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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Characterization of cellulosic wastes and gasification products from chicken farms  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gas chromatography indicated the variable quality of the producer gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The char had appreciable NPK values, and can be used as a fertiliser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bio-oil produced was of poor quality, having high moisture content and low pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mass and energy balances showed inadequate level energy recovery from the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future work includes changing the operating parameters of the gasification unit. - Abstract: The current article focuses on gasification as a primary disposal solution for cellulosic wastes derived from chicken farms, and the possibility to recover energy from this process. Wood shavings and chicken litter were characterized with a view to establishing their thermal parameters, compositional natures and calorific values. The main products obtained from the gasification of chicken litter, namely, producer gas, bio-oil and char, were also analysed in order to establish their potential as energy sources. The experimental protocol included bomb calorimetry, pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry (PCFC), thermo-gravimetric analyses (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD), mineral content analyses and gas chromatography. The mass and energy balances of the gasification unit were also estimated. The results obtained confirmed that gasification is a viable method of chicken litter disposal. In addition to this, it is also possible to recover some energy from the process. However, energy content in the gas-phase was relatively low. This might be due to the low energy efficiency (19.6%) of the gasification unit, which could be improved by changing the operation parameters.

Joseph, Paul, E-mail: p.joseph@ulster.ac.uk [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Tretsiakova-McNally, Svetlana; McKenna, Siobhan [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cellulosic materials recovered from steam classified municipal solid wastes as feedstocks for conversion to fuels and chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the treatment of municipal solid waste to separate and recover the cellulosic biomass from the nonbiomass components. ... highly suitable as a feedstock for conversion to fuel, fe...

Michael H. Eley; Gerald R. Guinn; Joyita Bagchi

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to fuel ethanol because it not only contains cellulose andCellulose conversion, % Co-Fermentation Glucose-ethanolamount of cellulose, can be used as fuel ethanol feedstocks

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, D.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials  

SciTech Connect

A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NO{sub x} vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180{degrees}C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200{degrees}C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time.

Pierce, R.A.; Smith, J.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

key to unlocking low-cost cellulosic ethanol. 2(1):26-40.1995 19941216. Commercial ethanol production process.facility and commercial ethanol production process.

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation enabled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation ena- Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation ena- bled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, Zhiguang Zhu, Y.-H. Percival Zhang PII: S0960-8524(12)00712-2 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.04.088 Reference: BITE 9966 To appear in: Bioresource Technology Received Date: 29 February 2012 Revised Date: 21 April 2012 Accepted Date: 21 April 2012 Please cite this article as: Sathitsuksanoh, N., Zhu, Z., Percival Zhang, Y.-H., Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent- based lignocellulose fractionation enabled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks, Bioresource Technology (2012), doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.04.088 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers

10

Organic waste management for EBI in Quebec, feedstock analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EBI is a company located in the province of Quebec in Canada with the mission to integrate waste management. Great challenges in regards to organic waste management are faced and anaerobic digestion is considered by EBI ...

Sylvestre, Olivier, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Improved oxidation resistance of organic/inorganic composite atomic layer deposition coated cellulose nanocrystal aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels are coated with thin conformal layers of Al2O3 using atomic layer deposition to form hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the Al2O3 penetrated more than 1500??m into the aerogel for extended precursor pulse and exposure/purge times. The measured profile of coated fiber radius versus depth from the aerogel surface agrees well with simulations of precursor penetration depth in modeled aerogel structures. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that Al2O3 coated CNC aerogel nanocomposites do not show significant thermal degradation below 295?°C as compared with 175?°C for uncoated CNC aerogels an improvement of over 100?°C.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Industrial waste heat recovery and cogeneration involving organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a systematic approach for energy integration involving waste heat recovery through an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The proposed approach is based...

César Giovani Gutiérrez-Arriaga…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste for energy production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study was carried out in order to evaluate the performance of anaerobic reactors treating OFMSW (organic fraction of municipal solid waste), especially in terms… (more)

Nayono, Satoto Endar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

D'Amico, E. L [Washington TRU Solutions (United States); Edmiston, D. R. [John Hart and Associates (United States); O'Leary, G. A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (United States); Rivera, M. A. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc. (United States); Steward, D. M. [Boulder Research Enterprises, LLC (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Environment, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Field Organization Directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory was developed by the Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) from an outgrowth of the Departments efforts to identify and establish the regulatory response lead persons in the Field Organizations. The directory was developed for intemal EH-231 use to identify both the DOE and DOE contractor Field Organizations in the Environment, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The Field Organization directory is divided into three substantive sections: (1) Environment; (2) Environmental Restoration; and (3) Waste Management which are organized to correspond to the management hierarchy at each Field Organization. The information provided includes the facility name and address, individual managers name, and telephone/fax numbers.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Power Generation From Waste Heat Using Organic Rankine Cycle Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many efforts are currently being pursued to develop and implement new energy technologies aimed at meeting our national energy goals The use of organic Rankine cycle engines to generate power from waste heat provides a near term means to greatly...

Prasad, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cellulose and cellobiose: adventures of a wandering organic chemist in theoretical chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The energies arising from the rotation of free hydroxyl groups in the central glucose residue of a cellulose crystalline assembly, calculated using RHF, DFT, and FMO2/MP2 methods, will be presented. In addition, interactions of this central glucose residue with some of the surrounding residues (selected on the basis of the interaction strengths) are analyzed. The mechanism of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellobiose, which is the repeating unit of cellulose. Energies corresponding to the different steps of this mechanism calculated using RHF and DFT are compared with those previously reported using molecular dynamics calculations and with experimental data.

Baluyut, John

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Organic tanks safety program FY96 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect

Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive by-products and contaminated process chemicals, which are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of salt cakes, metal oxide sludges, and partially saturated aqueous brine solutions. The tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes may be at risk for fuel- nitrate combustion accidents. The purpose of the Waste Aging Task is to elucidate how chemical and radiological processes will have aged or degraded the organic compounds stored in the tanks. Ultimately, the task seeks to develop quantitative measures of how aging changes the energetic properties of the wastes. This information will directly support efforts to evaluate the hazard as well as to develop potential control and mitigation strategies.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Clauss, S.A.; Sharma, A.K.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Degradation of Cellulose to Organic Acids in its Homogeneous Alkaline Aqueous Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026, P.R. ... Malonic acid (MA), lactic acid (LA), formic acid (FA), and acetic acid (AA) are the major valuable products, among them MA and LA are the top valuable platform molecules for synthesis of bulk chemicals and fuels. ... (21-24) Plenty of research has been reported using ionic liquid as solvent to convert cellulose in its homogeneous solution over solid or liquid catalysts, such as conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) or lactic acid, etc.(25-27) However, the high-cost of ionic liquids and the difficult in recovery and the difficult in reutilization of ionic liquid limit their application in large scale by now. ...

Lifeng Yan; Xiaoya Qi

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

Four Cellulosic Ethanol Breakthroughs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Today, the nation's first ever commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol biorefinery to use corn waste as a feedstock officially opened for business in Emmetsburg, Iowa. POET-DSM’s Project LIBERTY is the second of two Energy Department-funded cellulosic ethanol biorefineries to come on line within the past year. Learn more about how the Energy Department is helping the nation reduce its dependence on foreign oil and move the clean energy economy forward.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bio-hydrogen production from renewable organic wastes  

SciTech Connect

Methane fermentation has been in practice over a century for the stabilization of high strength organic waste/wastewater. Although methanogenesis is a well established process and methane--the end-product of methanogenesis is a useful energy source; it is a low value end product with relatively less energy content (about 56 kJ energy/g CH{sub 4}). Besides, methane and its combustion by-product are powerful greenhouse gases, and responsible for global climate change. So there is a pressing need to explore alternative environmental technologies that not only stabilize the waste/wastewater but also generate benign high value end products. From this perspective, anaerobic bioconversion of organic wastes to hydrogen gas is an attractive option that achieves both goals. From energy security stand point, generation of hydrogen energy from renewable organic waste/wastewater could substitute non-renewable fossil fuels, over two-third of which is imported from politically unstable countries. Thus, biological hydrogen production from renewable organic waste through dark fermentation represents a critically important area of bioenergy production. This study evaluated both process engineering and microbial physiology of biohydrogen production.

Shihwu Sung

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE  

SciTech Connect

General Atomics (GA) has recently completed a Phase I program for the development of a two-step alternative to incineration for the destruction of organics in transuranic wastes at the Savannah River Site. This process is known as thermal desorption-supercritical water oxidation, or TD-SCWO. The GA TD process uses heat to volatilize and transport organics from the waste material for subsequent treatment by SCWO. SCWO oxidizes organics in a steam medium at elevated temperatures and pressures in a manner that achieves excellent destruction efficiencies and compliance with all environmental requirements without the need for complex pollution-abatement equipment. This application of TD-SCWO is focused on a full-scale batch process for 55-gallon drums of mixed transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site. The Phase I reduced-scale test results show that the process operates as intended on surrogate waste matrices chosen to be representative of Savannah River Site transuranic mixed wastes. It provides a high degree of hydrogen removal and full containment of the radionuclide surrogate, with minimal requirements for pre-treatment and post-treatment. Other test objectives were to verify that the process produces no dioxins or furans, and meets all applicable regulatory criteria for retention of toxic metals, particulate, and criteria pollutants, while meeting WIPP/WAC and TRUPACT-II requirements. Thermal desorption of surrogate SRS mixed wastes at 500 psi and 1000 F met all tested requirements for WIPP/WAC and TRUPACT-II. SCWO of the desorbed surrogate organic materials at 500 psi and 1500 F also appears to meet all requirements for a nonincineration alternative, although >99.99% DRE for chlorinated solvents has not yet been demonstrated.

Mike Spritzer

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Advanced organic analysis and analytical methods development: FY 1995 progress report. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work performed during FY 1995 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in developing and optimizing analysis techniques for identifying organics present in Hanford waste tanks. The main focus was to provide a means for rapidly obtaining the most useful information concerning the organics present in tank waste, with minimal sample handling and with minimal waste generation. One major focus has been to optimize analytical methods for organic speciation. Select methods, such as atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, were developed to increase the speciation capabilities, while minimizing sample handling. A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to improve separation capabilities while minimizing additional waste generation. In addition, considerable emphasis has been placed on developing a rapid screening tool, based on Raman and infrared spectroscopy, for determining organic functional group content when complete organic speciation is not required. This capability would allow for a cost-effective means to screen the waste tanks to identify tanks that require more specialized and complete organic speciation to determine tank safety.

Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Public meetings on nuclear waste management: their function and organization  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on public meetings as a vehicle for public participation in nuclear waste management. The nature of public meetings is reviewed and the functions served by meetings highlighted. The range of participants and their concerns are addressed, including a review of the participants from past nuclear waste management meetings. A sound understanding of the expected participants allows DOE to tailor elements of the meeting, such as notification, format, and agenda to accommodate the attendees. Finally, the report discusses the organization of public meetings on nuclear waste management in order to enhance the DOE's functions for such meetings. Possible structures are suggested for a variety of elements that are relevant prior to, during and after the public meeting. These suggestions are intended to supplement the DOE Public Participation Manual.

Duvernoy, E.G.; Marcus, A.A.; Overcast, T.; Schilling, A.H.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Waste Tank Organic Safety Project: Analysis of liquid samples from Hanford waste tank 241-C-103  

SciTech Connect

A suite of physical and chemical analyses has been performed in support of activities directed toward the resolution of an Unreviewed Safety Question concerning the potential for a floating organic layer in Hanford waste tank 241-C-103 to sustain a pool fire. The analysis program was the result of a Data Quality Objectives exercise conducted jointly with staff from Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The organic layer has been analyzed for flash point, organic composition including volatile organics, inorganic anions and cations, radionuclides, and other physical and chemical parameters needed for a safety assessment leading to the resolution of the Unreviewed Safety Question. The aqueous layer underlying the floating organic material was also analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide composition, as well as other physical and chemical properties. This work was conducted to PNL Quality Assurance impact level III standards (Good Laboratory Practices).

Pool, K.H.; Bean, R.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Biomethane production by anaerobic digestion of organic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological process that takes place naturally when bacteria break down organic matter in environments with or without oxygen. Controlled anaerobic digestion of organic waste in enclosed landfill will generate methane. Almost any organic material can be processed with AD, including waste paper and cardboard (of a grade that is too low to recycle because of food contamination), grass clippings, leftover food, industrial effluents, sewage and animal waste. AD produces biogas which is comprised of around 60% methane (CH4) and 40% carbon dioxide (CO2). This biogas can be used to generate heat or electricity and/or can be used as a vehicular fuel. If the intended use is for power generation the biogas must be scrubbed to remove a number of impurities. After conditioning the biogas can be used for onsite power generation, to heat homes or can be added to the national natural gas grid. In recent years several research groups have shown the possibility of upgrading the biogas for biomethane production [1]. This study will show the feasibility of integrating anaerobic digestion plant with onsite polymeric membrane purification system for conditioned biomethane production.

A. Molino; F. Nanna; Y. Ding; B. Bikson; G. Braccio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fuel Gas Production from Organic Wastes by Low Capital Cost Batch Digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technical background is reviewed on energy recovery from biomass--i.e., all organic wastes, especially municipal solid wastes, but also including agricultural residues and crops grown specifically for ener...

Donald L. Wise; Alfred P. Leuschner…

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

SciTech Connect

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the second year`s findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

871; 871; NO. OF PAGES 5 Please cite this article in press as: Wilson DB. Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis, Curr Opin Microbiol (2011), doi:10.1016/j.mib.2011.04.004 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis David B Wilson Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by microorganisms is a key step in the global carbon cycle. Despite its abundance only a small percentage of microorganisms can degrade cellulose, probably because it is present in recalcitrant cell walls. There are at least five distinct mechanisms used by different microorganisms to degrade cellulose all of which involve cellulases. Cellulolytic organisms and cellulases are extremely diverse possibly because their natural substrates, plant cell walls, are very diverse. At this time the microbial ecology of cellulose degradation in any environment is still

31

The jiaoyao1 Mutant Is an Allele of korrigan1 That Abolishes Endoglucanase Activity and Affects the Organization of Both Cellulose Microfibrils and Microtubules in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the unsynchronized rate of individual elementary cellulose synthesis and the abrupt disruption...Pelletier, S., and Hofte, H. (2002). Resistance against herbicide isoxaben and cellulose...Modifications of cellulose synthase confer resistance to isoxaben and thiazolidinone herbicides...

Lei Lei; Tian Zhang; Richard Strasser; Christopher M. Lee; Martine Gonneau; Lukas Mach; Samantha Vernhettes; Seong H. Kim; Daniel J. Cosgrove; Shundai Li; Ying Gu

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery by Use of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The project is a combined analytical and experimental programme to investigate the feasibility of the Organic Rankine Cycle principle for waste heat recovery in industry....

Dipl.-Phys. G. Huppmann

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co(III) mediator in a neutral electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and neutral pH anolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the cobalt mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble radioactive species and is regenerated at the anode until all organics are converted to carbon dioxide and destroyed. The neutral electrolyte is non-corrosive, and thus extends the lifetime of the cell and its components.

Balazs, G. Bryan (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Patricia R. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Relative contributions of natural and waste-derived organics to the subsurface transport of radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Our laboratory is studying the role of organic compounds in the subsurface transport of radionuclides at shallow-land burial sites of low-level nuclear waste, including a commercial site at Maxey Flats, Kentucky, and an aqueous waste disposal site. At the Maxey Flats site, several radionuclides, notably Pu and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic, organic complexes. Waste-derived organics, particularly chelating agents such as EDTA, HEDTA and associated degradation products (e.g., ED3A), are abundant in aqueous waste leachates and appear to account for the complexation. EDTA, and probably other waste-derived chelating agents as well, are chelated to the Pu and /sup 60/Co in the leachates, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. In contrast, at the low-level aqueous waste disposal site, naturally-occurring organics, ranging from low molecular weight (MW) acids to high MW humic acids, account for the bulk of the groundwater's organic content. Certain radionuclides, notably /sup 60/Co, /sup 103/Ru and /sup 125/Sb, are mobile as anionic complexes. These radionuclides are clearly associated with higher MW organics, presumably humic and fulvic acids with nominal MW's > 1000. It is clear, therefore, that naturally-occurring organics may play an important role in radionuclide transport, particularly at nuclear waste burial sites containing little in the way of waste-derived organics.

Toste, A.P.; Myers, R.B.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Project LIBERTY, the nation’s first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plant to use corn waste as a feedstock, announced the start of production today. Once operating at full, commercial-scale, the biorefinery in Emmetsburg, Iowa will produce 25 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year - enough to avoid approximately 210,000 tons of CO2 emissions annually.

38

Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

advances required to produce cellulosic ethanol that is cost competitive with petroleum. Cellulosic ethanol is fuel produced from the inedible, organic material abundant in...

39

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pyrolysis Autoclave Technology Demonstration Program for Treatment of DOE Solidified Organic Wastes  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 2005, MSE Technologies Applications, Inc. (MSE) and THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (TTT) conducted a demonstration test of the Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR{sup sm}) in-drum pyrolysis autoclave system under contract to the Department of Energy. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate that the THOR{sup sm} pyrolysis autoclave system could successfully treat solidified organic waste to remove organics from the waste drums. The target waste was created at Rocky Flats and currently resides at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Removing the organics from these drums would allow them to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. Two drums of simulated organic setup waste were successfully treated. The simulated waste was virtually identical to the expected waste except for the absence of radioactive components. The simulated waste included carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, Texaco Regal oil, and other organics mixed with calcium silicate and Portland cement stabilization agents. The two-stage process consisted of the THOR{sup sm} electrically heated pyrolysis autoclave followed by the MSE off gas treatment system. The treatment resulted in a final waste composition that meets the requirements for WIPP transportation and disposal. There were no detectable volatile organic compounds in the treated solid residues. The destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) for total organics in the two drums ranged from >99.999% to >99.9999%. The operation of the process proved to be easily controllable using the pyrolysis autoclave heaters. Complete treatment of a fully loaded surrogate waste drum including heat-up and cooldown took place over a two-day period. This paper discusses the results of the successful pyrolysis autoclave demonstration testing. (authors)

Roesener, W.S.; Mason, J.B.; Ryan, K. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, 7800 E Union Ave, Denver, CO 80237 (United States); Bryson, S. [MSE Technologies Applications, Inc., 200 Technology Way, Butte, MT 59702 (United States); Eldredge, H.B. [Eldredge Engineering, P.A., 1090 Blue Ridge Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Application of Molecular Techniques To Elucidate the Influence of Cellulosic Waste on the Bacterial Community Structure at a Simulated Low-Level-Radioactive-Waste Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...environment to test the implementation of innovative waste characterization and retrieval...at these LLW sites and better design remediation processes that may be needed at these...Office of Science, Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP), contract...

Erin K. Field; Seth D'Imperio; Amber R. Miller; Michael R. VanEngelen; Robin Gerlach; Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Brent M. Peyton

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorption agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure. 3 figs.

Walsh, M.A.; Morris, R.S.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

Walsh, Myles A. (Falmouth, MA); Morris, Robert S. (Fairhaven, MA)

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste  

SciTech Connect

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Biomethane production from food waste and organic residues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Irish Research Council for Science Engineering and Technology (Enterprise Partnership Scheme (EPS)) Accepted Version Anaerobic digestion (AD) of biodegradable waste is an environmentally and economically… (more)

Browne, James D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conservation of energy by its recovery from low temperature waste heat is of increasing importance in today's world energy crisis. The Organic Rankine Cycle is a cost efficient and proven method of converting low temperature (200-400o F) waste...

Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A thermodynamic study of waste heat recovery from GT-MHR using organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation on the utilization of waste heat from a gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) using different arrangements of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) for power production. The con...

Mortaza Yari; S. M. S. Mahmoudi

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

One-step production of lactate from cellulose as the sole carbon source without any other organic nutrient by recombinant cellulolytic Bacillus subtilis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

step step production of lactate from cellulose as the sole carbon source without any other organic nutrient by recombinant cellulolytic Bacillus subtilis Xiao-Zhou Zhang a , Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh a,b , Zhiguang Zhu a , Y.-H. Percival Zhang a,b,c,n a Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA b Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA c BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 28 December 2010 Received in revised form 9 April 2011 Accepted 25 April 2011 Keywords: Bacillus subtilis Cellulase engineering Consolidated bioprocessing Endoglucanase Lactate Metabolic engineering Directed evolution a b s t r a c t Although intensive efforts have been made to create recombinant cellulolytic microorganisms,

51

Waste Tank Organic Safety Program: Analytical methods development. Progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this task are to develop and document extraction and analysis methods for organics in waste tanks, and to extend these methods to the analysis of actual core samples to support the Waste Tank organic Safety Program. This report documents progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (a) during FY 1994 on methods development, the analysis of waste from Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) and T-111, and the transfer of documented, developed analytical methods to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) and 222-S laboratory. This report is intended as an annual report, not a completed work.

Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ecotoxicological assessment of organic wastes spread on land: Towards a proposal of a suitable test battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The land spreading of organic wastes in agriculture is a common practice in Europe, under the regulation of the Directive 86/278/EEC. One of the objectives of this Directive is to prevent harmful effects of organic wastes on soil, plants and animals. Despite this regulatory framework, there is still a lack of harmonized ecotoxicological test strategy to assess the environmental hazard of such wastes. The aim of this study was to provide a first step towards the a priori ecotoxicological assessment of organic wastes before their land use. For that purpose, nine different organic wastes were assessed using direct (i.e. terrestrial tests) and indirect (i.e. tests on water eluates) approaches, for a total of thirteen endpoints. Then, multivariate analyzes were used to discriminate the most relevant test strategy, among the application rates and bioassays used. From our results, a draft of test strategy was proposed, using terrestrial bioassays (i.e. earthworms and plants) and a concentration range between one and ten times the recommended application rates of organic wastes.

