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a study of the analytic running coupling obtained from the standard perturbation theory results up to four-loop order, the QCD ``synthetic'' running coupling \\alpha_{syn} is built. In so doing the perturbative time-like discontinuity is preserved and nonperturbative contributions not only remove the nonphysical singularities of the perturbation theory in the infrared region but also decrease rapidly in the ultraviolet region. In the framework of the approach, on the one hand, the running coupling is enhanced at zero and, on the other hand, the dynamical gluon mass m_g arises. Fixing the parameter which characterize the infrared enhancement corresponding to the string tension \\sigma and normalization, say, at M_\\tau completely define the synthetic running coupling. In this case the dynamical gluon mass appears to be fixed and the higher loop stabilization property of m_g is observed. For \\sigma = (0.42 GeV)^2 and \\alpha_{syn}(M^2_\\tau) = 0.33 \\pm 0.01 it is obtained that m_g = 530 \\pm 80 MeV.

  6. Method of producing synthetic pitch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennel, Elliot B. (Morgantown, WV); Stansberry, Peter G. (North Olmsted, OH); Stiller, Alfred H. (Morgantown, WV); Zondlo, John W. (Albright, WV)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments of a method are described for modifying pitches, oils, tars, and binders by using these materials as solvents to extract organic chemicals from coal.

  7. Survey and Control of Synthetic Organics in Texas Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batchelor, B.; Shannon, J. D.; Yang, P.

    the level of trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) in these waters was also investigated. Conventional alum coagulation was studied in a series of jar tests in which the effect of pH and alum dose on removal of THMFP,ultraviolet absorbance (UVA), total...

  8. Fracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of synthetic polycrystalline diamond make it a promising material for many structural applications studies on the fracture toughness of polycrystalline diamond,29 primarily due to the difficultiesFracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty Ctystallume, 3506 Bassett Street, Santa Clara, California

  9. World synthetic rubber consumption is growing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide consumption of new rubber, both synthetic and natural, has increased. This report includes a prediction of even more growth in the rubber market which was made by the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers (IISRP), based in Houston. Figures are given for worldwide consumption.

  10. Purdue extension Agricultural&Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for an extended period and encourage biological treatment to minimize organic matter (BOD), nitrogenPurdue extension Don Jones Agricultural&Biological Engineering Alan Sutton AnimalSciences Purdue structures must be designed and managed to contain manure, wastewater, contaminated runoff, and ma- nure

  11. Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG)...

  12. Five synthetic rubber pond liners protect against leakage and weather

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinreich, G.; Hofsess, R.; Toy, D.A.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 137 million cu ft of pipeline quality gas is produced daily at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project in Beulah, ND. The facility is the only commercial plant in the US which produces gaseous and liquid fuels from low-grade coal. The plant needs to recycle and reuse 100% of the organic process wastewater, requiring a complicated treatment system of cooling towers, evaporators, a liquid waste incinerator and other units, each of which has its own surge pond. In total, the plant has five surge ponds which hold near 80 million gallons. To prevent the seepage of wastewater from the surge ponds into the ground water, a liner material was needed that would fulfill several design criteria. The liner had to be resistant to degradation caused by a very wide range of temperatures and it had to have a low coefficient of expansion. Resistance to both organic and inorganic chemical substances was another key requirement. Finally, the liner material needed to be easy to seam during field installation. An elastomeric membrane liner using the synthetic rubber and reinforcing polyester scrim best met the plant's requirements. One of the primary reasons for selecting synthetic rubber was its low coefficient of expansion. Extreme seasonal weather conditions, with temperatures ranging from below zero in the winter to over 100/sup 0/F in the summer, are common in North Dakota. And because the level of wastewater in the ponds constantly varies, a liner is frequently exposed to the elements. Overall, the synthetic rubber pond liners have performed through extreme weather conditions and have proven to be a cost-effective solution to wastewater storage at the gasification project.

  13. Synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancet, Michael S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Curran, George P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  14. Synthetic Self-Healing Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bello, Mollie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Given enough time, pressure, temperature fluctuation, and stress any material will fail. Currently, synthesized materials make up a large part of our everyday lives, and are used in a number of important applications such as; space travel, under water devices, precise instrumentation, transportation, and infrastructure. Structural failure of these material scan lead to expensive and dangerous consequences. In an attempt to prolong the life spans of specific materials and reduce efforts put into repairing them, biologically inspired, self-healing systems have been extensively investigated. The current review explores recent advances in three methods of synthesized self-healing: capsule based, vascular, and intrinsic. Ideally, self-healing materials require no human intervention to promote healing, are capable of surviving all the steps of polymer processing, and heal the same location repeatedly. Only the vascular method holds up to all of these idealities.

  15. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  16. Natural and Organic Beef Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    protein or by-products. Feed must not have been exposed to pesticides, fertilizers made from synthetic the harvest of an organic crop. · The use of genetic engineering, ionizing radiation and sewer sludge, crop rotation and cover crops, supplemented with animal and crop waste materials and allowed synthetic

  17. Synthetic and Biosynthetic Studies of Natural Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ve?liz Chanis, Eduardo Alberto

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , this derivative seems to be a better tolerated and less toxic drug. 1 1 0 Little or no antitumor activity was displayed by anthracycline analogs with the unnatural p-glycosidic bond (C-V epimer). 1 1 6 However, the p-anomer of 4-DMDA showed antitumor activity... with the surface of cell membranes. C. Synthetic Analysis Scheme 2 shows the basic synthetic strategies employed in the preparation of racemic and optically active 4-demethoxy anthracyclines. The strategies employed can be classified in three basic groups: 1...

  18. Systems Biology. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology. Systems Biology. Abstract: The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most...

  19. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS, INC 1411 Callaghan Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    1 SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS, INC 1411 Callaghan Drive Greenville, MI 48838 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET irritating and potentially toxic fumes containing oxides of nitrogen if exposed to extreme heat in air: (Conditions to Avoid) Stable under normal use conditions and in final use concentration. Incompatibility

  20. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS, INC 1411 Callaghan Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    1 SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS, INC 1411 Callaghan Drive Greenville, MI 48838 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET. It will produce irritating and potentially toxic fumes containing oxides of nitrogen if exposed to extreme heat: (Conditions to Avoid) Stable under normal use conditions and in final use concentration. Incompatibility

  1. Immobilization of radioiodine in synthetic boracite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babad, H.; Strachan, D.M.

    1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear waste storage product is disclosed in which radioiodine is incorporated in a synthetic boracite. The boracite may be prepared by reacting a transition metal iodide with an alkali horate under mild hydrothermal conditions, drying the reaction product, and then hot pressing.

  2. Intelligibility enhancement of synthetic speech in noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Intelligibility enhancement of synthetic speech in noise C´assia Valentini Botinh~ao TH E U N I V E of a hidden Markov model (HMM-) based speech synthesis system that allows for flexible enhancement strategies with noise-independent enhancement approaches based on the acoustics of highly intelligible speech

  3. 1 Synthetic Texturing 1.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Greg

    1 Synthetic Texturing 1.1 Introduction This dissertation describes improved methods for computer of this, the top of Figure 1.1 shows a horse model with a white surface and the bottom shows this same-hocformulasforlightreflection Figure 1.1: Stripe texture created using reaction-diffusion. Top is an untextured horse and the bottom

  4. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Cordatos

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  5. Novel Aryne Chemistry in Organic Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhijian Liu

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Arynes are among the most intensively studied systems in chemistry. However, many aspects of the chemistry of these reactive intermediates are not well understood yet and their use as reagents in synthetic organic chemistry has been somewhat limited, due to the harsh conditions needed to generate arynes and the often uncontrolled reactivity exhibited by these species. Recently, o-silylaryl triflates, which can generate the corresponding arynes under very mild reaction conditions, have been found very useful in organic synthesis. This thesis describes several novel and useful methodologies by employing arynes, which generate from o-silylaryl triflates, in organic synthesis. An efficient, reliable method for the N-arylation of amines, sulfonamides and carbamates, and the O-arylation of phenols and carboxylic acids is described in Chapter 1. Amines, sulfonamides, phenols, and carboxylic acids are good nucleophiles, which can react with arynes generated from a-silylaryl triflates to afford the corresponding N- and O-arylated products in very high yields. The regioselectivity of unsymmetrical arynes has also been studied. A lot of useful, functional groups can tolerate our reaction conditions. Carbazoles and dibenzofurans are important heteroaromatic compounds, which have a variety of biological activities. A variety of substituted carbazoles and dibenzofwans are readily prepared in good to excellent yields starting with the corresponding o-iodoanilines or o-iodophenols and o-silylaryl triflates by a treatment with CsF, followed by a Pd-catalyzed cyclization, which overall provides a one-pot, two-step process. By using this methodology, the carbazole alkaloid mukonine has been concisely synthesized in a very good yield. Insertion of an aryne into a {sigma}-bond between a nucleophile and an electrophile (Nu-E) should potentially be a very beneficial process from the standpoint of organic synthesis. A variety of substituted ketones and sulfoxides have been synthesized in good yields via the intermolecular C-N {sigma}-bond addition of amides and S-N {sigma}-bond addition of sulfinamides to arynes under mild reaction conditions. The indazole moiety is a frequently found subunit in drug substances with important biological activities. Indazole analogues have been readily synthesized under mild reaction conditions by the [3+2] cycloaddition of a variety of diazo compounds with o-silylaryl triflates in the presence of CsF or TBAF. Polycyclic aromatic and heteroaromatic hydrocarbons have been synthesized in high yields by two different processes involving the Pd-catalyzed annulation of arynes. Both processes appear to involve the catalytic, stepwise coupling of two very reactive substrates, an aryne and an organopalladium species, to generate excellent yields of cross-coupled products.

  6. 2010 Tetrapyrroles, Chemistry & Biology of Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angela Wilks

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Chemistry & Biology of Tetrapyrroles Gordon Conference is to bring together researchers from diverse disciplines that otherwise would not interact. By bringing biologists, chemists, engineers and clinicians with a common interest in tetrapyrroles the conference provides a forum for cross-disciplinary ideas and collaboration. The perspective provided by biologists, chemists, and clinicians working in fields such as newly discovered defects in human porphyrin metabolism, the myriad of strategies for light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms, novel tetrapyrroles that serve as auxiliary chromophores or enzyme cofactors, synthetic strategies in the design of novel tetrapyrrole scaffolds, and tetrapyrrole based cell signaling and regulatory systems, makes this conference unique in the field. Over the years the growing evidence for the role of tetrapyrroles and their reactive intermediates in cell signaling and regulation has been of increasing importance at this conference. The 2010 conference on Chemistry & Biology of Tetrapyrroles will focus on many of these new frontiers as outlined in the preliminary program listed. Speakers will emphasize unpublished results and new findings in the field. The oral sessions will be followed by the highly interactive afternoon poster sessions. The poster sessions provide all conferees with the opportunity to present their latest research and to exchange ideas in a more informal setting. As in the past, this opportunity will continue during the nightly social gathering that takes place in the poster hall following the evening lectures. All conferees are encouraged to submit and present posters. At the conference the best poster in the areas of biology, chemistry and medicine will be selected by a panel of previous conference chairs.

  7. Feedback control of flow separation using synthetic jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kihwan

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this research is to assess the effect of synthetic jets on flow separation and provide a feedback control strategy for flow separation using synthetic jets. The feedback control synthesis is conducted based upon CFD simulation...

  8. Active flow separation control using synthetic jet actuators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Preetham P

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of synthetic jet actuators for controlling the boundary layer flow and flow separation over a wing is investigated. A theory for the optimum design of actuators using motors is developed. A motor driven synthetic ...

  9. Expansion of Automotive Industries to Boost the Global Synthetic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the increase in the usage of synthetic and bio-based lubricants in the rampant global automotive industry, is expected to drive the global synthetic and bio-based lubricants...

  10. Development of Standards for NanoSIMS Analyses of Biological Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davission, M L; Weber, P K; Pett-Ridge, J; Singer, S

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NanoSIMS is a powerful analytical technique for investigating element distributions at the nanometer scale, but quantifying elemental abundances requires appropriate standards, which are not readily available for biological materials. Standards for trace element analyses have been extensively developed for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in the semiconductor industry and in the geological sciences. The three primary approaches for generating standards for SIMS are: (1) ion implantation (2) using previously characterized natural materials, and (3) preparing synthetic substances. Ion implantation is a reliable method for generating trace element standards, but it is expensive, which limits investigation of the analytical issues discussed above. It also requires low background levels of the elements of interest. Finding or making standard materials has the potential to provide more flexibility than ion implantation, but realizing homogeneity at the nano-scale is in itself a significant challenge. In this study, we experiment with all three approaches, but with an emphasis toward synthetic organic polymers in order to reduce costs, increase flexibility, and achieve a wide dynamic concentration range. This emphasis serves to meet the major challenge for biological samples of identifying matrix matched, homogeneous material. Biological samples themselves are typically heterogeneous at the scale of microns to 100s of microns, and therefore they are poor SIMS standards. Therefore, we focused on identifying 'biological-like' materials--either natural or synthetic--that can be used for standards. The primary criterion is that the material be as compositionally similar to biological samples as possible (primarily C, H, O, and N). For natural material we adsorbed organic colloids consisting of peptidoglycan (i.e., amino sugars), activated charcoal, and humic acids. Experiments conducted with Si on peptidoglycan showed low affinity as SiO{sub 2}, yet its distribution in the matrix was similar to that observed in spores. In experiments with Mo on humic acid, homogeneity was achieved and a sensitivity factor relative to C was determined. For synthetic material, we successfully prepared polyacrylic acid containing complexed elements of Mo, Ca, Sr, and Ba at low abundance. These were prepared as aqueous mixtures of dissolved elements and polyacrylic resin, followed by thin film drying. The Mo was homogeneously distributed and yielded a relative sensitivity factor nearly identical to that calculated for humic acid. This approach shows great promise for most water soluble metals. Poly(methacrylate) thin films were prepared that contained different low-level concentrations of Si introduced as a silane compound. Although homogeneity was not fully achieved, the analytical results did validate our previous quantitative methodology for Si. In addition, Commercial plastics were also examined for suitability for F and Cl. We found food-grade polyvinyl tubing produced high precision Cl determinations. For ion implantation, we used epoxy as the substrate and successfully extracted depth profiles and sensitivity factors for F and Cu.

  11. SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale M. O. Eshkalak, SPE, S. D of production from shale gas reservoirs. In this study, synthetic geomechanical logs (Including following-driven models are developed that are capable of generating synthetic geomechanical logs from conventional logs

  12. Composition and Biodegradation of a Synthetic Oil Spilled on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    -AN8) as well as a total of 27 L of hydraulic fluid MIL-5605 and synthetic turbine oil Aeroshell 500 in January 2003 on the 5 m-thick perennial ice cover of Lake Fryxell, spilling synthetic turbine oil et al. (9). Here, we compare the initial chemical composition of the synthetic turbine lubricant

  13. Numerical Methods for the Valuation of Synthetic Collateralized Debt Obligations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Numerical Methods for the Valuation of Synthetic Collateralized Debt Obligations by Xiaofang Ma Methods for the Valuation of Synthetic Collateralized Debt Obligations Xiaofang Ma Doctor of Philosophy methods for synthetic CDO valuation are presented. iii #12;Acknowledgements Although many people have

  14. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Synthetic Cable Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Synthetic Cable Termination Overview to be grasped. The methods for terminating the metallic cable will not work with the synthetic cable, so a new termination method is needed. The synthetic cable is a new design that has yet to be successfully terminated

  15. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Huber, Dale L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  16. Extinction cascade: Biological consequence of nuclear war/winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, G.L.; Pimm, S.; Fields, D.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In very general terms, this report describes the effects on biological organisms of a nuclear war and the projected nuclear winter that would follow. (TEM)

  17. TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

  18. Production of synthetic hydrocarbon fuels from peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodle, W.W.; Punwani, D.; Weil, S.A.

    1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for production of synthetic hydrocarbon fuels from peat providing wide variation of the composite proportion of liquid-gas output while maintaining high overall carbon conversion to useful fuel. The process and apparatus utilizes three process stages in a single vessel providing functions of drying wet peat, provisions for addition of both wet and dry peat to a hydropyrolysis zone and gasification of the peat char.

