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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Construction materials as a waste management solution for cellulose sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sustainable waste management system for effluents treatment sludge has been a pressing issue for pulp and paper sector. Recycling is always recommended in terms of environmental sustainability. Following an approach of waste valorisation, this work aims to demonstrate the technical viability of producing fiber-cement roof sheets incorporating cellulose primary sludge generated on paper and pulp mills. From the results obtained with preliminary studies it was possible to verify the possibility of producing fiber-cement sheets by replacing 25% of the conventional used virgin long fiber by primary effluent treatment cellulose sludge. This amount of incorporation was tested on an industrial scale. Environmental parameters related to water and waste, as well as tests for checking the quality of the final product was performed. These control parameters involved total solids in suspension, dissolved salts, chlorides, sulphates, COD, metals content. In the product, parameters like moisture, density and strength were controlled. The results showed that it is possible to replace the virgin long fibers pulp by primary sludge without impacts in final product characteristics and on the environment. This work ensures the elimination of significant waste amounts, which are nowadays sent to landfill, as well as reduces costs associated with the standard raw materials use in the fiber-cement industrial sector.

Modolo, R., E-mail: regina.modolo@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Civil Engineering Department/CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ferreira, V.M. [University of Aveiro, Civil Engineering Department/CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Machado, L.M. [RAIZ - Forest and Paper Research Institute, Portucel-Soporcel, Eixo (Portugal); Rodrigues, M.; Coelho, I. [CIMIANTO - Sociedade Tecnica Hidraulica, S.A., Alhandra (Portugal)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Characterization of cellulosic wastes and gasification products from chicken farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gas chromatography indicated the variable quality of the producer gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The char had appreciable NPK values, and can be used as a fertiliser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bio-oil produced was of poor quality, having high moisture content and low pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mass and energy balances showed inadequate level energy recovery from the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future work includes changing the operating parameters of the gasification unit. - Abstract: The current article focuses on gasification as a primary disposal solution for cellulosic wastes derived from chicken farms, and the possibility to recover energy from this process. Wood shavings and chicken litter were characterized with a view to establishing their thermal parameters, compositional natures and calorific values. The main products obtained from the gasification of chicken litter, namely, producer gas, bio-oil and char, were also analysed in order to establish their potential as energy sources. The experimental protocol included bomb calorimetry, pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry (PCFC), thermo-gravimetric analyses (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD), mineral content analyses and gas chromatography. The mass and energy balances of the gasification unit were also estimated. The results obtained confirmed that gasification is a viable method of chicken litter disposal. In addition to this, it is also possible to recover some energy from the process. However, energy content in the gas-phase was relatively low. This might be due to the low energy efficiency (19.6%) of the gasification unit, which could be improved by changing the operation parameters.

Joseph, Paul, E-mail: p.joseph@ulster.ac.uk [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Tretsiakova-McNally, Svetlana; McKenna, Siobhan [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to fuel ethanol because it not only contains cellulose andCellulose conversion, % Co-Fermentation Glucose-ethanolamount of cellulose, can be used as fuel ethanol feedstocks

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste.

Chrubasik, A.; Stich, W. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, D.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig.

Bickford, D.F.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, Dennis F. (Aiken, SC)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NO{sub x} vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180{degrees}C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200{degrees}C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time.

Pierce, R.A.; Smith, J.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

key to unlocking low-cost cellulosic ethanol. 2(1):26-40.1995 19941216. Commercial ethanol production process.facility and commercial ethanol production process.

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1996 19950414. Municipal solid waste processing facility andconversion of municipal-solid-waste to ethanol. Biotechnol.Bioconversion of municipal solid waste to glucose for bio-

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

Williams, M

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

Improved oxidation resistance of organic/inorganic composite atomic layer deposition coated cellulose nanocrystal aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels are coated with thin conformal layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using atomic layer deposition to form hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} penetrated more than 1500??m into the aerogel for extended precursor pulse and exposure/purge times. The measured profile of coated fiber radius versus depth from the aerogel surface agrees well with simulations of precursor penetration depth in modeled aerogel structures. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated CNC aerogel nanocomposites do not show significant thermal degradation below 295?°C as compared with 175?°C for uncoated CNC aerogels, an improvement of over 100?°C.

Smith, Sean W.; Matthews, David J.; Conley, John F., E-mail: jconley@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1148 Kelley Engineering Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Buesch, Christian; Simonsen, John [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 119 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Destruction of organic wastes by ammonium peroxydisulfate with electrolytic regeneration of the oxidant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is reported concerning a new aqueous process for oxidative destruction of solid- and liquid organic wastes. This process uses acidified ammonium peroxydisulfate and operates at ambient pressure and at 80- to 100 {degrees}C. The oxidant may be efficiently regenerated by electrolysis of the sulfate by-product at Pt anodes, even in the presence of organic and inorganic contaminants expected to be entrained in the cycle. Integral rate constants were determined for the oxidation of 25 diverse organic compounds at low (50 ppm) concentrations through fixed-time experiments with excess oxidant and a Pt wire catalyst. For high initial concentrations, uncatalyzed mineralization rates were measured for waste surrogates including kerosene, triethylamine, ion exchange resin, oxalic acid, trinitrotoluene, and cellulose. A packed bed reactor was tested with ethylene glycol, with offgas analysis by mass spectroscopy. Rate data extrapolate to throughputs of approximately 200 kg/m{sub 3}-day. The process may benefit the destruction of highly toxic or specialized industrial wastes as well as the organic fraction of mixed wastes.

Cooper, J.F.; Wang, J.F.; Krueger, R.; King, K.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Organic waste management for EBI in Quebec, feedstock analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBI is a company located in the province of Quebec in Canada with the mission to integrate waste management. Great challenges in regards to organic waste management are faced and anaerobic digestion is considered by EBI ...

Sylvestre, Olivier, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Organic rankine cycle waste heat applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A machine designed as a centrifugal compressor is applied as an organic rankine cycle turbine by operating the machine in reverse. In order to accommodate the higher pressures when operating as a turbine, a suitable refrigerant is chosen such that the pressures and temperatures are maintained within established limits. Such an adaptation of existing, relatively inexpensive equipment to an application that may be otherwise uneconomical, allows for the convenient and economical use of energy that would be otherwise lost by waste heat to the atmosphere.

Brasz, Joost J.; Biederman, Bruce P.

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

18

Anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste for energy production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study was carried out in order to evaluate the performance of anaerobic reactors treating OFMSW (organic fraction of municipal solid waste), especially in terms… (more)

Nayono, Satoto Endar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Electrically conductive cellulose composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

20

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation" Jian Shi, Mirvatwaste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation Jian Shi, MirvatIn addition, techno- economic evaluation of large scale

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Environment, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Field Organization Directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This directory was developed by the Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) from an outgrowth of the Departments efforts to identify and establish the regulatory response lead persons in the Field Organizations. The directory was developed for intemal EH-231 use to identify both the DOE and DOE contractor Field Organizations in the Environment, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The Field Organization directory is divided into three substantive sections: (1) Environment; (2) Environmental Restoration; and (3) Waste Management which are organized to correspond to the management hierarchy at each Field Organization. The information provided includes the facility name and address, individual managers name, and telephone/fax numbers.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Power Generation From Waste Heat Using Organic Rankine Cycle Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many efforts are currently being pursued to develop and implement new energy technologies aimed at meeting our national energy goals The use of organic Rankine cycle engines to generate power from waste heat provides a near term means to greatly...

Prasad, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization using combusted oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted at the Western Research Institute to evaluate the ability of combusted oil shale to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous wastes. The oil shale used in the research was a western oil shale retorted in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor. Two combustion temperatures were used, 1550{degrees}F and 1620{degrees}F (843{degrees}C and 882{degrees}C). The five wastes selected for experimentation were an API separator sludge, creosote-contaminated soil, mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge, and smelter dust. The API separator sludge and creosote-contaminated soil are US EPA-listed hazardous wastes and contain organic contaminants. The mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge (also an EPA-listed waste), and smelter dust contain high concentrations of heavy metals. The smelter dust and mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste fail the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for cadmium, and the metalplating sludge fails the TCLP for chromium. To evaluate the ability of the combusted oil shales to stabilize the hazardous wastes, mixtures involving varying amounts of each of the shales with each of the hazardous wastes were prepared, allowed to equilibrate, and then leached with deionized, distilled water. The leachates were analyzed for the hazardous constituent(s) of interest.

Sorini, S.S.; Lane, D.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Organic tanks safety program FY96 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive by-products and contaminated process chemicals, which are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of salt cakes, metal oxide sludges, and partially saturated aqueous brine solutions. The tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes may be at risk for fuel- nitrate combustion accidents. The purpose of the Waste Aging Task is to elucidate how chemical and radiological processes will have aged or degraded the organic compounds stored in the tanks. Ultimately, the task seeks to develop quantitative measures of how aging changes the energetic properties of the wastes. This information will directly support efforts to evaluate the hazard as well as to develop potential control and mitigation strategies.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Clauss, S.A.; Sharma, A.K.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) has recently completed a Phase I program for the development of a two-step alternative to incineration for the destruction of organics in transuranic wastes at the Savannah River Site. This process is known as thermal desorption-supercritical water oxidation, or TD-SCWO. The GA TD process uses heat to volatilize and transport organics from the waste material for subsequent treatment by SCWO. SCWO oxidizes organics in a steam medium at elevated temperatures and pressures in a manner that achieves excellent destruction efficiencies and compliance with all environmental requirements without the need for complex pollution-abatement equipment. This application of TD-SCWO is focused on a full-scale batch process for 55-gallon drums of mixed transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site. The Phase I reduced-scale test results show that the process operates as intended on surrogate waste matrices chosen to be representative of Savannah River Site transuranic mixed wastes. It provides a high degree of hydrogen removal and full containment of the radionuclide surrogate, with minimal requirements for pre-treatment and post-treatment. Other test objectives were to verify that the process produces no dioxins or furans, and meets all applicable regulatory criteria for retention of toxic metals, particulate, and criteria pollutants, while meeting WIPP/WAC and TRUPACT-II requirements. Thermal desorption of surrogate SRS mixed wastes at 500 psi and 1000 F met all tested requirements for WIPP/WAC and TRUPACT-II. SCWO of the desorbed surrogate organic materials at 500 psi and 1500 F also appears to meet all requirements for a nonincineration alternative, although >99.99% DRE for chlorinated solvents has not yet been demonstrated.

Mike Spritzer

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Advanced organic analysis and analytical methods development: FY 1995 progress report. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during FY 1995 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in developing and optimizing analysis techniques for identifying organics present in Hanford waste tanks. The main focus was to provide a means for rapidly obtaining the most useful information concerning the organics present in tank waste, with minimal sample handling and with minimal waste generation. One major focus has been to optimize analytical methods for organic speciation. Select methods, such as atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, were developed to increase the speciation capabilities, while minimizing sample handling. A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to improve separation capabilities while minimizing additional waste generation. In addition, considerable emphasis has been placed on developing a rapid screening tool, based on Raman and infrared spectroscopy, for determining organic functional group content when complete organic speciation is not required. This capability would allow for a cost-effective means to screen the waste tanks to identify tanks that require more specialized and complete organic speciation to determine tank safety.

Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Public meetings on nuclear waste management: their function and organization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on public meetings as a vehicle for public participation in nuclear waste management. The nature of public meetings is reviewed and the functions served by meetings highlighted. The range of participants and their concerns are addressed, including a review of the participants from past nuclear waste management meetings. A sound understanding of the expected participants allows DOE to tailor elements of the meeting, such as notification, format, and agenda to accommodate the attendees. Finally, the report discusses the organization of public meetings on nuclear waste management in order to enhance the DOE's functions for such meetings. Possible structures are suggested for a variety of elements that are relevant prior to, during and after the public meeting. These suggestions are intended to supplement the DOE Public Participation Manual.

Duvernoy, E.G.; Marcus, A.A.; Overcast, T.; Schilling, A.H.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Waste Tank Organic Safety Project: Analysis of liquid samples from Hanford waste tank 241-C-103  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A suite of physical and chemical analyses has been performed in support of activities directed toward the resolution of an Unreviewed Safety Question concerning the potential for a floating organic layer in Hanford waste tank 241-C-103 to sustain a pool fire. The analysis program was the result of a Data Quality Objectives exercise conducted jointly with staff from Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The organic layer has been analyzed for flash point, organic composition including volatile organics, inorganic anions and cations, radionuclides, and other physical and chemical parameters needed for a safety assessment leading to the resolution of the Unreviewed Safety Question. The aqueous layer underlying the floating organic material was also analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide composition, as well as other physical and chemical properties. This work was conducted to PNL Quality Assurance impact level III standards (Good Laboratory Practices).

Pool, K.H.; Bean, R.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest ORBIT2012 1 STUDY OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN ORGANIC SOLID WASTES BEFORE COMPOSTING J. Huet, as illustrated by current EU waste policy and its five main priorities: prevention, reuse, recycling, recovery

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Project plan for resolution of the organic waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-year project plan for the Organic Safety Project has been developed with the objective of resolving the organic safety issues associated with the High Level Waste (HLW) in Hanford`s single-shell tanks (SSTS) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The objective of the Organic Safety Project is to ensure safe interim storage until retrieval for pretreatment and disposal operations begins, and to resolve the organic safety issues by September 2001. Since the initial identification of organics as a tank waste safety issue, progress has been made in understanding the specific aspects of organic waste combustibility, and in developing and implementing activities to resolve the organic safety issues.

Meacham, J.E.

1996-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report gives the second year`s findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

Pierce, Robert A. (Aiken, SC); Smith, James R. (Corrales, NM); Ramsey, William G. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Bickford, Dennis F. (Folly Beach, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

advances required to produce cellulosic ethanol that is cost competitive with petroleum. Cellulosic ethanol is fuel produced from the inedible, organic material abundant in...

36

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

COMPARISON OF FIVE ORGANIC WASTES REGARDING THEIR BEHAVIOUR DURING1 COMPOSTING: PART 2, NITROGEN DYNAMIC2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARISON OF FIVE ORGANIC WASTES REGARDING THEIR BEHAVIOUR DURING1 COMPOSTING: PART 2, NITROGEN nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three3 composting simulations were performed applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the5 compost were characterized

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI-URBAN COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI transfer station and the households who helped me in getting food waste samples. It should thing in my life with this little effort. #12;iii Abstract The growth of municipal solid waste

Richner, Heinz

39

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co(III) mediator in a neutral electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and neutral pH anolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the cobalt mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble radioactive species and is regenerated at the anode until all organics are converted to carbon dioxide and destroyed. The neutral electrolyte is non-corrosive, and thus extends the lifetime of the cell and its components.

Balazs, G. Bryan (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Patricia R. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co(III) mediator in a neutral electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and neutral pH anolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the cobalt mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble radioactive species and is regenerated at the anode until all organics are converted to carbon dioxide and destroyed. The neutral electrolyte is non-corrosive, and thus extends the lifetime of the cell and its components. 2 figs.

Balazs, G.B.; Lewis, P.R.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Video Article Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic Wastes into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video Article Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic Wastes into Biogas: System@cornell.edu URL: http://www.jove.com/video/3978/ DOI: 10.3791/3978 Keywords: Anaerobic Digestion, Bioenergy, Biogas, Methane, Organic Waste, Methanogenesis, Energy Crops, Date Published: // Citation: Usack

Angenent, Lars T.

42

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Can a City of 5,000,000 Recycle 60% of its Organic Waste? Lessons from 1910 New York.!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can a City of 5,000,000 Recycle 60% of its Organic Waste? Lessons from 1910 New York.! Kevin Olsen for the disposal of organic wastes. The incinerator technology of the era only allowed for low temperature with the monies generated from the sale of the recovered materials. By 1907, 60% of the city's organic waste

Columbia University

45

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

Monitoring Volatile Organic Tank Waste Using Cermet Microsensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presently, very few inexpensive technologies exist in the marketplace that can determine the contents of tank waste or monitor the chemistry of tank constituents in near-real time. The research addressed this problem by developing and assessing ceramic-metallic based microsensors for determining the constituents of a liquid organic storage tank by examining the gases in the headspace of the tank. Overall, the WBO and YSZ sensors responded well to the chemicals in this study. Responses to various concentrations were distinguishable visually. This is a clear indication that pattern recognition tools will be effective in resolving the constituents and concentrations. In tests, such as the test with acetophenone, one sensor, the WBO sensor is not extremely effective. However, the other sensor, the YSZ sensor, is effective in resolving the concentrations. This supports the need to use an array of sensors, as one sensor may be reactive to a compound while another may not. In the course of this research, several interesting phenomena surfaced. New sensors, that were fabricated but not used in a contaminant gas, seemed to function more effectively and predictably if a ?conditioning? step was imposed upon them prior to use in square wave voltammetry. A conditioning step consists of running cyclic voltammetry prior to running square wave voltammetry. This step tends to ?cleanse? the sensor surface by providing a full -1.0 V to +1.0V sweep and both oxidizing and reducing compounds on the sensor surface. [Note: squarewave voltammetry will simply oxidize or reduce compounds ? it will not induce both reactions.] This sweep is essential for recovery between samples.

Edward G. Gatliff, Ph.D.; Laura R. Skubal, Ph.D.; Michael C. Vogt, Ph.D.

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

47

Organic tanks safety program, FY97 waste aging studies. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To model tank waste aging and interpret tank waste speciation results, the authors began measuring the reactivity of organic complexants and related compounds towards radiation-induced oxidation reactions. Because of the high efficiency of scavenging of the primary radicals of water radiolysis by nitrate and nitrite ion, the major radiolytically-generated radicals in these solutions, and in Hanford tank wastes, are NO{sub 2}, NO and O{sup {minus}}. Prior to this effort, little quantitative information existed for the reactions of these radicals with organic compounds such as those that were used in Hanford processes. Therefore, modeling of actual waste aging, or even simulated waste aging, was not feasible without measuring reactivities and determining reaction paths. The authors have made the first rate measurements of complexant aging and determined some of their degradation products.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Sharma, A.K.; Hogan, M.O.; Lilga, M.A.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

COMPARISON OF FIVE ORGANIC WASTES REGARDING THEIR BEHAVIOUR DURING1 COMPOSTING: PART 1, BIODEGRADABILITY, STABILIZATION KINETICS AND2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARISON OF FIVE ORGANIC WASTES REGARDING THEIR BEHAVIOUR DURING1 COMPOSTING: PART 1 during3 composting. Three experiments in lab-scale pilots (300L) were performed for each waste, each one to be proportional to the total11 mass of material biodegraded during composting.12 13 Keywords: organic waste

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Sorbent Testing for Solidification of Organic Plutonium/Uranium Extraction Waste - Phase IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating various sorbents to solidify and immobilize hazardous constituents of the organic fraction of plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) process waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS).[5] The purpose of the solidification is to provide a cost-effective alternative to incineration of the waste. Incineration at the Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at SRS is currently identified as the treatment technology for PUREX waste. However, the CIF is not in operation at this time, so SRS is interested in pursuing alternatives to incineration for treatment of this waste. The DOE Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte, MT was designated as the facility for conducting the sorbent testing and evaluation for the organic PUREX waste surrogate. MSE Technology Applications, Inc. tested and evaluated two clay and two polymer sorbents with the capability of solidifying organic PUREX waste. A surrogate organic PUREX waste recipe was utilized, and sorbents were tested and evaluated at bench-scale, 22-liter (5-gallon) scale, and 242-liter (55-gallon) scale. This paper presents experimental results evaluating four sorbent materials including: Imbiber Beads{sup TM} IMB230301-R, Nochar A610 Petrobond{sup TM}, Petroset II{sup TM}, and Petroset II Granular{sup TM}. Previous work at SRS indicated that these products could solidify organic PUREX waste on a bench scale [1]. The sorbents were evaluated using operational criteria and final wasteform properties. Operational criteria included: sorbent capacity; sorption rate; sorbent handling; and mixing requirements. Final wasteform evaluation properties included: ignitability; thermal stability; offgas generation, leachability tests and volumetric expansion. Bench-scale tests, 22-liter (5-gallon) tests, and initial 242-liter (55-gallon) tests are complete. This paper summarizes the results of the bench-scale, 22-liter (5-gallon) scale, and 242-liter (55-gallon) scale tests performed during FY05 with an aqueous/PUREX surrogate. (authors)

Bickford, J.L.; Joyce, H.O. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., P.O. Box 4078, Butte, MT 59701 (United States); Holmes-Burns, H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Building 705-3C, P.O. Box A, Aiken SC 29802 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Dalhousie Guide to Waste Management on Campus Look for the four bin system around campus designated for paper, recyclables, organics and garbage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the four bin system around campus designated for paper, recyclables, organics.) · Ceramics · Potato chip bags & candy wrappers · Styrofoam Not acceptable: · Organics · Recyclables and dry. Organic Waste No liquids. Garbage Reconsider all waste for potential reuse before discarding

Brownstone, Rob

52

Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C. [and others

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Ashtead, GB)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

organized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of Sustainable Waste Management Systems Goal The objective of the ISWA-TU Vienna Summer School (iTOOL) is to provide advanced knowledge in the field of waste management

Szmolyan, Peter

55

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes without electrode separators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell/electrolyte/mediator combination is described for the efficient destruction of organic contaminants using metal salt mediators in a sulfuric acid electrolyte, wherein the electrodes and mediator are chosen such that hydrogen gas is produced at the cathode and no cell membrane is required. 3 figs.

Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.; Hickman, R.G.; Lewis, P.R.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

Organic components of nuclear wastes and their potential for altering radionuclide distribution when released to soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normal waste processing at the Hanford operations requires the use of many organic materials, chiefly in the form of complexing agents and diluents. These organic materials and their chemical and radiolytic degradation products, have potential for complexing fission products and transuranium elements, both in the waste streams and upon infiltration into soil, perhaps influencing future sorption or migration of the nuclides. Particular complexation characteristics of various nuclides which constitute the major fission products, long-lived isotopes, and the most mobile in radioactive wastes are discussed briefly with regards to their anticipated sorption or mobility in soils. Included in the discussion are Am, Sb, Ce, Cs, Co, Cm, Eu, I, Np, Pm, Pu, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, U, and Zr. 107 references.

McFadden, K.M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid the inlet of a function- ing plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals cab- bage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor

Columbia University

58

Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSNBC.com Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen method for generating hydrogen fuel from wastewater is now operating at a California winery material in the wastewater into hydrogen gas. There is a lot more energy locked in the wastewater than

59

Final Report. Conversion of Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilizing Hermetic Organic Rankine Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of waste heat recovery using the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is updated. Advances in power electronics with lower cost enable the use of a single shaft, high-speed generator eliminating wear items and allowing hermetic sealing of the working fluid. This allows maintenance free operation and a compact configuration that lowers cost, enabling new market opportunities.