Pierre Huguier; Nicolas Manier; Laure Chabot; Pascale Bauda; Pascal Pandard

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cellulosic ethanol at last?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol at last? 10.1126/science.345...The spigots are open at a new cellulosic ethanol plant in Emmetsburg, Iowa. PHOTO...northwest corner of Iowa? Cellulosic ethanol, in quantities that have never flowed...

Robert F. Service

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C. [and others

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Emissions of unintentional persistent organic pollutants from open burning of municipal solid waste from developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Open burning of waste is the most significant source of polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) in many national inventories prepared pursuant to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. This is particularly true for developing countries. Emission factors for \\{POPs\\} such as PCDD/PCDF, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCB) and penta- and hexachlorobenzenes (PeCBz/HCB) from open burning of municipal solid waste in China and Mexico are reported herein. Six different waste sources were studied varying from urban-industrial to semi-urban to rural. For PCDD/PCDF, the emission factors to air ranged from 3.0 to 650 ng TEQ kg?1 waste and for dl-PCB from 0.092 to 54 ng TEQ kg?1 waste. Emission factors for PeCBz (17–1200 ng kg?1 waste) and HCB (24–1300 ng kg?1 waste) spanned a wide but similar range. Within the datasets there is no indication of significant waste composition effect on emission factor with the exception of significantly higher Mexico rural samples.

Tingting Zhang; Heidelore Fiedler; Gang Yu; Gustavo Solorzano Ochoa; William F. Carroll Jr.; Brian K. Gullett; Stellan Marklund; Abderrahmane Touati

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Waste Heat Recovery by Organic Fluid Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In organic vapor cycles, the compression work is often comparatively more important than in steam cycles. The efficiency of the pump should not be neglected. T, , Tr2 " Tr " 3 "" " 12 '--_L----L__-i tc Qv,>Qv2~Qv3 flowrole 'lturb ' 0.85 12~ 3JO... In organic vapor cycles, the compression work is often comparatively more important than in steam cycles. The efficiency of the pump should not be neglected. T, , Tr2 " Tr " 3 "" " 12 '--_L----L__-i tc Qv,>Qv2~Qv3 flowrole 'lturb ' 0.85 12~ 3JO...

Verneau, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes without electrode separators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell/electrolyte/mediator combination is described for the efficient destruction of organic contaminants using metal salt mediators in a sulfuric acid electrolyte, wherein the electrodes and mediator are chosen such that hydrogen gas is produced at the cathode and no cell membrane is required. 3 figs.

Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.; Hickman, R.G.; Lewis, P.R.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

Final Report. Conversion of Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilizing Hermetic Organic Rankine Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The design of waste heat recovery using the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is updated. Advances in power electronics with lower cost enable the use of a single shaft, high-speed generator eliminating wear items and allowing hermetic sealing of the working fluid. This allows maintenance free operation and a compact configuration that lowers cost, enabling new market opportunities.

Fuller, Robert L.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Heat-Exchanger Network Synthesis Involving Organic Rankine Cycle for Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article aims to present a mathematical model for the synthesis of a heat-exchanger network (HEN) which can be integrated with an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for the recovery of low-grade waste heat from the heat surplus zone of the background ...

Cheng-Liang Chen; Feng-Yi Chang; Tzu-Hsiang Chao; Hui-Chu Chen; Jui-Yuan Lee

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI-URBAN COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in dose-response assessment in QMRA. The risks were significantly higher than the acceptable risk level defined by USEPA and WHO for drinking water, which was used as a guideline acceptable risk in this studyi QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI

Richner, Heinz

62

Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSNBC.com Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen method for generating hydrogen fuel from wastewater is now operating at a California winery material in the wastewater into hydrogen gas. There is a lot more energy locked in the wastewater than

63

Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980  

SciTech Connect

The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

Singh, B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67 ± 0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (?30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1 ? 1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2 ? 2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions.

Prashant Rajput; M.M. Sarin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT&E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A/O/D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT&E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A/O/D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris.

Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of alternative nonflame technologies for destruction of hazardous organic waste  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) commissioned an evaluation of mixed waste treatment technologies that are alternatives to incineration for destruction of hazardous organic wastes. The purpose of this effort is to evaluate technologies that are alternatives to open-flame, free-oxygen combustion (as exemplified by incinerators), and recommend to the Waste Type Managers and the MWFA which technologies should be considered for further development. Alternative technologies were defined as those that have the potential to: destroy organic material without use of open-flame reactions with free gas-phase oxygen as the reaction mechanism; reduce the offgas volume and associated contaminants (metals, radionuclides, and particulates) emitted under normal operating conditions; eliminate or reduce the production of dioxins and furans; and reduce the potential for excursions in the process that can lead to accidental release of harmful levels of chemical or radioactive materials. Twenty-three technologies were identified that have the potential for meeting these requirements. These technologies were rated against the categories of performance, readiness for deployment, and environment safety, and health. The top ten technologies that resulted from this evaluation are Steam Reforming, Electron Beam, UV Photo-Oxidation, Ultrasonics, Eco Logic reduction process, Supercritical Water oxidation, Cerium Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation, DETOX{sup SM}, Direct Chemical Oxidation (peroxydisulfate), and Neutralization/Hydrolysis.

Schwinkendorf, W.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Musgrave, B.C. [BC Musgrave, Inc. (United States); Drake, R.N. [Drake Engineering, Inc. (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from a Heavy-Duty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from and efficiency of those systems. The system considered here is an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for recovering internal combustion engines presented in [1]. The system considered here is an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

69

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Organization of American States (OAS) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.sepa-americas.net/p Program Start 2008 Program End 2009 Country Belize UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References OAS Project Database[1] "The main objective of the Project is to assess the market potential for cellulosic ethanol in Belize through sustainable implementation of cellulosic ethanol technology utilizing agricultural and forest residues as primary biomass feedstock. A supplementary objective will be to help prepare for potential future cellulosic ethanol projects in other Caribbean

70

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The project objective is to develop the scroll expander for Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems to be used in medium-grade waste heat recovery applications, and to validate and quantify the benefits of the prototype system.

71

The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

Evans, Gordon Barcus

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Production of methane gas from organic fraction municipal solid waste (OFMSW) via anaerobic process: application methodology for the Malaysian condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid waste management in Malaysia is confronted with many problems, including low collection coverage, irregular collection services, inadequate equipment used for waste collection, crude open dumping and burning without air and water pollution control systems, inadequate legal provisions and resource constraints. These problems have various effects on the development of the solid waste management system in Malaysia. Anaerobic digestion has been suggested as an alternative method for removing high concentrations of organic waste. In this study, two types of anaerobic digesters which are Simulated Landfill Bioreactor (SLBR) and Anaerobic Solid-Liquid (ASL) reactor were proposed. The reactors were operated at a temperature 60°C, analysed for biogas production and volatile fatty acid.

Irnis Azura Zakarya; Ismail Abustan; Norli Ismail; Mohd Suffian Yusoff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Organic geochemical studies at a commercial shallow-land disposal site of low-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The subsurface migration of radionuclides has been studied at a commercial, shallow-land burial site of low-level nuclear waste at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. A variety of radionuclides including /sup 3/H, /sup 238/ /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr have migrated short distances on-site (meters to tens of meters). A number of the mobile radionuclides, notably plutonium and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic species with organic properties. As a result, we have studied the organic geochemistry of radioactive leachates pumped from a number of waste burial trenches throughout the site. The major aim of the organic research is to elucidate the role of organic compounds in mediating the subsurface migration of the mobile radionuclides in groundwater. A survey study of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic content of the waste leachates has revealed that organic compounds are readily leached from the buried waste. Organic chelating agents like EDTA, HEDTA and ED3A are the major hydrophilic organic compounds in the leachates, their concentrations ranging from 78 ppB to 19,511 ppB. A number of carboxylic acids are also present in the leachates, ranging from 675 ppB to 8757 ppB, collectively. A variety of hydrophobic organic compounds including barbiturates and other aromatic compounds, presumably waste-derived, are also present in the leachates, generally at lower ppB concentrations. A detailed chemical speciation study, aimed at determining whether any of the organic compounds identified in the survey study are associated with the mobile radionuclides, was undertaken using leachate from one of the waste trenches. It is clear that EDTA is chelated to plutonium and /sup 60/Co in the leachate, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. Other radionuclides, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr, may be associated with polar organic compounds such as carboxylic acids. 14 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A reclamation approach for mined prime farmland by adding organic wastes and lime to the subsoil  

SciTech Connect

Surface mined prime farmland may be reclaimed by adding organic wastes and lime to subsoil thus improving conditions in root zone. In this study, sewage sludge, poultry manure, horse bedding, and lime were applied to subsoil (15-30 cm) during reclamation. Soil properties and plant growth were measured over two years. All organic amendments tended to lower the subsoil bulk density and increase organic matter and total nitrogen. Liming raised exchangeable calcium, slightly increased pH, but decreased exchangeable magnesium and potassium. Corn ear-leaf and forage tissue nitrogen, yields, and nitrogen removal increased in treatments amended with sewage sludge and poultry manure, but not horse bedding. Subsoil application of sewage sludge or poultry manure seems like a promising method in the reclamation of surface mined prime farmland based on the improvements observed in the root zone environment.

Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Minimum variance control of organic Rankine cycle based waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, an online self-tuning generalized minimum variance (GMV) controller is proposed for a 100 KW waste heat recovery system with organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The ORC process model is formulated by the controlled autoregressive moving average (CARMA) model whose parameters are identified using the recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm with forgetting factor. The generalized minimum variance algorithm is applied to regulate ORC based waste heat recovery system. The contributions of this work are twofold: (1) the proposed control strategy is formulated under the data-driven framework, which does not need the precise mathematic model; (2) this proposed method is applied to handle tracking set-point variations and process disturbances by improved minimum objective GMV function. The performance of GMV controller is compared with the PID controller. The simulation results show that the proposed strategy can achieve satisfactory set-point tracking and disturbance rejection performance.

Guolian Hou; Shanshan Bi; Mingming Lin; Jianhua Zhang; Jinliang Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Microbial gas generation under expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository conditions  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository was investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosics (various types of paper) and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, neoprene, hypalon, and leaded hypalon) was examined. The rate of gas production from cellulose biodegradation in inundated samples incubated for 1,228 days at 30 C was biphasic, with an initial rapid rate up to approximately 600 days incubation, followed by a slower rate. The rate of total gas production in anaerobic samples containing mixed inoculum was as follows: 0.002 mL/g cellulose/day without nutrients; 0.004 mL/g cellulose/day with nutrients; and 0.01 mL/g cellulose/day in the presence of excess nitrate. Carbon dioxide production proceeded at a rate of 0.009 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples without nutrients, 0.05 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of nutrients, and 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day with excess nitrate. Adding nutrients and excess nitrate stimulated denitrification, as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sub 2}O in the headspace (200 {micro}mol/g cellulose). The addition of the potential backfill bentonite increased the rate of CO{sub 2} production to 0.3 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples with excess nitrate. Analysis of the solution showed that lactic, acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids were produced due to cellulose degradation. Samples incubated under anaerobic humid conditions for 415 days produced CO{sub 2} at a rate of 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the absence of nutrients, and 1 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of bentonite and nutrients. There was no evidence of biodegradation of electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Giles, M.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Approaching zero cellulose loss in cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) production: recovery and characterization of cellulosic solid residues (CSR) and CNC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study demonstrated the potential of simultaneously recovering cellulosic solid residues (CSR) and producing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by strong sulfuric acid hydrolysis to minimize cellulose loss to near...

Q. Q. Wang; J. Y. Zhu; R. S. Reiner; S. P. Verrill; U. Baxa; S. E. McNeil

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Electricity Production from Anaerobic Digestion of Household Organic Waste in Ontario: Techno-Economic and GHG Emission Analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity Production from Anaerobic Digestion of Household Organic Waste in Ontario: Techno-Economic and GHG Emission Analyses ... The life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and economics of electricity generation through anaerobic digestion (AD) of household source-separated organic waste (HSSOW) are investigated within the FiT program. ... AD can potentially provide considerable GHG emission reductions (up to 1 t CO2eq/t HSSOW) at relatively low to moderate cost (-$35 to 160/t CO2eq) by displacing fossil electricity and preventing the emission of landfill gas. ...

David Sanscartier; Heather L. MacLean; Bradley Saville

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

80

Growth and elemental composition of sorghum sudangrass grown on flyash/organic waste-amended soils  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefitsof using fly ash/organic waste mixtures amended to soils for growth andcomposition of mineral elements by `sorgrass` (Sorghum vulgaris var.sudanense Hitchc.) a shorghum-sudangrass hybrid plant. This experimentwas conducted using a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to either sewage sludge,poultry manure, or dairy manure at six application rates. Our threeorganic wastes when mixed with fly ash at varied rates of applicationresulted in elevated concentrations of NO{sub 3}, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, B,Cu and Zn in both soil and plants. The data of this study indicated thatthe availability of elements to plants varied according to the organicsource mixed with fly ash and the rate of application. The elements Band Zn were observed to be significantly greater in plant tissuesexposed to fly ash/poultry manure or fly ash/dairy manure mixtures.Soils amended with fly ash/sewage sludge or poultry manure generallyimproved plant growth and enhanced yield when applied at rates of 25tons/acre, and decreased thereafter. However, soils amended with flyash/dairy manure improved plant growth and enhanced yield when appliedat rates upto 50 tons/acre and decreased thereafter. The decreases inyield beyond these application rates were probably due to theaccumulation of high levels of B and Zn which are phytotoxic and/orelevated levels of inorganic dissolved salts. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

Sajwan, K.S. [Savannah State College, GA (United States); Ornes, W.H.; Youngblood, T.V. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cellulosic Biofuels Disappoint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulosic Biofuels Disappoint ... As part of the strategy, a goal of 36 billion gallons per year (bgy) of biofuel production was mandated by a Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) lasting from 2008 through 2022. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

Dynamic modeling and optimal control strategy of waste heat recovery Organic Rankine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs) are particularly suitable for recovering energy from low-grade heat sources. This paper describes the behavior of a small-scale ORC used to recover energy from a variable flow rate and temperature waste heat source. A traditional static model is unable to predict transient behavior in a cycle with a varying thermal source, whereas this capability is essential for simulating an appropriate cycle control strategy during part-load operation and start and stop procedures. A dynamic model of the ORC is therefore proposed focusing specifically on the time-varying performance of the heat exchangers, the dynamics of the other components being of minor importance. Three different control strategies are proposed and compared. The simulation results show that a model predictive control strategy based on the steady-state optimization of the cycle under various conditions is the one showing the best results.

Sylvain Quoilin; Richard Aumann; Andreas Grill; Andreas Schuster; Vincent Lemort; Hartmut Spliethoff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Method of saccharifying cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of a reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

Johnson, Eric A. (Brookline, MA); Demain, Arnold L. (Wellesley, MA); Madia, Ashwin (Decatur, IL)

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

Method of saccharifying cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

Extraction equilibria between organic CMPO-n-dodecane and aqueous nitric acid phases for selected tank waste components  

SciTech Connect

Removal of the transuranium elements from tank-stored wastes is an important step in the cost effective treatment and preparation of these wastes for permanent disposal. One promising method of treatment involves dissolving the tank sludges in acid, followed by extraction of the transuranium species. The TRUEX process, which uses an extracting medium composed of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in an organic solvent such as n-dodecane, is being tested for this purpose. Although CMPO is a powerful extractant for all the actinides, concern arises that certain process chemicals present in the waste will compete for the CMPO. Data will be presented on the pure component equilibrium characteristics of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate and bismuth nitrate partitioned between a nitric acid aqueous phase and a CMPO-n-dodecane organic phase.

Spencer, B.B.; Egan, B.Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Counce, R.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project of anaerobic digestion (AD) techniques for the conversion of biomass-related organic waste materials to useful energy products. This approach to industrial ecology, or sustainability, is well advanced in Europe where

Chatterjee, Avik P.

87

Ambient measurements of light-absorption by agricultural waste burning organic aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absorption properties (absorption Ångstrom exponent and mass absorption efficiency) of agricultural waste burning organic aerosols (AWB-OA) and their impact on total absorption were investigated in Cairo (Egypt) during the post-harvest rice straw burning autumn season. At 370 nm, AWB-OA were found to account for more than 25% of total absorption on average for the period of study (and for ?50% during intense biomass burning events), pointing out the major role potentially played by such particles on light absorption at short wavelengths. The absorption exponent obtained for AWB-OA (?3.5) is consistent with values previously reported for biomass burning brown carbon. In addition, AWB-OA were found to exhibit high mass absorption efficiencies at the near ultraviolet/mid-visible regions (e.g. 3.2±1.6 m2 g?1 at 370 nm and 0.8±0.4 m2 g?1 at 520 nm). Such findings clearly illustrate the need to take light absorption by organic aerosols into account for a better estimate of the radiative impact of biomass burning aerosols.

Olivier Favez; Stéphane C. Alfaro; Jean Sciare; Hélène Cachier; Magdy M. Abdelwahab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Modern Organic Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to organic chemistry, tautomerism, glutaconic acids, the constitution of urea, the menthone chemistry, carene, hydroxymethylenecamphor, squalene, insulin, the production of acetic acid from cellulose by anaerobic fermentation ...

J. R.

1928-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

90

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

91

Organic Rankine Cycle System Preliminary Design with Corn Cob Biomass Waste Burning as Heat Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable energy source potencies in Indonesia are needed to be utilized to fulfill the electricity requirement in rural or remote area that not yet get electricity. One of the potency is biomass waste. Therefore, this paper discusses about the electricity generation preliminary design of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system with corn cob biomass waste burning as heat source, so it can be obtained the theoretic corn farm area requirement, electricity power, and thermal efficiency at heat source temperature and flow rate variations. Corn cob burning temperature can heat up the heating fluid that is heated by boiler with corn cob as the biomass fuel. Furthermore, that heating fluid is used as ORC electricity generation heat source. The independent variables in this study are the heating fluid temperature which varied between 110, 120, and 130oC, and the heating fluid flow rate that varied between 100, 150, and 200 liter/minute. \\{R141b\\} is selected to be the working fluid, palm oil is used for heating fluid and water as cooling fluid. The calculation results that the theoretic electricity power, thermal efficiency, and corn farm area requirement, respectively, are in the range of 3.5-8.5 kW, 9.2-10.3%, and 49.5-101.1 hectare/year. All of the highest range values are resulted at the highest temperature and flow rate, 130oC and 200 liter/minute. This result shows that corn cob burning heat is potential to be utilized as electricity generation heat source for rural society, particularly for some areas that have been studied.

Nur Rohmah; Ghalya Pikra; Agus Salim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste  

SciTech Connect

Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Co, {sup 79}Se, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc as pertechnetate, {sup 106}Ru/Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, and {sup 243+244}Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}AMU, {sup 242}AMU, {sup 243}AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all contract limits (molar ratio of analyte to sodium or ratio of becquerels of analyte to moles of sodium) defined in Specification 7 for Envelope A. Except for a few cases, the characterization results met or surpassed the quality control requirements established by the governing quality assurance plan and met or surpassed the minimum reportable quantity requirements specified by BNFL.

SK Fiskum; PR Bredt; JA Campbell; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; GJ Lumetta; GM Mong; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist; RG Swoboda; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Potential of organic Rankine cycle using zeotropic mixtures as working fluids for waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The performance of the ORC (organic Rankine cycle) systems using zeotropic mixtures as working fluids for recovering waste heat of flue gas from industrial boiler is examined on the basis of thermodynamics and thermo-economics under different operating conditions. In order to explore the potential of the mixtures as the working fluids in the ORC, the effects of various mixtures with different components and composition proportions on the system performance have been analyzed. The results show that the compositions of the mixtures have an important effect on the ORC system performance, which is associated with the temperature glide during the phase change of mixtures. From the point of thermodynamics, the performance of the ORC system is not always improved by employing the mixtures as the working fluids. The merit of the mixtures is related to the restrictive conditions of the ORC, different operating conditions results in different conclusions. At a fixed pinch point temperature difference, the small mean heat transfer temperature difference in heat exchangers will lead to a larger heat transfer area and the larger total cost of the ORC system. Compared with the ORC with pure working fluids, the ORC with the mixtures presents a poor economical performance.

You-Rong Li; Mei-Tang Du; Chun-Mei Wu; Shuang-Ying Wu; Chao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Oxygen demand for the stabilization of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in passively aerated bioreactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • The use of an passively aerated reactor enables effective stabilization of OFMSW. • Convective air flow does not inhibit the aerobic stabilization of waste. • The use of an passively aerated reactor reduces the heat loss due to convection. • The volume of supplied air exceeds 1.7–2.88 times the microorganisms demand. - Abstract: Conventional aerobic waste treatment technologies require the use of aeration devices that actively transport air through the stabilized waste mass, which greatly increases operating costs. In addition, improperly operated active aeration systems, may have the adverse effect of cooling the stabilized biomass. Because active aeration can be a limiting factor for the stabilization process, passive aeration can be equally effective and less expensive. Unfortunately, there are few reports documenting the use of passive aeration systems in municipal waste stabilization. There have been doubts raised as to whether a passive aeration system provides enough oxygen to the organic matter mineralization processes. In this paper, the effectiveness of aeration during aerobic stabilization of four different organic fractions of municipal waste in a reactor with an integrated passive ventilation system and leachate recirculation was analyzed. For the study, four fractions separated by a rotary screen were chosen. Despite the high temperatures in the reactor, the air flow rate was below 0.016 m{sup 3}/h. Using Darcy’s equation, theoretical values of the air flow rate were estimated, depending on the intensity of microbial metabolism and the amount of oxygen required for the oxidation of organic compounds. Calculations showed that the volume of supplied air exceeded the microorganisms demand for oxidation and endogenous activity by 1.7–2.88-fold.