  19. Carboxylic acid sorption on synthetic clays in marine water: in vitro experiments and implications for organo-clay behaviour under marine conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Carboxylic acid sorption on synthetic clays in marine water: in vitro experiments and implications for organo-clay behaviour under marine conditions Sylvain Drouin a , Mohammed Boussafir a* , Jean to investigate the role of clay minerals in organic matter preservation, the fixation of pure organic compounds

  20. Molecular Recognition of Insulin by a Synthetic Receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinai, Jordan M.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Ryno, Lisa M.; Hargreaves, Nicholas D.; Morris, Christopher A.; Hart, P. John; Urbach, Adam R. (Texas-HSC); (Trinity U)

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of molecules that bind tightly and selectively to desired proteins continues to drive innovation at the interface of chemistry and biology. This paper describes the binding of human insulin by the synthetic receptor cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) in vitro. Isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy experiments show that Q7 binds to insulin with an equilibrium association constant of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} and with 50-100-fold selectivity versus proteins that are much larger but lack an N-terminal aromatic residue, and with >1000-fold selectivity versus an insulin variant lacking the N-terminal phenylalanine (Phe) residue. The crystal structure of the Q7{center_dot}insulin complex shows that binding occurs at the N-terminal Phe residue and that the N-terminus unfolds to enable binding. These findings suggest that site-selective recognition is based on the properties inherent to a protein terminus, including the unique chemical epitope presented by the terminal residue and the greater freedom of the terminus to unfold, like the end of a ball of string, to accommodate binding. Insulin recognition was predicted accurately from studies on short peptides and exemplifies an approach to protein recognition by targeting the terminus.

  1. Synthetic Strategies Toward Tetrahydrofurans Involving Double Diastereoselective Nucleophile-Promoted Aldol-Lactonizations and Subsequent Applications to Bioactive Natural Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arendt, Kevin M.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and Chiralpak IA columns. Infrared spectra were obtained as thin film on NaCl plates on a FTIR spectrometer. Vibrational frequencies are expressed in cm-1. Mass spectra were obtained at the Laboratory for Biological Mass Spectrometry at Texas A... Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by KEVIN MICHAEL ARENDT SYNTHETIC STRATEGIES...

  2. Engineering RNA logic with synthetic splicing ribozymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, Austin, 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reusable components, such as logic gates and code libraries, simplify the design and implementation of electronic circuits and computer programs. The engineering of biological systems would benefit also from reusable ...

  3. Real Beamline Optics from a Synthetic Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Bodenstein,Michael Tiefenback,Yves Roblin

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab can be described as a series of concatenated beamlines. Methods used to measure the Twiss parameters in closed orbit machines are not applicable in such open ended systems. We are using properly selected sets of real orbits in the accelerator, as one would for numerical analysis. The evolution of these trajectories along the beamline models the behavior of a synthetic beam which deterministically supplements beam profile-based Twiss parameter measurements and optimizes the efficiency of beamline tuning. Examples will be presented alongside a description of the process.

  4. Bioinformatics & Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Master of Science in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (90 ECTS) Contact Information Programme administration Bioinformatics and Computational Biology.unifr.ch/msc Programme administration Bioinformatics and Computational Biology University of Bern Baltzerstrasse 6 CH

  5. Chemistry in Motion: Tiny Synthetic Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter H. Colberg; Shang Yik Reigh; Bryan Robertson; Raymond Kapral

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Account, we describe how synthetic motors that operate by self-diffusiophoresis make use of a self-generated concentration gradient to drive motor motion. A description of propulsion by self-diffusiophoresis is presented for Janus particle motors comprising catalytic and noncatalytic faces. The properties of the dynamics of chemically powered motors are illustrated by presenting the results of particle-based simulations of sphere-dimer motors constructed from linked catalytic and noncatalytic spheres. The geometries of both Janus and sphere-dimer motors with asymmetric catalytic activity support the formation of concentration gradients around the motors. Because directed motion can occur only when the system is not in equilibrium, the nature of the environment and the role it plays in motor dynamics are described. Rotational Brownian motion also acts to limit directed motion, and it has especially strong effects for very small motors. We address the following question: how small can motors be and still exhibit effects due to propulsion, even if only to enhance diffusion? Synthetic motors have the potential to transform the manner in which chemical dynamical processes are carried out for a wide range of applications.

  6. Biological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    . Williams Professor of Biomedical Informations and Co-Director, Yale Computational Biology & Bioinformatics co-director of the Yale Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Program. In addition to the KeckBiological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series Dr. Mark B. Gerstein Albert L

  7. On Biology as an Emergent Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Pierre Noyes

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology is considered here as an "emergent science" in the sense of Anderson and of Laughlin and Pines. It is demonstrated that a straightforward mathematical definition of "biological system" is useful in showing how biology differs in structure from the lower levels in Anderson's "More is Different" hierarchy. Using cells in a chemostat as a paradigmatic exemplar of a biological system, it is found that a coherent collection of metabolic pathways through a single cell in the chemostat also satisfies the proposed definition of a biological system. This provides a theoretical and mathematical underpinning for Young's fundamental model of biological organization and integration. Evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of Young's method of analysis is provided by preliminary results of clinical trials of a specific application of Young's model to the treatment of cancer cachexia.

  8. aquatic organisms caused: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and sedimentary organic matter off Central Chile: response to changes caused by the 1997. GALLARDOc,d a Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM),...

  9. Synthetic magnetoelectric coupling in a nanocomposite multiferroic

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jain, P.; Wang, Q.; Roldan, M.; Glavic, A.; Lauter, V.; Urban, C.; Bi, Z.; Ahmed, T.; Zhu, J.; Varela, M.; et al

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the paucity of single phase multiferroic materials (with large ferromagnetic moment), composite systems seem an attractive solution to realize magnetoelectric coupling between ferromagnetic and ferroelectric order parameters. Despite having antiferromagnetic order, BiFeO? (BFO) has nevertheless been a key material due to excellent ferroelectric properties at room temperature. We studied a superlattice composed of 8 repetitions of 6 unit cells of La?.?Sr?.?MnO? (LSMO) grown on 5 unit cells of BFO. Significant net uncompensated magnetization in BFO, an insulating superlattice, is demonstrated using polarized neutron reflectometry. Remarkably, the magnetization enables magnetic field to change the dielectric properties of the superlattice, whichmore »we cite as an example of synthetic magnetoelectric coupling. Importantly, controlled creation of magnetic moment in BFO is a much needed path toward design and implementation of integrated oxide devices for next generation magnetoelectric data storage platforms.« less

  10. Fusion: an energy source for synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  11. Genomics-Bioinformatics Day: "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology & Mathematical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    3rd Genomics-Bioinformatics Day: "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology on "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology & Mathematical Biology: Their Relationship". Genomics, Bioinformatics, Computational Biology have a tremendous appeal and these fields have originated or grown

  12. Synthetic clay-magnetite aggregates designed for controlled deposition experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Synthetic clay-magnetite aggregates designed for controlled deposition experiments Feinberg, J M of synthetic clay-magnetite aggregates whose physical attributes can be tailored for controlled depositional orientation or oriented aggregation. Grain size distributions of magnetite in three different clay

  13. analogue synthetics coumarins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analogue synthetics coumarins First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Synthetic Analogues of...

  14. Synthetic Turf Fiber Wear Test Progress Report November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    Synthetic Turf Fiber Wear Test ­ Progress Report November 2011 Penn State's Center for Sports version of both the European standard for Surfaces for Outdoor Sports Areas - Exposure of Synthetic Turf% plastic. Each sample was filled with crumb rubber to a depth based on manufacturer specifications. Random

  15. Nanomolding Based Fabrication of Synthetic Gecko Foot-Hairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitti, Metin

    Nanomolding Based Fabrication of Synthetic Gecko Foot-Hairs Metin Sitti and Ronald S. Fearing Dept -- This paper proposes two different nanomolding methods to fabricate synthetic gecko foot-hair nanostructures a nano-pore membrane as a template. These templates are molded with silicone rubber, polyimide

  16. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  17. Bioinformatics Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Interdepartmental Graduate Program GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK FALL 2006 Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Interdepartmental Graduate Program GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK FALL 2006 #12;1 Welcome to the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB) program

  18. A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie Fungal spores Organic agriculture Pathogen dispersal Conventional agriculture uses herbicides, pesticides

  19. Biological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Science and the Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics at Columbia University. Dr. PeBiological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series Dr. Itsik Pe'er Associate Professor of Computer Science Columbia University Itsik Pe'er is an associate professor in the Department of Computer

  20. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Quantitative BiologyChapter 1: Microfluidics.………………………………………………………..… 1 1.1OF THE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Quantitative Biology

  1. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work...

  2. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  3. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug Delivery Vehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu, Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drugmicroemulsion; peptide; nano-low density lipoproteintherapeutic agents. A synthetic nano-LDL (nLDL) particle was

  4. Ultrafast thermally induced magnetic switching in synthetic ferrimagnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Richard F. L., E-mail: richard.evans@york.ac.uk; Ostler, Thomas A.; Chantrell, Roy W. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Radu, Ilie [Institut für Methoden und Instrumentierung der Forschung mit Synchrotronstrahlung, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Rasing, Theo [Radboud University, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalsewg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic ferrimagnets are composite magnetic structures formed from two or more anti-ferromagnetically coupled magnetic sublattices with different magnetic moments. Here, we report on atomistic spin simulations of the laser-induced magnetization dynamics on such synthetic ferrimagnets and demonstrate that the application of ultrashort laser pulses leads to sub-picosecond magnetization dynamics and all-optical switching in a similar manner as in ferrimagnetic alloys. Moreover, we present the essential material properties for successful laser-induced switching, demonstrating the feasibility of using a synthetic ferrimagnet as a high density magnetic storage element without the need of a write field.

  5. Computational optimization of synthetic water channels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, David Michael; Rempe, Susan L. B.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Membranes for liquid and gas separations and ion transport are critical to water purification, osmotic energy generation, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, and catalysis. Often these membranes lack pore uniformity and robustness under operating conditions, which can lead to a decrease in performance. The lack of uniformity means that many pores are non-functional. Traditional membranes overcome these limitations by using thick membrane materials that impede transport and selectivity, which results in decreased performance and increased operating costs. For example, limitations in membrane performance demand high applied pressures to deionize water using reverse osmosis. In contrast, cellular membranes combine high flux and selective transport using membrane-bound protein channels operating at small pressure differences. Pore size and chemistry in the cellular channels is defined uniformly and with sub-nanometer precision through protein folding. The thickness of these cellular membranes is limited to that of the cellular membrane bilayer, about 4 nm thick, which enhances transport. Pores in the cellular membranes are robust under operating conditions in the body. Recent efforts to mimic cellular water channels for efficient water deionization produced a significant advance in membrane function. The novel biomimetic design achieved a 10-fold increase in membrane permeability to water flow compared to commercial membranes and still maintained high salt rejection. Despite this success, there is a lack of understanding about why this membrane performs so well. To address this lack of knowledge, we used highperformance computing to interrogate the structural and chemical environments experienced by water and electrolytes in the newly created biomimetic membranes. We also compared the solvation environments between the biomimetic membrane and cellular water channels. These results will help inform future efforts to optimize and tune the performance of synthetic biomimetic membranes for applications in water purification, energy, and catalysis.

  6. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the surface of well-characterized synthetic manganese-substituted goethite minerals (Fe1-xMnxOOH) was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We chose to study the...

  7. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  8. Synthetic polypeptide-based hydrogel systems for biomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Mackenzie Marie

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogels formed from synthetic polypeptides generated by ring opening polymerization (ROP) of a-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) present a robust material for modeling the interaction between extracellular matrix ...

  9. Synthetic scaffolds and protein assemblies for engineering applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norville, Julie Erin, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S-layer proteins, which naturally self-assemble on the exterior of cells, provide an interesting basis for the creation of synthetic scaffolds. In this thesis, I created a plasmid which produces a recombinant form of a ...

  10. Synthetic strategies for the design of platinum anticancer drug candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Justin Jeff

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. The Synthetic Chemistry of Platinum Anticancer Agents Since the inception of cisplatin as a clinically approved anticancer agent, a large number of platinum compounds have been synthesized with the aim of finding ...

  11. Self-assembly of synthetic and biological components in water using cucurbit[8]uril

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zayed, Jameel Majed

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of adaptable materials,14 and programmable cells.15 1 Chapter 1 Introduction non-covalent interactions flagella machinery building blocks supramolecular assembly higher-ordered structures complex functionality emergence of complexity Figure 1.1: The emergence... measurements have seen application in supramolecular chemistry to investigate both the mobility, and rigidity, of guest molecules residing noncovalently within supramolecular host cavities,109,127 as well as for probing material architectures on the nanoscale...

  12. Open collaborative system design : a strategic framework with application to synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Matthew Robin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Across technology industries and particularly at the cutting edge of biotechnology a debate is under way about the proper balance between open and closed - between co-developing products with shared information and open ...

  13. Engineering & Technology January 2012 www.EandTmagazine.com 68 InformatIon technology SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    that interact by strand- displacement (see box, right) in a kind of computational soup. The project to build `velcro' that binds the two strands of the DnA double helix together. Methods to exploit this phenomenon strand-displacement. The researchers made four fully-connected artificial neurons from these elements

  14. Biological and Synthetic Locomotion in Newtonian and Complex Fluids at Low Reynolds Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pak, On Shun

    a 300 W (type ELH; General Electric Co. , Cleve- imaging oflamp ( type ELH; General Electric Co. , Cleve- scanning

  15. Biological and Synthetic Locomotion in Newtonian and Complex Fluids at Low Reynolds Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pak, On Shun

    Fischer. Controlled propulsion of artificial magnetic nanos-of the magnetic field leads to propulsion in the oppositepredict the propulsion speed under different magnetic field

  16. Synthetic Biology for Advanced Fuels (Opening Keynote Address - 2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Keasling, Jay

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Jay Keasling, CEO of the Joint BioEnergy Institute, delivers the opening keynote on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  17. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuk Lee, Sung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of microbial hosts for biofuels production. Metab Eng 2008,delivers next-generation biofuels. Nat Biotechnol 27.furfural (HMF). Biotechnol Biofuels 2008, 1:12. 40. Trinh

  18. Using synthetic biology to screen for functional diversity of GH1 enzymes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, Sam; Datta, Supratim; Hamilton, Matthew; Friedland, Greg; D'Haeseleer, Patrik; Chen, Jan-Fang; Chivian, Dylan; Egan, Rob; Sale, Kenneth; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled single genomes as well as complex environmental samples (metagenomes) to be comprehensively sequenced on a routine basis. Bioinformatics analysis of the resulting sequencing data reveals a continually expanding catalogue of predicted proteins ( 14 million as of April 2011), 75 percent of which are associated with functional annotation (COG, Pfam, Enzyme, Kegg, etc). These predicted proteins cover the full spectrum of known pathways and functional activities, including many novel biocatalysts that are expected to significantly contribute to the development of clean technologies including biomass degradation, lipid transformation for biodiesel generation, intermediates for polymer production, carbon capture, and bioremediation.

  19. Synthetic Biology for Tailored Enzyme Cocktails Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source HeatSweptCathode MaterialsandMarch

  20. Seismic attenuation studies using frequency domain synthetic seismograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Theresa Meade

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC ATTENUATION STUDIES USING FREQUENCY DOMAIN SYNTHETIC SEISMOGRAMS A Thesis by THERESA MEADE BUTLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1979 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC ATTENUATION STUDIES USING FREQUENCY DOMAIN SYNTHETIC SEI SMOGRAMlS A Thesis by THERESA MEADE BUTLER Approved as to sty1e and content by: rman o Com ttee Head of epartmen (Member) Membe August 1979...

  1. Synthetic reverberating activity patterns embedded in networks of cortical neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roni Vardi; Avner Wallach; Evi Kopelowitz; Moshe Abeles; Shimon Marom; Ido Kanter

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic reverberating activity patterns are experimentally generated by stimulation of a subset of neurons embedded in a spontaneously active network of cortical cells in-vitro. The neurons are artificially connected by means of conditional stimulation matrix, forming a synthetic local circuit with a predefined programmable connectivity and time-delays. Possible uses of this experimental design are demonstrated, analyzing the sensitivity of these deterministic activity patterns to transmission delays and to the nature of ongoing network dynamics.

  2. Synthetic environment employing a craft for providing user perspective reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maples, Creve (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Craig A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-dimensional user oriented synthetic environment system allows application programs to be programmed and accessed with input/output device independent, generic functional commands which are a distillation of the actual functions performed by any application program. A shared memory structure allows the translation of device specific commands to device independent, generic functional commands. Complete flexibility of the mapping of synthetic environment data to the user is thereby allowed. Accordingly, synthetic environment data may be provided to the user on parallel user information processing channels allowing the subcognitive mind to act as a filter, eliminating irrelevant information and allowing the processing of increase amounts of data by the user. The user is further provided with a craft surrounding the user within the synthetic environment, which craft, imparts important visual referential an motion parallax cues, enabling the user to better appreciate distances and directions within the synthetic environment. Display of this craft in close proximity to the user's point of perspective may be accomplished without substantially degrading the image resolution of the displayed portions of the synthetic environment.

  3. BE.440 Analysis of Biological Networks, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Essigmann, John

    This class analyzes complex biological processes from the molecular, cellular, extracellular, and organ levels of hierarchy. Emphasis is placed on the basic biochemical and biophysical principles that govern these processes. ...