Fuller, Robert L.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Characterizing the transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of organic wastes and digestates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia emissions varied depending on the nature of wastes and the treatment conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen losses resulted from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification can be estimated from biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification was the main process contributing to N losses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrification rate was negatively correlated to stripping rate of ammonia nitrogen. - Abstract: The transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of seven wastes were studied in ventilated air-tight 10-L reactors at 35 Degree-Sign C. Studied wastes included distinct types of organic wastes and their digestates. Ammonia emissions varied depending on the kind of waste and treatment conditions. These emissions accounted for 2-43% of the initial nitrogen. Total nitrogen losses, which resulted mainly from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification, accounted for 1-76% of the initial nitrogen. Ammonification was the main process responsible for nitrogen losses. An equation which allows estimating the ammonification flow of each type of waste according to its biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio was proposed. As a consequence of the lower contribution of storage and leachate rates, stripping and nitrification rates of ammonia nitrogen were negatively correlated. This observation suggests the possibility of promotingnitrification in order to reduce ammonia emissions.

Zeng Yang, E-mail: yang.zeng@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes Cedex (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France); Guardia, Amaury de; Daumoin, Mylene; Benoist, Jean-Claude [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes Cedex (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Action plan for responses to abnormal conditions in Hanford Site radioactive waste tanks with high organic content. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This action plan describes the criteria and the organizational responsibilities required for ensuring that waste storage tanks with high organic contents are maintained in a safe condition at the Hanford Site. In addition, response actions are outlined for (1) prevention or mitigation of excessive temperatures; or (2) a material release from any waste tank with high organic content. Other response actions may be defined by Westinghouse Hanford Company Systems Engineering if a waste tank parameter goes out of specification. Trend analysis indicates the waste tank parameters have seasonal variations, but are otherwise stable.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evaluation of alternative nonflame technologies for destruction of hazardous organic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) commissioned an evaluation of mixed waste treatment technologies that are alternatives to incineration for destruction of hazardous organic wastes. The purpose of this effort is to evaluate technologies that are alternatives to open-flame, free-oxygen combustion (as exemplified by incinerators), and recommend to the Waste Type Managers and the MWFA which technologies should be considered for further development. Alternative technologies were defined as those that have the potential to: destroy organic material without use of open-flame reactions with free gas-phase oxygen as the reaction mechanism; reduce the offgas volume and associated contaminants (metals, radionuclides, and particulates) emitted under normal operating conditions; eliminate or reduce the production of dioxins and furans; and reduce the potential for excursions in the process that can lead to accidental release of harmful levels of chemical or radioactive materials. Twenty-three technologies were identified that have the potential for meeting these requirements. These technologies were rated against the categories of performance, readiness for deployment, and environment safety, and health. The top ten technologies that resulted from this evaluation are Steam Reforming, Electron Beam, UV Photo-Oxidation, Ultrasonics, Eco Logic reduction process, Supercritical Water oxidation, Cerium Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation, DETOX{sup SM}, Direct Chemical Oxidation (peroxydisulfate), and Neutralization/Hydrolysis.

Schwinkendorf, W.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Musgrave, B.C. [BC Musgrave, Inc. (United States); Drake, R.N. [Drake Engineering, Inc. (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Organic chemical aging mechanisms: An annotated bibliography. Waste Tank Safety Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An annotated bibliography has been compiled of the potential chemical and radiological aging mechanisms of the organic constituents (non-ferrocyanide) that would likely be found in the UST at Hanford. The majority of the work that has been conducted on the aging of organic chemicals used for extraction and processing of nuclear materials has been in conjunction with the acid or PUREX type processes. At Hanford the waste being stored in the UST has been stabilized with caustic. The aging factors that were used in this work were radiolysis, hydrolysis and nitrite/nitrate oxidation. The purpose of this work was two-fold: to determine whether or not research had been or is currently being conducted on the species associated with the Hanford UST waste, either as a mixture or as individual chemicals or chemical functionalities, and to determine what areas of chemical aging need to be addressed by further research.

Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Nelson, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO[sub 2]. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement. 2 figs.

Balazs, G.B.; Chiba, Z.; Lewis, P.R.; Nelson, N.; Steward, G.A.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO.sub.2. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement.

Balazs, G. Bryan (Livermore, CA); Chiba, Zoher (Moraga, CA); Lewis, Patricia R. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Norvell (Palo Alto, CA); Steward, G. Anthony (Los Altos Hills, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Rankine Cycle to extract The theoretical Rankine Cycle efficiency (~R) is energy from low temperature waste heat. By 1968, a defined as: 3.8 megawatt unit using R-11 refrigerant was placed in commercial operation in Japan (2) and currently ?ZR.... Figure 2 compares the theo The basic Organic Rankine Cycle may be described retical Rankine efficiency for several hydrocarbons, using the Pressure-Enthalpy Diagram of a typical fluorocarbons and water within the evaporating working fluid (R-11). (See...

Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Cellulose binding domain proteins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Cellulose binding domain proteins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

Evans, Gordon Barcus

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cellulose and Hemicellulose Models 81 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 8486, 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cellulose and hemicellulose to produce sugars that organisms can ferment to ethanol and other productsCellulose and Hemicellulose Models 81 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 84­86, 2000-2289/00/84­86/0081/$14.00 81 *Author to whom all correspondence and reprint requests should be addressed. Cellulose

California at Riverside, University of

72

A reclamation approach for mined prime farmland by adding organic wastes and lime to the subsoil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface mined prime farmland may be reclaimed by adding organic wastes and lime to subsoil thus improving conditions in root zone. In this study, sewage sludge, poultry manure, horse bedding, and lime were applied to subsoil (15-30 cm) during reclamation. Soil properties and plant growth were measured over two years. All organic amendments tended to lower the subsoil bulk density and increase organic matter and total nitrogen. Liming raised exchangeable calcium, slightly increased pH, but decreased exchangeable magnesium and potassium. Corn ear-leaf and forage tissue nitrogen, yields, and nitrogen removal increased in treatments amended with sewage sludge and poultry manure, but not horse bedding. Subsoil application of sewage sludge or poultry manure seems like a promising method in the reclamation of surface mined prime farmland based on the improvements observed in the root zone environment.

Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessment of concentration mechanisms for organic wastes in underground storage tanks at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted an initial conservative evaluation of physical and chemical processes that could lead to significant localized concentrations of organic waste constituents in the Hanford underground storage tanks (USTs). This evaluation was part of ongoing studies at Hanford to assess potential safety risks associated with USTs containing organics. Organics in the tanks could pose a potential problem if localized concentrations are high enough to propagate combustion and are in sufficient quantity to produce a large heat and/or gas release if in contact with a suitable oxidant. The major sources of oxidants are oxygen in the overhead gas space of the tanks and sodium nitrate and nitrite either as salt cake solids or dissolved in the supernatant and interstitial liquids.

Gerber, M.A.; Burger, L.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Ryan, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Zollars, R.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Method of saccharifying cellulose  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of a reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

Johnson, Eric A. (Brookline, MA); Demain, Arnold L. (Wellesley, MA); Madia, Ashwin (Decatur, IL)

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

75

Method of saccharifying cellulose  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

76

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Waste: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to understand the susceptibility of transuranic and mixed waste to microbial degradation (as well as any mechanism which depends upon either complexation and/or redox of metal ions), it is essential to understand the association of metal ions with organic ligands present in mixed wastes. These ligands have been found in our previous EMSP study to limit electron transfer reactions and strongly affect transport and the eventual fate of radionuclides in the environment. As transuranic waste (and especially mixed waste) will be retained in burial sites and in legacy containment for (potentially) many years while awaiting treatment and removal (or remaining in place under stewardship agreements at government subsurface waste sites), it is also essential to understand the aging of mixed wastes and its implications for remediation and fate of radionuclides. Mixed waste containing actinides and organic materials are especially complex and require extensive study. The EMSP program described in this report is part of a joint program with the Environmental Sciences Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Stony Brook University portion of this award has focused on the association of uranium (U(VI)) and transuranic analogs (Ce(III) and Eu(III)) with cellulosic materials and related compounds, with development of implications for microbial transformation of mixed wastes. The elucidation of the chemical nature of mixed waste is essential for the formulation of remediation and encapsulation technologies, for understanding the fate of contaminant exposed to the environment, and for development of meaningful models for contaminant storage and recovery.

Halada, Gary P

2008-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Growth and elemental composition of sorghum sudangrass grown on flyash/organic waste-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefitsof using fly ash/organic waste mixtures amended to soils for growth andcomposition of mineral elements by `sorgrass` (Sorghum vulgaris var.sudanense Hitchc.) a shorghum-sudangrass hybrid plant. This experimentwas conducted using a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to either sewage sludge,poultry manure, or dairy manure at six application rates. Our threeorganic wastes when mixed with fly ash at varied rates of applicationresulted in elevated concentrations of NO{sub 3}, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, B,Cu and Zn in both soil and plants. The data of this study indicated thatthe availability of elements to plants varied according to the organicsource mixed with fly ash and the rate of application. The elements Band Zn were observed to be significantly greater in plant tissuesexposed to fly ash/poultry manure or fly ash/dairy manure mixtures.Soils amended with fly ash/sewage sludge or poultry manure generallyimproved plant growth and enhanced yield when applied at rates of 25tons/acre, and decreased thereafter. However, soils amended with flyash/dairy manure improved plant growth and enhanced yield when appliedat rates upto 50 tons/acre and decreased thereafter. The decreases inyield beyond these application rates were probably due to theaccumulation of high levels of B and Zn which are phytotoxic and/orelevated levels of inorganic dissolved salts. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

Sajwan, K.S. [Savannah State College, GA (United States); Ornes, W.H.; Youngblood, T.V. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

Testoni, A. L.

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Extraction equilibria between organic CMPO-n-dodecane and aqueous nitric acid phases for selected tank waste components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of the transuranium elements from tank-stored wastes is an important step in the cost effective treatment and preparation of these wastes for permanent disposal. One promising method of treatment involves dissolving the tank sludges in acid, followed by extraction of the transuranium species. The TRUEX process, which uses an extracting medium composed of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in an organic solvent such as n-dodecane, is being tested for this purpose. Although CMPO is a powerful extractant for all the actinides, concern arises that certain process chemicals present in the waste will compete for the CMPO. Data will be presented on the pure component equilibrium characteristics of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate and bismuth nitrate partitioned between a nitric acid aqueous phase and a CMPO-n-dodecane organic phase.

Spencer, B.B.; Egan, B.Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Counce, R.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project of anaerobic digestion (AD) techniques for the conversion of biomass-related organic waste materials to useful energy products. This approach to industrial ecology, or sustainability, is well advanced in Europe where

Chatterjee, Avik P.