Kasinski, Slawomir, E-mail: slawomir.kasinski@uwm.edu.pl; Wojnowska-Baryla, Irena

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Changes in Soil Physical Properties Due to Organic Waste Applications: A Review1 R. KHALEEL, K. R. REDDY, AND M. R. OVERCASH2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. REDDY, AND M. R. OVERCASH2 ABSTRACT Land application of organic wastes such as animal manure, munici- pal wastes, and sewage sludge could alter the soil physical properties. Repeated substantial). Several investiga- tors, in monitoring runoff water quality from small plot-sized land application areas

Florida, University of

97

Growth condition and bacterial community for maximum hydrolysis of suspended organic materials in anaerobic digestion of food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the effects of changing pH (5–7) and temperature (T..., 40–60 °C) on the efficiencies of bacterial hydrolysis of suspended organic matter (SOM) in wastewater from food waste recycling (FWR) and...

Man Deok Kim; Minkyung Song; Minho Jo…

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Organic Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating various sorbents to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both aqueous and organic waste streams are discharged from REDC. Organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX), Cleanex, and Pubex processes.1 The PUREX waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. An aqueous waste stream is also produced from these separation processes. MSE has been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes specially formulated radioactive shielding materials developed by Science and Technology Applications, LLC. This paper will focus on the sorbent testing work. Based on work performed at Savannah River Site (SRS) (Refs. 1, 2), ORNL tested and evaluated three sorbents capable of solidifying the PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex waste streams and a composite of the three organic waste streams: Imbiber Beads{sup R} IMB230301 (Imbiber Beads), Nochar A610 Petro Bond, and Petroset II Granular{sup TM} (Petroset II-G). Surrogates of the PUREX, Pubex, Cleanex, and a composite organic waste were used for the bench-scale testing. Recommendations resulting from the ORNL testing included follow-on testing by MSE for two of the three sorbents: Nochar Petro Bond and Petroset II-G. MSE recommended that another clay sorbent, Organoclay BM-QT-199, be added to the test sequence. The sorbent/surrogate combinations were tested at bench scale, 19-liter (L) [5-gallon (gal)] bucket scale, and 208-L (55-gal) drum scale. The testing performed by MSE will help ORNL select the right solidification materials and wasteform generation methods for the design of a new treatment facility. The results could also be used to help demonstrate that ORNL could meet the waste acceptance criteria for the ultimate disposal site for the waste-forms. The organics will be solidified as transuranic waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and the aqueous waste stream will be grouted and disposed of at the Nevada Test Site as low-level waste if real waste testing indicates similar results to the surrogate testing. The objective of this work was to identify a sorbent capable of solidifying PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex organic wastes individually and a composite of the three organic waste streams. The sorbent and surrogate combinations must also be compatible with processing equipment and maintain stability under a variety of conditions that could occur during storage/shipment of the solidified wastes. (authors)

Bickford, J.; Foote, M. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Montana (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, bioenergy from second generation cellulosic feedstocks cost more than fossil fuels. Another issue in dealing with corn grain as the feedstock for ethanol is that corn is used for food and livestock feed. The cellulosic process takes cellulosic material... Assessment and Utilization Options for Three Counties in Eastern Oregon? which was prepared by McNeil Technologies (2003); ?Biomass Inventory and Bioenergy Assessment: An evaluation of Organic Material Resources for Bioenergy Production in Washington State...

Gleinser, Matthew A.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Why Sequence Cellulose Degrading Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? One of the major DOE missions is the production of renewable fuels to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and also to take the place of petroleum-based fuels as these resources dwindle. Biologically produced ethanol is one possible replacement for fossil fuels. Currently, ethanol is produced from corn starch, but there is much research into using lignocellulosic materials (those containing cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) as the raw material for ethanol production. Ethanol production from cellulose requires several steps: pretreatment with steam, acid, or ammonia; digestion of cellulose to sugars; and fermentation of sugars to ethanol. The slowest and most expensive step is the breakdown of cellulose, chemically accomplished by cellulases. The second and third

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste activated sludge in China: Effect of organic loading rate  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) was examined on a pilot-scale reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System performance and stability under OLR of 1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6.0 and 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and HRT of 15d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing OLRs, pH values, VS removal rate and methane concentration decreased and VFA increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The changing of biogas production rate can be a practical approach to monitor and control anaerobic digestion system. - Abstract: The effects of organic loading rate on the performance and stability of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated on a pilot-scale reactor. The results showed that stable operation was achieved with organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.2-8.0 kg volatile solid (VS) (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}, with VS reduction rates of 61.7-69.9%, and volumetric biogas production of 0.89-5.28 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and hydraulic retention time of 15 days. With increasing OLRs, the anaerobic reactor showed a decrease in VS removal rate, average pH value and methane concentration, and a increase of volatile fatty acid concentration. By monitoring the biogas production rate (BPR), the anaerobic digestion system has a higher acidification risk under an OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. This result remarks the possibility of relating bioreactor performance with BPR in order to better understand and monitor anaerobic digestion process.

Liu Xiao, E-mail: liuxiao07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Wei; Shi Yunchun; Zheng Lei [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao Xingbao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Qiao Wei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhou Yingjun [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nisikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sandia National Laboratories: cellulosic biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cellulosic biofuels Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS Chemical Biology On July 31, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities, Energy,...

103

Biofuel Development from Cellulosic Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land-use changes resulting in habitat loss and habitat fragmentation can impact native wildlife species. However, cellulosic biomass feedstocks have the potential to provide habitat for...

Kimberly O’Keefe; Clint J. Springer; Jonathan Grennell…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2010, Verenium...

105

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to be less efficient and more expensive. This work examines organic ...

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Utilization of Vinegar for Isolation of Cellulose Producing Acetic Acid Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Wastes of traditionally fermented Turkish vinegar were used in the isolation of cellulose producing acetic acid bacteria. Waste material was pre-enriched in Hestrin-Schramm medium and microorganisms were isolated by plating dilution series on HS agar plates The isolated strains were subjected to elaborate biochemical and physiological tests for identification. Test results were compared to those of reference strains Gluconacetobacter xylinus DSM 46604, Gluconacetobacter hansenii DSM 5602 and Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens DSM 5603. Seventeen strains, out of which only three were found to secrete the exopolysaccharide cellulose. The highest cellulose yield was recorded as 0.263+-0.02 g cellulose L{sup -1} for the strain AS14 which resembled Gluconacetobacter hansenii in terms of biochemical tests.

Aydin, Y. Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci [Chemical Engineering Department of Istanbul Technical University, Ayazaga, Maslak, Istanbul, 34469 (Turkey)

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

Performance Analysis of Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery System for Stationary CNG Engine Based on Organic Rankine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to improve the electric efficiency of a stationary compressed natural gas (CNG) engine, a set of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system with internal heat exchanger (IHE) is designed to recover exhaust energy that is used to generate electricity. R416A is selected as the working fluid for the waste heat recovery system. According to the first and second laws of thermodynamics, the performances of the ORC system for waste heat recovery are discussed based on the analysis of engine exhaust waste heat characteristics. Subsequently, the stationary CNG engine-ORC with IHE combined system is presented. The electric efficiency and the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) are introduced to evaluate the operating performances of the combined system. The results show that, when the evaporation pressure is 3.5MPa and the engine is operating at the rated condition, the net power output and the thermal efficiency of the ORC system with IHE can reach up to 62.7kW and 12.5%, respectively. Compared with the stationary CNG engine, the electric efficiency of the combined system can be increased by a maximum 6.0%, while the BSFC can be reduced by a maximum 5.0%.

Songsong Song; Hongguang Zhang; Zongyong. Lou; Fubin Yang; Kai Yang; Hongjin Wang; Chen Bei; Ying Chang; Baofeng Yao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated-carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 giL potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent adsorption tube breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. Linear response was checked using both non-volatile TOX species (trichlorophenol) an

JG DOUGLAS; HK MEZNARICH, PHD; JR OLSEN; GA ROSS PHD; M STAUFFER

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 g/L potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent column breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. (3) Improper sample preservation: ion-chromatographic analysis of several samples wit

DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Optimal Use of Organic Waste in Future Energy Systems the Danish case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, gasification, fermentation (biogas production) and improved incineration. It is argued that it is important for CHP production. On the other hand least greenhouse gases are emitted if biogas is produced from waste. The approximate 70 Danish biogas plants contribute with a mere 1% of the electricity production

112

Cornell Waste Management Institute Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on all landfill and incinerator waste. Five dollars would be charged to the facility for every ton://www.nypsc.org) describes Framework Principles for Product Stewardship. · Other "types" of operations include pyrolysis and gasification plants. DEC is looking at these facilities to help insure they

Wang, Z. Jane

113

Cellulose nanocrystal from pomelo (C. Grandis osbeck) albedo: Chemical, morphology and crystallinity evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Citrus peel is one of the under-utilized waste materials that have potential in producing a valuable fibre, which are cellulose and cellulose nanocrystal. Cellulose was first isolated from pomelo (C. Grandis Osbeck) albedo by combination of alkali treatment and bleaching process, followed by acid hydrolysis (65% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 45 °C, 45min) to produce cellulose nanocrystal. The crystalline, structural, morphological and chemical properties of both materials were studied. Result reveals the crystallinity index obtained from X-ray diffraction for cellulose nanocrystal was found higher than extracted cellulose with the value of 60.27% and 57.47%, respectively. Fourier transform infrared showed that the chemical treatments removed most of the hemicellulose and lignin from the pomelo albedo fibre. This has been confirmed further by SEM and TEM for their morphological studies. These results showed that cellulose and cellulose nanocrystal were successfully obtained from pomelo albedo and might be potentially used in producing functional fibres for food application.

Zain, Nor Fazelin Mat; Yusop, Salma Mohamad [Food Science Program, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Ishak [Polymer Research Centre (PORCE), School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to… (more)

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A literature review of methods of analysis of organic analytes in radioactive wastes with an emphasis on sources from the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect

This report, compiled by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), examines literature originating through the United Kingdom (UK) nuclear industry relating to the analyses of organic constituents of radioactive waste. Additionally, secondary references from the UK and other counties, including the United States, have been reviewed. The purpose of this literature review was to find analytical methods that would apply to the mixed-waste matrices found at Hanford.

Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

PROCESS DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF CELLULOSE HYDROLYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

controlled, ethanol produced from cellulose is not currentlycellulose to sugars that are readily fermentable to ethanol.

Lindsey, R.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic...

119

EFFECT OF NITROGEN OXIDE PRETREATMENTS ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioconversion of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," LBL-of Cellulose and the Production of Ethanol," LBL-6859,the cellulose is a major obstacle to hydrolysis. Ethanol The

Borrevik, R.K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cost Effective Waste Heat Organic Rankine Cycle Applications and Systems Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conceptually, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power cycle has been well known to the engineering community for many years. Despite the rapid escalation of energy costs during the past decade, and a concerted, though somewhat belated, effort towards...

Rohrer, J. W.; Bronicki, L. Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studies of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).

Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.; Taylor, P.H. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

High dose radiolysis of aqueous solutions of chloromethanes: Importance in the storage of radioactive organic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiolysis of aqueous solutions of chloromethanes (dichloromethane, CH2Cl2; chloroform, CHCl3; and carbon tetrachloride, CCl4) was performed with ?-rays to doses sufficient to completely decompose the solute in order to estimate the effects of radiation on the long-term storage of mixed waste in enclosed containers. One of the main relevant products was the inorganic chloride anion, which increased in concentration with increasing radiation dose due to the reactions of radiolytic decomposition products of water with the chloromethane. The pH of the solutions was observed to decrease with irradiation due to the formation of H3O+ as the counter ion to Cl?, i.e. the main radiolytic decomposition product is hydrochloric acid. Polymer formation was observed in aerated solutions as a precipitate while deaerated solutions exhibited a slight turbidity.

P. Rajesh; J.A. LaVerne; S.M. Pimblott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF THERMAL-DEGRADATION RATES OF SOME CANDIDATE RANKINE-CYCLE ORGANIC WORKING FLUIDS FOR CONVERSION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT INTO POWER Mohan L. Jain, Jack Demirgian, John L. Krazinski, and H. Bushby Argonne National Laboratory..., Argonne, Illinois Howard Mattes and John Purcell U.S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT Serious concerns over the long-term thermal In a previous study [1] based on systems stability of organic working fluids and its effect analysis and covering...

Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Increased Levels of Markers of Microbial Exposure in Homes with Indoor Storage of Organic Household Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Levels of Markers of Microbial Exposure in Homes with Indoor Storage of Organic Household...might increase microbial exposure in the home environment. In this study we evaluated...House dust samples were collected in 99 homes in The Netherlands selected on the basis...

Inge M. Wouters; Jeroen Douwes; Gert Doekes; Peter S. Thorne; Bert Brunekreef; Dick J. J. Heederik

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Biocontrol of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Meat by Using Phages Immobilized on Modified Cellulose Membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excellent physical properties and low price. Moreover, cellulose can be easily manufactured...search for new applications for these natural bacterial killers using different strategies...Kaufman. 1997. Biodesulfurization of flue gases and other sulfate/sulfite waste streams...

H. Anany; W. Chen; R. Pelton; M. W. Griffiths

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cellulosic Biofuels and the Road to Energy Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulosic Biofuels and the Road to Energy Security ... And we badly need some operating commercial scale cellulosic biofuel plants. ...

Bruce E. Dale

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Cellulose hydrogels prepared from micron-sized bamboo cellulose fibers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We demonstrated for the first time that dimensionally stable hydrogels could be obtained from bamboo pulp fibers through dialysis against distilled water followed by a short time of ultrasonic treatment. Micron-sized short fibers rather than cellulose nanofibrils constituted the majority of fibers in the hydrogels. During the pulping process with HNO3 and KClO3, carboxylic groups could be introduced to cellulose due to the mild oxidation of hydroxyl groups. When presented in aqueous NaOH, the carboxylic groups could be converted into their sodium salt form. The subsequent dialysis treatment against water made the negatively charged COO? groups extensively exposed. The negatively charged cellulose fibers could induce considerable electrostatic repulsion between them, which was discovered to govern the formation of hydrogels. In addition, it was revealed that homogeneous hydrogels could be formed when the pH was at 7, 9 and 11. However, when salt was added, no dimensionally stable hydrogel was obtained.

Xiaofang Zhang; Yaru Wang; Canhui Lu; Wei Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

26 January 1983 research-article Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass [and Discussion...of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuel, ethanol. Within the scope of this objective...maximize the conversion efficiency of ethanol production from biomass. This can be...

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass [and Discussion] D. I. C. Wang G...microbiological conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuel, ethanol. Within the...efficiency of ethanol production from biomass. This can be achieved through the effective...

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cellulosic ethanol Cellulosic ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Cellethanol.jpg Cellulosic ethanol is identical to first generation bio ethanol except that it can be derived from agricultural residues, other lignocellulosic raw materials or energy crops. These lignocellulosic raw materials are more widely available than the standard material used for ethanol. They are also considered to be more sustainable, however they need to be broken down (hydrolysed) into simple sugars prior to distillation, a much more complex process than the first generation bioethanol. It first must go through pretreatment,hydrolysis then a conversion. Research since the 1970s and large investments are being made in the US and Europe to speed up development of this route to bioethanol. Biomass refineries like Inbicon in Denmark are producing

131

Waste Tank Safety Program. Annual status report for FY 1993, Task 3: Organic chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This task supports the tank-vapor project, mainly by providing organic analytical support and by analyzing Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) vapor-space samples, collected via SUMMA{trademark} canisters, by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (MS). In the absence of receiving tank-vapor samples, we have focused our efforts toward validating the normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) sampling and analysis methods and preparing the SUMMA{trademark} laboratory. All required milestones were met, including a report on the update of phase I sampling and analysis on August 15, 1993. This update described the work involved in preparing to analyze phase I samples (Appendix A). This report describes the analytical support provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL){sup (a)} to the Hanford Tank Safety Vapor Program.

Lucke, R.B.; Clauss, T.T.W.; Hoheimer, R.; Goheen, S.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Complete Genome Sequence of the Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Cellulosilyticum lentocellum  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosilyticum lentocellum DSM 5427 is an anaerobic, endospore-forming member of the Firmicutes. We describe the complete genome sequence of this cellulose-degrading bacterium; originally isolated from estuarine sediment of a river that received both domestic and paper mill waste. Comparative genomics of cellulolytic clostridia will provide insight into factors that influence degradation rates.

Miller, David A [Cornell University; Suen, Garret [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Fox, Brian G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Angert, Esther R. [Cornell University; Currie, Cameron [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

134

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance, ethanol and cellulose hydrolysis measurementsSimultaneous ethanol fermentation and cellulose hydrolysisand fermentation of cellulose to ethanol. Appl. Environ.

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

argentine organizations: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing...

136

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

137

Purification of aqueous cellulose ethers  

SciTech Connect

Manufacture of cellulose ethers usually involves high amounts of salt by-products. For application of the product, salt must be removed. In this work, we have studied the injection of high-pressure CO{sub 2} into an aqueous polymer-salt solution; we find that upon addition of isopropanol in addition to CO{sub 2}, the solution separates into two phases. One phase is rich in polymer and water, and the other phase contains mostly isopropanol, water and CO{sub 2}. The salt distributes between the two phases, thereby offering interesting possibilities for development of a new purification process for water-soluble polymers. This work presents experimental phase-equilibrium data for hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose with sodium acetate and potassium sulfate, respectively, in the region 40{degree}C and 30 to 80 bar. Based on these data, we suggest a process for the manufacture and purification of water-soluble cellulose ethers. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Bartscherer, K.A.; de Pablo, J.J.; Bonnin, M.C.; Prausnitz, J.M.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Myers, Michele D. (Dacono, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect

This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the direct evaporator. A testbed was constructed and the prototype demonstrated at the GE GRC Niskayuna facility.

Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organic Rankine cycle waste heat power conversion system. ”Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat Recovery. ” Journal ofRankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing Processes. ”

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Catalytic transformation of cellulose into platform chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conversion of biomass to renewable and valuable chemicals has attracted global interest in order to build up sustainable societies. Cellulose is the most abundant and non-food biomass; however, the low reactivity of cellulose has prevented its use in chemical industry except for the paper manufacturing. The heterogeneous catalysis for the conversion of cellulose has been expected to overcome this issue, because various types of heterogeneous catalysts can be designed and applied in a wide range of reaction conditions. Furthermore, solid catalysts are easily recovered and reused. In this review article, we show the present situation and perspective of heterogeneous catalysis for the transformation of cellulose into useful platform chemicals.

Mizuho Yabushita; Hirokazu Kobayashi; Atsushi Fukuoka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Accelerated Cellulose Depolymerization Catalyzed by Paired Metal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depolymerization Catalyzed by Paired Metal Chlorides in Ionic Liquid Solvent. Accelerated Cellulose Depolymerization Catalyzed by Paired Metal Chlorides in Ionic Liquid...

145

Influence of Coal Ash/Organic Waste Application on Distribution of Trace Metals in Soil, Plant, and Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was conducted to evaluate effects of coal ash mixture (coal ash, biosolids and yard waste compost ratio of ... fruits, and its leaching potential into groundwater. Coal ash mixture was applied at rates...

Yuncong Li; Min Zhang; Peter Stoffella; Zhenli He…

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Print Organization Print 2012-12 org chart A complete ALS organization chart (June 2013) is available in PDF. Appointed and elected members of advisory panels provide guidance to Berkeley Lab and ALS management in developing the ALS scientific and user programs. ALS Staff Photo staff photo thumb Click on the image to see a recent photo of ALS staff in front of the dome. The photo was taken on May 14, 2013. ALS Management and Advisory Team Steve Kevan, Deputy Division Director, Science Michael J. Banda, Deputy Division Director, Operations Robert W. Schoenlein, Senior Staff Scientist, Next Generation Light Source Initiative Janos Kirz, Scientific Advisor Paul Adams, Division Deputy for Biosciences ALS Scientific, Technical, and User Support Groups Accelerator Physics

147

Inverse Temperature-Dependent Pathway of Cellulose Decrystallization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

unchanged after the dimer diffused into the cellulose matrix. On the other hand, the rate of TFA penetration into the cellulose matrix was greatly retarded at higher...

148

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes for cellulosic biomass conversion are commercial •and advances in biomass conversion technologies forenhance conversion and extend impact of cellulosic biomass

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA) Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Single-step conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single-step conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a versatileplatform chemical. Single-step conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a...

151

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of glucose from cellulose Projected Cellulosic Ethanol CostsEthanol Research • Improve the understanding of biomass fractionation, pretreatment, and cellulosecellulose to glucose, and ferment all sugars Ethanol

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

153

The mathematical modelling of biomethane production and the growth of methanogenic bacteria in batch reactor systems fed with organic municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model was developed and validated for an anaerobic digestion system of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes (OFMSWs) by using a laboratory-scale system of two Packed Bed Reactors (PBRs). The equations were obtained by the mass balances of methanogenic bacteria of affluent and effluent lixiviated, as well as the interior in each reactor. The methane rate was obtained by multiplying the methanogenic activity. A differential equation was fitted with experimental results to obtain the parameters that best describe methanogenic behaviour. These kinetic parameters were used with the modified logistic equation with the special case n = 1.