  4. The physical, environmental, and evolutionary determinants of biological architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempes, Christopher Andrew Poling

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between structure and function is a longstanding and central topic in biology, evolution, and ecology. The importance of morphology is clearly visible in the diverse forms taken by innumerable organisms ...

  5. BISMUTH-CERAMIC NANOCOMPOSITES THROUGH BALL MILLING AND LIQUID CRYSTAL SYNTHETIC METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    characterized using UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. An additional synthetic method based on the infusion

  6. Leadership, Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmeri, Thomas

    Leadership, Policy & Organizations #12;2 At Peabody students have the opportunity to develop new College, in the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations (LPO). The faculty believes Patricia and Rodes Hart Chair, and Professor of Education Policy and Leadership, Ellen Goldring also serves

  7. Biological Systems Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    encompasses the areas of priority pathogen detection, extremophile biology and genomics, biohydrometallurgy, biomass conversion, coal bioprocessing, biodegradation...

  8. Computational Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Marcia K.

    Computational Biology & Bioinformatics at Yale An Interdepartmental PhD Program and a Track within://www.yale.edu/graduateschool/admissions/apply_online.html 2 #12;Introduction Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) is a rapidly developing multi experimentation. Computational and theoretical approaches to understanding biological systems provide an essential

  9. Computational Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Biology & Bioinformatics at Yale An Interdepartmental PhD Program and a Track within://www.yale.edu/graduateschool/admissions/apply_online.html #12;3 Introduction Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) is a rapidly developing multi experimentation. Computational and theoretical approaches to understanding biological systems provide an essential

  10. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  11. Apparatus, systems, and methods for ultrasound synthetic aperature focusing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuster, George J.; Crawford, Susan L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Harris, Robert V.

    2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    One form of the present invention is a technique for interrogating a sample with ultrasound which includes: generating ultrasonic energy data corresponding to a volume of a sample and performing a synthetic aperture focusing technique on the ultrasonic energy data. The synthetic aperture focusing technique includes: defining a number of hyperbolic surfaces which extend through the volume at different depths and a corresponding number of multiple element accumulation vectors, performing a focused element calculation procedure for a group of vectors which are representative of the interior of a designated aperture, performing another focused element calculation procedure for vectors corresponding to the boundary of the aperture, and providing an image corresponding to features of the sample in accordance with the synthetic aperture focusing technique.

  12. Concurrent Connection of Embryonic Chick Heart Using a Microfluidic Device for Organ-Explant-Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owaki, Hirofumi

    We propose a concurrent microvascular connection method called suction-induced vascular fixation (SVF) method for the achievement of Organ-Explant-Chip which is a biologically-designed simulator having biological materials ...

  13. Application of Synthetic Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication of Synthetic Diesel Fuels Application of Synthetic

  14. 2013 METALS IN BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JANUARY 20-25, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, Amy

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical topics for lectures and posters include: biochemical and biophysical characterization of new metal containing proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, factors, and chelators from all forms of life; synthesis, detailed characterization, and reaction chemistry of biomimetic compounds; novel crystal and solution structures of biological molecules and synthetic metal-chelates; discussions of the roles that metals play in medicine, maintenance of the environment, and biogeochemical processes; metal homeostasis; application of theory and computations to the structure and mechanism of metal-containing biological systems; and novel applications of spectroscopy to metals in biological systems.

  15. Ecology and Evolution Major www.biology.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Ecology and Evolution Major www.biology.pitt.edu Revised: 07/2012 The field of Ecology explores organisms have developed from ancestral ones. The Ecology and Evolution major is a good choice for students world, the ecological relationships of organisms from the individual to the global scale

  16. Conference of the Hellenic Society for Computational Biology & Bioinformatics HSCBB11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6th Conference of the Hellenic Society for Computational Biology & Bioinformatics · HSCBB11 FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT The 6th Conference of the Hellenic Society for Computational Biology & Bioinformatics ­ HSCBB11 ­ is co- organized by the Hellenic Society for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (HSCBB) jointly

  17. Evolution of complex organic molecules in hot molecular cores: Synthetic spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhury, Rumpa; Stéphan, Gwendoline; Bergin, Edwin A; Möller, Thomas; Schmiedeke, Anika; Zernickel, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot molecular cores (HMCs) are intermediate stages of high-mass star formation and are also known for their rich emission line spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands. The observed spectral feature of HMCs such as total number of emission lines and associated line intensities are also found to vary with evolutionary stages. We developed various 3D models for HMCs guided by the evolutionary scenarios proposed by recent empirical and modeling studies. We then investigated the spatio-temporal variation of temperature and molecular abundances in HMCs by consistently coupling gas-grain chemical evolution with radiative transfer calculations. We explored the effects of varying physical conditions on molecular abundances including density distribution and luminosity evolution of the central protostar(s). The time-dependent temperature structure of the hot core models provides a realistic framework for investigating the spatial variation of ice mantle evaporation as a function of evolutionary timescales. With increasing protos...

  18. Physics Pathway: A Digital Library Filled with Synthetic Interviews*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christel, Mike

    Physics Pathway: A Digital Library Filled with Synthetic Interviews* Michael G. Christel-412-268-7796 sms@cs.cmu.edu Dean Zollman Department of Physics Kansas State University Manhattan, KS 66506 1-785-532-1619 dzollman@phys.ksu.edu ABSTRACT Physics Pathway is a digital library available through an Adobe Flash portal

  19. Factors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 2. Synthetic Crude Oil Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    to the petroleum industry. Nonaqueous foams occur in the production of and refining of crude oil. Crude oil foamsFactors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 2. Synthetic Crude Oil Systems Nael N. Zaki, Michael K August 28, 2001 The influence of petroleum asphaltenes and resins on stabilizing model oil foams

  20. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielek, Timothy P. (Albuquerque, NM); Thompson, Douglas G. (Albuqerque, NM); Walker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  1. Matching a Human Walking Sequence with a VRML Synthetic Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buades Rubio, Jose María

    animation, computer vision, medical rehabilitation, virtual reality and entertainment. There is a greatMatching a Human Walking Sequence with a VRML Synthetic Model J. M. Buades, Ramon Mas and Francisco University of the Balearic Islands 07071 Palma de Mallorca, SPAIN {josemaria,ramon,paco}@anim.uib.es Abstract

  2. More U. S. , Canada synthetic rubber use seen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoad, M.J.

    1980-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    According to M.J. Rhoad of the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers Inc., the total U.S. and Canadian natural and synthetic rubber consumption will amount to (in thousands of metric tons/yr) 3385, 3305, 3855, and 4295 for 1979, 1980, 1985, and 1990, respectively, with synthetic rubber use increasing from an estimated 2.54 million metric tons/yr in 1979 to 3.27 million metric tons/yr by 1990, including an increase from 2.35 to 3.02 million metric tons/yr for the U.S. Rubber consumption for tires and tire products in the U.S. will increase at 2%/yr, with synthetic rubber accounting for 61.9% of the rubber used for tires in 1990, down from the 63.4% in 1979. In 1980, the decline in automobile and tire production will cause a 2.4% decline in new rubber consumption. During 1979-90, the amount of rubber used for nontire purposes will increase at 2.5%/yr.

  3. Progress in the Advanced Synthetic-Diamond Drill Bit Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dennis, T. [Dennis Tool Co., Houston, TX (United States); Le, Phi [Security DBS, Houston, TX (United States); Cohen, J. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Chow, J. [Hughes Christensen Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative research is currently underway among five drill bit companies and Sandia National Laboratories to improve synthetic-diamond drill bits for hard-rock applications. This work, sponsored by the US Department of Energy and individual bit companies, is aimed at improving performance and bit life in harder rock than has previously been possible to drill effectively with synthetic-diamond drill bits. The goal is to extend to harder rocks the economic advantages seen in using synthetic-diamond drill bits in soft and medium rock formations. Four projects are being conducted under this research program. Each project is investigating a different area of synthetic diamond bit technology that builds on the current technology base and market interests of the individual companies involved. These projects include: optimization of the PDC claw cutter; optimization of the Track-Set PDC bit; advanced TSP bit development; and optimization of impregnated-diamond drill bits. This paper describes the progress made in each of these projects to date.

  4. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography: Reconstruction by synthetic aperture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography: Reconstruction by synthetic aperture Dazi Feng, Yuan thermoacoustic signals, to which the delay-and-sum algorithm was applied for image reconstruc- tion. We greatly-induced thermoacoustic tomography based on focused transducers. Two mi- crowave sources, which had frequencies of 9 and 3

  5. Library of libraries: A novel approach in synthetic combinatorial libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Kit S.

    Library of libraries: A novel approach in synthetic combinatorial libraries Nikolai F. Sepetov peptide libraries for pharmacological purposes is not necessarily to find the most active peptide can be used subsequently for developing a drug. Therefore a library of motifs can give as much or more

  6. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging with Motion Estimation and Liliana Borcea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    Callaghan George Papanicolaou Abstract We introduce from first principles a synthetic aperture radar (SAR calibrated small apertures, (b) preliminary motion estimation from the data using the Wigner transform-band persistent surveillance SAR is a specific application that is covered by our analysis. Detailed numerical

  7. Electron holography and magnetic properties of exsolved synthetic titanomagnetites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    can inform our interpretation of both remanence measurements and bulk rock properties. #12;Electron holography and magnetic properties of exsolved synthetic titanomagnetites Church, N S nc-scale exsolution structures, but the contribution to bulk magnetic properties of these assemblages of iron

  8. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  9. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  10. Biology 4250 Evolutionary Genetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innes, David J.

    sickle cell anemia (non-synonymous substitution) Unlimited supply of markers Organism Genome size Yeast

  11. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  12. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

  13. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Area team for Soil Metagenomics and Carbon Cycling develops and uses community genomics approaches to link the biological processes controlling belowground carbon storage...

  14. Synthetic Hexaploid Wheat as a Source of Improvement for Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Jessica Kay

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of this research was to evaluate the potential and performance of synthetic wheat in Texas. Ten elite primary synthetics from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), screened for desirable traits, were backcrossed to two Texas cultivars, TAM...

  15. Nanofabricated collagen-inspired synthetic elastomers for primary rat hepatocyte culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettinger, Christopher J.

    Synthetic substrates that mimic the properties of extracellular matrix proteins hold significant promise for use in systems designed for tissue engineering applications. In this report, we designed a synthetic polymeric ...

  16. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  17. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  18. Method and apparatus for removing heat from electronic devices using synthetic jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rajdeep; Weaver, Jr., Stanton Earl; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Arik, Mehmet; Icoz, Tunc; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for removing heat comprises a heat sink having a cavity, and a synthetic jet stack comprising at least one synthetic jet mounted within the cavity. At least one rod and at least one engaging structure to provide a rigid positioning of the at least one synthetic jet with respect to the at least one rod. The synthetic jet comprises at least one orifice through which a fluid is ejected.

  19. Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science [AS or upper division) 4 #12;Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor Summary on page 2 Conservation Biology Concentration Elective 2 See note 3 on page 2 Semester Five: [15

  20. Synthetic Lung Tumor Data Sets for Comparison of Volumetric Algorithms1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Javier

    Synthetic Lung Tumor Data Sets for Comparison of Volumetric Algorithms1 Adele P. Peskin of synthetic lung tumor data in which synthetic tumors of known volume are embedded in clinical lung computerized tomographic (CT) data in different background settings in the lung. Because the change

  1. AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Prepare... yourself for a career in integrating life and engineering for systems in agriculture, food, environment, and energy, and to contribute to the world's largest industry. COLLEGE OF ACES COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

  2. Human Embryology & Developmental Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Biology is the modern synthesis of biological and medical sciences that looks at how the tissues, and is at the forefront of recent advances in modern medicine. Current research has shown that many of the molecular Web Pages for names). The Head of School of Medical Sciences is always available for advice regarding

  3. Molecular Biology DEGREE PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    to the course co-ordinator for that module (See University Catalogue of Courses or SMS World Wide Web Pages in molecular biology have a wide range of career options, including virtually all areas of biology, medicine with mastering statistics, graphics and word processing software packages. General Enquiries The Degree Programme

  4. The acquisition of dangerous biological materials :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceto, Donato Gonzalo; Astuto-Gribble, Lisa M.; Gaudioso, Jennifer M.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous terrorist organizations have openly expressed interest in producing and deploying biological weapons. However, a limiting factor for many terrorists has been the acquisition of dangerous biological agents, as evidenced by the very few successful instances of biological weapons use compared to the number of documented hoaxes. Biological agents vary greatly in their ability to cause loss of life and economic damage. Some agents, if released properly, can kill many people and cause an extensive number of secondary infections; other agents will sicken only a small number of people for a short period of time. Consequently, several biological agents can potentially be used to perpetrate a bioterrorism attack but few are likely capable of causing a high consequence event. It is crucial, from a US national security perspective, to more deeply understand the likelihood that terrorist organizations can acquire the range of these agents. Few studies have attempted to comprehensively compile the technical information directly relevant to the acquisition of dangerous bacteria, viruses and toxins. In this report, technical fact sheets were assembled for 46 potentially dangerous biological agents. Much of the information was taken from various research sources which could ultimately and significantly expedite and improve bioterrorism threat assessments. By systematically examining a number of specific agent characteristics included in these fact sheets, it may be possible to detect, target, and implement measures to thwart future terrorist acquisition attempts. In addition, the information in these fact sheets may be used as a tool to help laboratories gain a rudimentary understanding of how attractive a method laboratory theft is relative to other potential acquisition modes.

  5. Synthetic aperture integration (SAI) algorithm for SAR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  6. Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Pe-Der

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina... to human health if they exist in the water supply at relatively high concentrations. A wide variety of treatment processes are available to remove organic matter from wastewater. Biological treatment is the most cost effective method for removing oxygen...

  7. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Cordatos

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  8. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancet, Michael S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Curran, George P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor.

  9. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancet, M. S.; Curran, G. P.; Gorin, E.

    1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for producing a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor. 1 fig.

  10. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize carbon AboutOrganizing Committee

  11. Extracting information from biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chindelevitch, Leonid Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology, the study of biological systems in a holistic manner, has been catalyzed by a dramatic improvement in experimental techniques, coupled with a constantly increasing availability of biological data. The ...

  12. Master track Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    their master. Our two MSc courses "Computational Biology" and "Bioinformatics and Evolutionary GenomicsMaster track Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics Modeling and bioinformatics is an important Biology & Bioinformatics provides courses introducing you to the basic concepts of modeling

  13. Investigations of biological processes in Austrian MBT plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tintner, J. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Smidt, E., E-mail: ena.smidt@boku.ac.a [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Boehm, K.; Binner, E. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become an important technology in waste management during the last decade. The paper compiles investigations of mechanical biological processes in Austrian MBT plants. Samples from all plants representing different stages of degradation were included in this study. The range of the relevant parameters characterizing the materials and their behavior, e.g. total organic carbon, total nitrogen, respiration activity and gas generation sum, was determined. The evolution of total carbon and nitrogen containing compounds was compared and related to process operation. The respiration activity decreases in most of the plants by about 90% of the initial values whereas the ammonium release is still ongoing at the end of the biological treatment. If the biogenic waste fraction is not separated, it favors humification in MBT materials that is not observed to such extent in MSW. The amount of organic carbon is about 15% dry matter at the end of the biological treatment.

  14. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  15. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  16. Viewing biology in action | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biology in action Released: June 11, 2014 DOE-funded pilot program will create mesoscale biological imaging platform James Evans EMSL received first-year funding of almost...

  17. Todd Newberry: Professor of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newberry, Andrew Todd; Jarrell, Randall; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Professor of Biology: Early Retirement page 44 Jarrell: ToProfessor of Biology: Early Retirement page 45 Jarrell: ToWar 33 Voluntary Early Retirement Incentive Program (VERIP)

  18. From association to organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandler, George

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S.M. (1978). Organization theory and memory for prose: Aand summarize organization theory and relevant empiricalexplained in terms of organization theory. The hierarchical

  19. Organization Chart - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LSD Logo About Us People & Organization Research News & Events Safety Internal Resources Organization Chart Departments Scientific Staff Directory Committees Organization Chart...

  20. Biological Interactions and Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proactive "EMSL 2.0-style" research paradigm. Because of the rapid pace of modern genomics and systems biology research, it is necessary to respond rapidly and flexibly to...