85

Home and community composting for on-site treatment of urban organic waste: perspective for Europe and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home and community composting for on-site treatment of urban organic waste: perspective for Europe practice (Base Sce), this paper examines on-site UOW composting strategies using a combination of centralized composting facilities (CCF), community composting centres (CCC) and home composting (HC) (Sce 1, 2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Pyrolysis behavior of different type of materials contained in the rejects of packaging waste sorting plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the influence of materials in the pyrolysis of real plastic waste samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inorganic compounds remain unaltered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components give rise to an increase in char formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components promote the production of aqueous phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components increase CO and CO{sub 2} contents in the gases. - Abstract: In this paper rejected streams coming from a waste packaging material recovery facility have been characterized and separated into families of products of similar nature in order to determine the influence of different types of ingredients in the products obtained in the pyrolysis process. The pyrolysis experiments have been carried out in a non-stirred batch 3.5 dm{sup 3} reactor, swept with 1 L min{sup -1} N{sub 2}, at 500 Degree-Sign C for 30 min. Pyrolysis liquids are composed of an organic phase and an aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is greater as higher is the cellulosic material content in the sample. The organic phase contains valuable chemicals as styrene, ethylbenzene and toluene, and has high heating value (HHV) (33-40 MJ kg{sup -1}). Therefore they could be used as alternative fuels for heat and power generation and as a source of valuable chemicals. Pyrolysis gases are mainly composed of hydrocarbons but contain high amounts of CO and CO{sub 2}; their HHV is in the range of 18-46 MJ kg{sup -1}. The amount of CO-CO{sub 2} increases, and consequently HHV decreases as higher is the cellulosic content of the waste. Pyrolysis solids are mainly composed of inorganics and char formed in the process. The cellulosic materials lower the quality of the pyrolysis liquids and gases, and increase the production of char.

Adrados, A., E-mail: aitziber.adrados@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); De Marco, I.; Lopez-Urionabarrenechea, A.; Caballero, B.M.; Laresgoiti, M.F. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Co, {sup 79}Se, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc as pertechnetate, {sup 106}Ru/Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, and {sup 243+244}Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}AMU, {sup 242}AMU, {sup 243}AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all contract limits (molar ratio of analyte to sodium or ratio of becquerels of analyte to moles of sodium) defined in Specification 7 for Envelope A. Except for a few cases, the characterization results met or surpassed the quality control requirements established by the governing quality assurance plan and met or surpassed the minimum reportable quantity requirements specified by BNFL.

SK Fiskum; PR Bredt; JA Campbell; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; GJ Lumetta; GM Mong; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist; RG Swoboda; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, bioenergy from second generation cellulosic feedstocks cost more than fossil fuels. Another issue in dealing with corn grain as the feedstock for ethanol is that corn is used for food and livestock feed. The cellulosic process takes cellulosic material... Assessment and Utilization Options for Three Counties in Eastern Oregon? which was prepared by McNeil Technologies (2003); ?Biomass Inventory and Bioenergy Assessment: An evaluation of Organic Material Resources for Bioenergy Production in Washington State...

Gleinser, Matthew A.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

90

Oxygen demand for the stabilization of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in passively aerated bioreactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • The use of an passively aerated reactor enables effective stabilization of OFMSW. • Convective air flow does not inhibit the aerobic stabilization of waste. • The use of an passively aerated reactor reduces the heat loss due to convection. • The volume of supplied air exceeds 1.7–2.88 times the microorganisms demand. - Abstract: Conventional aerobic waste treatment technologies require the use of aeration devices that actively transport air through the stabilized waste mass, which greatly increases operating costs. In addition, improperly operated active aeration systems, may have the adverse effect of cooling the stabilized biomass. Because active aeration can be a limiting factor for the stabilization process, passive aeration can be equally effective and less expensive. Unfortunately, there are few reports documenting the use of passive aeration systems in municipal waste stabilization. There have been doubts raised as to whether a passive aeration system provides enough oxygen to the organic matter mineralization processes. In this paper, the effectiveness of aeration during aerobic stabilization of four different organic fractions of municipal waste in a reactor with an integrated passive ventilation system and leachate recirculation was analyzed. For the study, four fractions separated by a rotary screen were chosen. Despite the high temperatures in the reactor, the air flow rate was below 0.016 m{sup 3}/h. Using Darcy’s equation, theoretical values of the air flow rate were estimated, depending on the intensity of microbial metabolism and the amount of oxygen required for the oxidation of organic compounds. Calculations showed that the volume of supplied air exceeded the microorganisms demand for oxidation and endogenous activity by 1.7–2.88-fold.

Kasinski, Slawomir, E-mail: slawomir.kasinski@uwm.edu.pl; Wojnowska-Baryla, Irena

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the cellulose chains, and in fact the observed rapid decline in the resonance absorption intensity at temperatures in excess of 600C was attributed to aromatization...

92

REVISED GUIDELINES FOR USING CELLULOSE DEGRADATION PRODUCT-IMPACTED KD VALUES FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AND COMPOSITE ANALYSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulosic materials include wood, paper, rags, and cardboard products. These materials are co-disposed with radiological waste at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF). Cellulosic materials readily degrade in the environment to form cellulose degradation products (CDP) that will partition to the sediment or remain mobile in the groundwater. Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has conducted studies to estimate the impact of CDP on radionuclide sorption to SRS sediments (Kd values). It was found that CDP impact on radionuclide sorption varies with radionuclide and CDP concentration. Furthermore, it was found that the amount of carbon (C) in the system could increase or decrease Kd values with respect to the base case of when no CDP was added. Throughout the expected pH range of the ELLWF, a low concentration of CDP in the system would increase Kd values (because C would sorb to the sediment and provide more exchange sites for radionuclides to sorb), whereas greater concentrations of CDP ({ge}20 mg/L C) would decrease Kd values (because C would remain in solution and complex the radionuclide and not permit the radionuclide to sorb to the sediment). A review of >230 dissolved organic carbon (DOC) groundwater concentrations in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS indicated that the average DOC concentration, a gross measure of CDP, was 5 mg/L C. At approximately this DOC concentration, the laboratory studies demonstrated that no anions (Tc, I, or Se) or cations (Ni, Sr, Ce, Eu, Zr, or Th) have decreased sorption in the presence of carbon (an analogue for CDP).

Kaplan, D.

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

number = just monomers . Refinery for Cellulosic Biomass tofrom biomass through cellulosic refinery concept that could

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Genome-Based Models to Optimize In Situ Bioremediation of Uranium and Harvesting Electrical Energy from Waste Organic Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to provide computational tools to predictively model the behavior of two microbial communities of direct relevance to Department of Energy interests: 1) the microbial community responsible for in situ bioremediation of uranium in contaminated subsurface environments; and 2) the microbial community capable of harvesting electricity from waste organic matter and renewable biomass. During this project the concept of microbial electrosynthesis, a novel form of artificial photosynthesis for the direct production of fuels and other organic commodities from carbon dioxide and water was also developed and research was expanded into this area as well.

Lovley, Derek R

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

Accelerated Cellulose Depolymerization Catalyzed by Paired Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cellulose to sugars is a critical step and has been a major barrier for improved economics in the utilization of cellulosic biomass. We report a novel catalytic system...

96

Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2010, Verenium...

97

Changes in Soil Physical Properties Due to Organic Waste Applications: A Review1 R. KHALEEL, K. R. REDDY, AND M. R. OVERCASH2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. REDDY, AND M. R. OVERCASH2 ABSTRACT Land application of organic wastes such as animal manure, munici- pal wastes, and sewage sludge could alter the soil physical properties. Repeated substantial). Several investiga- tors, in monitoring runoff water quality from small plot-sized land application areas

Florida, University of

98

Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Organic Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating various sorbents to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both aqueous and organic waste streams are discharged from REDC. Organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX), Cleanex, and Pubex processes.1 The PUREX waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. An aqueous waste stream is also produced from these separation processes. MSE has been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes specially formulated radioactive shielding materials developed by Science and Technology Applications, LLC. This paper will focus on the sorbent testing work. Based on work performed at Savannah River Site (SRS) (Refs. 1, 2), ORNL tested and evaluated three sorbents capable of solidifying the PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex waste streams and a composite of the three organic waste streams: Imbiber Beads{sup R} IMB230301 (Imbiber Beads), Nochar A610 Petro Bond, and Petroset II Granular{sup TM} (Petroset II-G). Surrogates of the PUREX, Pubex, Cleanex, and a composite organic waste were used for the bench-scale testing. Recommendations resulting from the ORNL testing included follow-on testing by MSE for two of the three sorbents: Nochar Petro Bond and Petroset II-G. MSE recommended that another clay sorbent, Organoclay BM-QT-199, be added to the test sequence. The sorbent/surrogate combinations were tested at bench scale, 19-liter (L) [5-gallon (gal)] bucket scale, and 208-L (55-gal) drum scale. The testing performed by MSE will help ORNL select the right solidification materials and wasteform generation methods for the design of a new treatment facility. The results could also be used to help demonstrate that ORNL could meet the waste acceptance criteria for the ultimate disposal site for the waste-forms. The organics will be solidified as transuranic waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and the aqueous waste stream will be grouted and disposed of at the Nevada Test Site as low-level waste if real waste testing indicates similar results to the surrogate testing. The objective of this work was to identify a sorbent capable of solidifying PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex organic wastes individually and a composite of the three organic waste streams. The sorbent and surrogate combinations must also be compatible with processing equipment and maintain stability under a variety of conditions that could occur during storage/shipment of the solidified wastes. (authors)

Bickford, J.; Foote, M. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Montana (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

PROCESS DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF CELLULOSE HYDROLYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlled, ethanol produced from cellulose is not currentlycellulose to sugars that are readily fermentable to ethanol.

Lindsey, R.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Cellulose nanocrystal from pomelo (C. Grandis osbeck) albedo: Chemical, morphology and crystallinity evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citrus peel is one of the under-utilized waste materials that have potential in producing a valuable fibre, which are cellulose and cellulose nanocrystal. Cellulose was first isolated from pomelo (C. Grandis Osbeck) albedo by combination of alkali treatment and bleaching process, followed by acid hydrolysis (65% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 45 °C, 45min) to produce cellulose nanocrystal. The crystalline, structural, morphological and chemical properties of both materials were studied. Result reveals the crystallinity index obtained from X-ray diffraction for cellulose nanocrystal was found higher than extracted cellulose with the value of 60.27% and 57.47%, respectively. Fourier transform infrared showed that the chemical treatments removed most of the hemicellulose and lignin from the pomelo albedo fibre. This has been confirmed further by SEM and TEM for their morphological studies. These results showed that cellulose and cellulose nanocrystal were successfully obtained from pomelo albedo and might be potentially used in producing functional fibres for food application.

Zain, Nor Fazelin Mat; Yusop, Salma Mohamad [Food Science Program, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Ishak [Polymer Research Centre (PORCE), School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

105

Volatilization of selected organic compounds from a creosote-waste land-treatment facility. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to evaluate the emissions of volatile and semi-volatile compounds which are constituents of a complex creosote waste from laboratory simulations of a land treatment system to assess the potential human exposure to hazardous compounds from this source. In addition, the Thibodeaux-Hwang Air Emission Release Rate (AERR) model was evaluated for its use in predicting emission rates of hazardous constituents of creosote wood preservative waste from land treatment facilities. A group of hazardous volatile and semi-volatile constituents present in the creosote waste was selected for evaluation in this study and included a variety of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA's), phenol, and chlorinated and substituted phenols.

Scott, E.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Dalhousie Guide to Waste Management on Campus Look for the four bin system around campus designated for paper, recyclables, organics and garbage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the four bin system around campus designated for paper, recyclables, organics.) · Ceramics · Potato chip bags & candy wrappers · Styrofoam Not acceptable: · Organics · Recyclables. For personal cell phone disposal, visit: call2recycle.ca · Employees can request office related e-waste

Brownstone, Rob

107

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to be less efficient and more expensive. This work examines organic ...