Liliana Alzate-Gaviria; Antonino Perez-Hernandez; Hector M. Poggi-Varaldo; P.J. Sebastian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption Fuel consisting of cellulosic biofuel or a blend of gasoline and cellulosic

155

Definition: Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Cellulosic ethanol An advanced type of biofuel that is produced by breaking down and using the cellulose compound found in trees and grasses.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel produced from wood, grasses, or the inedible parts of plants. It is a type of biofuel produced from lignocellulose, a structural material that comprises much of the mass of plants. Lignocellulose is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Corn stover, Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), Miscanthus grass species, wood chips and the byproducts of lawn and tree maintenance are some of the more popular cellulosic materials for ethanol production. Production of ethanol from lignocellulose has the advantage of abundant and

156

Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reaction Mechanisms in Reaction Mechanisms in Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review. - - pacific N o r t h ~ ~ ~ , baboratwies I - - bCL-T-,,;, .,- , . . . I ' I . - " 1- jl,! # . .' , . - --h 1 , i b - . "I 1.- . . ., .. ' N O T - I C E , , If PACIF tC NORTHWLST U B O R A T ~ R Y .4peiild by B h m E far c h t ,EP4ERGY RESEARCH AN0 PEVELOPMEM ADMtNlSTRAnQN U m h Contract Z Y - ~ ~ - C ~ & I # D w n : m a , m & l 3 Q j l m OIdrfrn m y - !*? 1SI71Y9 1 - m-u3 2s-m .**-2?3 ,Sbca lcPa w m *a0 Iffy &a It- w-% w w @.a SlO.0 m u 6 REACTION MECHANISMS IN CELLULOSE PYROLYSIS A LITERATURE REVIEW by Peter M. Molton T.F. Demmitt Chemical Technology Department BATTELLE Pacific Northwest Laboratories Richland, Washington 99352 CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L I S T OF F I G U R E S iii L I S T O F T A B L E S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i v . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . INTRODUCTION 1

157

Phase II Nuclide Partition Laboratory Study Influence of Cellulose Degradation Products on the Transport of Nuclides from SRS Shallow Land Burial Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Degradation products of cellulosic materials (e.g., paper and wood products) can significantly influence the subsurface transport of metals and radionuclides. Codisposal of radionuclides with cellulosic materials in the E-Area slit trenches at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is, therefore, expected to influence nuclide fate and transport in the subsurface. Due to the complexities of these systems and the scarcity of site-specific data, the effects of cellulose waste loading and its subsequent influence on nuclide transport are not well established.

Serkiz, S.M.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

159

Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility  

SciTech Connect

The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: Cellulose, ethanol, biofuel, Clostridiumincreases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrassincreases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cellulose- and Xylan-Degrading Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacteria from Biocompost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to utilize both cellulose and xylan, including strains of Clostridium...species reported to utilize xylan, and the rate of cellulose...able to degrade cellulose, xylan, and their mixture with the...locations 40 to 50 cm below the surface and temperatures ranging from...

M. V. Sizova; J. A. Izquierdo; N. S. Panikov; L. R. Lynd

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

Johnson, B.M.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

Johnson, Bruce M. (Bend, OR)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

141 Open ORC Systemfor Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorof an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ect of working ?uids on organic Rankine cycle for waste heatof such devices. Organic Rankine cycles and Stirling engines

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL underBioconversion of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol, LBL-of Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation (with

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation." Reportand Continuous Cellulose Hydrolysis with and without EthanolLindsey. CELLULOSE BIOCONVERSION TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL

Wilke, C.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation." ReportOf Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol I Charles R. WilkeBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL CharlesBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL Charlesof Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Lawrence Berkeley

Wilke, Charles R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioconversion of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol." (JuneBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL CharlesBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL Charles

Wilke, Charles R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethanol-production from cellobiose, amorphous cellulose, andsugars into ethanol. hemicellulose and cellulose by hydro-ethanol has been improving the technology for hydro- lysis of recalcitrant cellulose,

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with either enzyme or cellulose, III, ETHANOL FERMENTATIONof Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Progress Report,of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Progress Report,

Wilke, Charles R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL underof Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation, withCandidate. CELLULOSE BIOCONVERSION TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

High-Temperature Enzymatic Breakdown of Cellulose  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Materiais, Campinas/SP, Brazil. Supplemental material...friends at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for...funded by Department of Energy awards 06103-OKL and...Cellulose is an abundant and renewable biopolymer that can be...

Hongliang Wang; Fabio Squina; Fernando Segato; Andrew Mort; David Lee; Kirk Pappan; Rolf Prade

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Flocculation of microfibrillated cellulose in shear flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, the rheological properties of microfibrillated cellulose suspensions under stepped flow and constant shear were studied using a combination of rotational dynamic rheometer and digital imaging. Du...

Anni Karppinen; Tapio Saarinen; Juha Salmela; Antti Laukkanen…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cellulose biosynthesis and function in bacteria.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for obtaining enhanced or reduced expres- sion by genetic engineering; as mentioned above, the genes for cellulose synthesis reside...food stabilizers (102a), and acoustic diaphragms for audio instruments (80a). Eventually, the wide availability of...

P Ross; R Mayer; M Benziman

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Time-resolved X-ray diffraction microprobe studies of the conversion of cellulose I to ethylenediamine-cellulose I  

SciTech Connect

Structural changes during the treatment of films of highly crystalline microfibers of Cladophora cellulose with ethylenediamine (EDA) have been studied by time-resolved X-ray microprobe diffraction methods. As EDA penetrates the sample and converts cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I, the measured profile widths of reflections reveal changes in the shapes and average dimensions of cellulose I and EDA-cellulose I crystals. The (200) direction of cellulose I is most resistant to EDA penetration, with EDA penetrating most effectively at the hydrophilic edges of the hydrogen bonded sheets of cellulose chains. Most of the cellulose chains in the initial crystals of cellulose I are incorporated into crystals of EDA-cellulose I. The size of the emerging EDA-cellulose I crystals is limited to about half of their size in cellulose I, most likely due to strains introduced by the penetration of EDA molecules. There is no evidence of any gradual structural transition from cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I involving a continuously changing intermediate phase. Rather, the results point to a rapid transition to EDA-cellulose I in regions of the microfibrils that have been penetrated by EDA.

Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Wada, Masahisa; Hanson, B. Leif; Langan, Paul (Toledo); (U of Tokyo); (CNRS-CRMD); (LANL)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

179

The distribution and biomagnification of higher brominated \\{BDEs\\} in terrestrial organisms affected by a typical e-waste burning site in South China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Soil, vegetation, and several terrestrial species including turtledove, chicken, goose, grasshopper, dragonfly, butterfly and ant, were collected from an area surrounding a typical e-waste burning site in South China. The samples were examined to investigate the levels, congener profiles, and biomagnification extent of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) that may be present in the environment as a result of the e-waste, which was processed in a crude recycling style. Elevated levels of ?21PBDEs were found in the biota (101–4725 ng g?1 lipid weight (lw)), vegetation leaf (82.9–319 ng g?1 dry weight (dw)) and soil samples (5.2–22 110 ng g?1 dw), indicating that PBDE contamination in the samples collected from the e-waste burning site may pose risks to the local terrestrial ecosystem and local populations. Higher BDE congeners, especially deca-BDE (BDE-209) were the dominant homologs in organisms and nonbiological matrices, followed by nona-BDE and octa-BDE. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) were calculated as the ratio of the lipid-normalized concentration in the predator to that in the prey. The highest BMF (3.4) was determined for BDE-153 in the grasshopper/turtledove food chain. Other higher brominated congeners, such as BDE-202, -203, -154, -183 and -209, were also biomagnified in the terrestrial food chain with \\{BMFs\\} of 1.7–3.3. BDE-47, -100, and -99 were not biomagnified in the examined food chains (BMFs < 1), which suggests that bioaccumulation and biotransformation of \\{PBDEs\\} in terrestrial ecosystems could be distinguished from those in aquatic ecosystems.

Zhiqiang Nie; Shulei Tian; Yajun Tian; Zhenwu Tang; Yi Tao; Qingqi Die; Yanyan Fang; Jie He; Qi Wang; Qifei Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Soluble arsenic and selenium species in fly ash/organic waste-amended soils using ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Mixing coal fly ash with an organic waste increases macronutrient content and may make land application of fly ash a viable disposal alternative. However, trace element chemistry of these mixed waste products warrants investigation. Speciation of As and Se in soil solutions of fly ash-, poultry litter- and sewage sludge-amended soils was determined over a 10-day period by ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). Detection limits were 0.031, 0.028, 0.051, 0.161, 0.497, and 0.660 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1} for dimethylarsinate (DMA), As(III), monomethylarsonate (MMA), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI), respectively. Arsenic was highly water-soluble from poultry litter and appeared to be predominantly As(V). Arsenic(V) was the predominant species in soil amended with two fly ashes. Application of fly ash/poultry litter mixtures increased As solubility and led to the prevalence of DMA as the major As species. DMA concentrations of these soil solutions decreased rapidly over the sampling period relative to As(V), suggesting that DMA readily underwent mineralization in the soil solution. Se(VI) was the predominant soluble Se species in all treatments indicating rapid oxidation of Se(IV) initially solubilized from the fly ashes.

Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences] [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit A qualified investor may receive a tax credit of up to 40% of an

183

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit A tax credit is available for investments in a qualified small business

184

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing The Kansas Development Finance Authority may issue revenue bonds to cover

185

New Insights into Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions in Cellulose  

SciTech Connect

In this quantum chemical study, we explore hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) and stacking interactions in different crystalline cellulose allomorphs, namely cellulose I and cellulose IIII. We consider a model system representing a cellulose crystalline core, made from six cellobiose units arranged in three layers with two chains per layer. We calculate the contributions of intrasheet and intersheet interactions to the structure and stability in both cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores. Reference structures for this study were generated from molecular dynamics simulations of water-solvated cellulose I and IIII fibrils. A systematic analysis of various conformations describing different mutual orientations of cellobiose units is performed using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) with the M06-2X with 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. We dissect the nature of the forces that stabilize the cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores and quantify the relative strength of H-bonding and stacking interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that individual H-bonding interactions are stronger in cellulose I than in cellulose IIII. We also observe a significant contribution from cooperative stacking interactions to the stabilization of cellulose I . In addition, the theory of atoms-in-molecules (AIM) has been employed to characterize and quantify these intermolecular interactions. AIM analyses highlight the role of nonconventional CH O H-bonding in the cellulose assemblies. Finally, we calculate molecular electrostatic potential maps for the cellulose allomorphs that capture the differences in chemical reactivity of the systems considered in our study.

Langan, Paul [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams  

SciTech Connect

Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

Rapp, F., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT (Germany); Elsner, P., E-mail: peter.elsner@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT, Germany and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Application guide for waste heat recovery with organic Rankine cycle equipment. Final report May-Dec 82  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed; also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle RandD.

Moynihan, P.I.

1983-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

MICROÖRGANISMS CONCERNED IN THE DECOMPOSITION OF CELLULOSES IN THE SOIL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1886 ttber garung der Cellulose mit Bildung von Methan und Kohlensiiure. Ztshr. physiol. Chem., 10...OMELIANSKI, W. 1904(a) Ueber die Trennung der Wasserstoff- und Methan- garung der Cellulose. Centrbl. Bakt., 2 Abt...

Selman A. Waksman; C. E. Skinner

1926-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material Erin Baker Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty; Environmental policy 2 #12;1 Introduction This paper contains supplementary material for "Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

190

Electric Field Alignment of Cellulose Based-Polymer Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulose whiskers (CWs) obtained from naturally occuring cellulose are nano-inclusions which show a lot of promise as mechanical reinforcements in polymers. Typically, a relatively high content is added to realize improvement in effective...

Kalidindi, Sanjay Varma

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

191

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorand Simulation of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System forControl of Organic Rankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Simulation studies of the insolubility of cellulose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Simulation studies of the insolubility of cellulose Malin Bergenstråhle a , Jakob Wohlert a, , Michael E. Himmel b , John W. Brady a, * a Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States b National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401-3393, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 4 February 2010 Received in revised form 5 June 2010 Accepted 25 June 2010 Available online 6 July 2010 Keywords: Cellulase Cellobiohydrolase I Cellulose Computer modeling Molecular dynamics a b s t r a c t Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate the potentials of mean force for separating short cellooligomers in aqueous solution as a means of estimating the contributions of hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonding to the insolubility of crystalline cellulose. A series of four potential of mean force (pmf) calculations

193

Why sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? Amanita thiersii is a white, sticky mushroom that obtains its carbon by decomposing grasses, playing a role in the terrestrial carbon cycle. The fungus is commonly found in grasslands throughout the central United States and grows in grassy areas away from trees, often seen on lawns after the rain. By sequencing A. thiersii's genome, researchers hope increase the list of fungi that might provide enzymes that can be used to commercialize the production of cellulosic biofuel, which falls in with the U.S. Department of Energy's mission to develop clean energy, by potentially offering a more cost-effective method of breaking down lignocellulose in plant cell walls. Because the fungus is found in regions where the biomass is high in

194

Transitions in biofuel technologies: An appraisal of the social impacts of cellulosic ethanol using the Delphi method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The sustainability of biofuels produced from food crops has become a focus of public and scientific scrutiny in the past few years. In the case of ethanol production, advanced technologies aim at avoiding controversy by using instead cellulosic biomass contained in wastes, residues and dedicated energy crops. However, despite the positive expectations that drive the development of the so-called “cellulosic” ethanol, sustainability challenges remain to be elucidated. Expecting to contribute to closing the gap in the field of the social assessment of biofuels, this paper reports and analyses the results of a Delphi survey that explored the perception of biofuel experts from different countries on potential social impacts of cellulosic ethanol. The complexity of appraising impacts emerges as one important conclusion of the study along with the realisation that these will be context-specific. Except for the case of municipal solid waste used as feedstock, such a technological transition might not be able to ameliorate the issues already faced by conventional ethanol, especially when production is based in poorer countries. This is because impacts of cellulosic ethanol depend upon both the technical dimension of its production and the socio-political context of locations where production might take place.

Barbara E. Ribeiro; Miguel A. Quintanilla

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effects of Mine Waste Contamination on Fish and Wildlife Habitat at Multiple Levels of Biological Organization in the Methow River, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

A three-year multidisciplinary study was conducted on the relationship between mine waste contamination and the effects on aquatic and terrestrial habitats in the Methow River below abandoned mines near Twisp in Okanogan County, Washington (U.S.A.). Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to study potentially impacted sites. Although the dissolved metal content of water in the Methow River was below the limits of detection, eleven chemicals of potential environmental concern were identified in the tailings, mine effluents, groundwater, streamwater and sediments (Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn). The potential for ecosystem level impacts was reflected in the risk of contamination in the mine waste to communities and populations that are valued for their functional properties related to energy storage and nutrient cycling. Dissolved and sediment metal contamination changed the benthic insect community structure in a tributary of the Methow River below Alder Mine, and at the population level, caddisfly larval development in the Methow River was delayed. Arsenic accumulation in bear hair and Cd in fish liver suggest top predators are effected. In situ exposure of juvenile triploid trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to conditions at the downstream site resulted in reduced growth and increased mortality among exposed individuals. Histopathological studies of their tissues revealed extensive glycogen inclusions suggesting food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body. Subcellular observations revealed mitochondrial changes including a decrease in the number and increase in the size of electron-dense metrical granules, the presence of glycogen bodies in the cytoplasm, and glycogen nuclei in exposed trout hepatocytes, which are signs that Type IV Glycogen Storage disease is occurring. GSD IV is caused by either a deficiency or inactivation of the glycogen branching enzyme that results in the synthesis of an abnormal glycogen molecule that is insoluble and has decreased branch points and increased chain length. These results show that the effects of mine waste contaminants can be expressed at all levels of organization from molecular to ecosystem-level responses.

Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin Containing Substrates Bin Yang cellulose and solids containing 56% cellulose and 28% lignin from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn of cellulase and particularly beta-glucosidase on lignin. Of particular note, BSA treatment of pretreated corn

California at Riverside, University of

197

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

198

Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

Woodward, J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered.

Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Waste generator services implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pump targets hydrogen risk in nuclear waste tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pump targets hydrogen risk in nuclear waste tank ... Researchers believe that thermal and radiolytic breakdown of organic compounds in the tank's wastes produces the hydrogen. ...

DEBORAH ILLMAN

1993-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hawaii Permit Application for Solid Waste Management Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to receive a permit for a solid waste management facility. Form Type CertificateForm of Completion Form Topic Permit Application for Solid Waste Management Facility Organization...

203

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Microbial Cellulose Utilization: Fundamentals and Biotechnology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology ARTICLE REVIEWS Microbial Cellulose...utilization in natural environments is further enhanced...and comprehensive reviews address this large...and the research literature primarily as an...process engineering literature to refer to a process...a comprehensive review of the pretreatment...

Lee R. Lynd; Paul J. Weimer; Willem H. van Zyl; Isak S. Pretorius

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thermal degradation of cellulose in alkali  

SciTech Connect

Biomass in an alkaline aqueous slurry can be liquefied by heat and pressure. Understanding the mechanisms of biomass liquefaction to improve the efficiency of converting biomass to useful products, particularly chemicals and synthetic fuels is discussed. To study the chemical mechanisms of this process, pure cellulose, the main component of biomass, was liquefied. The 78 cellulose liquefaction products that were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry include polyols, furans, ketones, hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds. Polyols may be formed by hydrogenolytic cleavage. Furans an cyclic ketones may be cyclization products of dicarbonyl intermediates formed by aldol condensation of small initial degradation products such as acetone and acrolein. Several of these small carbonyl compounds were used as model compounds to test proposed mechanisms for furans and cyclic ketones and obtained products supporting five of the mechanisms. For the best case of 26 cellulose liquefaction experiments, 34% of the initial mass of the cellulose was converted to acetone-soluble oil with a heat of combustion of 14,000 Btu/lb.

Miller, R.K.; Molton, P.M.; Russell, J.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Biochemistry of Cellulose and Related Polysaccharides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... cereal grains are important in the germination process3. Thus oat glucan is located on the surface of the kernel, and during germination, it has been suggested, it is dissolved ... cellulose arise by resynthesis of fragmented glucose molecules. Similar experiments have been extended to the xylan of the wheat plant by Altermatt and Neish10. The results suggest that the xylose ...

B. A. STONE

1958-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

209

Cellulose-Bound Magnesium Diboride Superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulose-Bound Magnesium Diboride Superconductivity Y.L. Lin and M.O. Pekguleryuz Department Canada Abstract--Two-phase superconductor tapes were produced by blending high purity magnesium diboride junctions. I. INTRODUCTION Magnesium diboride was found to be superconducting in 2001 by Nagamatsu et al. [1

Ryan, Dominic

210

Compositions for enhancing hydroysis of cellulosic material by cellulolytic enzyme compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to compositions comprising a GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and an organic compound comprising a carboxylic acid moiety, a lactone moiety, a phenolic moiety, a flavonoid moiety, or a combination thereof, wherein the combination of the GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and the organic compound enhances hydrolysis of a cellulosic material by a cellulolytic enzyme compared to the GH61 polypeptide alone or the organic compound alone. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Johansen, Katja Salomon

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Development and experimental study on organic Rankine cycle system with single-screw expander for waste heat recovery from exhaust of diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A single-screw expander with 155 mm diameter screw has been developed. A spiral-tube type evaporator and an aluminum multi-channel parallel type condenser have also been developed with weight of 147 kg and 78 kg, respectively. Based on the development of above components, an ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system prototype was assembled and tested for waste heat recovery from diesel engine exhaust. An experimental system was built for this ORC system, and experiments were conducted for different expander torque and diesel engine loads. Influences of expander torque and diesel engine loads on the performances of ORC system were studied. The results indicated that the maximum of the power output is 10.38 kW and the biggest ORC efficiency and overall system efficiency are respectively 6.48% and 43.8%, which are achieved at 250 kW of diesel engine output. Meanwhile the biggest improvement of overall system efficiency is 1.53%. The maximums of volume efficiency, adiabatic efficiency and total efficiency of single-screw expander are 90.73%, 73.25% and 57.88%, respectively.

Ye-Qiang Zhang; Yu-Ting Wu; Guo-Dong Xia; Chong-Fang Ma; Wei-Ning Ji; Shan-Wei Liu; Kai Yang; Fu-Bin Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Conceptual structure and computational organization of the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This presentation describes the overall conceptual structure and computational organization of the 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository carried out by the DOE in support of a licensing application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The following topics are addressed: (i) regulatory background, (ii) the three basic entities underlying a PA, (iii) determination of expected, mean and median dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository, (iv) the relationship between probability, sets and scenario classes, (v) scenario classes and the characterization of aleatory uncertainty, (vi) scenario classes and the determination of expected dose to the RMEI, (vii) analysis decomposition, (viii) disjoint and nondisjoint scenario classes, (ix) scenario classes and the NRC’s YM review plan, (x) characterization of epistemic uncertainty, and (xi) adequacy of Latin hypercube sample size used in the propagation of epistemic uncertainty. This article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA and is intended as an introduction to following articles in the issue that provide additional analysis details and specific analysis results.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use  

SciTech Connect

Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP contract requirements. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization oftank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste-loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

PILOT PLANT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JUNE 30, 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioconversion of Cellulose to Ethanol" to the Professionaland produce ethanol directly from cellulose. The methodof Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation." ,.l

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by an engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by anKeywords: cellulose, cellulosome, ethanol, yeast,growth and ethanol production from cellulose. However,

Goyal, Garima; Tsai, Shen-Long; Madan, Bhawna; DaSilva, Nancy A; Chen, Wilfred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Fabrication and characterization of nanofibrillated cellulose and its aerogels from natural pine needles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To obtain the nanofibriled cellulose from natural pine needles, a combination of chemical pretreatments and subsequently ultrasonic treatments was employed for removing the hemicelluloses and lignins and splitting the bundled cellulose into pine needle nanofibres. Using SEM and diameter distribution method, it was confirmed that the obtained pine needle nanofibres had a narrow diameter from 30-70 nm. The crystalline type of the pine needle nanofibres was the cellulose I type. The crystallinity reached 66.19%, which was increased by 7.61% as compared with the raw material pine needles. The TGA and DTG results showed that the degradation temperature of the nanofibres was increased to approximately 267 °C and 352 °C compared with 221 °C and 343 °C of the raw material fibres, respectively. Furthermore, the highly flexible and ultralight pine needle nanofibres aerogels were prepared from the aqueous pine needle nanofibres solution using the freezing-drying technique. Aerogels were studied by SEM observation and nitrogen gas adsorption. The mechanical properties were measured in compression for aerogels. This study provides a new opportunity to fabricate novel nanomaterials from waste biomass materials, which is crucial for the fully utilising of abundant biomass resources.