  1. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  2. Concentration and separation of biological organisms by ultrafiltration and dielectrophoresis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Hill, Vincent R. (Decatur, GA); Fintschenko, Yolanda (Livermore, CA); Cummings, Eric B. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for monitoring sources of public water supply for a variety of pathogens by using a combination of ultrafiltration techniques together dielectrophoretic separation techniques. Because water-borne pathogens, whether present due to "natural" contamination or intentional introduction, would likely be present in drinking water at low concentrations when samples are collected for monitoring or outbreak investigations, an approach is needed to quickly and efficiently concentrate and separate particles such as viruses, bacteria, and parasites in large volumes of water (e.g., 100 L or more) while simultaneously reducing the sample volume to levels sufficient for detecting low concentrations of microbes (e.g., <10 mL). The technique is also designed to screen the separated microbes based on specific conductivity and size.

  3. Organic and Printed Electronics for Biological Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 10, no. 2,Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 12, no. 3,nanoparticle microelectromechanical systems,” Journal of

  4. Organic and Printed Electronics for Biological Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Methodist University (SMU), for helping me exploreRichard Williams in SMU for his constant encouragement and

  5. Structural and Computational Studies of Small Organic and Biological Molecules 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Casal, Patricia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to investigate the energetics of the crystal structures: i.e., the sublimation, lattice and proton transfer energies, as well as the energies of the individual hydrogen bonds, in order to relate the structural changes observed by experiment. A new computational...

  6. Nanoparticle Formation of Organic Compounds With Retained Biological Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    solvents and/ or higher temperatures.4 Owing to the high compres- sibility of SCFs, the physical properties to be formed as well as control of the size distribution.7 Moreover, SC-CO2 antisolvent precipitation is highly.58C and 75.8 bar). Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) is also nonflammable and inexpensive.6

  7. Organic and Printed Electronics for Biological Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Q. Zhang, “Printed electronics for low-cost electronicUltra-Low-Cost Printed Electronics,” Ph.D. dissertation,capability of printed electronics to make important aspects

  8. Organic and Printed Electronics for Biological Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    patterns such as heaters and RTDs, the first step is to beprinted heaters and RTDs, the next step is to integrate theof RTDs and heaters involves numerous processing steps and

  9. Investigation of Trace Uranium in Biological Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, James Christopher

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy synthetic urine quality assurance standards from an inter-laboratory exercise in 2012. The separation apparatus was able to consistently separate uranium from the synthetic urine solutions with a consistent recovery between...

  10. Inorganic Metal Oxide/Organic Polymer Nanocomposites And Method Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Simpson, Randy (Livermore, CA)

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal in organic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophilic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  11. Systems Biology Knowledgebase for a New Era in Biology A Genomics:GTL Report from the May 2008 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregurick, S.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Stevens, R.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology has entered a systems-science era with the goal to establish a predictive understanding of the mechanisms of cellular function and the interactions of biological systems with their environment and with each other. Vast amounts of data on the composition, physiology, and function of complex biological systems and their natural environments are emerging from new analytical technologies. Effectively exploiting these data requires developing a new generation of capabilities for analyzing and managing the information. By revealing the core principles and processes conserved in collective genomes across all biology and by enabling insights into the interplay between an organism's genotype and its environment, systems biology will allow scientific breakthroughs in our ability to project behaviors of natural systems and to manipulate and engineer managed systems. These breakthroughs will benefit Department of Energy (DOE) missions in energy security, climate protection, and environmental remediation.

  12. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica Sanderson

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and discusses results from the project 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production', performed at five different full-scale commercial wallboard plants. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study has been to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere at wallboard manufacturing plants when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project has been co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope included seven discrete tasks, each including a test conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different wet FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a base-case test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5,could not be conducted as planned and instead was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3. Subsequently an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced from the Task 5 FGD system, but with an additive expected to impact the stability of mercury, so Task 6 was added to the project. Finally, Task 7 was added to evaluate synthetic gypsum produced at a power plant from an additional coal type. In the project, process stacks in the wallboard plant were sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. In every task, the stack locations sampled included a gypsum dryer and a gypsum calciner. In Tasks 1 and 4 through 7, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. These results and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. The results from the project showed a wide range of percentage mercury losses from the synthetic gypsum feedstocks as measured by the Ontario Hydro method at the process stacks, ranging from 2% to 55% of the mercury in the gypsum feedstock. For the tasks exceeding 10% mercury loss across the wallboard plant, most of the loss occurred across the gypsum calciner. When total wallboard emissions remained below 10%, the primary emission location varied with a much less pronounced difference in emission between the gypsum dryer, calciner and board dryer. For all seven tasks, the majority of the mercury emissions were measured to be in the elemental form (Hg{sup 0}). Overall, the measured mercury loss mass rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.17 grams of mercury per dry ton of synthetic gypsum processed, or 0.01 to 0.4 pounds of mercury released per million square feet of wallboard produced from synthetic gypsum. The Coal Combustion Product Production and Use Survey from the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) indicate that 7,579,187 short tons of synthetic gypsum were used for wallboard production in 2006. Extrapolating the results of this study to the ACAA industry usage rate, we estimate that mercury releases from wallboard production plants in 2006 ranged between 150 to 3000 pounds for the entire U.S. wallboard industry. With only seven sets of wallboard plant measurements, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about what variables impact the mercury loss percentages across the wallboard plants. One significant o

  13. Synthetic fuel concept to steal CO2 from air

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(Insert DirectiveSynthetic fuel concept

  14. Synthetic muscle developed with PPPL scientists' help ready for launch |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(Insert DirectiveSynthetic fuel

  15. Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrubasik, A.; Stich, W. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste.

  16. Complex biological and bio-inspired systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding and characterization ofthe fundamental processes of the function of biological systems underpins many of the important challenges facing American society, from the pathology of infectious disease and the efficacy ofvaccines, to the development of materials that mimic biological functionality and deliver exceptional and novel structural and dynamic properties. These problems are fundamentally complex, involving many interacting components and poorly understood bio-chemical kinetics. We use the basic science of statistical physics, kinetic theory, cellular bio-chemistry, soft-matter physics, and information science to develop cell level models and explore the use ofbiomimetic materials. This project seeks to determine how cell level processes, such as response to mechanical stresses, chemical constituents and related gradients, and other cell signaling mechanisms, integrate and combine to create a functioning organism. The research focuses on the basic physical processes that take place at different levels ofthe biological organism: the basic role of molecular and chemical interactions are investigated, the dynamics of the DNA-molecule and its phylogenetic role are examined and the regulatory networks of complex biochemical processes are modeled. These efforts may lead to early warning algorithms ofpathogen outbreaks, new bio-sensors to detect hazards from pathomic viruses to chemical contaminants. Other potential applications include the development of efficient bio-fuel alternative-energy processes and the exploration ofnovel materials for energy usages. Finally, we use the notion of 'coarse-graining,' which is a method for averaging over less important degrees of freedom to develop computational models to predict cell function and systems-level response to disease, chemical stress, or biological pathomic agents. This project supports Energy Security, Threat Reduction, and the missions of the DOE Office of Science through its efforts to accurately model biological systems at the molecular and cellular level. The project's impact encompasses applications to biofuels, to novel sensors and to materials with broad use for energy or threat reduction. The broad, interdisciplinary approach of CNLS offers the unparalleled strength of combining science backgrounds and expertise -a unique and important asset in attacking the complex science of biological organisms. This approach also allows crossfertilization, with concepts and techniques transferring across field boundaries.

  17. Harvard Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    Guide Glove Material Applications Butyl A synthetic rubber material that offers the highest permeation resistance to gas and water vapors. Esp. suited for use with esters and ketones. Neoprene A synthetic rubber and caustics. Moderate abrasion resistance. Nitrile A synthetic rubber material that offers chemical

  18. Synthetic fuels from peat: state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punwani, D.V.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world has significant resources of peat. Total energy contained in these resources is estimated to be equivalent to over 1800 billion barrels of oil. Peat has been used extensively in Europe and Russia for years as a source of energy. In the United States, where peat resources are estimated at equivalent to 240 billion barrels of oil, peat is not used commercially as a source of energy. In 1974, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) initiated peat gasification research under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco). The results of that work, continued at IGT under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Minnegasco, show that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is a better raw material for making synthetic fuels than coal. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of the total system of taking peat from the ground and converting it to synthetic fuels. This system incorporates subsystems on harvesting, dewatering, and conversion processes. The world peat resources and environmental effects on large-scale peat utilization are also reviewed.

  19. Economical utilization of natural gas to produce synthetic petroleum liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agee, K.L.; Agee, M.A. [Syntroleum Corp., Tulsa, OK (United States); Willingham, F.Y.; Trepper, E.L. [Bateman Engineering, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new process for converting pipeline quality or subquality natural gas into liquid fuels and other petroleum products is described. The technology, developed by Syntroleum Corporation, utilizes autothermal reforming with air to produce a nitrogen-diluted synthesis gas having a near ideal ratio for converting into synthetic hydrocarbons via Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. A proprietary F-T catalyst system, designed to operate in a nitrogen-diluted atmosphere, achieves conversion rates comparable to conventional F-T processes without the need for recycle and the associated recompression equipment. This results in potential plant capital costs low enough to make conversion of remote and or subquality gas into synthetic fuels economical, based on current oil prices. The process is energy self-sufficient and compact enough to be constructed in 5,000 to 10,000 b/d plants on floating or platform facilities to utilize offshore gas reserves. The liquid fuels produced by the process are free of sulfur and aromatics. The process has been demonstrated at pilot-scale. Numerous engineering studies and cost estimates have been conducted to provide the information needed for economic evaluation and confident scale-up. This paper also outlines improvements to the process currently under development and how the process presents new opportunities for gas processors.

  20. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  1. Institute for Multiscale Modeling of Biological Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulaitis, Michael E; Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand; Lenhoff, Abraham

    2009-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute for Multiscale Modeling of Biological Interactions (IMMBI) has two primary goals: Foster interdisciplinary collaborations among faculty and their research laboratories that will lead to novel applications of multiscale simulation and modeling methods in the biological sciences and engineering; and Building on the unique biophysical/biology-based engineering foundations of the participating faculty, train scientists and engineers to apply computational methods that collectively span multiple time and length scales of biological organization. The success of IMMBI will be defined by the following: Size and quality of the applicant pool for pre-doctoral and post-doctoral fellows; Academic performance; Quality of the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral research; Impact of the research broadly and to the DOE (ASCR program) mission; Distinction of the next career step for pre-doctoral and post-doctoral fellows; and Faculty collaborations that result from IMMBI activities. Specific details about accomplishments during the three years of DOE support for IMMBI have been documented in Annual Progress Reports (April 2005, June 2006, and March 2007) and a Report for a National Academy of Sciences Review (October 2005) that were submitted to DOE on the dates indicated. An overview of these accomplishments is provided.

  2. Reduction of NOx in Synthetic Diesel Exhaust via Two-Step Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Citation: Tonkyn RG, SE Barlow, and J Hoard.2003."Reduction of NOx in Synthetic Diesel Exhaust via Two-Step Plasma-Catalysis Treatment."Applied Catalysis. B,...

  3. HE3286, an oral synthetic steroid, treats lung inflammation in mice without immune suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implications for therapy. Treat Respir Med 2004, 3:147-59.as a potential agent to treat autoimmune diseases. Autoimmunan oral synthetic steroid, treats lung inflammation in mice

  4. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VI) with the Iron Oxide Goethite, University of California,Values for Synthetic Goethite and Pyrolusite" submitted tothe two Mn-substituted goethite minerals used in this study.

  5. Phosphate and Organic Acids as Competing Sorbates on Amorphous Aluminum Oxide. (3791)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Phosphate and Organic Acids as Competing Sorbates on Amorphous Aluminum Oxide. (3791) Authors: K sorption of P to amorphous aluminum oxides. Alum initially decreases litter pH, so the stability of P was employed to investigate the adsorption of phosphate and oxalate, to synthetic amorphous aluminum hydroxide

  6. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited. They are expected to anticipate and react quickly to prevent a potential threat while staying accountable to their public stakeholders, many of whom remain unaware of the very threats the organization is trying to address. When budgets are flush, it is easy to believe that money will solve all problems; but during times of economic hardship, managers must rely on creative and cost-effective management approaches to implement their missions. Fortunately, managers of nonproliferation organizations can draw on a wealth of research on organizational design and culture to help them identify the management strategies most appropriate for them. Such research can help nonproliferation managers think about their own organizational structures and cultures and adapt accepted management principles to their unique organizational mission. This analytical process is not straight forward, as some managers may find themselves taking risks that others might not take, such as making ostensibly risky investments for the common good, or supporting creative thinking to help mission accomplishment. Some management principles that are relatively straightforward for other organizations may be difficult to envision and implement in a nonproliferation organization. Therefore, the goal of this study is to help nonproliferation managers identify management principles that can be implemented in a nonproliferation organization and, in the process, help maximize the value of the organization's products and effectiveness of its mission.

  7. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica Sanderson; Gary M. Blythe; Mandi Richardson

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 6 of the study 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope now includes six discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to include testing with an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. Subsequent to conducting Task 5 under these revised conditions, an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced at the same FGD system, but with an additive (Degussa Corporation's TMT-15) being used in the FGD system. TMT-15 was expected to impact the stability of mercury in synthetic gypsum used to produce wallboard, so Task 6 was added to the project to test this theory. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. For every task, the stack locations sampled have included a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. For Tasks 1, 4, 5 and 6, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 6 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower limestone forced oxidation FGD system, with the forced oxidation conducted in the reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, and the SCR was in service during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. Also, as mentioned above, Degussa additive TMT-15 was being added to the FGD system when this gypsum was produced. The results of the Task 6 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 55% of the incoming mercury was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as about 4% across the dryer mill, 6% across the board dryer kiln, and 45% across the kettle calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 5 results showed on a percentage basis, but about 30% lower on a mass basis. The same power plant FGD system produced the synthetic gypsum used in Task 5 (with no use of TMT-15) and in Task 6 (with TMT-15 added to the FGD system). The lower emissions on a mass basis appeared

  8. Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology Organizations Hiring Students in Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Inc Rocky Mountain Research Station Savannah River Site December 2012 / May 2013 Schlumberger of Health Public Lab Minnesota Dept of Ag Missouri Department of Conservation Missouri Solar Applications Nantucket Conservation Foundation National Park Service Nebraska Game and Parks Commission NICHES Land Trust

  9. Leading Edge Nuclear Biology: What's Been Most Surprising?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pikaard, Craig

    Leading Edge Voices Nuclear Biology: What's Been Most Surprising? Restricting Genomic Partners Job with inappropriate elements. So, a major question in the field of nuclear organization is how do cells ensure have demonstrated that thousands of regulatory regions undergo activation or decommissioning even

  10. September 2004 313NEW BIOLOGICAL BOOKS differentiation, morphogenesis, signal transduction,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    - tors. It is recommended for acquisition by univer- sity libraries. Jianxiong Li, Biochemistry & Cell Biology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York Sustainable Soils: The Place of Organic Mat- ter in Sustaining Soils and Their Productiv- ity. By Benjamin Wolf and George H Snyder. Food Prod

  11. Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon

  12. Fishery Biology Graduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Biology Graduate Programs University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program/degrees/index.html University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Fisheries Conservation and Management http://ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/wildlifefisheries/gradstudiesFisheries.html Auburn University Auburn, Alabama 368490001 Programs: Aquaculture, Aquatic Ecology, Fishery Management

  13. BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Microscope) Analytical Equipment · High Performance Liquid Chromatography · Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography · Gas Chromatography · GC/MS · Elemental Analyser Molecular Biology Equipment · Biorad PCR Machine reactor for scale up studies In-line Particle sizers Rheometers Separation tanks Oscillating column (4m

  14. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    and interdisciplinary areas, including biochemical solar energy research, artificial photosynthesis and bio Biology at Rensselaer invites applications from students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree in an interdisciplinary environment with research opportunities in emerging fields, such as energy and the environment

  15. Biological and Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. After capitalize on recent technological and scientific advances. Several multidisciplinary projects of key,ecosystemmonitoringandrestoration,combiningcropresearchandmicrobial engineering to make biofuels a viable alternative to fossil fuels, and personalized medicine to improve health

  16. Biological and Environmental Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recalcitrance. Using an integrated approach to solving the challenge of producing biofuel from cellulosic materials, the center will not only provide the scientific basis for affordable and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. BESC researchers have

  17. CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells David Dingli and Martin A. Nowak Cancer cells are generally infectious agents and be transmitted between individuals. The current view of cancer development is that normal cells are transformed into tumour cells by sequential mutations that activate cancer- promoting

  18. ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

  19. Oxygen as a control on seafloor biological communities and their roles in sedimentary carbon cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxygen as a control on seafloor biological communities and their roles in sedimentary carbon experiments were conducted at sites spanning the steep oxygen, organic matter, and biological community gradients across the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone, in order to quantify the role that fauna play

  20. 6th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy, P.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology is an annual two-day event gathering the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investigating complex systems. In recognition of the fundamental similarity between the scientific problems addressed in environmental science and systems biology studies at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels, the 2007 Symposium featured global leaders in “Systems Biology and the Environment.” The objective of the 2007 “Systems Biology and the Environment” International Symposium was to stimulate interdisciplinary thinking and research that spans systems biology and environmental science. This Symposium was well aligned with the DOE’s Genomics:GTL program efforts to achieve scientific objectives for each of the three DOE missions: • Develop biofuels as a major secure energy source for this century, • Develop biological solutions for intractable environmental problems, and • Understand biosystems’ climate impacts and assess sequestration strategies Our scientific program highlighted world-class research exemplifying these priorities. The Symposium featured 45 minute lectures from 12 researchers including: Penny/Sallie Chisholm of MIT gave the keynote address “Tiny Cells, Global Impact: What Prochlorococcus Can Teach Us About Systems Biology”, plus Jim Fredrickson of PNNL, Nitin Baliga of ISB, Steve Briggs of UCSD, David Cox of Perlegen Sciences, Antoine Danchin of Institut Pasteur, John Delaney of the U of Washington, John Groopman of Johns Hopkins, Ben Kerr of the U of Washington, Steve Koonin of BP, Elliott Meyerowitz of Caltech, and Ed Rubin of LBNL. The 2007 Symposium promoted DOE’s three mission areas among scientists from multiple disciplines representing academia, non-profit research institutions, and the private sector. As in all previous Symposia, we had excellent attendance of participants representing 20-30 academic or research-oriented facilities along with 25-30 private corporations from 5-10 countries. To broaden the audience for the Symposium and ensure the continued accessibility of the presentations, we made the presentation videos available afterward on the ISB’s website.