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

EFFECT OF NITROGEN OXIDE PRETREATMENTS ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioconversion of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," LBL-of Cellulose and the Production of Ethanol," LBL-6859,the cellulose is a major obstacle to hydrolysis. Ethanol The

Borrevik, R.K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 g/L potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent column breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. (3) Improper sample preservation: ion-chromatographic analysis of several samples wit

DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated-carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 giL potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent adsorption tube breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. Linear response was checked using both non-volatile TOX species (trichlorophenol) an

JG DOUGLAS; HK MEZNARICH, PHD; JR OLSEN; GA ROSS PHD; M STAUFFER

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cornell Waste Management Institute Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on all landfill and incinerator waste. Five dollars would be charged to the facility for every ton://www.nypsc.org) describes Framework Principles for Product Stewardship. · Other "types" of operations include pyrolysis and gasification plants. DEC is looking at these facilities to help insure they

Wang, Z. Jane

112

Optimal Use of Organic Waste in Future Energy Systems the Danish case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, gasification, fermentation (biogas production) and improved incineration. It is argued that it is important for CHP production. On the other hand least greenhouse gases are emitted if biogas is produced from waste. The approximate 70 Danish biogas plants contribute with a mere 1% of the electricity production

113

A multi-component partitioning model to predict organic leaching from stabilized/solidified oily wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

42 44 44 Figure 12. 3 Pseudo-Component Model using Modified K values, j = 1 Figure 13. TOC Leaching Rate from a Solidified Oily Waste, . ????, 46 50 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Composition of Ordinary Portland Cement Table 2. Basic Hydration.... Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and flyash are common binders of choice as they are inexpensive, stable against damage and fire, and methods of mixing and processing them are well understood. Poor treatment efficiencies have been found when solidifying...

O'Cleirigh, Declan Ronan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cost Effective Waste Heat Organic Rankine Cycle Applications and Systems Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptually, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power cycle has been well known to the engineering community for many years. Despite the rapid escalation of energy costs during the past decade, and a concerted, though somewhat belated, effort towards...

Rohrer, J. W.; Bronicki, L. Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studies of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).

Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.; Taylor, P.H. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Compositions for saccharification of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to enzyme compositions for high temperature saccharification of cellulosic material and to uses thereof.

McBrayer, Brett; Shaghasi, Tarana; Vlasenko, Elena

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

An Assessment of the Stability and the Potential for In-Situ Synthesis of Regulated Organic Compounds in High Level Radioactive Waste Stored at Hanford, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability assessment examined 269 non-detected regulated compounds, first seeking literature references of the stability of the compounds, then evaluating each compound based upon the presence of functional groups using professional judgment. Compounds that could potentially survive for significant periods in the tanks (>1 year) were designated as stable. Most of the functional groups associated with the regulated organic compounds were considered unstable under tank waste conditions. The general exceptions with respect to functional group stability are some simple substituted aromatic and polycyclic aromatic compounds that resist oxidation and the multiple substituted aliphatic and aromatic halides that hydrolyze or dehydrohalogenate slowly under tank waste conditions. One-hundred and eighty-one (181) regulated, organic compounds were determined as likely unstable in the tank waste environment.

Wiemers, K.D.; Babad, H.; Hallen, R.T.; Jackson, L.P.; Lerchen, M.E.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Purification of aqueous cellulose ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manufacture of cellulose ethers usually involves high amounts of salt by-products. For application of the product, salt must be removed. In this work, we have studied the injection of high-pressure CO{sub 2} into an aqueous polymer-salt solution; we find that upon addition of isopropanol in addition to CO{sub 2}, the solution separates into two phases. One phase is rich in polymer and water, and the other phase contains mostly isopropanol, water and CO{sub 2}. The salt distributes between the two phases, thereby offering interesting possibilities for development of a new purification process for water-soluble polymers. This work presents experimental phase-equilibrium data for hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose with sodium acetate and potassium sulfate, respectively, in the region 40{degree}C and 30 to 80 bar. Based on these data, we suggest a process for the manufacture and purification of water-soluble cellulose ethers. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Bartscherer, K.A.; de Pablo, J.J.; Bonnin, M.C.; Prausnitz, J.M.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance, ethanol and cellulose hydrolysis measurementsSimultaneous ethanol fermentation and cellulose hydrolysisand fermentation of cellulose to ethanol. Appl. Environ.

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Waste Tank Safety Program. Annual status report for FY 1993, Task 3: Organic chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This task supports the tank-vapor project, mainly by providing organic analytical support and by analyzing Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) vapor-space samples, collected via SUMMA{trademark} canisters, by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (MS). In the absence of receiving tank-vapor samples, we have focused our efforts toward validating the normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) sampling and analysis methods and preparing the SUMMA{trademark} laboratory. All required milestones were met, including a report on the update of phase I sampling and analysis on August 15, 1993. This update described the work involved in preparing to analyze phase I samples (Appendix A). This report describes the analytical support provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL){sup (a)} to the Hanford Tank Safety Vapor Program.

Lucke, R.B.; Clauss, T.T.W.; Hoheimer, R.; Goheen, S.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Myers, Michele D. (Dacono, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

125

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

Electrospinning of Cellulose and Carbon Nanotube-Cellulose Fibers for Smart Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulose is one of the Earth’s most abundant natural polymers and is used as a raw material in various applications. Recently, cellulose based electro-active paper (EAPap) has been investigated for its potential as a smart material...

Pankonien, Alexander

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

argentine organizations: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing...

128

Briquette comprising caking coal and municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Briquettes of specified geometry and composition are produced to serve as feed material or ''burden'' in a moving-burden gasifier for the production of a synthesis or fuel gas from organic solid waste materials and coal, including especially, the so-called ''caking'' coals, as in the process of copending application number 675,918. The briquettes are formed from a well-blended mixture of shredded organic solid wastes, including especially, municipal solid waste (Msw) or biomass, and crushed caking coal, including coal fines. A binder material may or may not be required, depending on the coal/msw ratio and the compaction pressure employed. The briquettes may be extruded, stamped, or pressed, employing compaction pressures in excess of 1000 psi, and preferably in the range of 2000 to 10,000 psi. The briquettes may be circular, polygonal, or irregular in cross-section; they may be solid, or concentrically perforated to form a hollow cylinder or polygon; they may be formed into saddles, pillows or doughnuts. The ratio of caking coal to shredded municipal solid waste is controlled so that each part of the predominantly cellulosic organic solid waste will be blended with 0.5 to 3.0 parts of crushed coal. Suitable binder materials include dewatered sewage slude (Dss), ''black liquor'' rich in lignin derivatives, black strap molasses, waste oil, and starch. The binder concentration is preferably in the range of 2 to 6 percent. If coals high in sulfur content are to be processed, at least a stoichiometric equivalent of dolomite may be included in the briquette formulation to eliminate a major fraction of the sulfur with the slag.

Schulz, H.W.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA) Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cellulose requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking...

132

Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and...

133

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of glucose from cellulose Projected Cellulosic Ethanol CostsEthanol Research • Improve the understanding of biomass fractionation, pretreatment, and cellulosecellulose to glucose, and ferment all sugars Ethanol

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the direct evaporator. A testbed was constructed and the prototype demonstrated at the GE GRC Niskayuna facility.

Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

137

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the flexibility to run on numerous biomass feedstocks including wood chips, tall grasses, corn stover (residual biofuels from cellulosic biomass. The company's Consolidated Bioprocessing method converts non-food biomass feedstocks #12;into cellulosic ethanol through the use of a patented process that eliminates the need

138

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic Rankine cycle waste heat power conversion system. ”Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat Recovery. ” Journal ofRankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing Processes. ”

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Cellulose, ethanol, biofuel, Clostridiumincreases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrassincreases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC) Laboratories »OrganicOrganization

144

Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

Johnson, B.M.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

Johnson, Bruce M. (Bend, OR)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Synthetic biology approach to cellulose degradation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on earth, is composed of ? – 1,4 – linked glucose units, which in turn form a highly ordered crystalline structure that is insoluble and recalcitrant to degradation. It is the ...

Lakhundi, Sahreena Saleem

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Introduction Proposed Strategy for Cellulosic Bioethanol Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Valdes Chem C234 Spring 2011, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Our current energy crisis has-322. 3. Lau, M. W., and B. E. Dale. "Cellulosic Ethanol Production from AFEX-treated Corn Stover Using

Iglesia, Enrique

148

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL underBioconversion of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol, LBL-of Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation (with

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation." Reportand Continuous Cellulose Hydrolysis with and without EthanolLindsey. CELLULOSE BIOCONVERSION TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL

Wilke, C.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation." ReportOf Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol I Charles R. WilkeBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL CharlesBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL Charlesof Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Lawrence Berkeley

Wilke, Charles R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioconversion of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol." (JuneBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL CharlesBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL Charles

Wilke, Charles R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ethanol-production from cellobiose, amorphous cellulose, andsugars into ethanol. hemicellulose and cellulose by hydro-ethanol has been improving the technology for hydro- lysis of recalcitrant cellulose,

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with either enzyme or cellulose, III, ETHANOL FERMENTATIONof Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Progress Report,of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Progress Report,

Wilke, Charles R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL underof Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation, withCandidate. CELLULOSE BIOCONVERSION TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Enzymatic hydrolysis of low substituted carboxymethyl cellulose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF LOW SUBSTITUTED CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULOSE A Thesis by GUADALUPE CHANONA DOMINGUEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1984 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF LOW SUBSTITUTED CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULOSE A Thesis by GUADALUPE CHANONA DOMINGUEZ Approved as to style and content by: Cady R. Engler airman) Ed. J. Soltes (Member...

Chanona Dominquez, Guadalupe

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

158

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

Rapp, F., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT (Germany); Elsner, P., E-mail: peter.elsner@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT, Germany and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

141 Open ORC Systemfor Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorof an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the yeast chromosomes for direct conversion of cellulose tothe yeast chromosomes for direct conversion of cellulose to

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material Erin Baker Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty; Environmental policy 2 #12;1 Introduction This paper contains supplementary material for "Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

164

NREL: News - NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

114 NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme CelA digests cellulose faster than enzymes from commercial preparations January 2, 2014 Researchers at...

165

Electric Field Alignment of Cellulose Based-Polymer Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulose whiskers (CWs) obtained from naturally occuring cellulose are nano-inclusions which show a lot of promise as mechanical reinforcements in polymers. Typically, a relatively high content is added to realize improvement in effective...

Kalidindi, Sanjay Varma

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Research Advances Cellulosic Ethanol, NREL Leads the Way (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure highlights NREL's recent advances in cellulosic ethanol production. Research at NREL addresses both biochemical and thermochemical processes.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Soluble arsenic and selenium species in fly ash/organic waste-amended soils using ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixing coal fly ash with an organic waste increases macronutrient content and may make land application of fly ash a viable disposal alternative. However, trace element chemistry of these mixed waste products warrants investigation. Speciation of As and Se in soil solutions of fly ash-, poultry litter- and sewage sludge-amended soils was determined over a 10-day period by ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). Detection limits were 0.031, 0.028, 0.051, 0.161, 0.497, and 0.660 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1} for dimethylarsinate (DMA), As(III), monomethylarsonate (MMA), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI), respectively. Arsenic was highly water-soluble from poultry litter and appeared to be predominantly As(V). Arsenic(V) was the predominant species in soil amended with two fly ashes. Application of fly ash/poultry litter mixtures increased As solubility and led to the prevalence of DMA as the major As species. DMA concentrations of these soil solutions decreased rapidly over the sampling period relative to As(V), suggesting that DMA readily underwent mineralization in the soil solution. Se(VI) was the predominant soluble Se species in all treatments indicating rapid oxidation of Se(IV) initially solubilized from the fly ashes.

Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences] [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Interface control document between PUREX Plant Transition and Solid Waste Disposal Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interfacing responsibilities regarding solid waste management are described for the Solid Waste Disposal Division and the PUREX Transition Organization.

Carlson, A.B.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

172

BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin Containing Substrates Bin Yang cellulose and solids containing 56% cellulose and 28% lignin from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn of cellulase and particularly beta-glucosidase on lignin. Of particular note, BSA treatment of pretreated corn

California at Riverside, University of

173

Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

Woodward, J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered.

Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rates for Municipal Solid Waste: Implementation Experience,RCRA) and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984,by the EPA, states, and solid waste organizations throughout

Menell, Peter S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Magnetic Alignment of Cellulose Nanowhiskers in an All-Cellulose Composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unidirectional reinforced nanocomposite paper was fabricated from cellulose nanowhiskers and wood pulp under an externally-applied magnetic field. A 1.2 Tesla magnetic field was applied in order to align the nanowhiskers in the pulp as it was being formed into a sheet of paper. The magnetic alignment was driven by the characteristic negative diamagnetic anisotropy of the cellulose nanowhiskers. ESEM micrographs demonstrated unidirectional alignment of the nanowhiskers in the all-cellulose composite paper. Comparing with control paper sheets made from wood pulp only, the storage modulus in the all-cellulose nanocomposites increased dramatically. The storage modulus along the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field was much stronger than that parallel to the magnetic field. This new nanocomposite, which contains preferentially-oriented microstructures and has improved mechanical properties, demonstrates the possibility of expanding the functionality of paper products and constitutes a promising alternative to hydrocarbon based materials and fibers.

Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Zuyan; Al-Haik, Marwan; Tehrani, Mehran; Murray, Frank; Tennenbaum, Rina; Garmestani, Hamid

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Thermal degradation of cellulose in alkali  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass in an alkaline aqueous slurry can be liquefied by heat and pressure. Understanding the mechanisms of biomass liquefaction to improve the efficiency of converting biomass to useful products, particularly chemicals and synthetic fuels is discussed. To study the chemical mechanisms of this process, pure cellulose, the main component of biomass, was liquefied. The 78 cellulose liquefaction products that were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry include polyols, furans, ketones, hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds. Polyols may be formed by hydrogenolytic cleavage. Furans an cyclic ketones may be cyclization products of dicarbonyl intermediates formed by aldol condensation of small initial degradation products such as acetone and acrolein. Several of these small carbonyl compounds were used as model compounds to test proposed mechanisms for furans and cyclic ketones and obtained products supporting five of the mechanisms. For the best case of 26 cellulose liquefaction experiments, 34% of the initial mass of the cellulose was converted to acetone-soluble oil with a heat of combustion of 14,000 Btu/lb.

Miller, R.K.; Molton, P.M.; Russell, J.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cellulose-Bound Magnesium Diboride Superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulose-Bound Magnesium Diboride Superconductivity Y.L. Lin and M.O. Pekguleryuz Department Canada Abstract--Two-phase superconductor tapes were produced by blending high purity magnesium diboride junctions. I. INTRODUCTION Magnesium diboride was found to be superconducting in 2001 by Nagamatsu et al. [1

Ryan, Dominic

179

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) ORGANIC AND NITRATE DESTRUCTION PRIOR TO VITRIFICATION: CRUCIBLE SCALE TO ENGINEERING SCALE DEMONSTRATIONS AND NON-RADIOACTIVE TO RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over a decade ago, an in-tank precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The full scale demonstration with actual HLW was performed in SRS Tank 48 (T48). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was added to enable Cs-137 extraction as CsTPB. The CsTPB, an organic, and its decomposition products proved to be problematic for subsequent processing of the Cs-137 precipitate in the SRS HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal in a HLW repository. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a technology for destroying the organics and nitrates in the T48 waste to render it compatible with subsequent HLW vitrification. During FBSR processing the T48 waste is converted into organic-free and nitrate-free carbonate-based minerals which are water soluble. The soluble nature of the carbonate-based minerals allows them to be dissolved and pumped to the vitrification facility or returned to the tank farm for future vitrification. The initial use of the FBSR process for T48 waste was demonstrated with simulated waste in 2003 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a specially designed sealed crucible test that reproduces the FBSR pyrolysis reactions, i.e. carbonate formation, organic and nitrate destruction. This was followed by pilot scale testing of simulants at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003-4 and then engineering scale demonstrations by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRS/SRNL at the Hazen Research, Inc. (HRI) test facility in Golden, CO in 2006 and 2008. Radioactive sealed crucible testing with real T48 waste was performed at SRNL in 2008, and radioactive Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was performed in the SRNL Shielded Cell Facility (SCF) in 2008.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M; Gene Daniel, G; Paul Burket, P; Charles Crawford, C

2009-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

Compositions for enhancing hydroysis of cellulosic material by cellulolytic enzyme compositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention relates to compositions comprising a GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and an organic compound comprising a carboxylic acid moiety, a lactone moiety, a phenolic moiety, a flavonoid moiety, or a combination thereof, wherein the combination of the GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and the organic compound enhances hydrolysis of a cellulosic material by a cellulolytic enzyme compared to the GH61 polypeptide alone or the organic compound alone. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Johansen, Katja Salomon

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

PILOT PLANT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JUNE 30, 1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioconversion of Cellulose to Ethanol" to the Professionaland produce ethanol directly from cellulose. The methodof Cellulose by Coupling with Ethanol Fermentation." ,.l

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by an engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by anKeywords: cellulose, cellulosome, ethanol, yeast,growth and ethanol production from cellulose. However,

Goyal, Garima; Tsai, Shen-Long; Madan, Bhawna; DaSilva, Nancy A; Chen, Wilfred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

2011-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

187

Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN) [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2004 WASTE TYPE Brake Cleaner Recycling System Mercury Utility Devices Substitution 60 Hazardous Waste $1,750 $2,500 $1 of one PCB spill and clean-up event. Organic Solvents Substitution 678 Hazardous Waste $1,355 $36,500 $26

193

DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP contract requirements. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization oftank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste-loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

43% Hemicellulose 27% Lignin 17% Other 13% Agricultural45% Hemicellulose 25% Lignin 22% Extractives 5% Ash3% Woody Crops Ash 15% Lignin 10% Cellulose Hemicellulose 9%

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Single-step conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of HMF directly from raw natural cellulose represents the last major barrier toward the development of a sustainable HMF platform. Here we report an unprecedented single-step...

196

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale SustainableHydrogen Batteries Nuclear By Lee Lynd, Dartmouth Ethanol •Ethanol, ethyl alcohol, fermentation ethanol, or just “

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

acetobacter xylinum cellulose: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the structure and properties (more) Kuutti, Lauri 2013-01-01 78 HYDROGELS AND AEROGELS BASED ON CHEMICALLY CROSS-LINKED CELLULOSE NANOCRYSTALS. Open Access Theses and...

198

The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Andy Aden Feb. 5, 2009 The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy...

199

Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis. Abstract: Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining...

200

The Anaerobic Digestion of Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and commercialization. Anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic municipal solid waste and subsequent biogas and methaneThe Anaerobic Digestion of Organic Municipal Solid Waste in California. Anaerobic Digestion Technology 2.1. Feedstock Characterization 2.2. Collection & Sorting 2.2.1. Waste

Iglesia, Enrique

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fiberous and other waste materials from textile production. The use of recyclable materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass fiber wastes, and waste dusts for use in textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials are considered. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JAN. 31, 1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioconversion Of Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol CharlesBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under

Wilke, C.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Regenerating cellulose from ionic liquids for an accelerated enzymatic hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials into fuel ethanol has become a research priority in producing affordable and renewable energy. The pretreatment of lignocelluloses is known to be key to the fast enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Recently, certain ionic liquids (ILs)were found capable of dissolving more than 10 wt% cellulose. Preliminary investigations [Dadi, A.P., Varanasi, S., Schall, C.A., 2006. Enhancement of cellulose saccharification kinetics using an ionic liquid pretreatment step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 95, 904 910; Liu, L., Chen, H., 2006. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose materials treated with ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl. Chin. Sci. Bull. 51, 2432 2436; Dadi, A.P., Schall, C.A., Varanasi, S., 2007. Mitigation of cellulose recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis by ionic liquid pretreatment. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 137 140, 407 421] suggest that celluloses regenerated from IL solutions are subject to faster saccharification than untreated substrates. These encouraging results offer the possibility of using ILs as alternative and nonvolatile solvents for cellulose pretreatment. However, these studies are limited to two chloride-based ILs: (a) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl), which is a corrosive, toxic and extremely hygroscopic solid (m.p. 70 C), and (b) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl), which is viscous and has a reactive side-chain. Therefore, more in-depth research involving other ILs is much needed to explore this promising pretreatment route. For this reason, we studied a number of chloride- and acetate-based ILs for cellulose regeneration, including several ILs newly developed in our laboratory. This will enable us to select inexpensive, efficient and environmentally benign solvents for processing cellulosic biomass. Our data confirm that all regenerated celluloses are less crystalline (58 75% lower) and more accessible to cellulase (>2 times) than untreated substrates. As a result, regenerated Avicel cellulose, filter paper and cottonwere hydrolyzed 2 10 times faster than the respective untreated celluloses. A complete hydrolysis of Avicel cellulose could be achieved in 6 h given the Trichoderma reesei cellulase/substrate ratio (w/w) of 3:20 at 50 C. In addition,we observed that cellulase is more thermally stable (up to 60 C) in the presence of regenerated cellulose. Furthermore, our systematic studies suggest that the presence of various ILs during the hydrolysis induced different degrees of cellulase inactivation. Therefore, a thorough removal of IL residues after cellulose regeneration is highly recommended, and a systematic investigation on this subject is much needed.

Zhao, Hua [Savannah State University; Jones, Cecil L [Savannah State University; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Xia, Shuqian [Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; Olubajo, Olarongbe [Savannah State University; Person, Vernecia [Savannah State University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EthanolOf Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol I Charles R. WilkeCELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of U.S.

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

UTILIZATION OF IMMOBILIZED B-GLUCOSIDASE IN THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enzymatic conversion of cellulose to ethanol. Reprinted frombetween the cellulose hydrolysis and ethanol fer- mentationcellulose to glucose in order to ferment the glucose to ethanol

Isaacs, S.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetylated cellulose cardboard Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cardboard, wood, and other fibrous plant material. Cellulosic... Press, Alexandria, VA. Ethanol From Cellulose: A General Review P.C. Badger INTRODUCTION The use... during the...