Shaoliang Xiao; Runan Gao; Yun Lu; Jian Li; Qingfeng Sun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fiberous and other waste materials from textile production. The use of recyclable materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass fiber wastes, and waste dusts for use in textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials are considered. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A revised structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II from a neutron fiber diffraction analysis  

SciTech Connect

The crystal and molecular structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II have been revised using new neutron diffraction data extending to 1.2 {angstrom} resolution collected from two highly crystalline fiber samples of mercerized flax. Mercerization was achieved in NaOH/H{sub 2}O for one sample and in NaOD/D{sub 2}O for the other, corresponding to the labile hydroxymethyl moieties being hydrogenated and deuterated, respectively. Fourier difference maps were calculated in which neutron difference amplitudes were combined with phases calculated from two revised X-ray models of cellulose II. The revised phasing models were determined by refinement against the X-ray data set of Kolpak and Blackwell, using the LALS methodology. Both models have two antiparallel chains organized in a P2{sub 1} space group and unit cell parameters: a = 8.01 {angstrom}, b = 9.04 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, and {gamma} = 117.1{degree}. One has equivalent backbone conformations for both chains but different conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties: gt for the origin chain and tg for the center chain. The second model based on the recent crystal structures of cellotetraose, has different conformations for the two chains but nearly equivalent conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties. On the basis of the X-ray data alone, the models could not be differentiated. From the neutron Fourier difference maps, possible labile hydrogen atom positions were identified for each model and refined using LALS. The second model is significantly different from previous proposals based on the crystal structures of cellotetraose, MD simulations of cellulose II, and any potential hydrogen-bonding network in the structure of cellulose II determined in earlier X-ray fiber diffraction studies. The exact localization of the labile hydrogen atoms involved in this bonding, together with their donor and acceptor characteristics, is presented and discussed. This study provides, for the first time, the coordinates of all of the atoms in cellulose II.

Langan, P.; Nishiyama, Y.; Chanzy, H.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulosic Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment Lee Lynd 1,2 and Mark Laser 1 1 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2.1 Our Place in History The two most profound societal transformations in history have been spawned by radical shifts in human- kind's use of natural resources. The agricultural revolution, which spanned about two millennia beginning around 4000 BC, saw hunter-gatherer societies subsisting on wild plants and animals being largely dis- placed by those cultivating the land to produce crops and domesticated livestock. The industrial revolution followed, beginning around 1700 and lasting roughly two hundred years, during which time preindustrial agricultural societies gave way to those harnessing precious metals and fossil energy to develop sophisti- cated economies centered

223

Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

Trzcinski, Antoine P., E-mail: a.trzcinski05@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stuckey, David C., E-mail: d.stuckey@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

2011-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The discourse of democracy in Canadian nuclear waste management policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Canadian nuclear waste management policy has taken a deliberative democratic turn. What ... identify limitations in this turn by evaluating the Nuclear Waste Management Organization’s subsequent consultation proc...

Genevieve Fuji Johnson

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale SustainableHydrogen Batteries Nuclear By Lee Lynd, Dartmouth Ethanol •Ethanol, ethyl alcohol, fermentation ethanol, or just “

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis. Abstract: Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining...

230

The Journey to Commercializing Cellulosic Biofuels in the United States  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

In Hugoton, Kansas, a state-of-the-art biorefinery has begun producing 25 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol.

231

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

43% Hemicellulose 27% Lignin 17% Other 13% Agricultural45% Hemicellulose 25% Lignin 22% Extractives 5% Ash3% Woody Crops Ash 15% Lignin 10% Cellulose Hemicellulose 9%

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Structures of cellulose acetate membranes for reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies under the scanning electron microscope have shown that the cellulose acetate membranes used for reverse osmosis are high-molecular-weight condensation structures of...

I. N. Vlodavets; G. Z. Nefedova…

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol At the February 12, 2009 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Andy Aden (National Renewable...

234

Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC). Scientists are investigating the unique properties of crystalline cellulose...

235

Phase Transitions in Cellulose Microfibril Dispersions by High-Energy Mechanical Deagglomeration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase Transitions in Cellulose Microfibril Dispersions by High-Energy Mechanical Deagglomeration ... This is achieved by applying high-energy mechanical deagglomeration to bacterial cellulose (BC) networks in the presence of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). ...

Sandra J. Veen; Anke Kuijk; Peter Versluis; Henk Husken; Krassimir P. Velikov

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JAN. 31, 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioconversion Of Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol CharlesBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under

Wilke, C.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EthanolOf Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol I Charles R. WilkeCELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of U.S.

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Synthesis of ?-Cyclodextrin Functionalized Cellulose Nanocrystals and Their Interactions with Amphiphilic Compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) obtained from acid hydrolysis of cellulose fibres has attracted enormous interests due to its large surface area, high negative surface charge density,… (more)

Zhang, Feifei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

UTILIZATION OF IMMOBILIZED B-GLUCOSIDASE IN THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enzymatic conversion of cellulose to ethanol. Reprinted frombetween the cellulose hydrolysis and ethanol fer- mentationcellulose to glucose in order to ferment the glucose to ethanol

Isaacs, S.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Coarse-grained model for the interconversion between different crystalline cellulose allomorphs  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of Langevin dynamics simulations on a coarse grained model for crystalline cellulose. In particular, we analyze two different cellulose crystalline forms: cellulose I (the natural form of cellulose) and cellulose IIII (obtained after cellulose I is treated with anhydrous liquid ammonia). Cellulose IIII has been the focus of wide interest in the field of cellulosic biofuels as it can be efficiently hydrolyzed to glucose (its enzymatic degradation rates are up to 5 fold higher than those of cellulose I ). In turn, glucose can eventually be fermented into fuels. The coarse-grained model presented in this study is based on a simplified geometry and on an effective potential mimicking the changes in both intracrystalline hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions during the transition from cellulose I to cellulose IIII. The model accurately reproduces both structural and thermomechanical properties of cellulose I and IIII. The work presented herein describes the structural transition from cellulose I to cellulose IIII as driven by the change in the equilibrium state of two degrees of freedom in the cellulose chains. The structural transition from cellulose I to cellulose IIII is essentially reduced to a search for optimal spatial arrangement of the cellulose chains.

Langan, Paul [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Wastes: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume Reduction  

SciTech Connect

I. To characterize the biodegradation of cellulosic materials using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. II. To develop an electrochemical/spectroscopic methodology to characterize TRU waste microbial transformation III. To develop molecular models of TRU complexes in order to understand microbial transformation In all cases, objectives are designed to compliment the efforts from other team members, and will be periodically coordinated through the lead P.I. at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), A.J. Francis.

Halada, Gary P.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion Rajeev Kumar degradation products, collectively termed as chars and/or pseudo-lignin. In order to understand the factors derived pseudo-lignin on cellulose conversion at the moderate to low enzyme loadings necessary

California at Riverside, University of

243

Hydration Control of the Mechanical and Dynamical Properties of Cellulose  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Loukas Petridis *†, Hugh M. O’Neill ‡§, Mariah Johnsen †?, Bingxin Fan ?, Roland Schulz †#, Eugene Mamontov ?, Janna Maranas ?, Paul Langan ‡§?, and Jeremy C. Smith †# ... sucrofermentans (ATCC 700178) in minimal media and purification of cellulose has been described previously. ... In vivo generated deuterated bacterial cellulose, cultivated from 100% deuterated glycerol in D2O medium, was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liq. ...

Loukas Petridis; Hugh M. O’Neill; Mariah Johnsen; Bingxin Fan; Roland Schulz; Eugene Mamontov; Janna Maranas; Paul Langan; Jeremy C. Smith

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose  

SciTech Connect

This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Integrated chemical/biological treatment of paint stripper mixed waste: Metals toxicity and separation  

SciTech Connect

The DOE complex has generated vast quantities of complex heterogeneous mixed wastes. Paint stripper waste (PSW) is a complex waste that arose from decontamination and decommissioning activities. It contains paint stripper, cheesecloth, cellulose-based paints with Pb and Cr, and suspect Pu. Los Alamos National Laboratory has 150--200 barrels of PSW and other national laboratories such as Rocky Flats Plant have many more barrels of heterogeneous waste. Few technologies exist that can treat this complex waste. Our approach to solving this problem is the integration of two established technologies: biodegradation and metals chelation.

Vanderberg-Twary, L.; Grumbine, R.K.; Foreman, T.; Hanners, J.L.; Brainard, J.R.; Sauer, N.N.; Unkefer, P.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking October 6, 2007 - 4:21pm Addthis SOPERTON, GA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today attended a groundbreaking ceremony for Range Fuels' biorefinery - one of the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol biorefineries - and made the following statement. "Together, the Department of Energy and private sector pioneers, such as Range Fuels, are blending science and technology to advance the President's goal of reducing our dependence on foreign oil," U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "The production of cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol is a significant part of America's energy future. This new

247

DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Place Itasca, Illinois Zip 60143 Product DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol is a joint venture to develop technologies for cellulosic ethanol. Coordinates 32.1666°, -97.154369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.1666,"lon":-97.154369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic 704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi SUMMARY ThIs EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a propsal, (Fulton Project) that consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery facility producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a patented concentrated acid hydrolysis process. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 4, 2010 EA-1704: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire

249

Physical properties of agave cellulose graft polymethyl methacrylate  

SciTech Connect

The grafting polymerization of methyl methacrylate and Agave cellulose was prepared and their structural analysis and morphology were investigated. The grafting reaction was carried out in an aqueous medium using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The structural analysis of the graft copolymers was carried out by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The graft copolymers were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). An additional peak at 1732 cm{sup ?1} which was attributed to the C=O of ester stretching vibration of poly(methyl methacrylate), appeared in the spectrum of grafted Agave cellulose. A slight decrease of crystallinity index upon grafting was found from 0.74 to 0.68 for cellulose and grafted Agave cellulose, respectively. Another evidence of grafting showed in the FESEM observation, where the surface of the grafted cellulose was found to be roughed than the raw one.

Rosli, Noor Afizah; Ahmad, Ishak; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Anuar, Farah Hannan [Polymer Research Centre (PORCE), School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

251

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a “nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

Surface-Configuration Change of CF4 Plasma Treated Cellulose and Cellulose Acetate by Interaction of Water with Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface-configuration change due to the change of contacting medium from (dry) air to liquid water and also from (dry) air to a high relative humidity air was investigated for cellulose and cellulose acetate. CF4 plasma treatment was used to tag the ...

Takeshi Yasuda; Tsumuko Okuno; Kaori Tsuji; Hirotsugu Yasuda

1996-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

254

Investigation of the organic matter in inactive nuclear tank liquids  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology for regulatory organics fails to account for the organic matter that is suggested by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) inactive nuclear waste-tank liquids and sludges. Identification and measurement of the total organics are needed to select appropriate waste treatment technologies. An initial investigation was made of the nature of the organics in several waste-tank liquids. This report details the analysis of ORNL wastes.

Schenley, R.L.; Griest, W.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Grand Opening for Project LIBERTY: Nation’s First Plant to Use Corn Waste as a Feedstock  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

POET-DSM’s Project LIBERTY in Emmetsburg, Iowa, will celebrate its grand opening September 3, 2014, becoming the first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plant to use corn waste as a feedstock. Developed through a joint venture between POET LLC in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and DSM Royal, a Dutch enzyme manufacturer, the project uses biochemical conversion technologies (yeast and enzymes) to convert cellulosic biomass into transportation fuels.

256

The Ethics of Nuclear Waste in Canada: Risks, Harms and Unfairness.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO)  – the crown corporation responsible for the long-term storage of nuclear fuel waste in Canada  – seeks to bury… (more)

Wilding, Ethan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Surface plasmon resonance imaging of the enzymatic degradation of cellulose microfibrils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and provide useful metrics of enzyme activity that are of relevance to the cellulosic ethanol industry. Introduction The degradation of cellulose by enzymes is a key step in the production of cellulosic ethanol.1 the production of cellulosic ethanol more economically viable, however this is challenging because

Dutcher, John

258

Discovery of Cellulose as a Smart Material Jaehwan Kim* and Sungryul Yun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discovery of Cellulose as a Smart Material Jaehwan Kim* and Sungryul Yun Center for EAPap Actuator in cellulose applications and technologies by reporting our discovery of cellulose as a smart material that can, however, the potential of cellulose as a smart lightweight material that can be used as a sensor

Ounaies, Zoubeida

259

Waste Disposition Update by Christine Gelles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Disposition Update Waste Disposition Update Christine Gelles Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management (EM-30) EM SSAB Chairs Meeting Washington, DC 2 October 2012 www.em.doe.gov 2 o Waste Stream Highlights o DOE Transportation Update o Greater Than Class C (GTCC) Low Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement o Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future o Nuclear Regulatory Commission's LLW Regulatory Initiatives Discussion Topics www.em.doe.gov 3 Waste Stream Highlights www.em.doe.gov 4 o Within current budget outlook, it is especially critical that EM ensures safe, reliable and cost effective disposition paths exist. o The program's refocused organization and the detailed

260

NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Author Proof A ARTICLE Cellulose Hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: II: Numerical Results and Analysis Wen Zhou, 1,2 Zhiqian Hao, 3 Ying Xu, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler 3 1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-2492; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 16 December 2008; revision received 13 March 2009; accepted 27 April 2009 Published online 12 May 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22388 ABSTRACT: Numerical simulation results are presented for a cellulose hydrolysis model which incorporates both the enzymatic glucan chain fragmentation kinetics and the hydrolytic

262

Author Proof A ARTICLE Cellulose Hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I: I: A General Modeling Formalism Wen Zhou, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler, 3 Zhiqian Hao, 3 Ying Xu 1,2 1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennassee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 16 December 2008; revision received 13 March 2009; accepted 27 April 2009 Published online 8 May 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22389 ABSTRACT: We develop a general framework for a realistic rate equation modeling of cellulose hydrolysis using non- complexed cellulase. Our proposed formalism, for the first time, takes

263

Carbohydrate derivedpseudolignin can retard cellulose biological conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbohydrate Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion Rajeev Kumar, 1,2,3 Fan Hu, 3,4 Poulomi Sannigrahi, 3,4 Seokwon Jung, 3,4 Arthur J. Ragauskas, 3,4 Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, California 92507; telephone: 951-781-5668; fax: 951-781-5790; e-mail: rajeev.dartmouth@gmail.com 2 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, 446 Winston Chung Hall, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, California 92507 3 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6422 4 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT: Dilute acid as well as water only (hydrother- mal) pretreatments often lead to a significant

264

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

2 - Radioactive waste (RAW) categories, characterization and processing route selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The principal approach to radioactive waste management is to transform ‘as generated’ waste to a waste package suitable for safe long-term storage or ultimate disposal. A waste characterization system allows an assessment of the potential risks connected with waste handling and disposal and also allows the waste to be classified into groups (streams) according to their properties and projected processing routes. A properly selected waste classification system also enables the selection of the proper processing technology for each class of waste, tailored to waste volume, properties and available technologies in each country or waste processing organization. Long-term safe disposal of processed waste is a basic requirement of all waste classification and waste processing schemes discussed in this chapter.

R. Burcl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Modifying cellulose fibers by adsorption/precipitation of xylan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Xylan was precipitated on bleached and unbleached softwood ... more detailed information of the distribution of adsorbed xylan on cellulosic surfaces. The adsorption step was carried out at ... the beating degree...

Albrecht Miletzky; Manuel Punz; Armin Zankel; Sandra Schlader…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

28,000 vehicles off the road. The cellulosic ethanol produced at the Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas (ABBK) facility, located about 90 miles southwest of Dodge City, Kansas,...

268

Silicone rubber membrane bioreactors for bacterial cellulose production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulose production byAcetobacter pasteurianus...was investigated in static culture using four bioreactors with silicone rubber membrane submerged in the medium. The shape ... , flat sack, tube and cylindrical b...

Masayuki Onodera; Ikuro Harashima; Kiyoshi Toda…

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Chiral Plasmonic Films Formed by Gold Nanorods and Cellulose Nanocrystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chiral plasmonic films have been prepared by incorporating gold nanorods (NRs) in a macroscopic cholesteric film formed by self-assembled cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). Composite NR-CNC films revealed strong plasmonic chiroptical activity, dependent on ...

Ana Querejeta-Fernández; Grégory Chauve; Myriam Methot; Jean Bouchard; Eugenia Kumacheva

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hybrid Systems of Silver Nanoparticles Generated on Cellulose Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(4-7) For instance, polymer supported silver NPs at the moment are attracting much attention in biomedical applications, due to the antibacterial character, enabling their use in wound dressing materials, body wall repairs, tissue scaffolds, or even antimicrobial filters. ... (26) Recently, a cellulose acetate nanofibrillar aerogel structure with about 6 wt % loading content of Ag NPs was prepared. ... Graft copolymerization onto cellulose-based filter paper and its further development as silver nanoparticles loaded antibacterial food-packaging material ...

Ana Maria Ferraria; Sami Boufi; Nicolas Battaglini; Ana Maria Botelho do Rego; Manuel ReiVilar

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cellulose challenge: where do we go from here  

SciTech Connect

Because of its relatively low cost and high level of availability, wood has become a popular biomass resource for the manufacture of fuels and chemical products. The producers of high-purity cellulose pulps face problems because the kraft process which is the standard source of dissolving pulp involves huge investments. The article examines the future of this industry and assesses these new technologies: solvent pulping; low lignin biomass and microbial cellulose. 6 references.

Lipinsky, E.S.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hydroxypropylation of cellulose as a pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) suggest that factors such as particle size, surface area, degree of polymerization, and pore volume also influence hydrolytic behavior. Figure 1. Chemical structure of cellulose showing reactive hydroxyl (-OH) groups. Repeating anhydrocellobiose units... unique chemical properties is hydrozypropylcellulose (HPC). The possibility of forming long poly(propylene oxide) side chains during HPC synthesis makes this cellulose derivative particularly interesting for study. The ability of HPC to possess...

Brix, Scott Tyson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Microbial Cellulose Utilization: Fundamentals and Biotechnology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the cellulolytic enzyme system of the processing organism...223, 348, 678), steam explosion (546, 581...organisms. Important tools for understanding microbial...been developed. Such tools include systems that allow foreign genes...

Lee R. Lynd; Paul J. Weimer; Willem H. van Zyl; Isak S. Pretorius

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Structure and dynamics of a complex of cellulose with EDA: insights into the action of amines on cellulose  

SciTech Connect

The neutron structure of a complex of EDA with cellulose has been determined to reveal the location of hydrogen atoms involved in hydrogen bonding. EDA disrupts the hydrogen bonding pattern of naturally occurring cellulose by accepting a strong hydrogen bond from the O6 hydroxymethyl group as the conformation of this group is rotated from tg to gt. The O3-H O5 intrachain hydrogen bond commonly found in cellulose allomorphs is observed to be disordered in the neutron structure, and quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics calculations show that O3 prefers to donate to EDA. The hydrogen bonding arrangement is highly dynamic with bonds continually being formed and broken thus explaining the difficulty in locating all of the hydrogen atoms in the neutron scattering density maps. Comparison with other polysaccharide-amine complexes supports a common underlying mechanism for amine disruption of cellulose.

Sawada, Daisuke [ORNL; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS); Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Parthasarathi, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Forsyth, V. T. [Institut Laue Langevin and Keele University; Wada, Masahisa [University of Tokyo, Japan; Langan, Paul [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quaternary Ammonium Salts and their Low-Melting Eutectics for the Conversion of Cellulose and Cellulose-Derived Sugars.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of Ionic Liquids (ILs) as solvents presents a promising route for the conversion of cellulosic biomass feedstock to value-added products, like 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF),… (more)

Parvathikar, Sameer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Efficient Sugar Release by the Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation Technology and Enzymatic Cellulose Hydrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia 24061, and Department of Energy (DOE) BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 ... The biomass samples before pretreatment were prepared in the same way as the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI) (21, 22). ... to make cellulosic materials accessible to enzymic hydrolysis, with increased attention to the fundamental chem. ...

Geoffrey Moxley; Zhiguang Zhu; Y.-H. Percival Zhang

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

285

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iogen Biorefinery Partners, LLC Iogen Biorefinery Partners, LLC Corporate HQ: Arlington, VA Proposed Facility Location: Shelley, Idaho Description: This project from a leading enzyme player will demonstrate a scaled up biochemical process with the flexibility to process a wide range of agricultural residues into cellulose ethanol. CEO or Equivalent: Brian Foody Participants: Iogen Corporation, Goldman Sachs; Royal Dutch Shell Oil Company; Others Production: * 18 million gallons/year in the first plant, 250 million gallons/year in future plants * Cellulose ethanol & co-products in first plant; future plants to be primarily cellulose ethanol Technology & Feedstocks: * Agricultural residues: wheat straw, barley straw, corn stover, switchgrass and rice

286

Real-Time Observation of the Swelling and Hydrolysis of a Single Crystalline Cellulose Fiber Catalyzed by Cellulase 7B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facilitate its application for the efficient and economical production of cellulosic ethanol. INTRODUCTIONReal-Time Observation of the Swelling and Hydrolysis of a Single Crystalline Cellulose Fiber Information ABSTRACT: The biodegradation of cellulose involves the enzymatic action of cellulases

Dutcher, John

287

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

288

Revaluing waste in New York City : planning for small-scale compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-third of the municipal solid waste stream is organic material that, when processed in landfills, produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Composting is a proven strategy for organic waste management, which ...

Neilson, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic...