  1. Mortality study of employees at a synthetic rubber manufacturing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, T.M.; Buffler, P.A.; Holguin, A.H.; Hsi, B.P.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mortality follow-up study was conducted of workers employed at a synthetic rubber manufacturing plant in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Interest in the potential health effects of exposure to methyl chloride, one of the substances used in the manufacturing process, provided the impetus for this study. The study cohort consisted of 852 male process workers who had worked at least 1 month during the period from startup of operations in 1943 through December 31, 1978. Mortality from all causes was lower than expected when compared with the U.S. male population. No excess mortality from any specific cause of death was found in the study population after analysis by level and duration of exposure.

  2. Sampling and analysis of butadiene at a synthetic rubber plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich, J.D.; DeWees, W.G.; Segall, R.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Butadiene emission samples were collected from the process vent stream of a plant manufacturing synthetic rubber from styrene and butadiene. On-site analysis of samples was performed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. The precision of butadiene concentrations was determined from simultaneous samples collected at a nominal sampling rate of 0.050 L/min, rather than at the recommended sampling rate of 0.5 L/min. In addition, simultaneous samples were collected at both 0.20 L/min and 0.050 L/min and analyzed to determine if the mean values or precisions of the measured concentrations were influenced by the sampling rate. Acceptable precision was observed at both sampling rates, and the mean values and precisions of butadiene levels determined were statistically equal for simultaneous samples.

  3. Characterization of secondary collection system flows beneath synthetic composite liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenleer, M.E. [Wenck Associates, Inc., Grand Rapids, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary liner systems for landfills are becoming more common. Subtitle D may be construed to require secondary liners to meet monitorability requirements for new units. Michigan requires secondary liners in many situations, most commonly at previously contaminated sites to allow for differential monitoring of the new cell(s). Much work has been done in characterizing the flow of liquids through FML/clay composite liners but less is known about flows through FML/geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) composite liners or through isolated FMLs. Flow and chemical data are examined from two Michigan landfills employing different configurations of all synthetic primary and secondary liners. The data is examined for apparent trends. Conclusions are drawn about the application of generic action flow rates as a regulatory standard to these systems and the chemical characteristics of the liquids in secondary systems. Calculations are presented to achieve a realistic action leakage rate for these systems.

  4. Observation of Dirac Monopoles in a Synthetic Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, M W; Kandel, S; Möttönen, M; Hall, D S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic monopoles --- particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles --- have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin-ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3. Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in b...

  5. Giant g-factors of natural impurities in synthetic quartz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Farr, Warrick G.; Tobar, Michael E., E-mail: michael.tobar@uwa.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of g-factors of natural paramagnetic impurities in a pure synthetic quartz crystal at milli-Kelvin temperatures. Measurements are made by performing spectroscopy using multiple high-Q whispering gallery modes sustained in the crystal. Extreme sensitivity of the method at low temperatures allows the determination of natural residual impurities introduced during the crystal growth. We observe g-factors that significantly differ from integer multiples of the electron g-factor in vacuum, and with values of up to 7.6, which reveals much stronger coupling between impurities and the crystal lattice than in previous studies. Both substitutional and interstitial ions are proposed as candidates for the observed interactions.

  6. Inorganic metal oxide/organic polymer nanocomposites and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal inorganic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophillic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the composite material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  7. 2007 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imke Schroeder

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Archaea are a fascinating and diverse group of prokaryotic organisms with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of this GRC conference, 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology', expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting the evolution and composition of microbial communities and novel archaeal species, their impact on the environment, archaeal metabolism, and research that stems from sequence analysis of archaeal genomes. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple reputable areas with new scientific topics in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  8. Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science [AS Geology Elective 3-4 See note 2 on page 2 General Elective 4 #12;Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Summary on page 2 Conservation Biology Concentration Elective 2 See note 3 on page 2 Semester Five: [15

  9. Plant responses to phosphorus-deficiency stress: the role of organic acids in P mobilization from iron oxide and P acquisition by sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sarah Elizabeth

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -deficiency stress are organic-acid exudation from the roots and increased phosphatase activity. Organic-acid-induced P release from iron-oxide surfaces was studied using synthetic iron oxides. The amounts of P released and Fe dissolved from ferrihydrite and goethite...

  10. Experiment design for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apgar, Joshua Farley

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanism-based chemical kinetic models are increasingly being used to describe biological signaling. Such models serve to encapsulate current understanding of pathways and to enable insight into complex biological processes. ...

  11. Modular architecture in biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Gopal (Gopal Sebastian)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, biology has been revolutionized by an explosion in the availability of data. Translating this new wealth of information into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs will require a ...

  12. Biological Engineering integrates life sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    mitigating 40 million pounds of carbon dioxide greenhouse gases each year, and would pay for itself in les with the constantly evolving science of biology, the field of Biological Engineering tackles local, national

  13. WOBBLED SYNTHETIC DISCRIMINANT FUNCTION CLASSIFICATION Chye-Hwa Loo and Atef Elsherbeni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    fragment-based recognition approach and a new type of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filter in this paper is to use a new type of Synthetic Discriminant Function (SDF) to reduce the number of reference the principal of SDF while introducing a new type of SDF code named Wobbled SDF. In Section 2, the Analysis

  14. BLIND TESTS OF REFRACTION MICROTREMOR ANALYSIS AGAINST SYNTHETICS AND BOREHOLE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLIND TESTS OF REFRACTION MICROTREMOR ANALYSIS AGAINST SYNTHETICS AND BOREHOLE DATA Karalyn Heath1 the synthetics in a blind test, following standard ReMi procedures. Between the models and the blind results, we% for Z0. For the second application, we completed blind analyses of refraction microtremor data taken

  15. Image-Based Rendering for Non-Diffuse Synthetic Scenes Dani Lischinski Ari Rappoport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappoport, Ari

    Image-Based Rendering for Non-Diffuse Synthetic Scenes Dani Lischinski Ari Rappoport The Hebrew University Abstract. Most current image-based rendering methods operate under the assumption that all with image-based rendering of non-diffuse synthetic scenes. We introduce a new family of image-based scene

  16. Feasibility study for mapping the polar ice bottom topography using interferometric synthetic-aperture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    interferometric synthetic-aperture radar processing for basal surface topography mapping of the thickest GreenlandFeasibility study for mapping the polar ice bottom topography using interferometric synthetic sheets. Ice bottom topography drives ice dynamics, which affects the mass balance. Accurate information

  17. Reduced thermal resistance of the silicon-synthetic diamond composite substrates at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Si sub- strates, depends on the polycrystalline-diamond grain size, diamond layer thicknessReduced thermal resistance of the silicon-synthetic diamond composite substrates at elevated of synthetic diamond-silicon composite substrates. Although composite substrates are more thermally resistive

  18. 3-D airborne ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    3-D airborne ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic was implemented by mechanical scanning a co-located transmitter and receiver using the classic synthetic aperture, silicone rubber, and foam plastics, in an attempt to overcome bad mechanical impedance matching between

  19. Nanomolding Based Fabrication of Synthetic Gecko Foot-Hairs Metin Sitti and Ronald S. Fearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Ron

    Nanomolding Based Fabrication of Synthetic Gecko Foot-Hairs Metin Sitti and Ronald S. Fearing Dept- This paper proposes two different nanomolding methods to fabricate synthetic gecko foot-hair nanostructures a nano-pore membrane as a template. These templates are molded with silicone rubber, polyamide

  20. The use of flexible synthetic rubbers for casts of complex fossils from natural moulds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    The use of flexible synthetic rubbers for casts of complex fossils from natural moulds M. J. BENTON (Dugdale DD118) synthetic rubbers make excellent casting materials for the production of high). They described the methods of use and results from such commercially available silicone rubbers as Silastic 9161

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL LONGWAVE INFRARED (LWIR) SYNTHETIC IMAGE GENERATION INCORPORATING ANGULAR EMJSSWITY EFFECTS USING RAY-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    . These routines require a sequence of images to evaluate tracking algorithms. The evaluation of sensor performanceTHREE-DIMENSIONAL LONGWAVE INFRARED (LWIR) SYNTHETIC IMAGE GENERATION INCORPORATING ANGULAR Memorial Drive Rochester, New York 14623-0887 ABSTRAO A technique for longwave infrared (LWIR) synthetic

  2. Monitoring of SAGD Process: Seismic Interpretation of Ray+Born Synthetic 4D Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Monitoring of SAGD Process: Seismic Interpretation of Ray+Born Synthetic 4D Data C. Joseph1, G ­ Monitoring of SAGD Process: Seismic Interpretation of Ray+Born Synthetic 4D Data ­ The objective of this study is to evaluate which production information can be deduced from a 4D seismic survey during

  3. Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop Wiley HS, Kaplan S. 2011. "Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory...

  4. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen...

  5. Environmental Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microbiology, biogeochemistry, molecular biology, molecular dynamics, bioinformatics, genomics, neutron science, chemistry, and computing-and spans multiple scales, from the...

  6. Systems Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of interdisciplinary scientists. Additional systems biology resources Research Highlights Media Mentions Publications Newsletters Biosciences Division Recent news releases 11...

  7. Perspectives Computational Biology in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neshich, Goran

    Perspectives Computational Biology in Brazil Goran Neshich Introduction At the request of the PLoS Computational Biology Editor-in- Chief, I agreed to write about computational biology in Brazil (see author of the field itself is short); b) the current state of the field in Brazil; c) the influence of computational

  8. COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    in the burgeoning fields of bioinformatics and computational biology. A major outcome of the initial funding period was the establishment of ISU's interdepartmental graduate program in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB for Research Excellence in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB). The ISU-NMSU partnership

  9. Crystalline guanine adducts of natural and synthetic trioxacarcins suggest a common biological mechanism and reveal a basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    oligonucleotide d(CGTATACG). Crystallographic analysis suggests that 7 is an anthraquinone derivative, which we an anthraquinone. We believe that this heretofore unrecognized chemical instability of natural trioxacarcins may

  10. Synthetic biology in yeast : reconstructing the galactose network to probe the role of feedback induction in response to metabolic stimuli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferry, Michael Stephen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thinner into a clean dark glass bottle, make sure to do thisa working 30ml amber glass bottle, which you refill from theswab 41265T31 Glass bottle (amber) Instant Adhesive

  11. Synthetic Biology and Bioenergy: Helping the Good Guy and Stopping the Bad (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercedes-Roca, Maria [Zamorano Panamerican Agriculture School

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Maria Mercedes-Roca of the Zamorano Panamerican Agriculture School speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  12. Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology in Strain Development Every year, we consume about 27 billion barrels of fossil oil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    billion barrels of fossil oil. This enormous amount of oil is used for fueling our cars and airplanes

  13. Microfluidics for Synthetic Biology : : developing technologies for study of gene networks in single cells and large populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razinkov, Ivan Alexandrovich

    5.5.1 MicrofluidicsMicroscopy and Microfluidics . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.7.53.6.2 Microfluidics and Microscopy . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Gregg, Charles T. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, W. Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Hiebert, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  15. Industry-wide studies report of an in-depth survey at Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, E.R.; Ungers, L.J.; Fajen, J.M.

    1987-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to assess worker exposure to 1,3-butadiene at a polymer production facility, an in-depth industrial-hygiene survey was conducted at Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana. This facility incorporated a number of controls designed to prevent the release of chemical intermediates and products into the air. Personal protective equipment included rubber, cotton, or vinyl gloves depending on the job performed. Respirators were required for field lab samplers and maintenance personnel performing specific tasks. Half-face organic vapor respirators were used. The authors recommend that consideration be given to converting to a closed-loop sampling system for obtaining quality control samples.

  16. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica Marshall Sanderson

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 5 of the study ''Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,'' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. The FGD process is used to control the sulfur dioxide emissions which would result in acid rain if not controlled. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies developed for power plants involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope includes five discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The five tasks were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to evaluate gypsum produced from an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to a previous task, Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. The stack locations sampled for each task include a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. The stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested as part of this task, and was tested as part of Tasks 1 and 4. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 5 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, but the SCR was bypassed during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower, limestone reagent FGD system, with forced oxidation conducted in a reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. Gypsum fines blow down is believed to be an important variable that impacts the amount of mercury in the gypsum byproduct and possibly its stability during the wallboard process. The results of the Task 5 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 51% of the incoming mercury in the FGD gypsum was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as 2% or less each across the wet gypsum dryer and product wallboard dryer, and about 50% across the gypsum calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 3 results showed, on both a percentage and a mass basis, for gypsum produced by a power plant firing bituminous coal and also having gypsum fines blow down as part of the FGD dewatering scheme. As was seen in the Task 1 through 4 results, most of the mercury detected in the stack testing on the wet gypsum dryer and kettle calciner was in the form of elemental mercury. In the wallboard dryer kiln, a more signific

  17. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of ?-Pinene. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic...

  18. 7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sive, Hazel L.

    The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological ...

  19. Arbib, Fagg and Grafton: Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping May 20, 2001 1 Arbib, M.A., Fagg, A.H., and Grafton, S.T., to appear, Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping: From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Arbib, Fagg and Grafton: Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping May 20, 2001 1 Arbib, M.A., Fagg, A.H., and Grafton, S.T., to appear, Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping: From Primate Neurophysiology to Human, Eds.), Cambridge MA: The MIT Press. Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping: From Primate Neurophysiology

  20. Energy from biological processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment responds to a request by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation for an evaluation of the energy potential of various sources of plant and animal matter (biomass). This report complements an earlier OTA report on the Application of Solar Technology to Today's Energy Needs in evaluating the major solar energy resources available to the United States. The findings also will serve as part of the material to be used in an upcoming OTA assessment of synthetic fuels for transportation. This volume presents analyses of prominent biomass issues, summaries of four biomass fuel cycles, a description of biomass' place in two plausible energy futures, and discussions of policy options for promoting energy from biomass. The four fuel cycles - wood, alcohol fuels, grasses and crop residues, and animal wastes - were chosen because of their near- to mid-term energy potential and because of the public interest in them. A second volume presents technical analyses of the resource base, conversion technologies, and end uses that provide a basis for the discussion in this volume. Also included in Volume II are various unconventional approaches to bioenergy production as well as the use of biomass to produce chemicals.

  1. Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

  2. Departmental Organization and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

  3. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers...

  4. AN INTEGRATED BIOLOGICAL CONTROL SYSTEM AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON AR; CAUDILL JG; GIDDINGS RF; RODRIGUEZ JM; ROOS RC; WILDE JW

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999 an integrated biological control system was instituted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Successes and changes to the program needed to be communicated to a large and diverse mix of organizations and individuals. Efforts at communication are directed toward the following: Hanford Contractors (Liquid or Tank Waste, Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Science and Technology, Site Infrastructure), General Hanford Employees, and Hanford Advisory Board (Native American Tribes, Environmental Groups, Local Citizens, Washington State and Oregon State regulatory agencies). Communication was done through direct interface meetings, individual communication, where appropriate, and broadly sharing program reports. The objectives of the communication efforts was to have the program well coordinated with Hanford contractors, and to have the program understood well enough that all stakeholders would have confidence in the work performed by the program to reduce or elimated spread of radioactive contamination by biotic vectors. Communication of successes and changes to an integrated biological control system instituted in 1999 at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site have required regular interfaces with not only a diverse group of Hanford contractors (i.e., those responsible for liquid or tank waste, solid wastes, environmental restoration, science and technology, and site infrastructure), and general Hanford employees, but also with a consortium of designated stake holders organized as the Hanford Advisory Board (i.e., Native American tribes, various environmental groups, local citizens, Washington state and Oregon regulatory agencies, etc.). Direct interface meetings, individual communication where appropriate, and transparency of the biological control program were the methods and outcome of this effort.