207

Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid- EngineB2 MarchBacterial Cellulose

208

Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Shimshon, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (North Gallilea, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

213

What is (and is not) vital to advancing cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to many, the uniqueness of cellu- losic ethanol as a sustainable, liquid transportation fuel, which canWhat is (and is not) vital to advancing cellulosic ethanol Charles E. Wyman Chemical of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92506, USA Ethanol made biologically from cellulosic

California at Riverside, University of

214

Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion Rajeev Kumar degradation products, collectively termed as chars and/or pseudo-lignin. In order to understand the factors derived pseudo-lignin on cellulose conversion at the moderate to low enzyme loadings necessary

California at Riverside, University of

215

Nitrogen and Sulfur Requirements for Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii on Cellulosic Substrates in Minimal Nutrient Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth media for cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii bacteria usually contain excess nutrients that would increase costs for consolidated bioprocessing for biofuel production and create a waste stream with nitrogen, sulfur and phosphate. C. thermocellum was grown on crystalline cellulose with varying concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and growth rate and alcohol production response curves were determined. Both bacteria assimilated sulfate in the presence of ascorbate reductant, increasing the ratio of oxidized to reduced fermentation products. From these results, a low ionic strength, defined minimal nutrient medium with decreased nitrogen, sulfur, phosphate and vitamin supplements was developed for the fermentation of cellobiose, cellulose and acid-pretreated Populus. Carbon and electron balance calculations indicate the unidentified residual fermentation products must include highly reduced molecules. Both bacterial populations were maintained in co-cultures with substrates containing xylan or hemicellulose in defined medium with sulfate and basal vitamin supplements.

Kridelbaugh, Donna M [ORNL; Nelson, Josh C [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through prevention, minimization, and recycling · Classroom or one-on-one waste generator training, other DOE and University waste organizations · Flammable waste cans, 30-gallon, 55-gallon drums (steelCompliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated

218

Month HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered Landfilled Total Diversion Jan-10 0.00 0.00 0.00 15.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 15.50 0.00 15.50 100.0%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Diversion Diversion Rate (Recycled / Total) SS Secure Shredding Scrap Scrap Metals (All) CG&MP Cans, GlassMonth HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered Landfilled Total Diversion Jan-09 0.00 0.00 0.00 0

Waterloo, University of

219

Month HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered Landfilled Total Diversion Jan-09 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.0%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Diversion Diversion Rate (Recycled / Total) SS Secure Shredding Scrap Scrap Metals (All) CG&MP Cans, GlassMonth HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc: Month HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered

Waterloo, University of

220

Surface plasmon resonance imaging of the enzymatic degradation of cellulose microfibrils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and provide useful metrics of enzyme activity that are of relevance to the cellulosic ethanol industry. Introduction The degradation of cellulose by enzymes is a key step in the production of cellulosic ethanol.1 the production of cellulosic ethanol more economically viable, however this is challenging because

Dutcher, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Discovery of Cellulose as a Smart Material Jaehwan Kim* and Sungryul Yun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discovery of Cellulose as a Smart Material Jaehwan Kim* and Sungryul Yun Center for EAPap Actuator in cellulose applications and technologies by reporting our discovery of cellulose as a smart material that can, however, the potential of cellulose as a smart lightweight material that can be used as a sensor

Ounaies, Zoubeida

222

NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

224

The structure and mechanics of nanofibrillar cellulose foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crystalline nanofibrillar cellulose has remarkable mechanical properties: a Young's modulus of about 130 GPa and a tensile strength in the range of 750–1000 MPa. Recently, there has been increasing interest in exploiting ...

Ali, Zubaidah Mohammed

225

Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

28,000 vehicles off the road. The cellulosic ethanol produced at the Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas (ABBK) facility, located about 90 miles southwest of Dodge City, Kansas,...

226

Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

Huang, Jessica J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

affecting cellulose content: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and mass loss are important data to be measured for wildland fires modelling purpose and fire hazard studies on ligno-cellulosic fuels. Around 638 and 778 K, two dominating and...

228

Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, we characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIAc). In steady shear flow, the semidilute solutions ...

Haward, Simon J.

229

13. Sustainability in Practice: Exploring Innovations in Domestic Solid Waste Management in India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental conditions, particularly through solid waste management. Solid waste is defined as the organic waste management to reduce waste, in terms of minimising waste, maximising re-use and recycling of garbage collection and transportation; and ii. Inviting private sector to install waste recycling plants

Columbia University

230

Structure and processing of fibrous cellulose: bacterial and ascidian material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gelatinous pellicle by layered deposition (Figure 2.1 (b)) [14]. The thickness of cellulose pellicle increases with time and reaches a maximum thickness [14]. Since the past few decades, a lot of biochemistry and microbiology research has been directed... and textiles, templates for electronic components, separation membranes, batteries, super-capacitors, electro-active polymers, and many others. Loads of reviews are available on cellulose nanowhisker production, properties and applications [4, 127, 128...

Khandelwal, Mudrika

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

Waste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste prevention, recycling and reuse, biological treatment with land use of products, energy recoveryWaste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER #12;Preface 3 Re-evaluating waste: ISWA key messages 4 ISWA Commitments 6 Introduction 7 Technologies 8 Material recovery 14 Organic recovery 16 Energy

232

Investigation of the organic matter in inactive nuclear tank liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology for regulatory organics fails to account for the organic matter that is suggested by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) inactive nuclear waste-tank liquids and sludges. Identification and measurement of the total organics are needed to select appropriate waste treatment technologies. An initial investigation was made of the nature of the organics in several waste-tank liquids. This report details the analysis of ORNL wastes.

Schenley, R.L.; Griest, W.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Review of Today's Anaerobic Diges6on Technology of Organic Municipal Solid Waste and Its Implementa6on in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Don 1603 of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act · Rural Energy for America of methane into the atmosphere 3. Energy ProducDon · 65,412 million T3 of methane] Zero Waste Energy. (2013). SMARTFERM. Retrieved from: h

Iglesia, Enrique

234

Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management`s objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

Cuzens, J.E.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Strategic Utilization of Paper/Wood Waste for Biodiesel Fuel Art J. Ragauskas, Institute of Paper Science and Technology; Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategic Utilization of Paper/Wood Waste for Biodiesel Fuel Art J. Ragauskas, Institute of Paper lignocellulosics to biodiesel fuel Feedstocks ABSTRACT This poster examines the potential of utilizing waste paper CelluloseHemicelluloseLigninResource Cracking and Refining of Polysaccharides Bio-Diesel Substitutes

238

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Tsien, Roger Y.

239

Solvent-Driven Preferential Association of Lignin with Regions of Crystalline Cellulose in Molecular Dynamics Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation of lignin onto cellulose after pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is an obstacle to economically viable cellulosic ethanol production. Here, 750 ns nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are reported of a system of lignin and cellulose in aqueous solution. Lignin is found to strongly associate with itself and the cellulose. However, noncrystalline regions of cellulose are observed to have a lower tendency to associate with lignin than crystalline regions, and this is found to arise from stronger hydration of the noncrystalline chains. The results suggest that the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to hydrolysis arises not only from the inaccessibility of inner fibers but also due to the promotion of lignin adhesion.

Lindner, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; Petridis, Loukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Schulz, Roland [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A process for containment removal and waste volume reduction to remediate groundwater containing certain radionuclides, toxic metals and organics. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project to remove groundwater contaminants by an improved treatment process was performed during 1990 October--1992 March by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the United States Department of Energy, managed by Argonne National Laboratory. The goal was to generate high-quality effluent while minimizing secondary waste volume. Two effluent target levels, within an order of magnitude, or less than the US Drinking Water Limit, were set to judge the process effectiveness. The program employed mixed waste feeds containing cadmium, uranium, lead, iron, calcium, strontium-85-90, cesium-137, benzene and trichlorethylene in simulated and actual groundwater and soil leachate solutions. A combination of process steps consisting of sequential chemical conditioning, cross-flow microfiltration and dewatering by low temperature-evaporation, or filter pressing were effective for the treatment of mixed waste having diverse physico-chemical properties. A simplified single-stage version of the process was implemented to treat ground and surface waters contaminated with strontium-90 at the Chalk River Laboratories site. Effluent targets and project goals were met successfully.

Buckley, L.P.; Killey, D.R.W.; Vijayan, S.; Wong, P.C.F. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Real-Time Observation of the Swelling and Hydrolysis of a Single Crystalline Cellulose Fiber Catalyzed by Cellulase 7B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facilitate its application for the efficient and economical production of cellulosic ethanol. INTRODUCTIONReal-Time Observation of the Swelling and Hydrolysis of a Single Crystalline Cellulose Fiber Information ABSTRACT: The biodegradation of cellulose involves the enzymatic action of cellulases

Dutcher, John

242

Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

NONE

1998-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. Waste management 1993 symposium papers and viewgraphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has the most diverse and largest amount of highly radioactive waste of any site in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program has been established within the DOE to safely manage and immobilize these wastes in anticipation of permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Management 1993 Symposium Papers and Viewgraphs covered the following topics: Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Overview; Tank Waste Retrieval Issues and Options for their Resolution; Tank Waste Pretreatment - Issues, Alternatives and Strategies for Resolution; Low-Level Waste Disposal - Grout Issue and Alternative Waste Form Technology; A Strategy for Resolving High-Priority Hanford Site Radioactive Waste Storage Tank Safety Issues; Tank Waste Chemistry - A New Understanding of Waste Aging; Recent Results from Characterization of Ferrocyanide Wastes at the Hanford Site; Resolving the Safety Issue for Radioactive Waste Tanks with High Organic Content; Technology to Support Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Objectives.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by an engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulase, clostridia, and ethanol. Microbiol Mol Biol RevNext- generation cellulosic ethanol technologies and theirProduction of cellulosic ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Goyal, Garima; Tsai, Shen-Long; Madan, Bhawna; DaSilva, Nancy A; Chen, Wilfred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

252

Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement and Jeffrey Keisler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement Erin Baker and Jeffrey Keisler funding and the likelihood of achieving advances in cellulosic biofuel technologies. While in collecting more information on this technology. Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric cellulose acetate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION 90 4. CONCLUSION 91 CHAPTER III: CELLULOSE-ACETATE-BASED CARBON AEROGELS 93 1... .1. EVOLUTION OF CELLULOSE-ACETATE-BASED AEROGELS DURING PYROLYSIS 97 3.1.1....

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundant biopolymers cellulose Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: abundant biopolymers cellulose Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Cellulose 8: 91-97,200. (i) 2001 Kluwer AcademIc Publishers....

255

Cellulose Simulations Demystify High-Temperature Behavior (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular simulations that model cellulose microfibrils at high temperature indicate regions that may be easier to break down, which could lead to more efficient processing of cellulose into biofuel.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. We discovered that C. papyrosolvens produces a multiprotein, multicom

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

259

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3...

260

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Primary Radiation Defect Production in Polyethylene and Cellulose Jussi Polvi,* Petri Luukkonen, and Kai Nordlund  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary Radiation Defect Production in Polyethylene and Cellulose Jussi Polvi,* Petri Luukkonen in polyethylene and cellulose were examined using molecular dynamics simulations. The governing reactions in both. Crystalline cellulose was found to be more resistant to radiation damage than crystalline polyethylene

Nordlund, Kai

262

Changes in the Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rate of Avicel Cellulose With Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Cellulose can be hydrolyzed to glucose, a sugar that is easily fermented to ethanol and otherChanges in the Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rate of Avicel Cellulose With Conversion Bin Yang, Deidre M: 10.1002/bit.20942 Abstract: The slow down in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose with conversion has

California at Riverside, University of

263

Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2009;102: 66­72. � 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. KEYWORDS: cellulose; ethanol; model validation Introduction Conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol and other liquid fuels is of interest

California at Riverside, University of

264

Enzymatically based cellulosic ethanol production technology was selected as a key area for biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enzymatically based cellulosic ethanol production technology was selected as a key area for biomass cellulosic ethanol com- petitive. Improvements in dilute acid pretreatment and cellulase produced by Trichoderma reesei discov- ered during World War II led to most of the historic cellulosic ethanol cost

California at Riverside, University of

265

Net energy of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass M. R. Schmer*, K. P. Vogel*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net energy of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass M. R. Schmer*, K. P. Vogel* , R. B. Mitchell that received low agricultural inputs. Estimated average greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from cellulosic ethanol of grain-ethanol capacity. An additional feedstock source for producing ethanol is the ligno- cellulosic

Laughlin, Robert B.