290

WIMS - Waste Information Management System  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Welcome To WIMS Welcome To WIMS Waste Information Management System WIMS new web address: http://www.emwims.org WIMS is developed to provide DOE Headquarters and site waste managers with the tools necessary to easily visualize, understand, and manage the vast volumes, categories, and problems of forecasted waste streams. WIMS meets this need by providing a user-friendly online system to gather, organize, and present waste forecast data from DOE sites. This system provides a method for identification of waste forecast volumes, material classes, disposition pathways, and potential choke points and barriers to final disposition. Disclaimer: Disposition facility information presented is for planning purposes only and does not represent DOE's decisions or commitments. Any selection of disposition facility will be made after technical, economic, and policy considerations.

291

Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by an engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulase, clostridia, and ethanol. Microbiol Mol Biol RevNext- generation cellulosic ethanol technologies and theirProduction of cellulosic ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Goyal, Garima; Tsai, Shen-Long; Madan, Bhawna; DaSilva, Nancy A; Chen, Wilfred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Waste recycling in the textile industry. July 1983-September 1989 (Citations from World Textile abstracts). Report for July 1983-September 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations on the recycling of waste-fibrous materials for textile production, and the recycling of textile-waste materials. Topics include use of wastes as raw materials for textile and fabric manufacturing; reuse of waste cloth, scraps, fibers, and polymeric materials from textile manufacturing; and the equipment used to collect, sort, and process textile wastes. Materials considered include cellulosic wastes, polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass-fiber wastes, and waste dusts. Applications discussed include textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related published bibliographies. (Contains 242 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Cellulose: sustainable and renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Cellulose: sustainable and renewable material for many The talk will cover the use of cellulose as a sustainable and renewable source for use in composites

Mumby, Peter J.

294

Diversity of Glycosyl Hydrolases from Cellulose-Depleting Communities Enriched from Casts of Two Earthworm Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metagenomic fosmid libraries from cellulose-depleting...annotated in public databases as...introducing myRDP space and quality controlled public data. Nucleic...metagenomic fosmid libraries from cellulose-depleting...annotated in public databases as...

Ana Beloqui; Taras Y. Nechitaylo; Nieves López-Cortés; Azam Ghazi; María-Eugenia Guazzaroni; Julio Polaina; Axel W. Strittmatter; Oleg Reva; Agnes Waliczek; Michail M. Yakimov; Olga V. Golyshina; Manuel Ferrer; Peter N. Golyshin

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

100 years of cellulose fiber diffraction and the emergence of complementary techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystallinity is a fundamental property of cellulose. Over recent years an understanding has developed of cellulose synthesized at the plasma membrane by protein complexes that add glucose sugars to linear cha...

Alfred French; Paul Langan

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement and Jeffrey Keisler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement Erin Baker and Jeffrey Keisler funding and the likelihood of achieving advances in cellulosic biofuel technologies. While in collecting more information on this technology. Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

297

Requirement of the Type II Secretion System for Utilization of Cellulosic Substrates by Cellvibrio japonicus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cellulose led us to examine its ability to utilize feedstocks relevant to the bioenergy field. We chose two key biomass feedstocks for these studies: corn stover and switchgrass. Because current approaches to cellulosic biofuels typically involve...

Jeffrey G. Gardner; David H. Keating

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

J33. CSSC Cellulosic H2 2009 (High Resolution $$$).pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reprint Reprint © Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Supported by  WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Table of Contents X. Ye, Y. Wang, R. C. Hopkins, M. W. W. Adams, B. R. Evans, J. R. Mielenz, Y.-H. P. Zhang* 149 - 152 Spontaneous High-Yield Production of Hydrogen from Cellulosic Materials and Water Catalyzed by Enzyme Cocktails Cocktail reception: Biohydrogen is pro- duced in high yield from cellulosic ma- terials and water in a one-pot process catalyzed by up to 14 enzymes and one coenzyme. This assembly of enzymes re- sults in non-natural catabolic pathways. These spontaneous reactions are con- ducted under modest reaction condi- tions (32 8C and atmospheric pressure). DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900017 Spontaneous High-Yield Production of Hydrogen from Cellulosic Materials and Water Catalyzed by Enzyme Cocktails Xinhao Ye, [a] Yiran Wang, [a] Robert

299

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Breaking down cellulose without blasting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2011 4, 2011 Breaking down cellulose without blasting lignin: "Dry rot" genome offers lessons for biofuel pretreatment WALNUT CREEK, Calif.-Feared by realtors and homeowners alike, dry rot due to the fungus Serpula lacrymans causes millions of dollars worth of damage to homes and buildings around the world. This brown rot fungus' capacity to break down the cellulose in wood led to its selection for sequencing by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) in 2007, with the goal of identifying the enzymes involved in the degradation process and using the information to improve cellulosic biofuels production. Photo: A variant of Serpula lacrymans causes dry rot. (Dave Brown via Flickr/Creative Commons Attribution 2.0) As reported online July 14 in Science Express, an international team of

300

New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Received: Received: 7 September 2012 Accepted: 13 September 2012 Published online in Wiley Online Library: (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI 10.1002/jctb.3959 New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, a† Anthe George b,c and Y-H Percival Zhang a,d,e∗ Abstract Non-food lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable bioresource as a collectable, transportable, and storable chemical energy that is far from fully utilized. The goal of biomass pretreatment is to improve the enzymatic digestibility of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. Many substrate factors, such as substrate accessibility, lignin content, particle size and so on, contribute to its recalcitrance. Cellulose accessibility to hydrolytic enzymes is believed to be the most important substrate characteristic limiting enzymatic hydrolysis. Cellulose

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ionic-Liquid Induced Changes in Cellulose Structure Associated with Enhanced Biomass Hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect

The effects of varying ionic liquid pretreatment parameters on various sources of lignocellulosic biomass have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fiber diffraction, and compositional analysis. Comparative enzymatic hydrolysis and sugar analysis were used to relate the observed changes in cellulose structure to biomass digestibility. In this study, the factor most clearly associated with enhanced biomass hydrolysis is the conversion of cellulose fibers from the cellulose I to the cellulose II crystal phase.

Samayam, Indira P.; Hanson, B. Leif; Langan, Paul; Schall, Constance A. (Toledo)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Scientists at DOE national laboratories successfully demonstrated technical advances required to produce cellulosic ethanol that is cost competitive with petroleum.

304

Cellulose solventbased biomass pretreatment breaks highly ordered hydrogen bonds in cellulose fibers of switchgrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvent-Based Solvent-Based Biomass Pretreatment Breaks Highly Ordered Hydrogen Bonds in Cellulose Fibers of Switchgrass Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, 1,2 Zhiguang Zhu, 1 Sungsool Wi, 3 Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,4 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061; telephone: 540-231-7414, fax: 540-231-3199; e-mail: ypzhang@vt.edu 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 3 Chemistry Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 4 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee Received 25 June 2010; revision received 23 August 2010; accepted 4 October 2010 Published online 21 October 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com).

305

Primary Radiation Defect Production in Polyethylene and Cellulose Jussi Polvi,* Petri Luukkonen, and Kai Nordlund  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primary Radiation Defect Production in Polyethylene and Cellulose Jussi Polvi,* Petri Luukkonen in polyethylene and cellulose were examined using molecular dynamics simulations. The governing reactions in both. Crystalline cellulose was found to be more resistant to radiation damage than crystalline polyethylene

Nordlund, Kai

306

Changes in the Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rate of Avicel Cellulose With Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION Cellulose can be hydrolyzed to glucose, a sugar that is easily fermented to ethanol and otherChanges in the Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rate of Avicel Cellulose With Conversion Bin Yang, Deidre M: 10.1002/bit.20942 Abstract: The slow down in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose with conversion has

California at Riverside, University of

307

Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2009;102: 66­72. � 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. KEYWORDS: cellulose; ethanol; model validation Introduction Conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol and other liquid fuels is of interest

California at Riverside, University of

308

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from Sugar Wheat straw Variation Cultivar a b s t r a c t Optimizing cellulosic ethanol yield depends Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Decreasing the cost of producing cellulosic ethanol

California at Riverside, University of

309

Production of Cellulase on Mixtures of Xylose and Cellulose in a Fed-Batch Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

saccharification to sugars for ethanol production. In the past decade, enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose hasProduction of Cellulase on Mixtures of Xylose and Cellulose in a Fed-Batch Process Ali Mohagheghi was studied in a fed-batch system. An initial mixture of 30 g/L xylose and 20 g/L cellulose

California at Riverside, University of

310

Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification: cellulose; ethanol; kinetics; reactor design Introduction Plant biomass is the only foreseeable sustainable­803] for simultaneous saccharification of fermentation of cellulosic biomass is extended and modified to accommodate

California at Riverside, University of

311

Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) have attracted much attention over the past several years due to their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) have attracted much attention over the past several years due- hydroxybutyrate-hydroxyvalerate). Cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared from microcrystilline cellulose (MCC) using and spun into fibers using a spinneret of diameter 370 m and an ethanol coagulation bath. The fibers were

Collins, Gary S.

312

Thermodynamic and economic optimizations of a waste heat to power plant driven by a subcritical ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) using pure or zeotropic working fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper carried out the thermodynamic and economic optimizations of a subcritical ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) using a pure or a zeotropic mixture working fluid. Two pure organic compounds, i.e. n-pentane and R245fa, and their mixtures with various concentrations were used as ORC working fluid for this study. Two optimizations, i.e. exergy efficiency maximization and LCOE (Levelized Cost of Electricity) minimization, were performed to find out the optimum operating conditions of the system and to determine the best working fluid from the studied media. Hot water at temperature of 150 °C and pressure of 5 bars was used to simulate the heat source medium. Whereas, cooling water at temperature of 20 °C was considered to be the heat sink medium. The mass flow rate of heat source is fixed at 50 kg/s for the optimizations. According to the results, the n-pentane-based ORC showed the highest maximized exergy efficiency (53.2%) and the lowest minimized LCOE (0.0863 $/kWh). Regarding \\{ORCs\\} using zeotropic working fluids, 0.05 and 0.1 \\{R245fa\\} mass fraction mixtures present the comparable economic features and thermodynamic performances to the system using n-pentane at minimum LCOE. The ORC using \\{R245fa\\} represents the least profitable system.

Van Long Le; Abdelhamid Kheiri; Michel Feidt; Sandrine Pelloux-Prayer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Investigation of the organic matter in inactive nuclear tank liquids. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology for regulatory organics fails to account for the organic matter that is suggested by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) inactive nuclear waste-tank liquids and sludges. Identification and measurement of the total organics are needed to select appropriate waste treatment technologies. An initial investigation was made of the nature of the organics in several waste-tank liquids. This report details the analysis of ORNL wastes.

Schenley, R.L.; Griest, W.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

315

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Experiences with treatment of mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

During its many years of research activities involving toxic chemicals and radioactive materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has generated considerable amounts of waste. Much of this waste includes chemically hazardous components and radioisotopes. Los Alamos chose to use an electrochemical process for the treatment of many mixed waste components. The electro-chemical process, which the authors are developing, can treat a great variety of waste using one type of equipment built at a moderate expense. Such a process can extract heavy metals, destroy cyanides, dissolve contamination from surfaces, oxidize toxic organic compounds, separate salts into acids and bases, and reduce the nitrates. All this can be accomplished using the equipment and one crew of trained operating personnel. Results of a treatability study of chosen mixed wastes from Los Alamos Mixed Waste Inventory are presented. Using electrochemical methods cyanide and heavy metals bearing wastes were treated to below disposal limits.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.; Smith, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nuttall, E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

Francis, Raymond

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

Whats Next for Nuclear Waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHAT'S NEXT FOR NUCLEAR WASTE? A New Strategy for the CSRA September 2009 PREFACE This White Paper was prepared by the Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO) to...

319

Irreversible transformations of native celluloses, upon exposure to elevated temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbohydrate Polymers 100 (2014) 2- 8 Carbohydrate Polymers 100 (2014) 2- 8 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Carbohydrate Polymers j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / c a r b p o l Irreversible transformations of native celluloses, upon exposure to elevated temperatures R.S. Atalla a , M.F. Crowley b , M.E. Himmel b , R.H. Atalla a,c,∗ a Cellulose Sciences International, Madison, WI, United States b National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO, United States c University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 August 2012 Received in revised form 4 June 2013 Accepted 7 June 2013 Available online 15 June 2013 Keywords: Transformation Irreversible Celluloses Elevated Temperatures Native Accessibility Aggregation a b s t r a c t Current research, basic and applied, assumes that observed recalcitrance of celluloses is an inherent

320

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

SciTech Connect

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Unconventional Relationshipsfor Hemicellulose Hydrolysis and Subsequent Cellulose Digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid to recover high yields of sugars directly from hemicellulose and subsequently by enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual cellulose, and these sugars can be used to produce fuels and needed technology advances. Hemicellulose removal is affected by solids concentration and flow through

California at Riverside, University of

322

TOPICAL PAPER Potential Synergies and Challenges in Refining Cellulosic Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOPICAL PAPER Potential Synergies and Challenges in Refining Cellulosic Biomass to Fuels, Chemicals that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, enhance energy security, improve the economy, dispose of such products, and sugar costs are predicted to drop with plant size as a result of economies of scale

California at Riverside, University of

323

Microbial Cellulose Utilization: Fundamentals and Biotechnology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...structure based on minimum conformational energy. Individual models are a source of considerable...in amounts sufficient to provide usable energy to an organism were thought to be carried...between catabolite repression and the energy status of the cell may exist. A study...

Lee R. Lynd; Paul J. Weimer; Willem H. van Zyl; Isak S. Pretorius

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

325

Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of efficiency-enhanced cogeneration system utilizing high-temperature exhaust-gas from a regenerative thermal oxidizer for waste volatile-organic-compound gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a gas-turbine cogeneration system that makes effective use of the calorific value of the volatile organic compound (VOC) gases exhausted during production processes at a manufacturing plant. The system utilizes the high-temperature exhaust-gas from the regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) which is used for incinerating VOC gases. The high-temperature exhaust gas is employed to resuperheat the steam injected into the gasturbine. The steam-injection temperature raised in this way increases the heat input, resulting in the improved efficiency of the gas-turbine. Based on the actual operation of the system, we obtained the following results: • Operation with the steam-injection temperature at 300 °C (45 °C resuperheated from 255 °C) increased the efficiency of the gasturbine by 0.7%. • The system can enhance the efficiency by 1.3% when the steam-injection temperature is elevated to 340 °C (85 °C resuperheated). In this case, up to 6.6 million yen of the total energy cost and 400 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions can be reduced annually. • A gas-turbine cogeneration and RTO system can reduce energy consumption by 23% and CO2 emission by 30.1% at the plant.

Masaaki Bannai; Akira Houkabe; Masahiko Furukawa; Takao Kashiwagi; Atsushi Akisawa; Takuya Yoshida; Hiroyuki Yamada

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Municipal Solid Waste:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contact This report was prepared by staff of the Renewable Information Team, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

328

Review Of Rheology Modifiers For Hanford Waste  

SciTech Connect

As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)'s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy - Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed - a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues: The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that do not appreciably change the pH of the waste; Organics are typically reductants and could impact glass REDOX if not accounted for in the reductant addition calculations; Stability of the modifiers in a caustic, radioactive environment is not known, but some of the modifiers tested were specifically designed to withstand caustic conditions; These acids will add to the total organic carbon content of the wastes. Radiolytic decomposition of the acids could result in organic and hydrogen gas generation. These potential impacts must be addressed in future studies with simulants representative of real waste and finally with tests using actual waste based on the rheology differences seen between SRS simulants and actual waste. The only non-organic modifier evaluated was sodium metasilicate. Further evaluation of this modifier is recommended if a reducing modifier is a concern.

Pareizs, J. M.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1600°C2000°C 1200°C Scrubber H2, CO, CO2, H2O #12;THERMOSELECTDESTRUCTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (DIOXINS/FURANS) 1200 °C 2000 °C 70 °C Quench Degassing channel Gasifier Waste carries dioxins, furans Total destruction

Columbia University

330

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

331

Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose. The most common species for this purpose are pine, spruce and birch in the Nordic countries and eucalyptus and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose diverse novel processes for separating cellulose, hemi cellulose and lignin from biomass. Biorefineries

Kaski, Samuel

332

VI.5 Recycling of plastic waste, rubber waste and end-of-life cars in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Among different types of consumer waste in Germany, plastic waste, rubber waste, and end-of-life cars are closely intertwined. Processing techniques applied to these types of consumer waste are identical in many cases. This chapter outlines these similarities and discusses each type of consumer waste. The regulations for plastic waste recycling only apply to private households. Regulations are limited to packaging waste with the ordinance on packaging waste being the legal provision. The recycling of packaging remnants from production or defective production units is partially organized by producers themselves. Energy recovery of plastic packaging is limited to combined heat and power stations. Packaging waste that cannot be submitted to mechanical recycling is usually treated by the means of feedstock recycling. The treatment of plastic waste comprises fragmentation, sizing, sorting, washing and drying, agglomeration, and granulation. Rubber waste is unsuitable for deposition at landfill sites because of poor compressibility, resilient surfaces, extremely long rotting time, and forming of cavities with air inclusion. An increased utilization of rubber waste in the production of new tires depends directly on the quality of the vulcanization process.

Peter Dreher; Martin Faulstich; Gabriele Weber-Blaschke; Burkhard Berninger; Uwe Keilhammer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Characterization of urban solid waste in Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The characterization of urban solid waste generation is fundamental for adequate decision making in the management strategy of urban solid waste in a city. The objective of this study is to characterize the waste generated in the households of Chihuahua city, and to compare the results obtained in areas of the city with three different socioeconomic levels. In order to identify the different socioeconomic trends in waste generation and characterization, 560 samples of solid waste were collected during 1 week from 80 households in Chihuahua and were hand sorted and classified into 15 weighted fractions. The average waste generation in Chihuahua calculated in this study was 0.676 kg per capita per day in April 2006. The main fractions were: organic (48%), paper (16%) and plastic (12%). Results show an increased waste generation associated with the socioeconomic level. The characterization in amount and composition of urban waste is the first step needed for the successful implementation of an integral waste management system.

Guadalupe Gomez; Montserrat Meneses; Lourdes Ballinas; Francesc Castells

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

Somerville, Chris [Director, Energy Biosciences Institute

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

336

MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: CASE nutrient management, organic waste, wastewater and septage that contained high concentration of nutrients area. The nitrogen fluxes in relation to organic waste and wastewater were chosen as indicators

Richner, Heinz

337

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

338

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

339

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

340

Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game February 9, 2011 - 1:40pm Addthis Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How does it work? Vegetative and agricultural waste reacts with oxygen to produce synthesis gas, which consists of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The gas is cooled, cleaned, and fed to naturally occurring bacteria. The bacteria convert the gas into cellulosic ethanol, which is then purified to be used as a transportation fuel. Blueprints of the INEOS Biorefinery | Courtesy of INEOS Today marks the groundbreaking of INEOS Bio's Indian River Bioenergy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Design, Synthesis and Affinity Properties of Biologically Active Peptide and Protein Conjugates of Cotton Cellulose  

SciTech Connect

The formation of peptide and protein conjugates of cellulose on cotton fabrics provides promising leads for the development of wound healing, antibacterial, and decontaminating textiles. An approach to the design, synthesis, and analysis of bioconjugates containing cellulose peptide and protein conjugates includes: 1) computer graphic modeling for a rationally designed structure; 2) attachment of the peptide or protein to cotton cellulose through a linker amino acid, and 3) characterization of the resulting bioconjugate. Computer graphic simulation of protein and peptide cellulose conjugates gives a rationally designed biopolymer to target synthetic modifications to the cotton cellulose. Techniques for preparing these types of conjugates involve both sequential assembly of the peptide on the fabric and direct crosslinking of the peptide or protein as cellulose bound esters or carboxymethylcellulose amides.

Edwards, J. V.; Goheen, Steven C.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

343

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60,700 ETHANOL RECOVERY Dist. Column CondenserF2 Steam Exchanger Ethanol Absorber 10 ft. diameter. 38Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Progress Report, LBL-

Wilke, Charles R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOCONVERSION TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL BERKELEY PROGRAM--JulyXylose Fermentation to Ethanol (a) (b) Fusarium oxysporum (OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 Javier Perez I II. ETHANOL FERMENTATION STUDIES A. B.Development Studies of Ethanol Production--------------- 19of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol." (June 1979) and (b)

Wilke, Charles R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL Charles R. Wilke andEconomic Evaluation of Hydrolysis and Ethanol Fermentationa kinetic equation for ethanol production along with design

Wilke, Charles R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strides in the conversion of biomass to ethanol. Americancostly op- eration in the conversion of biomass to ethanol,The biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

Li, Mo

349

Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t uels Cellulosic biomass could help * meet California’smeasures are needed to help overcome the per- ceived risksrun; addition of the word "help." Laboratories at the Center

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases  

SciTech Connect

Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA “Roadmap” objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled “The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases” was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by “pure” enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH “pretreatment” provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

Stipanovic, Arthur J [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

352

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e.g. corn stover, wheat straw), herbaceous energy crops (for Corn Stover. Golden, Colorado: National Renewable Energy

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

Nilsen, David N. (Lebanon, OR); Galvan, Gloria J. (Albany, OR); Hundley, Gary L. (Corvallis, OR); Wright, John B. (Albany, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Life cycle analysis of waste management options for EBI in Quebec  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quebec has issued a mandate requiring all waste management facilities to ban the landfilling of organic waste by 2020. EBI is considering Anaerobic Digestion as one of its alternative options, but is uncertain if it is the ...