  5. Thermodynamic assessment of the variation of the surface areas of two synthetic swelling clays during adsorption of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thermodynamic assessment of the variation of the surface areas of two synthetic swelling clays; Synthetic smectite; Water; Adsorption; Surface area; Swelling clay; Interlayer space #12;1. Introduction Synthetic clays are very interesting materials, both for scientific research and for industrial applications

  6. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by adding Synthetic Wax C. Petita , A. Milliena , F. Canestrarib , V. Pannunziob , A. Virgilib a Université.petit@unilim.fr , Phone : +33555934519 Abstract Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax

  7. Kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrotreating synthetic middle distillates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, I.P. (Petro-Canada R and D Dept., Sheridan Park, Ontario (Canada)); Wilson, M.F. (CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Middle distillates from the Tar Sands deposits in Alberta are an important component of diesel and jet fuels in the Canadian market. Commercial catalysts based on sulfided Ni-Mo and Ni-W are currently used to hydrogenate synthetic distillates to improve the cetane number and smoke point. In previous work {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the kinetics of overall hydrogenation of aromatics over sulfided Co-Mo, Ni-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. Arrhenius parameters were obtained for hydrogenation over sulfided Ni-W catalyst for a similar distillate feedstock. In the latter study, mass spectrometry was used to quantitate the three major aromatic hydrocarbon group types in the feed and products. In this study, liquid products from hydrotreating experiments with a hydrotreated distillate from delayed coking of Athabasca bitumen and sulfided Co-Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts have been analyzed by mass spectrometry. This completes a preliminary comparison of the kinetics of hydrogenation of alkylbenzenes, benzocycloparaffins and benzodicycloparaffins, the three major aromatic hydrocarbon types in these distillates.

  8. Conventional and synthetic aperature processing for airborne ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, R.M. [Airborne Environmental Surveys, Santa Maria, CA (United States); Simkins, W.L.; Brown, R.D. [MSB Technologies, Inc., Rome, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past four years Airborne Environmental Surveys (AES), a Division of Era Aviation, Inc. has used unique and patented airborne Frequency-Modulated, Continuous Wave (FM-CW) radars and processes for detecting and mapping subsurface phenomena. Primary application has focused on the detection of man-made objects in landfills, hazardous waste sites (some of which contain unexploded ordinance), and subsurface plumes of refined free-floating hydrocarbons. Recently, MSB Technologies, Inc. (MSB) has developed a form of synthetic aperture radar processing (SAR), called GPSAR{trademark}, that is tailored especially for the AES radars. Used as an adjunct to more conventional airborne ground-penetrating radar data processing techniques, GPSAR takes advantage of the radars` coherent transmission and produces imagery that is better focused and more accurate in determining an object`s range and true depth. This paper describes the iterative stages of data processing and analysis used with the radars and shows the added advantages that GPSAR processing offers.

  9. Observation of Dirac Monopoles in a Synthetic Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. W. Ray; E. Ruokokoski; S. Kandel; M. Möttönen; D. S. Hall

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic monopoles --- particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles --- have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin-ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3. Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in both experiments and matching numerical simulations, at the termini of vortex lines within the condensate. By directly imaging such a vortex line, the presence of a monopole may be discerned from the experimental data alone. These real-space images provide conclusive and long-awaited experimental evidence of the existence of Dirac monopoles. Our result provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe and manipulate these quantum-mechanical entities in a controlled environment.

  10. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  11. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiological and

  12. Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiologicalLaboratories

  13. Z .Synthetic Metals 114 2000 201207 www.elsevier.comrlocatersynmet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanyi

    work on dye-sensitized solar cell is centered on w xruthennium­bipyridine complexes 9­11 sensitizing solar cell, it is necessary to probe the sensitization of other kinds of dyes, such as organic molecules illumination of simulated solar light, the dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO film generated greater than 1 m

  14. Organe und Gremien Organe der Stiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Batavia IL (USA) Prof. Dr. F. Krausz BESSY GmbH, Berlin Prof. Dr. B. Naroska Universität Hamburg Prof. Dr. F. Pauss European Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Geneva (CH) Dr. N. Roe Lawrence Berkeley Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Geneva (CH) Dr. A. Wrulich Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (CH) 14 #12

  15. Organe und Gremien Organe der Stiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medizinische Forschung, Heidelberg Prof. Dr. E. Jaeschke BESSY GmbH, Berlin Prof. Dr. W. Jentschke Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg (Ehrenmitglied) Dr. K.-H. Kissler European Organization for Particle Physics Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Geneva (CH) Prof. Dr. W. Sandner Max-Born-Institut, Berlin Dr. M

  16. Organe und Gremien Organe der Stiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassel Prof. Dr. S. Großmann Fachbereich Physik, Universität Marburg Prof. Dr. E. Jaeschke BESSY Gmb Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Genf (CH) Prof. Dr. V. Metag Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung GSI, Darmstadt Dr. D. Möhl European Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Genf (CH) Prof. Dr. J. Stachel

  17. Organe und Gremien Organe der Stiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BESSY GmbH, Berlin Prof. Dr. W. Jentschke II. Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg (Ehrenmitglied) Dr. K.-H. Kissler European Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Geneva (CH) Prof. Dr. K. Königsmann Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg Dr. J. May European Organization for Particle Physics CERN

  18. Chemico-Biological Interactions 166 (2007) 264276 Chemical process-based reconstruction of exposures for an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Keywords: Chloroprene; Vinyl chloride; Plastics; Synthetic rubber; Exposure reconstruction; Occupational

  19. Organic binders for iron ore pelletization and steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karkoska, D.; Sankey, E. [Allied Colloids, Suffolk, VA (United States); Anderson, R. [Eveleth Mines, MN (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, bentonite has been used in the agglomeration process in North American iron ore plants. In 1986, Eveleth Mines replaced bentonite with Peridur, a carboxy methyl cellulose organic binder used in conjunction with 1% limestone. Since May of 1993, Allied Colloids` Alcotac FE8 has been used by Eveleth as the replacement for bentonite. This paper discusses the performance benefits obtained when bentonite was replaced with an organic binder. These totally synthetic binders are used in conjunction with limestone. The benefits of organic binders are: improved metallurgical parameters of the fired pellet, especially the reducibility, which results in more efficient use of gases in the blast furnace; reduced silica in the pellet, in the case of Eveleth Mines this was a reduction of 0.5%, a lower silica pellet reduces slag in the blast furnace; increased production in both the agglomeration/induration and steelmaking processes; and a decrease in coke consumption.

  20. The Role of Spin for Kinetic Control of Recombination in Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akshay, Rao; Philip C.Y., Chow; Gélinas, Simon; Schlenker, Cody W.; Li, Chang-Zhi; Yip, Hin-Lap; Jen, Alex K-Y.; Ginger, David S.; Friend, Richard H.

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In biological complexes, cascade structures promote the spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes, preventing their recombination. In contrast, the photogenerated excitons in organic photovoltaic cells are dissociated at a single...

  1. Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

  2. Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

  3. CHAMELEONS: A NEW MODEL ORGANISM FOR UNDERSTANDING THE EVOLUTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF MORPHOLOGICAL NOVELTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Raul Eduardo

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With ~64,000 species of extant vertebrates spanning a tremendous array of morphologies, attempting to understand how organisms adapt and evolve phenotypically across environments has become a major focus of biology. Genomic ...

  4. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  5. Synthetic fuels from peat by the IGT PEATGAS Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punwani, D.V.; Rader, A.M.; Kopstein, M.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat gasification research at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) began in 1974 under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Gas company (Minnegasco). The preliminary evaluation conducted under that program showed encouraging results and led to an expanded program under the joint sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Minnegasco. The current program is also funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the Northern Natural Gas Company (NNGC). Since 1976 IGT has completed tests with peats from Minnesota, North Carolina, and Maine in laboratory-scale equipment and process development units (PDU's). Tests in the hydrogasification PDU (which represents a scale-up of 250 times the laboratory-scale equipment) confirm the laboratory results. Preparations are being made for pilot-plant scale gasification tests in a modified coal gasification pilot plant (HYGAS) in Chicago. Based on the experimental results obtained in the laboratory-scale tests, IGT conceived a two-stage gasifier (named PEATGAS) for converting peat to synthetic fuels. The PEATGAS Process can be used for making medium- or high-Btu gas as well as liquid fuels. A complete process design and cost estimates have been prepared for a plant producing 250 million cubic feet of SNG per day from Minnesota peat containing 50% moisture. These estimates show that the conversion of peat (containing 50% moisture) is competitive with other alternative methods of SNG production. This paper discusses the important and significant gasification characteristics of the peats evaluated. The paper also describes the use of the PEATGAS Process for production of medium-Btu gas, methanol, and gasoline.

  6. Department of Systems Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rostock, Universität

    Department of Systems Biology & Bioinformatics Faculty of Computer Sciences & Electrical, comparability and fairness. Practical Aspects and Soft Skills Technical Achievement Background understanding

  7. Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Welcome to the Administrative section of the Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database. Please logon. Logon Name: Password: Logon CommentsEmail Us * Security...

  8. CollegeofScience Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ,populations,and even ecosystems. Our courses will help prepare you for a career in biology,be it in biodiversity

  9. COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtel, William

    COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY, AND AUTONOMOUS William Bechtel and Adele- nomological framework and its focus on laws as the primary explanatory vehicle; for them, a scientific

  10. ash-based synthetic aggregates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state particle size distributions in a 3-d synthetic turbulent flow. We show how a fractal-like structure, typical of aggregates in natural systems, can be incorporated in an...

  11. Joint anisotropy characterization and image formation in wide-angle synthetic aperture radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Kush R. (Kush Raj)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imagery formed from wide-angle synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements has fine cross-range resolution in principle. However, conventional SAR image formation techniques assume isotropic scattering, which is not valid ...

  12. ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ForPeerReview Only From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main Auvergne, Remi; ICGM CAILLOL, Sylvain; ICGM, IAM Boutevin, Bernard; ICGM Keywords: vegetable oils, biobased polyols, polyurethanes, epoxidized vegetable oils, commercial polyols URL: http

  13. Focused synthetic aperture radar processing of ice-sounder data collected over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legarsky, J.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Akins, T. L.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing algorithm for airborne/spaceborne ice-sounding radar systems and applied it to data collected in Greenland. By using focused SAR (phase-corrected coherent averaging), we improved along...

  14. Structural Analysis of Human and Bovine Bone for Development of Synthetic Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Eunhwa

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing demands in bone repair and replacement, this research investigates the microstructure, properties and performance of bovine bone, human bone, and synthetic materials. Doing so, experimental approaches were used to exam and compare...

  15. Volumetric analysis of fish swimming hydrodynamics using synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendelson, Leah Rose

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract This thesis details the implementation of a three-dimensional PIV system to study the hydrodynamics of freely swimming Giant Danio (Danio aequipinnatus). Volumetric particle fields are reconstructed using synthetic ...

  16. Identification of conserved chromatin-regulatory complexes among the class B synthetic multivulva proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Melissa M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The class A, B, and C synthetic Multivulva (synMuv) genes act redundantly to antagonize Ras-mediated vulval induction in C. elegans. Many of these genes encode proteins that are likely to function in transcriptional ...

  17. Differential Attraction of Heliothis subflexa Males to Synthetic Pheromone Lures in Eastern US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Differential Attraction of Heliothis subflexa Males to Synthetic Pheromone Lures in Eastern US in Eastern US showed that when the acetates were omitted from a 7-component blend in rubber septa, fewer

  18. Ribozyme-based insulator parts buffer synthetic circuits from genetic context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lou, Chunbo

    Synthetic genetic programs are built from circuits that integrate sensors and implement temporal control of gene expression. Transcriptional circuits are layered by using promoters to carry the signal between circuits. In ...

  19. High-field remanence properties of synthetic and natural submicrometre haematites and goethites: significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-field remanence properties of synthetic and natural submicrometre haematites and goethites September 2004 Editor: V. Courtillot Abstract Haematite and goethite are significant magnetic components both of marine and terrestrial sediments. Variable magnetic behaviour in haematite and goethite has

  20. Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

  1. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  2. XAFS of Synthetic Iron(III)-Arsenate Co-Precipitates and Uranium Mill Neutralized Raffinate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Jiang, D. T. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); COGEMA Resources Inc., Saskatoon, SK S7K 3X5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Cutler, J. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Demopoulos, G. P. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rowson, J. W. [Department of Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    XAFS studies were carried out for chemical speciation of arsenic species in uranium mill neutralized raffinate solids. To aid the structural characterization, synthetic iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates were prepared to mimic the actual uranium mill tailings neutralization products. The principle components analysis method was used to validate the synthetic amorphous scorodite as a primary model compound for arsenate species in the raffinate samples under the specific precipitation conditions.

  3. Lighting system with thermal management system having point contact synthetic jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Sharma, Rajdeep

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting system having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system includes a plurality of synthetic jets. The synthetic jets are arranged within the lighting system such that they are secured at contact points.

  4. Process for gasification using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancet, Michael S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Curran, George P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gasification process is disclosed using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  5. Modeling disease-related proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae : insights into alpha-synuclein and TorsinA biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valastyan, Julie S. (Julie Suzanne)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long been used to model complex cellular processes. As a eukaryote, much of its fundamental biology is conserved with higher organisms. As a single-celled, genetically tractable ...

  6. The stability and chemical modification of synthetically useful enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Gordon Lee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Dr. C. -H. Wong for his help, advice, guidance, support during the last two years. His innovative and hard working approach tow t advancement of chemistry knowledge will always remain with me. I th Drs. ott and Presley for serving on my committee...-Huey Wong Several examples of chemical modification of proteins and the resulting change in enzyme stability have been explored. Procedures are described here for the preparation of water-soluble immobilized enzymes of interest as catalysts in organic...

  7. Organic photovoltaics and concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapel, Jonathan King

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

  8. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

  9. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

  10. Evaluation of the Nephrotoxicity of Complex Mixtures Containing Organics and Metals: Advantages and Disadvantages of the Use of Real-world Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane Ellen Simmons; Raymond S. H. Yang; Ezra Berman

    As part of a multidisciplinary health effects study, the nephrotoxicity of complex industrial waste mixtures was assessed. Adult, male Fischer 344 rats were gavaged with samples of complex industrial waste and nephrotoxicity evaluated 24 hr later. Of the 10 tested samples, 4 produced increased absolute or relative kidney weight, or both, coupled with a statistically significant alteration in at least one of the measured serum parameters (urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CREAT), and BUN/CREAT ratio). Although the waste samples had been analyzed for a number of organic chemicals and 7 of the 10 samples were analyzed also for 12 elemental metals and metalloids, their nephrotoxicity was not readily predicted from the partial chemical characterization data. Because the chemical form or speciation of the metals was unknown, it was not possible to estimate their contribution to the observed biological response. Various experimental approaches, including use of real-world complex mixtures, chemically defined synthetic mixtures, and simple mixtures, will be necessary to adequately determine the potential human health risk from exposure to complex

  11. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

  12. Organizing and Personalizing Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Ah-Hwee

    Vista). More sophis- ticated ones, such as Northern Light, BullsEye and Copernic go a step further organize

  13. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  14. CCPPolicyBriefing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    . METHODOLOGY · The author incorporates the economic theory of organizations into the framework of public law to establish the theory of cartel organization, and calls for further studies to disclose the sophisticatedCCPPolicyBriefing September 2008 Cartel Organization and Antitrust Enforcement W: www

  15. Staunton State Park Biological Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staunton State Park Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Siemers, Phyllis Pineda, and Jill. The information management staff with CNHP was responsible for integrating the data resulting from the inventory

  16. FISHERY RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY, GALVESTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stations conduct fish ry re - search in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the work of the Bureau's Gulf, St. Pet rsburg Beach, Fla. Biological Res earch Biological Laboratory, Beaufort, N. C hw Gulf of Mexico Abundance of postlarval and juv nil shrimp Pink shrimp life history . Brown

  17. Synthetic Coal Slag Infiltration into Varying Refractory Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaneko, Tetsuya K.; Thomas, Hugh; Bennett, James P.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The infiltrations of synthetic coal slag into 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–15%SiO{sub 2}, and 90%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} refractories with a temperature gradient induced along the penetration direction were compared to one another. The infiltrating slag was synthesized with a composition that is representative of an average of the ash contents from U S coal feedstock. Experiments were conducted with a hot-face temperature of 1450°C in a CO/CO{sub 2} atmosphere. Minimal penetration was observed in the 90%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material because interactions between the refractory and the slag produced a protective layer of FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which impeded slag flow into the bulk of the refractory. After 5 h, the 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample exhibited an average penetration of 12.7 mm whereas the 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–15%SiO{sub 2} sample showed 3.8 mm. Slag infiltrated into the 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–15%SiO{sub 2} refractory systems by dissolving the respective refractories' matrix materials, which consist of fine Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and an amorphous alumino-silicate phase. Due to enrichment in SiO{sub 2}, a network-former, infiltration into the 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–15%SiO{sub 2} system yielded a higher viscosity slag and hence, a shallower penetration depth. The results suggest that slag infiltration can be limited by interactions with the refractory through the formation of either a solid layer that physically impedes fluid flow or a more viscous slag that retards infiltration.