Wilson, Jaclyn D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Effects of biodrying process on municipal solid waste properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of biodrying process on municipal solid waste (MSW) properties was studied. The results obtained indicated that after 14 d, biodrying reduced the water content of waste, allowing the production of biodried waste with a net heating value (NHV) of 16,779 ± 2,074 kJ kg?1 wet weight, i.e. 41% higher than that of untreated waste. The low moisture content of the biodried material reduced, also, the potential impacts of the waste, i.e. potential self-ignition and potential odors production. Low waste impacts suggest to landfill the biodried material obtaining energy via biogas production by waste re-moistening, i.e. bioreactor. Nevertheless, results of this work indicate that biodrying process because of the partial degradation of the organic fraction contained in the waste (losses of 290 g kg?1 VS), reduced of about 28% the total producible biogas.

F. Tambone; B. Scaglia; S. Scotti; F. Adani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Conversion Technology and the San Jose Zero Waste Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conversion Technology and the Conversion Technology and the San José Zero Waste Initiative DOE Webinar - April 16, 2013 Michele Young - Organics Manger - City of San Jose San Jose's Green Vision Plant Master Plan Climate Protection Plan Zero Waste Strategic Plan Organics-to-Energy Strategic Work Plan Integrated Strategic Planning Zero Waste San José Green Vision Renewable Energy 75% Diversion by 2013 Zero Waste by 2022 100% Renewable by 2022 100% Green City Fleet by 2022 Infrastructure - Technology Type - Processing costs

358

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

359

Crystal Structure and Hydrogen-Bonding System in Cellulose I? from Synchrotron X-ray and Neutron Fiber Diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal and molecular structure together with the hydrogen-bonding system in cellulose I? has been determined using synchrotron and neutron diffraction data recorded from oriented fibrous samples prepared by aligning cellulose microcrystals from ...?

Yoshiharu Nishiyama; Paul Langan; Henri Chanzy

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

How biomass is born: understanding cellulose synthesis for second generation Nadav Sorek, Energy Biosciences Institute, UC Berkeley, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biomass is born: understanding cellulose synthesis for second generation biofuels Nadav Sorek, Energy Biosciences Institute, UC Berkeley, USA Lignocellulosic biofuels, also known as second generation utilization of cellulose in terms of energy production. . #12;

Shamir, Ron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Containment and stabilization technologies for mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

A prevalent approach to the cleanup of waste sites contaminated with hazardous chemicals and radionuclides is to contain and/or stabilize wastes within the site. Stabilization involves treating the wastes in some fashion, either in situ or above ground after retrieval, to reduce the leachability and release rate of waste constituents to the environment. This approach is generally reserved for radionuclide contaminants, inorganic hazardous contaminants such as heavy metals, and nonvolatile organic contaminants. This paper describes the recent developments in the technical options available for containing and stabilizing wastes. A brief description of each technology is given along with a discussion of the most recent developments and examples of useful applications.

Buelt, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Solid waste recycling programs at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats (RFP) recycling programs for solid waste materials have been in place for over ten years. Within the last three years, the programs were centralized under the direction of the Rocky Flats Waste Minimization department, with the assistance of various plant organizations (e.g., Trucking, Building Services, Regulated Waste Operations, property Utilization and Disposal and Security). Waste Minimization designs collection and transportation systems for recyclable materials and evaluates recycling markets for opportunities to add new commodities to the existing programs. The Waste Minimization department also promotes employee participation in the Rocky Flats Recycling Programs, and collects all recycling data for publication. A description of the program status as of January 1994 is given.

Millette, R.L.; Blackman, T.E.; Shepard, M.D. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Analysis of an imperfectly competitive cellulosic biofuel supply chain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We study the strategic behavior in an imperfectly competitive cellulosic biofuel supply chain. An optimization-based supply chain model is used to obtain long-run planning outcomes, based on which we develop market models considering both perfect and imperfect competitions. The equilibrium among stakeholders in the multi-echelon supply chain can be obtained by solving a collection of first-order conditions associated with their profit-maximization problems. For the imperfect competition, the model, additionally, allows firms with significant market share at different segment of the supply chain to exercise market power. We apply the models to an illustrative case study of California.

Yongxi Huang; Yihsu Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Radioactive Waste Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

365

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Waste?to?Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

367

Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation and Their Selective Inclusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation-performance supramolecular polysaccharide composites from cellulose (CEL), chitosan (CS), and (2,3,6-tri to dissolve and prepare the composites. Because a majority (>88%) of the IL used was recovered for reuse

Reid, Scott A.

368

Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT: In dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, lignin has been shown formed by hydrothermal pretreatment of a mixture of Avicel cellulose and poplar wood showed that lignin

California at Riverside, University of

369

Comparison of low-energy radiation effects in polyethylene and cellulose Jussi Polvi, Kai Nordlund  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of low-energy radiation effects in polyethylene and cellulose Jussi Polvi, Kai Nordlund, for a carbon atom in polyethylene chain, and for one of the carbon atoms in cellulose chain. Our analysis shows and on average slightly higher for the carbon atoms in the polyethylene chain than for the target carbon atom

Nordlund, Kai

370

1 Electrospun Polyethylene Oxide/Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite 2 Nanofibrous Mats with Homogeneous and Heterogeneous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Electrospun Polyethylene Oxide/Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite 2 Nanofibrous Mats(acrylic acid) (PAA),14 polyethylene oxide (PEO),15 poly(lactic 57acid) (PLA),16,17 polystyrene (PS),18 was successfully used 9 to fabricate polyethylene oxide/cellulose nanocrystal (PEO/ 10 CNC) composite nanofibrous

371

The self-heating of damp cellulosic materials: I. High thermal conductivity and diffusivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......self-heating of damp cellulosic materials: I. High thermal conductivity...stockpiles of cellulosic materials are analysed. The model...distinct bifurcation diagrams. In particular it is...stockpile sizes for materials prone to self-heating...surfaces by breakage on handling. In such circumstances......

R. A. SISSON; A. SWIFT; G. C. WAKE; B. F. GRAY

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Increased enzyme binding to substrate is not necessary for more efficient cellulose hydrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...desorption, despite high xylan solubilization, which...inactive enzymes from the surface of cellulose is competitive...the increased fibril surface hydrophilicity as confirmed...enzyme binding, cellulose surface chain extraction, and...substrates and chemical treatment methods used are provided in SI...

Dahai Gao; Shishir P. S. Chundawat; Anurag Sethi; Venkatesh Balan; S. Gnanakaran; Bruce E. Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evaluation of interphase properties in a cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene composite by nanoindentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fiber and polypropylene (PP) matrix in a cellulose fiber-reinforced PP composite were investigatedEvaluation of interphase properties in a cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene composite of Material Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, United States c Metals and Ceramic Division, Oak

Wang, Siqun

374

Cellulose swelling and dissolution as a tool to study the fiber structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ methylmorpholine N-oxide and water mixtures, or soda solutions) or in ionic liquids are studied. Some cellulose. Key words: cellulose, swelling, dissolution, N ­ methylmorpholine N-oxide, ionic liquids, structure; 1 cells grow (2) . Whatever the origin of the native fiber cells, some common morphological architecture

Boyer, Edmond

375

Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations1 of water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in mortars2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations1 of water retention mechanism by cellulose : 10.1016/j.cemconres.2012.06.002 #12;2 ABSTRACT22 23 We show how nuclear magnetic spin-lattice relaxation dispersion of protons-water24 (NMRD) can be used to elucidate the effect of cellulose ethers

Boyer, Edmond

376

Hydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation and electrohydrogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation primarily of: acetic, lactic, succinic, and formic acids and ethanol. An additional 800 Ã? 290 mL H2/g #12;1. Introduction Biohydrogen production from cellulose has received consid- erable attention

377

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

International waste management fact book  

SciTech Connect

Many countries around the world are faced with nuclear and environmental management problems similar to those being addressed by the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this Fact Book is to provide the latest information on US and international organizations, programs, activities and key personnel to promote mutual cooperation to solve these problems. Areas addressed include all aspects of closing the commercial and nuclear fuel cycle and managing the wastes and sites from defense-related, nuclear materials production programs.

Amaya, J.P.; LaMarche, M.N.; Upton, J.F.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Transuranic Waste Tabletop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transuranic Waste Tabletop Transuranic Waste Tabletop Transuranic Waste Tabletop OBJECTIVES Given a simulated radioactive materials transportation accident, applicable procedures, and map references, demonstrate through participatory discussion a working knowledge of the following emergency response and concept of operations elements: „ Concept of operations for the emergency response to a radioactive materials transportation accident, including the Unified Incident Command System utilized in the field. „ Initial and extended response of emergency personnel and the interface between these organizations and Federal and State Regulatory agencies (i.e., Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], Department of Transportation [DOT], and the appropriate State agency). „ Communications between the Incident Commander (IC) and the

380

Chapter 3 - Emerging Catalysis for 5-HMF Formation from Cellulosic Carbohydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main fundamental building blocks of cellulosic biomass are C-6 carbohydrates followed by C-5 carbohydrates. 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) is a potential platform chemical from C-6 carbohydrates for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. Converting glucose to 5-HMF is a critical step in the utilization of cellulosic biomass because ?-d-glucose is the fundamental building block of cellulose polymer. The current understanding of the mechanisms involved in glucose isomerization to fructose and subsequent dehydration to 5-HMF in different solvents is presented and discussed. New breakthroughs in catalytic systems efficient for the isomerization between aldohexose and ketohexose are reviewed, with a focus on the mechanistic understanding. One of the challenges of cellulosic biomass utilization by a catalytic system is the presence of a large variety of and often in high loadings of minerals. Understanding the effects of the minerals or other contaminants is emphasized. Keywords 5-HMF, Platform chemicals, Cellulose, Carbohydrates

Z. Conrad Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

382

Robust Solution to Difficult Hydrogen Issues When Shipping Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been open, receiving, and disposing of transuranic (TRU) waste since March 26, 1999. The majority of the waste has a path forward for shipment to and disposal at the WIPP, but there are about two percent (2%) or approximately 3,020 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of the volume of TRU waste (high wattage TRU waste) that is not shippable because of gas generation limits set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste includes plutonium-238 waste, solidified organic waste, and other high plutonium-239 wastes. Flammable gases are potentially generated during transport of TRU waste by the radiolysis of hydrogenous materials and therefore, the concentration at the end of the shipping period must be predicted. Two options are currently available to TRU waste sites for solving this problem: (1) gas generation testing on each drum, and (2) waste form modification by repackaging and/or treatment. Repackaging some of the high wattage waste may require up to 20:1 drum increase to meet the gas generation limits of less than five percent (5%) hydrogen in the inner most layer of confinement (the layer closest to the waste). (This is the limit set by the NRC.) These options increase waste handling and transportation risks and there are high costs and potential worker exposure associated with repackaging this high-wattage TRU waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is pursuing a twofold approach to develop a shipping path for these wastes. They are: regulatory change and technology development. For the regulatory change, a more detailed knowledge of the high wattage waste (e.g., void volumes, gas generation potential of specific chemical constituents) may allow refinement of the current assumptions in the gas generation model for Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging for Contact-Handled (CH) TRU waste. For technology development, one of the options being pursued is the use of a robust container, the ARROW-PAK{trademark} System. (1) The ARROW-PAK{trademark} is a macroencapsulation treatment technology, developed by Boh Environmental, LLC, New Orleans, Louisiana. This technology has been designed to withstand any unexpected hydrogen deflagration (i.e. no consequence) and other benefits such as criticality control.

Countiss, S. S.; Basabilvazo, G. T.; Moody, D. C. III; Lott, S. A.; Pickerell, M.; Baca, T.; CH2M Hill; Tujague, S.; Svetlik, H.; Hannah, T.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

383

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs are encouraging energy intensive industries to investigate alternative means of waste heat recovery from process streams. The use of organic fluids in Rankine cycles offers improved potential for economical cogeneration from...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

386

Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility  

SciTech Connect

Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

388

Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marketed separately from conventionally grown produce in order to be profitably sold. Because of the amount of organic material include compost, Purdue University · Cooperative Extension Service · Knowledge to Go

389

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerox waste treatment Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facilities that could be modified to generate hydrogen Fuel... from organic waste Wastewater treatment plants ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

391

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Development of an Efficient, Cost- Effective System to Recover Medium- Grade...

392

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

393

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect

The WMG QAP is an integral part of a management system designed to ensure that WMG activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified in a manner that assures a quality product. A quality product is one that meets all waste acceptance criteria, conforms to all permit and regulatory requirements, and is accepted at the offsite treatment, storage, and disposal facility. In addition to internal processes, this QA Plan identifies WMG processes providing oversight and assurance to line management that waste is managed according to all federal, state, and local requirements for waste generator areas. A variety of quality assurance activities are integral to managing waste. These QA functions have been identified in the relevant procedures and in subsequent sections of this plan. The WMG QAP defines the requirements of the WMG quality assurance program. These requirements are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, Contractor Requirements Document, the LBNL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), and other applicable environmental compliance documents. The QAP and all associated WMG policies and procedures are periodically reviewed and revised, as necessary, to implement corrective actions, and to reflect changes that have occurred in regulations, requirements, or practices as a result of feedback on work performed or lessons learned from other organizations. The provisions of this QAP and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by the WMG; WMG personnel, contractors, and vendors; and personnel from other associated LBNL organizations, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WMG-approved QA programs.

Waste Management Group

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

397

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Energy Website: www.gtz.de/en/themen/umwelt-infrastruktur/abfall/30026.htm References: GHG Calculator for Waste Management[1] Waste Management - GTZ Website[2] Logo: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management The necessity to reduce greenhouse gases and thus mitigate climate change is accepted worldwide. Especially in low- and middle-income countries, waste management causes a great part of the national greenhouse gas production, because landfills produce methane which has a particularly strong effect on climate change. Therefore, it is essential to minimize

398

Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC) Place Washington, DC Product GWECC is a global alternative energy company headquartered in Washington DC, USA. References Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC) is a company located in Washington, DC . References ↑ "Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Waste_to_Energy_Conversion_Company_GWECC&oldid=345924" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

399

High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Karthik Subramanian Bruce Wiersma November 2008 High Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting karthik.subramanian@srnl.doe.gov bruce.wiersma@srnl.doe.gov 2 Acknowledgements * Bruce Wiersma (SRNL) * Kayle Boomer (Hanford) * Michael T. Terry (Facilitator) * SRS - Liquid Waste Organization * Hanford Tank Farms * DOE-EM 3 Background * High level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks provide critical interim confinement for waste prior to processing and permanent disposal * Maintaining structural integrity (SI) of the tanks is a critical component of operations 4 Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 * Discuss the HLW tank integrity technology needs based upon the evolving waste processing and tank closure requirements along with its continued storage mission

400

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Method for destroying hazardous organics and other combustible materials in a subcritical/supercritical reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste destruction method using a reactor vessel to combust and destroy organic and combustible waste, including the steps of introducing a supply of waste into the reactor vessel, introducing a supply of an oxidant into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste forming a waste and oxidant mixture, introducing a supply of water into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste and oxidant mixture forming a waste, water and oxidant mixture, reciprocatingly compressing the waste, water and oxidant mixture forming a compressed mixture, igniting the compressed mixture forming a exhaust gas, and venting the exhaust gas into the surrounding atmosphere.

Janikowski, Stuart K. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Waste Information Management System with 2012-13 Waste Streams - 13095  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Information Management System (WIMS) 2012-13 was updated to support the Department of Energy (DOE) accelerated cleanup program. The schedule compression required close coordination and a comprehensive review and prioritization of the barriers that impeded treatment and disposition of the waste streams at each site. Many issues related to waste treatment and disposal were potential critical path issues under the accelerated schedule. In order to facilitate accelerated cleanup initiatives, waste managers at DOE field sites and at DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., needed timely waste forecast and transportation information regarding the volumes and types of radioactive waste that would be generated by DOE sites over the next 40 years. Each local DOE site historically collected, organized, and displayed waste forecast information in separate and unique systems. In order for interested parties to understand and view the complete DOE complex-wide picture, the radioactive waste and shipment information of each DOE site needed to be entered into a common application. The WIMS application was therefore created to serve as a common application to improve stakeholder comprehension and improve DOE radioactive waste treatment and disposal planning and scheduling. WIMS allows identification of total forecasted waste volumes, material classes, disposition sites, choke points, technological or regulatory barriers to treatment and disposal, along with forecasted waste transportation information by rail, truck and inter-modal shipments. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida, developed and deployed the web-based forecast and transportation system and is responsible for updating the radioactive waste forecast and transportation data on a regular basis to ensure the long-term viability and value of this system. (authors)

Upadhyay, H.; Quintero, W.; Lagos, L.; Shoffner, P.; Roelant, D. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Evaluation of Bioremediation in a Coal-Coking Waste Lagoon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bioremediation is a new and relatively unproven alternative for the destruction of complex organic wastes. While bioremediation of relatively simple hydrocarbons, such as the constituents of gasoline and diese...

Maureen E. Leavitt; Duane A. Graves…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Assessing Resource Intensity and Renewability of Cellulosic Ethanol Technologies Using Eco-LCA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing Resource Intensity and Renewability of Cellulosic Ethanol Technologies Using Eco-LCA ... Recognizing the contributions of ecosystem services and the lack of their comprehensive accounting in life cycle assessment (LCA), an in-depth analysis of their contribution in the life cycle of cellulosic ethanol derived from five different feedstocks was conducted, with gasoline and corn ethanol as reference fuels. ... The relative use intensity of natural resources encompassing land and ecosystem goods and services by cellulosic ethanol was estimated using the Eco-LCA framework. ...

Anil Baral; Bhavik R. Bakshi; Raymond L. Smith

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

405

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800 C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000--1,550 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification. 2 figs.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Molten Salt Oxidation of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) can be characterized as a simple noncombustion process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes including chemical warfare agents, combustible solids, halogenated solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls, plutonium-contaminated solids, uranium-contaminated solvents and fission product-contaminated oil. The MSO destruction efficiency of the hazardous organic constituents in the wastes exceeds 99.9999%. Radioactive species, such as actinides and rare earth fission products, are retained in the salt bath. These elements can be recovered from the spent salt using conventional chemical processes, such as ion exchange, to render the salt as nonradioactive and nonhazardous. This paper reviews the principles and capabilities of MSO, previous mixed waste studies, and a new US Department of Energy program to demonstrate the process for the treatment of mixed wastes.

Gay, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.; Newman, C. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Method for recovering materials from waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, a vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800{degrees}C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1000--1550{degrees}C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cellulose hydrolysis in evolving substrate morphologies III: Timescale analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrolysis Hydrolysis in Evolving Substrate Morphologies III: Time-Scale Analysis Wen Zhou, 1,2 Ying Xu, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler 3 1 Computational Systems Biology Lab, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-2492; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 11 December 2009; revision received 4 May 2010; accepted 10 May 2010 Published online 1 June 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22814 ABSTRACT: We present a time-scale analysis for the enzy- matic hydrolysis of solid cellulosic substrates,

409

Syngas Production by Thermochemical Gasification of Carbonaceous Waste Materials in a 150 kWth Packed-Bed Solar Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbonaceous feedstocks experimentally investigated included coal,(9-11) petcoke,(12, 13) cellulose,(14, 15) biochar,(11, 16) and waste materials such as scrap tire chips and powders, dried sewage sludge, industrial sludges, and fluff. ... reactor for the steam-gasification of petcoke, carried out in a high-flux solar furnace. ... A petcoke-water slurry was continuously injected into a solar cavity-receiver to create a vortex flow directly exposed to concd. ...

Christian Wieckert; Albert Obrist; Peter von Zedtwitz; Gilles Maag; Aldo Steinfeld

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

Template Synthesis of Nanostructured Metals using Cellulose Nanocrystal  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter, cellulose nanocrystal (CNXL) has been used as a template and reducing agent for synthesizing nanoscale inorganic solids such as metal oxide, metal carbide, and nanocrystalline metals. CNXL selectively nucleates metal or metal oxide phases in ordered arrangements commensurate with the attendant structure and chemistry of the fiber. The reaction has an analogy to the well-known Tollen’s reagent where addition of an aldehyde or glucose analyte to a glass vessel containing a soluble ammoniacal silver complex causes reduction of the silver to form a mirror on the vessel surface. For the synthesis of TiO2, CNXL produced mesoporous anatase with 5-10 nm particle sizes and 170-200 m2/g surface area after air-calcination. Silica-infiltrated CNXL produced very homogeneous SiC nanowires with 70 nm in diameter at 1400 oC in Ar. For the syntheses of metal nanoparticles, upon addition of aqueous metal ion containing solutions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Ag(I), Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(IV), or even selenite, Se(IV)) into the CNXL suspension, reduction to the metal occurs under hydrothermal conditions to form ordered metal nanostructures. Ni (II) and Cu(II) ions required high temperature (300-400 oC) to be reduced due to their low reduction potentials. However, metal ions including Ag(I), Au(III), Pt(IV), Pd(II), Se(IV) needed lower temperatures (160-200 oC) to be reduced. Enhanced catalytic activity on these templated surfaces has been demonstrated for a methylene-blue dye photo-induced decomposition (Se nanocrystals resident on crystalline cellulose).