  18. Evidence for light perception in a bioluminescent organ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Evidence for light perception in a bioluminescent organ Deyan Tonga , Natalia S. Rozasb , Todd H of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706; cDepartment of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University species have been implicated in the perception and control of light emission, particularly

  19. Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ussery, David W.

    Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology Visualisation of Large Amounts of Data Dave Ussery 27 February, 2008 #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group

  20. Climatic and biological consequences of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, H.D.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projecting comprehensively the climatic and biological consequences of nuclear war brings into question the perceived security ascribed to policies of deterrence, as well as the efficacy of civil preparedness measures, particularly relocation plans. It is presumed the probability that nuclear war will occur is low, but the potential consequences are so great that the issue must be given full attention. Nuclear war is the greatest environmental threat we face. Yet the problem should be solvable. It is especially important that environmentally concerned citizens and scientists apply their knowledge and understanding to the problem because many of the changes in environmental quality that concerns us today, such as air and water pollution by a host of organic and inorganic agents, represent the principle mechanism whereby life could be threatened in the aftermath of nuclear war. 29 references.

  1. Loop Quantum Theory Applied to Biology and Nonlinear Whole Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2008-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The loop quantum theory, which constitutes a very small discontinuous space, as new method is applied to biology. The model of protein folding and lungs is proposed. In the model, some known results are used, and four approximate conclusions are obtained: their structures are quantized, their space regions are finite, various singularities correspond to folding and crossed points, and different types of catastrophe exist. Further, based on the inseparability and correlativity of the biological systems, the nonlinear whole biology is proposed, and four basic hypotheses are formed. It may unify reductionism and holism, structuralism and functionalism. Finally, the medical meaning of the theory is discussed briefly.

  2. From Population to Organization Thinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, David; Maxfield, Robert; Read, Dwight W; van der Leeuw, Sander E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herbert Simon developed a theory of organization for complexin need of a theory of organization. As we have alreadya deeper theory of organization: complex networks,

  3. Mesangial cell biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abboud, Hanna E., E-mail: Abboud@uthscsa.edu

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the renin–angiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

  4. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF); Boden, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowley, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Dattoria, Vince [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Desai, Narayan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foster, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Goldstone, Robin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gregurick, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological Systems Science Division; Houghton, John [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; Izaurralde, Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Joseph, Renu [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Pritchard, Matt [British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), Oxon (United Kingdom); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Strand, Gary [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Stuart, Cory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tatusova, Tatiana [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Thomas, Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zurawski, Jason [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  5. Environment Assisted Quantum Transport in Organic Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vattay, Gabor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the new discoveries in quantum biology is the role of Environment Assisted Quantum Transport (ENAQT) in excitonic transport processes. In disordered quantum systems transport is most efficient when the environment just destroys quantum interferences responsible for localization, but the coupling does not drive the system to fully classical thermal diffusion yet. This poised realm between the pure quantum and the semi-classical domains has not been considered in other biological transport processes, such as charge transport through organic molecules. Binding in receptor-ligand complexes is assumed to be static as electrons are assumed to be not able to cross the ligand molecule. We show that ENAQT makes cross ligand transport possible and efficient between certain atoms opening the way for the reorganization of the charge distribution on the receptor when the ligand molecule docks. This new effect can potentially change our understanding how receptors work. We demonstrate room temperature ENAQT on the c...

  6. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsuk Kang; Young-Gui Yoon; D. Thirumalai; Changbong Hyeon

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yeast ($N\\approx 1.2\\times 10^7$, $\\phi<\\phi_c^{\\infty}$) are equilibrated with no clear signature of such organization.

  7. Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological Wastewater Treatment of the microbial communities within biological wastewater treatment reactors is incomplete due to limitations microbial community composition in five biological wastewater treatment reactors in China and the United

  8. Sociology: Computational Organization Theory Sociology: Computational Organization Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Sociology: Computational Organization Theory Sociology: Computational Organization Theory Kathleen; organization theory; organizational learning; social networks; expert systems Citation: Kathleen Carley, 1994, "Sociology: Computational Organization Theory." Social Science Computer Review, 12(4): 611-624. #12;Sociology

  9. Theory of Organic Magnetoresistance in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    Theory of Organic Magnetoresistance in Disordered Organic Semiconductors Nicholas J. Harmon semiconductors, disordered semiconductors, organic magnetoresistance, percolation theory, spin transport organic semiconductors. The theory proposed here maps the complex phenomena of spin-dependent hopping onto

  10. Feasibility of Organizations -A Refinement of Chemical Organization Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    Feasibility of Organizations - A Refinement of Chemical Organization Theory with Application to P a theorem providing a criteria for an unfeasible organization. This is a refinement of organization theory organization. Key words: reaction networks, constructive dynamical systems, chem- ical organization theory

  11. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida (Photo Credit: Michael Masellis, Biology Major Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida Future Science Teachers' Club Recent Grant Successes Forthcoming Publications

  12. The sequestration efficiency of the biological pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois; Deutsch, Curtis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preformed phosphate, soft tissue pump and atmospheric CO 2 ,efficiency of the biological pump Tim DeVries, 1 Francoisproduces a “biological pump” that reduces the concentration

  13. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology and High Performance Computing Manfred Zorn, TeresaBiology and High Performance Computing Presenters: Manfred99-Portland High performance computing has become one of the

  14. Synthetic drill-in fluid for gravel packing depleted sands and pressured shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, S.; Griffith, G. [Chevron USA Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Jones, T.; Hinojosa, R. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Houston, TX (United States); Smejkal, K. [Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weighted synthetic- or oil-base drill-in fluids offer an excellent solution to the problem of reactive, pressured shale. However, some operators remain uneasy about drilling into a reservoir with an invert emulsion drill-in fluid. This apprehension is partly due to the possibility of creating emulsion blocks or changing the rock matrix wettability. Either of these conditions may reduce the crude`s mobility by restricting flow. This formation damage is avoided with water-base drill-in fluids, but the borehole stability problem remains an issue. A synthetic drill-in fluid`s ability to stabilize reactive shales is well documented. There remains a concern that once reactive shales are exposed to completion brine, the inhibition imparted by a synthetic fluid is lost. If lost, the shale particles could spall (slough) freely into the wellbore, plugging the screens and resulting in an incomplete gravel placement. Another concern is the effective displacement of the synthetic fluid to the completion brine without creating undesirable emulsions and damaging the integrity of the synthetic-fluid filter cake. The key appears to be selecting a spacer system that prevents formation of viscous emulsions at the interfaces and would not aggressively attack the wellbore filter cake. The paper describes laboratory evaluation, simulated core tests, test results, a field case history in the South Timbalier field offshore Louisiana, and lessons learned.

  15. Food Exemption Request Organization Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Exemption Request Organization Information Organization Received ______ Organizations are permitted one food exemption per semester. Requests must be submitted): ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Only homemade food may be provided by your organization. Initial ______ No prepared food may

  16. Astatinated organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milius, R.A.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and kits for incorporating a radioactive astatine isotope (particularly [sup 211]At) into an organic compound by electrophilic astatodestannylation of organostannanes. 3 figs.

  17. AGRI-SCIENCE CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    photosynthetic efficiency Improve chemical agronomic and agro-ecological control measures Modelling through translation of chemical biology tools and technologies Control weeds, disease and pests Minimise a platform to steer future research and policy directions. · Encourage external outreach to engage

  18. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

  19. BIOLOGICAL SAFETY POLICY PROGRAM TOPICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    research protocols involving hazardous materials, reviews construction design for safety features with or near biologically hazardous materials (infectious agents, biohazards or recombinant DNA). 1.3 "Infectious waste" or "biohazardous waste" is defined by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental

  20. Chemistry Division Department of Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    1 Chemistry Division Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Illinois Institute-13 Chemistry Division invites nominations for Kilpatrick Fellowship for the academic year 2012's Chemistry Department from 1947­1960. Mary Kilpatrick was a chemistry faculty member from 1947

  1. Modular design of biological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norville, Julie Erin, 1980-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of my research is the development of technology for building compound biological systems from simpler pieces. I designed BioScaffold parts, a family of variable regions that can be inserted into a DNA sequence ...

  2. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  3. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Hongsuk; Thirumalai, D; Hyeon, Changbong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yea...

  4. Biological Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdleBiological Science Biological Science The protozoan

  5. Effect of 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) on Partitioning of Np and Pu to Synthetic Boehmite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of plutonium IV and V on goethite. Geochim. Cosmo. Acta,reduction on synthetic goethite (?-FeOOH) and hematite (?-Fe

  6. Synthetic studies toward palau򡭩ne and enantioselective total synthesis of biogenetically related (+)-phakellin and (+)-monobromophakellin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shaohui

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Oroidin alkaloids, also known as pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids, have become a hot area of chemical and biological research due to their diverse and intriguing structural features and biological activities. Palau'amine (i), one of the hexacyclic...

  7. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  8. Method for biological purification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucido, John A. (Mt. Sinai, NY); Keenan, Daniel (Rockville Centre, NY); Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY); Shelenkova, Ludmila (Yaphank, NY)

    2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing a microorganism culture in an active exponential growth and delivering a supply of microorganisms to an environment containing wastes for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of the wastes. The apparatus comprises a bioreactor and an operably connected controller. The bioreactor has a bioreactor chamber for containing a supply of microorganisms, a second chamber for containing a supply of water and inorganic nutrients, and a third chamber for containing a supply of organic nutrients. The bioreactor is operably connected to the controller in which a first pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the second chamber and third chamber, and a second pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the environment containing wastes to be biodegraded. The controller further includes a timer and regulator operably connected to the first and second pumps to effectively maintain the microorganisms in exponential growth in the bioreactor chamber and to deliver microorganisms to an environment to be treated. Also, disclosed is a method for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of wastes.

  9. A bio-synthetic interface for discovery of viral entry mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutzler, Mike; Maar, Dianna; Negrete, Oscar; Hayden, Carl C.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Wang, Julia

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding and defending against pathogenic viruses is an important public health and biodefense challenge. The focus of our LDRD project has been to uncover the mechanisms enveloped viruses use to identify and invade host cells. We have constructed interfaces between viral particles and synthetic lipid bilayers. This approach provides a minimal setting for investigating the initial events of host-virus interaction - (i) recognition of, and (ii) entry into the host via membrane fusion. This understanding could enable rational design of therapeutics that block viral entry as well as future construction of synthetic, non-proliferating sensors that detect live virus in the environment. We have observed fusion between synthetic lipid vesicles and Vesicular Stomatitis virus particles, and we have observed interactions between Nipah virus-like particles and supported lipid bilayers and giant unilamellar vesicles.

  10. SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY, 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27-JULY 2, 2010, ITALY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor William Moerner

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology focuses on cutting-edge research in single-molecule science. Tremendous technical developments have made it possible to detect, identify, track, and manipulate single biomolecules in an ambient environment or even in a live cell. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are addressed, and new knowledge derived from these approaches continues to emerge. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of biomolecular machines: what they do, how they work individually, how they work together, and finally, how they work inside live cells. The burgeoning use of single-molecule methods to elucidate biological problems is a highly multidisciplinary pursuit, involving both force- and fluorescence-based methods, the most up-to-date advances in microscopy, innovative biological and chemical approaches, and nanotechnology tools. This conference seeks to bring together top experts in molecular and cell biology with innovators in the measurement and manipulation of single molecules, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and to exchange ideas with leaders in the field. A number of excellent poster presenters will be selected for short oral talks. Topics as diverse as single-molecule sequencing, DNA/RNA/protein interactions, folding machines, cellular biophysics, synthetic biology and bioengineering, force spectroscopy, new method developments, superresolution imaging in cells, and novel probes for single-molecule imaging will be on the program. Additionally, the collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings in the beauty of the Il Ciocco site in Tuscany, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to interact and brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations directed toward compelling biological problems.

  11. Effective Presentations Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, David H.

    1 Pericles Effective Presentations · Content · Organization · Delivery · Visual aids and graphics Be brave Graphics · KISS · Powerpoint: ­ Font · Bigger than you'd expect · San serif ­ Lines · Thicker than · Organization · Energy · Clarity · Poise Key: Practice Web Resources · http

  12. Unidentified growth factors for turkey poults maintained on a synthetic diet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Fathi Mahmoud

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNIDENTII'IED GROWTH 1'ACTORS FQR TURKEY PQULTS MAINTAINED QN A SYNTHETIC DIET A Thesis EATHI M. SALAMA Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER QE SCIENCE January 1956 Major Subjects Biochemistry and Nutrition LIIRARY B 4 M CuLLEBE 8F tEXAB UNIDENTIFIED GROWTH FACTORS FOR TURKEY POULTS IEAINTAINED ON A SYNTHETIC DIET A Thesis FATHI M. SALAMA Approved as to style...

  13. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sederoff, Heike (Raleigh, NC); Huber, Steven C (Savoy, IL); Larabell, Carolyn A (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  14. The German plan for synthetic fuel self-sufficiency, 1933-1942

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tooley, Terry Hunt

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Thus, even nitrogen could be produced and 2 added to other elements to form useful products synthetically. From 1909 to 1913, engineer Carl Bosch of Badische Analin- und Soda-Fabri k (BASF) teamed up with Haber to perfect the industrial process... for fixa- tion of nitrogen. By 1913, BASF had a small synthetic ammonia plant in production at Oppau, near Ludwigshafen, the headquarters of BASF. With the onset of World War I, Germany's supplies of Chilean nitrates were cut off, and the dem nd...

  15. Characterization of natural chabazite and 5A synthetic zeolites. Part II. Adsorption properties and porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stakebake, J.L.; Fritz, J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured for four samples of chabazite, which were collected from different geographical locations, and for a Linde 5A synthetic zeolite. All isotherms were Type I and obeyed the Langmuir adsorption model. Surface areas and pore diameters were calculated from the adsorption data. The MP method was used to determine the pore volume distribution for each sample. The results indicated that all of the chabazite samples had nearly identical properties, and these properties were also very similar to those of the Linde 5A synthetic zeolite.

  16. Muffle furnace evaluation of FGD sludge-coal-clay mixtures as potential synthetic aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettit, Jesse William

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or returned to the adjacent surface coal mines for disposal. Alternatives to these two methods of disposal are being studied (3, 6, 11). The feasibility of using this material as a raw material in the manufacture of synthetic aggregates has recently been... suitability of synthetic aggregates made from lignite fly ash using a rotary kiln. Lignite or subbituminous coals such as those used are typical of the high-lime or "western" coals that are mined in the western half of the United States. Because of the high...

  17. Integrative Biology Keith A. Crandall, Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    . The bioinformatics major is for students with interests in both the computer and the biological sciences. The degree merges these interests in the areas of bioinformatics and computational biology, giving students Programs and Degrees BS Bioinformatics BS Biology Composite Teaching BS Integrative Biology Students should

  18. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States); [Colby Coll., Waterville, ME (United States); Neff, J. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States); [Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  19. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  20. The effect of mean cell residence time on the adsorbability of dissolved organic compounds found in petrochemical wastewaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Timothy Loring

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , each with a different mean cell residence time, biologically treated the waste- water. Follow1ng biolog1cal treatment, the wastewater was subjected to activated carbon adsorption treatment. The Freundlich isotherm, non-adsorbable organic compound... residence time on adsorbability is the same for petrochemical wastewater as it is for municipal wastewater. The purpose of this thesis is to determine if the mean cell residence time in a biological treatment process can af'feet the ad- sorbability...

  1. Departmental Organization Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Law 95-91, 42 United States Code 7101, Department of Energy Organization Act, Section 642 gives to the Secretary of the Department of Energy the responsibility to approve organization changes affecting the number, designation, or mission of Departmental Elements and to approve the addition, deletion, or transfer of missions and/or functions of or between Departmental Elements. In order to streamline the organizational change process, the Secretary has delegate to the Heads of Departmental Headquarters and Field Elements the authority to approve organization changes. No cancellations.