Shin, Yongsoon; Exarhos, Gregory J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Medical waste treatment and decontamination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which hybrid microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional hybrid microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Integrated Waste Tracking Systems (IWTS) - A Comprehensive Waste Management Tool  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site located near Idaho Falls, ID USA, has developed a comprehensive waste management and tracking tool that integrates multiple operational activities with characterization data from waste declaration through final waste disposition. The Integrated Waste Tracking System (IWTS) provides information necessary to help facility personnel properly manage their waste and demonstrate a wide range of legal and regulatory compliance. As a client?server database system, the IWTS is a proven tracking, characterization, compliance, and reporting tool that meets the needs of both operations and management while providing a high level of flexibility. This paper describes some of the history involved with the development and current use of IWTS as a comprehensive waste management tool as well as a discussion of IWTS deployments performed by the INL for outside clients. Waste management spans a wide range of activities including: work group interactions, regulatory compliance management, reporting, procedure management, and similar activities. The IWTS documents these activities and performs tasks in a computer-automated environment. Waste characterization data, container characterization data, shipments, waste processing, disposals, reporting, and limit compliance checks are just a few of the items that IWTS documents and performs to help waste management personnel perform their jobs. Throughout most hazardous and radioactive waste generating, storage and disposal sites, waste management is performed by many different groups of people in many facilities. Several organizations administer their areas of waste management using their own procedures and documentation independent of other organizations. Files are kept, some of which are treated as quality records, others not as stringent. Quality records maintain a history of: changes performed after approval, the reason for the change(s), and a record of whom and when the changes were made. As regulations and permits change, and as the proliferation of personal computers flourish, procedures and data files begin to be stored in electronic databases. With many different organizations, contractors, and unique procedures, several dozen databases are used to track and maintain aspects of waste management. As one can see, the logistics of collecting and certifying data from all organizations to provide comprehensive information would not only take weeks to perform, but usually presents a variety of answers that require an immediate unified resolution. A lot of personnel time is spent scrubbing the data in order to determine the correct information. The issue of disparate data is a concern in itself, and is coupled with the costs associated with maintaining several separate databases. In order to gain waste management efficiencies across an entire facility or site, several waste management databases located among several organizations would need to be consolidated. The IWTS is a system to do just that, namely store and track containerized waste information for an entire site. The IWTS has proven itself at the INL since 1995 as an efficient, successful, time saving management tool to help meet the needs of both operations and management for hazardous and radiological containerized waste. Other sites have also benefited from IWTS as it has been deployed at West Valley Nuclear Services Company DOE site as well as Ontario Power Ge

Robert S. Anderson

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

415

A model for a national low level waste program  

SciTech Connect

A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

417

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500 C with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO{sub 2} gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO{sub 2} gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO{sub 2} absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described. 8 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NREL: Continuum Magazine - At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive Issue 5 Print Version Share this resource At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive DOE challenge met-research advances cut costs to produce fuel from non-food plant sources. A photo showing a silhouette of a man wearing glass in a dark room lit only by a band of light consisting or red, blue, and white dots (26186). Enlarge image In NREL's new Energy Systems Integration Facility, the Insight Collaboration Laboratory shows a 3D model of cellulose microfibrils. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL Imagine a near perfect transportation fuel-it's clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable. Now imagine that it's also affordable. Bringing this vision closer to reality was the challenge the U.S.

422

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of22 Mohammad Riaz ETHANOL FERMENTATION STUDIES II I. A. B.Hydrolyzates to Ethanol J2 Ren-Der Yang

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Increased enzyme binding to substrate is not necessary for more efficient cellulose hydrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ultrastructure, which was reported in a recent review article (1). However, the impact...the Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research...based on the values available in the literature for CBH-I acting on cellulose...

Dahai Gao; Shishir P. S. Chundawat; Anurag Sethi; Venkatesh Balan; S. Gnanakaran; Bruce E. Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Energy Department Announces Up to $14 Million for Applying Landscape Design to Cellulosic Bioenergy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department today announced up to $14 million to support landscape design approaches that maintain or enhance the environmental and socio-economic sustainability of cellulosic bioenergy through the improvement of feedstock production, logistics systems, and technology development.

425

Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic Ethanol Shipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

?Imagine powering a plane or car with fuels made from grasses, wood, or other plant residues. This type of fuel, called cellulosic ethanol, has the potential to be a major source of renewable fuel...

426

Graphene for reducing bubble defects and enhancing mechanical properties of graphene/cellulose acetate composite films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we have demonstrated a strategy by which graphene was used to reduce the bubble defects and enhance the mechanical properties in graphene/cellulose acetate (Gr/CA) composite films. Mono- and multil...

Lei Liu; Zhigang Shen; Shuaishuai Liang; Min Yi…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Adsorption and viscoelastic properties of cationic xylan on cellulose film using QCM-D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption and viscoelastic properties of cationic xylan layers adsorbed from an aqueous electrolyte solution ... 10, 100 mM) on a cellulose model surface were studied using quartz crystal microbalance with ....

Sang Hoon Lee; Hak Lae Lee; Hye Jung Youn

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the surface was more hydrophilic while the glucan and xylanxylan is a physical barrier that covers up the crystalline cellulose surfacesurface available for enzyme adsorption compared to the looser amorphous structure of xylan.

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The molecular basis of the adsorption of xylans on cellulose surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to model the adsorption of xylan on cellulose, we have simulated, at ... level, the gas phase adsorption of small xylan fragments having 5 skeletal ? (1 ?...5...), using molecular dynamics simulations. A...

Karim Mazeau; Landry Charlier

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Catalytic transformations of cellulose and its derived carbohydrates into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, levulinic acid, and lactic acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic transformation of cellulose into key building-block or platform chemicals such as 5-hydoxymethylfurfural (HMF), levulinic acid, and lactic acid under mild conditions, has attracted much attention...

Weiping Deng; Qinghong Zhang; Ye Wang

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Kinetic Study on the Acid-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of Cellulose to Levulinic Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variety of interesting bulk chemicals is accessible by the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose. An interesting example is levulinic acid, a versatile precursor for fuel additives, polymers, and resins. A detailed kinetic study on the acid-catalyzed ...

B. Girisuta; L. P. B. M. Janssen; H. J. Heeres

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Plenary I: Progress in Advanced Biofuels DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise William Provine, Director–Science and Technology External Affairs, DuPont

433

Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants  

SciTech Connect

Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

434

Conduction mechanism of lithium bis(oxalato)borate–cellulose acetate polymer gel electrolytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polymer gel electrolytes (PGE) belonging to salt–solvent–polymer hybrid systems are prepared using a mixture of lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), ?-butyrolactone (?-BL), and cellulose acetate (CA). The increase...

S. Z. Z. Abidin; M. Z. A. Yahya; O. H. Hassan; A. M. M. Ali

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Impact of pretreatment and downstream processing technologies on economics and energy in cellulosic ethanol production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While advantages of biofuel have been widely reported, studies also highlight the challenges in large scale production of biofuel. Cost of ethanol and process energy use in cellulosic ethanol plants are dependent...

Deepak Kumar; Ganti S Murthy

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Ab initio calculation of the structure of acetate cellulose membranes for reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The elementary unit of the monoacetate cellulose membrane in lithium, sodium, and potassium chloride solutions was simulated with the Gaussian-98 program package. The results are used for qualitative explanation ...

E. V. Butyrskaya; V. A. Shaposhnik; A. A. Reznikov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Comparison of cellulose consumption between Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes flavipes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) under laboratory conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are interested in determining the effects of subterranean termite soldier ratios on the overall cellulose consumption of Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes flavipes. In nature, Coptotermes formosanus is found in very large colonies and a...

Lancaster, Denise

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Catalytic conversion of cellulose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural over chromium trichloride in ionic liquid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An efficient method for converting cellulose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) using an inexpensive ionic...3·6H2O) was developed. The effects of hydrochloric acid loading, catalyst dosage, reaction temperatur...

Shui Wang; Yizhen Du; Wenqian Zhang…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Catalytic conversion of cellulose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in high yields via a two-step process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a key renewable chemical for plastics and fine chemicals, the preparation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) from biomass is an...3 was added which lead to a 5-HMF yield of 73% based on cellulose substrate. Th...

Xinhua Qi; Masaru Watanabe; Taku M. Aida; Richard L. Smith Jr.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellulose and/or hemicellulose to monomer sugars that could be subsequently fermented into ethanol andcellulose and hemicellulose must be broken down fully to monomers for fermentation to ethanol

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Comparison of Cellulosic Ethanol Yields from Midwestern Maize and Reconstructed Tallgrass Prairie Systems Managed for Bioenergy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Maize- and prairie-based systems were investigated as cellulosic feedstocks by conducting a 9 ha side-by-side comparison on fertile soils in the Midwestern United States. Maize was grown continuously with adequat...

V. A. Nichols; F. E. Miguez; M. E. Jarchow; M. Z. Liebman; B. S. Dien

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

EA-1705: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Mascoma Corporation, Kinross Charter Township, Michigan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The frontier Project consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a proprietary pretreatment and fermentation process.

443

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

444

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary Name: IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Cost: Free Related Tools Energy Development Index (EDI) Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model ... further results A simple spreadsheet model for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from existing waste management practices (transportation, composting, anaerobic digestion, mechanical biological treatment, recycling, landfilling) in

445

The quantification of oxygen toxicity by the technique of cellulose acetate electrophoresis of rat serum proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE QUANTIFICATION OF OXYGEN TOXICITY BY THE TECHNIQUE OF CELLULOSE ACETATE ELECTROPHORESIS OF RAT SERUM PROTEINS A Thesis by MARCIA WAGNER BARKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&ii University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Biology THE QUANTIFICATION OF OXYGEN TOXICITY BY THE TECHNIQUE OF CELLULOSE ACETATE ELECTROPHORESIS OF RAT SERUM PROTEINS A Thesis by MARCIA WAGNER BARKER Approved...

Barker, Marcia Wagner

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from tank waste. * Decreases the volume of water to create room in double-shell tanks, allowing them to accept waste from noncompliant single- shell tanks. * Treats up to 1...

447

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trucks for scale. The DSTs have limited capacity and are aging. Maintaining these tanks is important to ensure that waste is ready to supply the Waste Treatment Plant. The...

448

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

449

Nuclear waste solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glass and polycrystalline materials for high-level radioactive waste immobilization are discussed. Borosilicate glass has been selected as the waste form for defence high-level radwaste in the US. Since releas...

L. L. Hench; D. E. Clark; A. B. Harker

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Adequacy of a Small Quantity Site RH-TRU Waste Program in Meeting Proposed WIPP Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The first remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste is expected to be permanently disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The first RH-TRU waste shipments are scheduled from the Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) to WIPP in order to facilitate compliance with BCL Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) milestones. Milestones requiring RH-TRU waste containerization and removal from the site by 2004 in order to meet a 2006 site closure goal, established by Congress in the Defense Facilities Closure Projects account, necessitated the establishment and implementation of a site-specific program to direct the packaging of BCLDP RH-TRU waste prior to the finalization of WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements. The program was designed to collect waste data, including audio and videotape records of waste packaging, such that upon completion of waste packaging, comprehensive data records exist from which compliance with final WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements can be demonstrated. With the BCLDP data records generated to date and the development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) of preliminary documents proposing the WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization program, it is possible to evaluate the adequacy of the BCLDP program with respect to meeting proposed characterization objectives. The BCLDP characterization program uses primarily acceptable knowledge (AK) and visual examination (VE) during waste packaging to characterize RH-TRU waste. These methods are used to estimate physical waste parameters, including weight percentages of metals, cellulosics, plastics, and rubber in the waste, and to determine the absence of prohibited items, including free liquids. AK combined with computer modeling is used to estimate radiological waste parameters, including total activity on a waste container basis, for the majority of BCLDP RH-TRU waste. AK combined with direct analysis is used to characterize radiological parameters for the small populations of the RH-TRU waste generated by the BCLDP. All characterization based on AK is verified. Per its design for comprehensive waste data collection, the BCLDP characterization program using AK and waste packaging procedures, including VE during packaging, meets the proposed WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization objectives. The conservative program design implemented generates certification data that will be adequate to meet any additional program requirements that may be imposed by the CBFO.

Biedscheid, J.; Stahl, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Peters, K.; Eide, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i Innovation for Our Energy Future Technologies Overview Presented to: DOD-DOE Waste-to- Energy Workshop Energy Workshop Dr. Robert J. Remick J 13 2011 January 13, 2011 Capital Hilton Hotel Washington, DC NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future Anaerobic Digestion of Organic Wastes is a Good Source of Methane. Organic waste + methanogenic bacteria → methane (CH 4 ) Issues: High levels of contamination Time varying output of gas quantity and quality Innovation for Our Energy Future Photo courtesy of Dos Rios Water Recycling Center, San Antonio, TX

452

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

453

Science Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

454

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2) has teamed with the Facilities' Grounds and Roads team and the Solid Waste Transfer Facility to implement green waste composting. Previously, branches and logs were being diverted and mulched by Kirtland Air Force Base at their Construction & Demolition Landfill that is on base and utilized under contract by Sandia. The mulch is available to the Air Force and Sandia for landscaping uses. However, grass clippings, leaves, and other green waste were being disposed in the landfill. In an initiative to save time and trips by small trucks with trailers to the landfill carrying organic debris, two 30 cubic yard rolloffs were

455

Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, Orange County, California Proposed Facility Location: Southern California Description: This company has experience building biomass power plants in California and their technology has been demonstrated at the pilot scale. One of its partners is Waste Management Inc., a leading waste-to-energy company. This project will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann Participants: Waste Management, Inc., JGC Corporation; MECS Inc.; NAES; PetroDiamond Production: * 19 million gallons/year in the unit in which DOE will be participating. Technology & Feedstocks: * Concentrated acid processing of 700 tons/day of sorted green waste and wood

457

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, Orange County, California Proposed Facility Location: Southern California Description: This company has experience building biomass power plants in California and their technology has been demonstrated at the pilot scale. One of its partners is Waste Management Inc., a leading waste-to-energy company. This project will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann Participants: Waste Management, Inc., JGC Corporation; MECS Inc.; NAES; PetroDiamond Production: * 19 million gallons/year in the unit in which DOE will be participating. Technology & Feedstocks: * Concentrated acid processing of 700 tons/day of sorted green waste and wood

458

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

459

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

460

Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added in an excess amount needed. 3 figures.

Moens, L.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

About Us Organization Organization Organization Printable PDF News & Blog CIO Leadership Organization Contact Us...

462

Organization | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

About Us Organization Organization Organization News Leadership Organization History Careers Contact Us...

463

Hanford site transuranic waste sampling plan  

SciTech Connect

This sampling plan (SP) describes the selection of containers for sampling of homogeneous solids and soil/gravel and for visual examination of transuranic and mixed transuranic (collectively referred to as TRU) waste generated at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The activities described in this SP will be conducted under the Hanford Site TRU Waste Certification Program. This SP is designed to meet the requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (CAO-94-1010) (DOE 1996a) (QAPP), site-specific implementation of which is described in the Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Characterization Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (HNF-2599) (Hanford 1998b) (QAPP). The QAPP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements and protocols for TRU waste characterization activities at the Hanford Site. In addition, the QAPP identifies responsible organizations, describes required program activities, outlines sampling and analysis strategies, and identifies procedures for characterization activities. The QAPP identifies specific requirements for TRU waste sampling plans. Table 1-1 presents these requirements and indicates sections in this SP where these requirements are addressed.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

464

Municipal solid waste disposal in Portugal  

SciTech Connect

In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal has been one of the most important environmental problems for all of the Portuguese regions. The basic principles of MSW management in Portugal are: (1) prevention or reduction, (2) reuse, (3) recovery (e.g., recycling, incineration with heat recovery), and (4) polluter-pay principle. A brief history of legislative trends in waste management is provided herein as background for current waste management and recycling activities. The paper also presents and discusses the municipal solid waste management in Portugal and is based primarily on a national inquiry carried out in 2003 and directed to the MSW management entities. Additionally, the MSW responsibility and management structure in Portugal is presented, together with the present situation of production, collection, recycling, treatment and elimination of MSW. Results showed that 96% of MSW was collected mixed (4% was separately collected) and that 68% was disposed of in landfill, 21% was incinerated at waste-to-energy plants, 8% was treated at organic waste recovery plants and 3% was delivered to sorting. The average generation rate of MSW was 1.32 kg/capita/day.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Didelet, Filipe [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This pilot-scale integrated biorefinery will produce 250,000 gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol when running at full operational status.

466

Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE/EIS-0026-SA02) (6/23/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal of Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE/EIS-0026-SA02) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action Transuranic (TRU) waste is waste that contains alpha particle-emitting radionuclides with atomic numbers greater than uranium (92) and half-lives greater than 20 years, in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram of waste. Some TRU wastes are mixed with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (referred to as PCB-commingled TRU waste). PCBs exist in DOE's TRU waste as mixtures of synthetic organic chemicals with physical properties ranging from oily liquids to waxy solids. Exposure to PCBs can result in adverse health effects. For example, PCBs in blood or in fatty tissue as a result of inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption may cause reproductive effects,

467

Organization and Functions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working to Ensure the Safety and Security of Hazardous Material Shipments Working to Ensure the Safety and Security of Hazardous Material Shipments Organization and Functions Mission Unit EM-30 Deputy Assistant Secretary/ADAS Waste Management Director Office of Packaging and Transportation EM-33 Regulations & Standards Support * ANSI * ASME/ ASTM * DHS * DOD FEMA * FMCSA * FRA * IAEA * ICAO * IMO * NRC * Orders * PHMSA TSA * UN TDG SCOE Packaging Certification * CoCs for Type B/AF Packages * DOE Exemptions * DOT Special Permits & COCA * QA * RAMPAC * SCALE * Technical Assistance * Training Program & Site Support * ATMS * EFCOG * EIS Reviews * IPT * Load Securement Guide * PMC * RADCALC * RADTRAN * Secure transport * Technical assistance * Tenders * TMC * TRAGIS

468

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

469

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

470

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonconventional Fluids," ASME Jour of Engineering for Power,fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles," Applied Thermal Engineering,fluid in waste heat recovery," Applied Thermal Engineering,

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Short mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste allows landfill impact reduction saving waste energy content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of full scale MBT process (28 d) in removing inhibition condition for successive biogas (ABP) production in landfill and in reducing total waste impact. For this purpose the organic fraction of MSW was treated in a full-scale MBT plant and successively incubated vs. untreated waste, in simulated landfills for one year. Results showed that untreated landfilled-waste gave a total ABP reduction that was null. On the contrary MBT process reduced ABP of 44%, but successive incubation for one year in landfill gave a total ABP reduction of 86%. This ABP reduction corresponded to a MBT process of 22 weeks length, according to the predictive regression developed for ABP reduction vs. MBT-time. Therefore short MBT allowed reducing landfill impact, preserving energy content (ABP) to be produced successively by bioreactor technology since pre-treatment avoided process inhibition because of partial waste biostabilization.

Barbara Scaglia; Silvia Salati; Alessandra Di Gregorio; Alberto Carrera; Fulvia Tambone; Fabrizio Adani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

474

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

475

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

477

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

478

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

479

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

480

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

6 - Nuclear Waste Regulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most influential national and international bodies providing recommendations on radiation protection are described, including the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Protection philosophies and the ICRP general principles of radiation protection are discussed. Radioactive material regulations and sources of radiation are explained. Criteria of exemption from regulatory control are discussed with examples of exemption levels for naturally occurring and radioactive waste radionuclides. Clearance of both moderate and bulk amounts of materials from regulatory control is also explained, including examples of EU and the UK regulations. Dose limits recommended by the ICRP are given, as well as the main principles of control of radiation hazards. Nuclear waste classification schemes are outlined, including the IAEA classification scheme. A brief explanation of nuclear waste classes including exempt waste, very short-lived waste, very low-level waste, low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and high-level waste is given. Examples of waste classification schemes are given, including that of the UK.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

483

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

484

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

Bernardi, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Single-step conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a versatile platform chemical  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to use cellulosic biomass as feedstock for the large-scale production of liquid fuels and chemicals depends critically on the development of effective low temperature processes. One promising biomass-derived platform chemical is 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), which is suitable for alternative polymers or for liquid biofuels. While HMF can currently be made from fructose and glucose, the ability to synthesize HMF directly from raw natural cellulose would remove a major barrier to the development of a sustainable HMF platform. Here we report a single-step catalytic process where cellulose as the feed is rapidly depolymerized and the resulting glucose is converted to HMF under mild conditions. A pair of metal chlorides (CuCl2 and CrCl2) dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([EMIM]Cl) at temperatures of 80–120 °C collectively catalyze the single-step process of converting cellulose to HMF with an unrefined 96% purity among recoverable products (at 55.4 ± 4.0% HMF yield). After extractive separation of HMF from the solvent, the catalytic performance of recovered [EMIM]Cl and the catalysts was maintained in repeated uses. Cellulose depolymerization occurs at a rate that is about one order of magnitude faster than conventional acid-catalyzed hydrolysis. In contrast, single metal chlorides at the same total loading showed considerably less activity under similar conditions.

Yu Su; Heather M. Brown; Xiwen Huang; Xiao-dong Zhou; James E. Amonette; Z. Conrad Zhang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based LC–MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium vs sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.

Yi Xiong; Samuel T. Coradetti; Xin Li; Marina A. Gritsenko; Therese Clauss; Vlad Petyuk; David Camp; Richard Smith; Jamie H.D. Cate; Feng Yang; N. Louise Glass

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Single-step conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a versatile platform chemical  

SciTech Connect

The ability to use cellulosic biomass as feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals currently derived from petroleum depends critically on the development of effective low-temperature processes. While HMF, as a versatile platform chemical suitable for use in polymer synthesis or production of liquid biofuels, can currently be made from fructose and glucose, synthesis of HMF directly from raw natural cellulose represents the last major barrier toward the development of a sustainable HMF platform. Here we report an unprecedented single-step pathway that depolymerizes cellulose rapidly under mild conditions and converts the resulting glucose to hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). A pair of metal chlorides (CuCl2 and CrCl2) dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride at temperatures of 80-120°C catalyzes cellulose depolymerization and the subsequent glucose conversion to HMF with 95% selectivity among recoverable products (at 56% HMF yield). Cellulose depolymerization, which can also be catalyzed by other metalchloride pairs such as CuCl2 paired with PdCl2, CrCl3, or FeCl3, occurs at a rate that is more than one order of magnitude faster than conventional acid-catalyzed hydrolysis. In contrast, single-metal chlorides at the same total loading showed low activity under similar conditions. Mechanistic studies suggest that the C2 hydrogen of the imidazolium ring is activated by the paired metal-chloride catalysts.

Su, Yu; Brown, Heather M.; Huang, Xiwen; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Amonette, James E.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z