  2. Design of insulating devices for in vitro synthetic circuits Elisa Franco, Domitilla Del Vecchio and Richard M. Murray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    Design of insulating devices for in vitro synthetic circuits Elisa Franco, Domitilla Del Vecchio as an insulating device. This circuit is composed of nucleic acids, which can be designed to interact according their functionality. Insulation blocks are crucial to this purpose. Simple direct connection of different synthetic

  3. A Synthetic Carotenoid Pathway We designed a 8400 nucleotide DNA sequence to encode the seven crt enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    RNA to the free energy change Gtot according to: Predictive Design of Synthetic Microbes 1Pennsylvania State a synthetic gene network that combines cell-to-cell communication with logical cellular computing to execute into a microbial host enables the production of fuels, specialty chemicals, and drugs from renewable feedstocks

  4. 57106 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 180 / Tuesday, September 17, 2013 / Proposed Rules for lead in synthetic iron oxide for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposes to lower the specification limit for lead in synthetic iron oxide for human food use from 1057106 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 180 / Tuesday, September 17, 2013 / Proposed Rules for lead in synthetic iron oxide for human food use. DATES: The color additive petition was filed on July 16, 2013

  5. Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 28, No. 5, May 2002 (C 2002) EVALUATION OF SYNTHETIC HYDROCARBONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 28, No. 5, May 2002 (C 2002) EVALUATION OF SYNTHETIC HYDROCARBONS of five straight-chain hydrocarbons (C24, C25, C26, C28, C30) to detached elytra of the red milkweed, and placed them in an exposed location outdoors. The amount of hydrocarbons on the elytra did not change over

  6. Shallow intraplate earthquakes in Western Australia observed by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tregoning, Paul

    Shallow intraplate earthquakes in Western Australia observed by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture earthquakes in a stable continental region of southwest Western Australia. Both small-magnitude events occur with tectonic processes in this area of Western Australia often initiate in the upper 1 km of crust. Citation

  7. A fluorescent assay for chloride transport; identification of a synthetic anionophore with improved activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    A fluorescent assay for chloride transport; identification of a synthetic anionophore with improved on the chloride-sensitive probe, lucigenin, is developed for monitoring chloride transport into vesicles, and used to compare the effectiveness of three steroid- derived transporters. A topic of growing interest

  8. Synthetic aggregates prepared from flue gas desulfurization by-products using various binder materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, J.; Graham, U.M.; Hower, J.C.; Robl, T.L. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products can be converted into environmentally safe and structurally stable aggregates. One type of synthetic aggregate was prepared using an optimum mixture of (FGD) by-products, fly ash, and water. Mineral reactions have been examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope.

  9. Hydrogen and minor element incorporation in synthetic rutile G. D. BROMILEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen and minor element incorporation in synthetic rutile G. D. BROMILEY 1,2, * AND N. HILAIRET from substitutional defects. KEYWORDS: rutile, hydrogen, substitution, solubility, spectroscopy of lower- valence cations may be charge-balanced by incorporation of hydrogen in the rutile structure

  10. Synthetic diamond and wurtzite structures self-assemble with isotropic pair interactions Mikael C. Rechtsman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillinger, Frank

    Synthetic diamond and wurtzite structures self-assemble with isotropic pair interactions Mikael C with strongly repulsive cores that cause the tetrahedrally coordinated diamond and wurtzite lattices-dimensional diamond and wurtzite structures can self-assemble with isotropic in- teractions possessing a strongly

  11. Evaluating speech intelligibility enhancement for HMM-based synthetic speech in noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Evaluating speech intelligibility enhancement for HMM-based synthetic speech in noise Cassia It is possible to increase the intelligibility of speech in noise by enhancing the clean speech signal Valentini-Botinhao, Junichi Yamagishi, Simon King The Centre for Speech Technology Research, University

  12. P16: A distortion-weighted glimpse-based intelligibility metric for modified and synthetic speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    for speech enhancement in known noise conditions," in Proc. Interspeech, pp. 1636-1639. M. Cooke, C. Mayo, CP16: A distortion-weighted glimpse-based intelligibility metric for modified and synthetic speech Yan Tang1 and Martin Cooke2,1 Cassia Valentini-Botinhao3 1 Language and Speech Laboratory, University

  13. A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples Gwenn E; published 12 November 2002. [1] Basal hydrology is acknowledged as a fundamental control on glacier dynamics of existing basal hydrology models is the treatment of the glacier bed as an isolated system. We present

  14. Sensor Based Synthetic Actors in a Tennis Game Simulation Hansrudi NOSER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Sensor Based Synthetic Actors in a Tennis Game Simulation Hansrudi NOSER Daniel THALMANN Computer@lig.di.epfl.ch; thalmann@lig.di.epfl.ch) Abstract In this article we propose a model of a tennis game simulation and audition. Physical modeling of the ball dynamic and sound rendering enhance realism. An interactive user

  15. Change Detection Using Synthetic Aperture Sonar: Preliminary Results from the Larvik Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    detection technology for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with synthetic aperture sonars (SAS of route survey with unmanned systems, this means repeatedly surveying ports and important transit routes the processing have been proposed, however the field as applied to the underwater environment remains in its

  16. Effects of natural and synthetic plant oestrogens on rumen fluid degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effects of natural and synthetic plant oestrogens on rumen fluid degradation of some feedstuffs. V interfere with the rumen degradation of feeds, an extract from SC was prepared, purified, freeze-dried and utilized for in vitro trials of rumen degradability on several feeds: wheat straw (WS), cocksfoot hay (DH

  17. Ris-PhD-27(EN) Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    winds in offshore wind resource assessment. Firstly, wind wakes behind two large offshore wind farms farming 3 2.1 Horns Rev and Nysted offshore wind farms 4 3 Synthetic aperture radar 6 3.1 Imaging geometry in offshore wind energy planning as a supplement to on site measurements, which are costly and sparse

  18. Effects of potential additives to promote seal swelling on the thermal stability of synthetic jet fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lind, D.D.; Gormley, R.G.; Zandhuis, P.H.; Baltrus, J.P.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic fuels derived from the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process using natural gas or coal-derived synthesis gas as feedstocks can be used for powering of ground vehicles, aircraft and ships. Because of their chemical and physical properties, F-T fuels will probably require additives in order to meet specifications with respect to lubricity and seal swell capability for use in ground and air vehicles. These additives can include oxygenates and compounds containing other heteroatoms that may adversely affect thermal stability. In order to understand what additives will be the most beneficial, a comprehensive experimental and computational study of conventional and additized fuels has been undertaken. The experimental approach includes analysis of the trace oxygenate and nitrogen-containing compounds present in conventional petroleum-derived fuels and trying to relate their presence (or absence) to changes in the desired properties of the fuels. This paper describes the results of efforts to test the thermal stability of synthetic fuels and surrogate fuels containing single-component additives that have been identified in earlier research as the best potential additives for promoting seal swelling in synthetic fuels, as well as mixtures of synthetic and petroleum-derived fuels.

  19. Modeling Wildland Fire Radiance in Synthetic Remote Sensing B.S. Beijing Institute of Technology, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    efforts in phenomenology studies, algorithm development, and sensor evaluation. Synthetic scenes are also and op- tical properties of wildfire and burn area in an infrared remote sensing system will assist look like as seen by the airborne sensor. Radiance scene rendering of the 3D flame iv #12;v includes 2D

  20. Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Tubuliform Spidroin 1 Contributes to Extensibility in Synthetic Fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnesa, Eric; Hsia, Yang; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Weber, Warner; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff; Tang, Simon; Agari, Kimiko; Vierra, Craig (AZU); (Pacific)

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Spider silk is renowned for its extraordinary mechanical properties, having a balance of high tensile strength and extensibility. To date, the majority of studies have focused on the production of dragline silks from synthetic spider silk gene products. Here we report the first mechanical analysis of synthetic egg case silk fibers spun from the Latrodectus hesperus tubuliform silk proteins, TuSp1 and ECP-2. We provide evidence that recombinant ECP-2 proteins can be spun into fibers that display mechanical properties similar to other synthetic spider silks. We also demonstrate that silks spun from recombinant thioredoxin-TuSp1 fusion proteins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain exhibit increased extensibility and toughness when compared to the identical fibers spun from fusion proteins lacking the C-terminus. Mechanical analyses reveal that the properties of synthetic tubuliform silks can be modulated by altering the postspin draw ratios of the fibers. Fibers subject to increased draw ratios showed elevated tensile strength and decreased extensibility but maintained constant toughness. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies indicate that postdrawn fibers containing the C-terminal domain of TuSp1 have more amorphous content when compared to fibers lacking the C-terminus. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that recombinant tubuliform spidroins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain with embedded protein tags can be effectively spun into fibers, resulting in similar tensile strength but increased extensibility relative to nontagged recombinant dragline silk proteins spun from equivalently sized proteins.

  1. Synthetic fabrication strategy optimizes the illumination geometry and transport properties of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solar cells. Using oriented titanium oxide (TiO2 ) nanotube (NT) arrays has shown promise for dye- sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). High solar conversion efficiency requires that the incident light entersSynthetic fabrication strategy optimizes the illumination geometry and transport properties of dye-sensitized

  2. Super-resolution in incoherent optical imaging using synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Super-resolution in incoherent optical imaging using synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements Barak the Rayleigh limit of the system is obtained by tiling digitally several Fresnel holographic elements into a complete Fresnel hologram of the observed object. Each element is acquired by the limited-aperture system

  3. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  4. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging with Motion Estimation and , T. Callaghan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borcea, Liliana

    principles a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging and target motion estimation method that is combined of the data into properly calibrated small apertures, (b) motion or platform trajectory perturbation estimation process. X-band persistent surveillance SAR is a specific application that is covered by our

  5. Birth and Growth of Cavitation Bubbles within Water under Tension Confined in a Simple Synthetic Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Birth and Growth of Cavitation Bubbles within Water under Tension Confined in a Simple Synthetic. Cavitation can spontaneously occur, nucleating a bubble. We investigate the dynamics of spontaneous or triggered cavitation inside water filled microcavities of a hydrogel. Results show that a stable bubble

  6. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

  7. Organic contaminant separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Mar, P.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

  8. Cloning and characterization of EXC-1, an IRGP homologue that controls Intracellular Trafficking and the Maintenance of Shape in Small Biological Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grussendorf, Kelly Ann

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological tubes are ubiquitous structures that carry out vital roles. The formation and maintenance of these tubule structures is a fundamental process in most organisms. The goal of this work is to get a better understanding ...

  9. Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 CODE of the Department of Chemical of Chemical & Biological Engineering. For clarity of presentation, some passages are copied directly from shall offer an undergraduate chemical and biological engineering program of technological, scientific

  10. A bioinformatics/computational biology postdoctoral research position available to analyze biological networks in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiaheng

    A bioinformatics/computational biology postdoctoral research position available to analyze biological networks in plants A bioinformatics postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Dr. Sue Rhee at the Carnegie Institution, Department of Plant Biology (Stanford, CA

  11. Biological and Chemical Sciences Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Chromatography Regulatory Science Synthesis and Characterization of Inorganic Materials Synthesis Analytical Method Development Analytical Spectroscopy Characterization of Inorganic and Organic Materials, molecular biophysics and biochem- istry; analytical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, materi- als chemistry

  12. Department of Plant Biology and Pathology Expanded Course Description for 11:015:440

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    Department of Plant Biology and Pathology Expanded Course Description for 11:015:440 Agroecology including traditional and organic farming, plant and animal production, energy, pest management, specialized Business · Native Bees Provide Insurance Against Ongoing Honey Bee Losses · Solar Options in Agriculture

  13. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  14. Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore,2 Catherine Boyen,1,2 and Anne Siegel4,5 Abstract Brown algae belong to a phylogenetic lineage distantly siliculosus as a model organism for brown algae has represented a framework in which several omics techniques

  15. STRUCTURE-MECHANICAL PROPERTY RELATIONSHIPS IN A BIOLOGICAL CERAMIC-POLYMER COMPOSITE: NACRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    171 STRUCTURE-MECHANICAL PROPERTY RELATIONSHIPS IN A BIOLOGICAL CERAMIC-POLYMER COMPOSITE: NACRE, a laminated ceramic- polymer biocompositefound in seashell. Four-pointbending strength and three-point bend and ultramicrotomedsections with and without the intactarago- nite platelets. We found that the organic matrix is indeed

  16. Genome Sequence of the Nematode C. elegans: A Platform for Investigating Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy, Sean

    Genome Sequence of the Nematode C. elegans: A Platform for Investigating Biology The C. elegans Sequencing Consortium* R E V I E W The 97-megabase genomic sequence of the nematode Cae- norhabditis elegans in other organisms. There is a variety of repeated sequences, both local and dispersed. The distinctive

  17. Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology: Some Illustrative Case Studies Living matter obeys the laws of physics, and the principles and methods of theoretical physics ought to find useful application observation, I will describe a few specific instances where approaches inspired by theoretical physics allow

  18. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in the technology programs must satisfy the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS for the technology programs are listed by subject matter in three major categories: (A) Basic Subjects, (B) Advanced

  19. WithCarbonSequestration Biological-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Techno-Economic Analysis of H2 Production by Gasification of Biomass · Renewables Analysis · BiomassWithCarbonSequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Biological- and Biomass- Based Hydrogen Production RoxanneRoxanne DanzDanz #12;Barriers Hydrogen Production from Biomass

  20. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  1. Theory in Biology available light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Magazine R406 Theory in Biology Theory is available light Martin A. Nowak Many people praise Gregor the neutral theory of evolution, which assumes that the overwhelming majority of molecular mutations do assume the neutral theory is correct. In a brilliant PhD thesis submitted in 1964, Bill Hamilton

  2. Water purification using organic salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  3. Fundamental Biology of Plants and Plant Pests Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in graduate education and research in fundamental plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and research in molecular biology and genomics of crop plants and their pests, mechanisms of biological and genomics are opening many new pathways for crop plant improvement and pest management, which will enhance organisms. Build faculty capacity in secondary metabolism and the genomics and population genetics

  4. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  5. A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential for great impact. Biofuels are a promising form ofbe engineered to produce biofuels, the fuels are often toxicKeywords Feedback control Á Biofuels Á Biological control

  6. Imaging mobile zinc in biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomat, Elisa

    Trafficking and regulation of mobile zinc pools influence cellular functions and pathological conditions in multiple organs, including brain, pancreas, and prostate. The quest for a dynamic description of zinc distribution ...

  7. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grün, Rebecca [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany) [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)] [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam.

  8. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  9. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  10. Department of Biology -Committees and Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons Biology Safety Committee Dave Omond Ed Bruggink Jim Cheetham (Chair) Mike Weber Biology Space Committee Jim Cheetham (Chair) Mike Weber Tom Sherratt Ed Bruggink Curriculum Committee (elected) Tom

  11. MS.BIOLOGY.THESIS ACADEMIC LEARNING PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    effectively to constructive feedback. Job Prospects for Biology Graduates MS in Biology Bioremediation Biotechnology Medical Research Industry Government Education Microbiology Health Professions Research Health Food Production Pollution Control Environmental Diagnostics Forestry Agriculture #12;APPENDIX B

  12. Stochastic processes in biological systems : selected problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artomov, Maksym

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Majority of biological processes can not be described deterministically. Multple levels of regulation contribute to the noise in the observable properties of the cells: fluctuations are ubiquitous in biological networks ...

  13. Abiotic and Biological Transformation of Tetraalkoxysilanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    . An aerobic microbial culture from the local wastewater treatment plant that could grow and mineralizeAbiotic and Biological Transformation of Tetraalkoxysilanes and Trichloroethene/ cis-1 compounds (tetra- alkoxysilanes) by abiotic hydrolysis and biological mineralization was investigated

  14. Noah A. Rosenberg Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    , Life Sciences Institute and Center for Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics, University of Michigan Education 2001-2005 University of Southern California, Postdoc, Molecular and Computational Biology 1998, BMC Bioinformatics 2010- Editorial Board Member, Human Biology 2010- Associate Editor, Genetics 2009

  15. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  16. advanced molecular biology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    311 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Molecular Biology Biology 311 Fall 2013 Syllabus Instructor: Dr. Deborah Lycan Class: MWF 9@lclark.edu Website: http:...

  17. PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (1216...

  18. EMSL Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop EMSL Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop "Biological Interactions...

  19. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  20. Method for forming a layer of synthetic corrosion products on tubing surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Salamon, Eugene J. M. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for forming a synthetic corrosion product layer on tube surfaces. The method utilizes two dissimilar materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion. An object tube and sacrificial tube are positioned one inside the other such that an annular region is created between the two tubes' surfaces. A slurry of synthetic corrosion products is injected into this annular region and the assembly is heat treated. This heat causes the tubes to expand, the inner tube with the higher coefficient of expansion expanding more than the outer tube, thereby creating internal pressures which consolidate the corrosion products and adhere the corrosion products to the tubing surfaces. The sacrificial tube may then be removed by conventional chemical etching or mechanical methods.