266

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from Sugar Wheat straw Variation Cultivar a b s t r a c t Optimizing cellulosic ethanol yield depends Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Decreasing the cost of producing cellulosic ethanol

California at Riverside, University of

267

Production of Cellulase on Mixtures of Xylose and Cellulose in a Fed-Batch Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

saccharification to sugars for ethanol production. In the past decade, enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose hasProduction of Cellulase on Mixtures of Xylose and Cellulose in a Fed-Batch Process Ali Mohagheghi was studied in a fed-batch system. An initial mixture of 30 g/L xylose and 20 g/L cellulose

California at Riverside, University of

268

Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification: cellulose; ethanol; kinetics; reactor design Introduction Plant biomass is the only foreseeable sustainable­803] for simultaneous saccharification of fermentation of cellulosic biomass is extended and modified to accommodate

California at Riverside, University of

269

Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) have attracted much attention over the past several years due to their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) have attracted much attention over the past several years due- hydroxybutyrate-hydroxyvalerate). Cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared from microcrystilline cellulose (MCC) using and spun into fibers using a spinneret of diameter 370 m and an ethanol coagulation bath. The fibers were

Collins, Gary S.

270

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

271

Put only cleaned drug bottles into the same case as bottles of residential waste.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Put only cleaned drug bottles into the same case as bottles of residential waste. Put uncleaned aluminum foil. Put them into the drum used for residential waste. Experiment-Related Waste Committee Pharmaceutical Waste and Others Organic Waste Liquids Experiment-Relatedand ResidentialWastebyType #12;

Nakamura, Iku

272

Incineration of radioactive waste in shaft furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of nuclear technology depends greatly on solving the problems, concerning the treatment of waste, arising from power station activity. A great deal of waste will arise in the process of atomic power station decommissioning. One of the methods for radioactive waste treatment is a method of combustion. The volume reduction factor of the final product is 60--100. In the process of combustion, the organic radwaste is transported into gaseous wastes and ash. For better environmental protection, one must achieve the minimal release of nuclides from partially burned products in the gaseous phase, and maximize the waste in ash form suitable for final disposal.

Dmitriev, S.A.; Knyasev, I.A.; Kobelev, A.P. [Moscow SIA Radon, Sergiev Posad (Russian Federation). Dept. of Engineering Supply

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

274

Solid Waste Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Solid Waste Management Program Plan (SWMPP) is to provide a summary level comprehensive approach for the storage, treatment, and disposal of current and future solid waste received at the Hanford Site (from onsite and offsite generators) in a manner compliant with current and evolving regulations and orders (federal, state, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)). The Plan also presents activities required for disposal of selected wastes currently in retrievable storage. The SWMPP provides a central focus for the description and control of cost, scope, and schedule of Hanford Site solid waste activities, and provides a vehicle for ready communication of the scope of those activities to onsite and offsite organizations. This Plan represents the most complete description available of Hanford Site Solid Waste Management (SWM) activities and the interfaces between those activities. It will be updated annually to reflect changes in plans due to evolving regulatory requirements and/or the SWM mission. 8 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Duncan, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic...

276

Revaluing waste in New York City : planning for small-scale compost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One-third of the municipal solid waste stream is organic material that, when processed in landfills, produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Composting is a proven strategy for organic waste management, which ...

Neilson, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report, calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of data on the disposition of hazardous wastes generated on the Hanford Reservation. This information is on EPA requirement every two years. Wastes include: tank simulant waste; alkaline batteries; lead-based paints; organic solvents; light bulbs containing lead and/or mercury; monitoring well drilling wastes; soils contaminated with trace metals, halogenated organics, or other pollutants; Ni-Cd batteries; pesticides; waste oils and greases; wastes from the cleanup of fuel/gasoline spills; filters; metals; and other.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Waste recycling in the textile industry. July 1983-September 1989 (Citations from World Textile abstracts). Report for July 1983-September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations on the recycling of waste-fibrous materials for textile production, and the recycling of textile-waste materials. Topics include use of wastes as raw materials for textile and fabric manufacturing; reuse of waste cloth, scraps, fibers, and polymeric materials from textile manufacturing; and the equipment used to collect, sort, and process textile wastes. Materials considered include cellulosic wastes, polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass-fiber wastes, and waste dusts. Applications discussed include textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related published bibliographies. (Contains 242 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Dangerous Waste Characteristics of Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed Wastes from the Hanford Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes existing analytical data from samples taken from the Hanford tanks designated as potentially containing transuranic mixed process wastes. Process knowledge of the wastes transferred to these tanks has been reviewed to determine whether the dangerous waste characteristics now assigned to all Hanford underground storage tanks are applicable to these particular wastes. Supplemental technologies are being examined to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission and accomplish waste treatment safely and efficiently. To date, 11 Hanford waste tanks have been designated as potentially containing contact-handled (CH) transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes. The CH-TRUM wastes are found in single-shell tanks B-201 through B-204, T-201 through T-204, T-104, T-110, and T-111. Methods and equipment to solidify and package the CH-TRUM wastes are part of the supplemental technologies being evaluated. The resulting packages and wastes must be acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The dangerous waste characteristics being considered include ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity arising from the presence of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol at levels above the dangerous waste threshold. The analytical data reviewed include concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, cyanide, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, total organic carbon, and oxalate; the composition of the tank headspace, pH, and mercury. Differential scanning calorimetry results were used to determine the energetics of the wastes as a function of temperature.

Tingey, Joel M.; Bryan, Garry H.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

TOPICAL PAPER Potential Synergies and Challenges in Refining Cellulosic Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOPICAL PAPER Potential Synergies and Challenges in Refining Cellulosic Biomass to Fuels, Chemicals that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, enhance energy security, improve the economy, dispose of such products, and sugar costs are predicted to drop with plant size as a result of economies of scale

California at Riverside, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

Francis, Raymond

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Role Of Informal Solid Waste Management Sector And Possibilities Of Integration; The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2047 GMT GPC Composition of Urban solid waste in India Organic 40% Recyclable 20% Inert debris 35% Misc. High generation of organics. Recycling Viable option. 75% waste is recyclable (in some form). #12/containers City Dumping site/ other unauthorised dumping sites #12;Waste Composition organic 54% inert debris 25

Columbia University

284

Waste Audit Report Submitted by Kate Dykman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-run, Soma Cafe. Of the 5048 kg of waste (1388.2 kg Recycling + 660 kg Compost + estimated 3000 kg Landfill.3.2 Paper Recycling 6 2.3.3 Cardboard Recycling 6 3 Methods 3.1Waste Sort Methodology 8 3.1.1 Duration Composition 9 4.1.2 Waste Composition by Material 9 Organics 11 Paper 11 Plastics 12 Miscellaneous 13 Glass 13

Martin, Jeff

285

Swedish nuclear waste efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

Rydberg, J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Wasted Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

287

Experiences with treatment of mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During its many years of research activities involving toxic chemicals and radioactive materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has generated considerable amounts of waste. Much of this waste includes chemically hazardous components and radioisotopes. Los Alamos chose to use an electrochemical process for the treatment of many mixed waste components. The electro-chemical process, which the authors are developing, can treat a great variety of waste using one type of equipment built at a moderate expense. Such a process can extract heavy metals, destroy cyanides, dissolve contamination from surfaces, oxidize toxic organic compounds, separate salts into acids and bases, and reduce the nitrates. All this can be accomplished using the equipment and one crew of trained operating personnel. Results of a treatability study of chosen mixed wastes from Los Alamos Mixed Waste Inventory are presented. Using electrochemical methods cyanide and heavy metals bearing wastes were treated to below disposal limits.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.; Smith, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nuttall, E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Investigation of the organic matter in inactive nuclear tank liquids. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology for regulatory organics fails to account for the organic matter that is suggested by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) inactive nuclear waste-tank liquids and sludges. Identification and measurement of the total organics are needed to select appropriate waste treatment technologies. An initial investigation was made of the nature of the organics in several waste-tank liquids. This report details the analysis of ORNL wastes.

Schenley, R.L.; Griest, W.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

QUALITY OF COMPOSTS FROM MUNICIPAL BIODEGRADABLE WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUALITY OF COMPOSTS FROM MUNICIPAL BIODEGRADABLE WASTE OF DIFFERENT ORIGINS I. ZDANEVITCH AND O countries. One of the outputs of this treatment is a compost prepared from the organic matter of the waste the total MSW in the plant. Unlike in Germany or Austria, where only the compost from selective collection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

290

Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose. The most common species for this purpose are pine, spruce and birch in the Nordic countries and eucalyptus and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose diverse novel processes for separating cellulose, hemi cellulose and lignin from biomass. Biorefineries

Kaski, Samuel

291

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500 C by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO[sub 3]. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed. 3 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Catalytic wet oxidation of phenolic wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effective removal of toxic chemicals from water is a problem of increasing importance. Aqueous phase oxidation of dilute organic contaminants is an attractive alternative to separation and/or incineration for the treatment of waste water...

Thomas, Brook James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Study of polyelectrolyte complexes of chitosan and sulfoethyl cellulose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complexing of polycation chitosan and polyanion sulphoethyl cellulose during the formation of polyelectrolyte simplex membranes using the layer-by-layer deposition of a solution of one polyion on a gel-like film of another one has been studied. The structural characteristics of the multilayer composites and their components have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. A technique is proposed for studying the structure of surface layers of thin polymer films (15-20 {mu}m) using a portable DIFREI-401 diffractometer. It is shown that the sequence of layer deposition during the formation of membrane films does not affect their structural characteristics. The interaction between positively charged chitosan groups (-NH{sub 3}{sup +}) and negatively charged sulfoethyl cellulose groups (-SO{sub 3}{sup -}) during the growth of polyelectrolyte complexes results in a packing of chitosan chains in the multilayer film.

Baklagina, Yu. G., E-mail: membrane@hq.macro.ru; Kononova, S. V.; Petrova, V. A.; Kruchinina, E. V.; Nud'ga, L. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Macromolecular Compounds (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Macromolecular Compounds (Russian Federation); Romanov, D. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Grebenshchikov Institute of Silicate Chemistry (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Grebenshchikov Institute of Silicate Chemistry (Russian Federation); Klechkovskaya, V. V.; Orekhov, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Bogomazov, A. V.; Arkhipov, S. N. [ZAO Nauchnye Pribory (Russian Federation)] [ZAO Nauchnye Pribory (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; and analysis of spent fuel policy implementation.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

Somerville, Chris [Director, Energy Biosciences Institute

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass Facility JumpBedford RuralOpenBekkCellulosic

297

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Smart Waste Management with Self-Describing Yann Glouche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of recyclable products. We assume organic wastes products are not recycled and hence RFID tags are no its content and can report back to the rest of the recycling chain. Keywords-green IT; waste management; recycling chain; RFID; NFC; QR code. I. INTRODUCTION Waste management is an important requirement

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

299

Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

Donna Post Guillen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Design, Synthesis and Affinity Properties of Biologically Active Peptide and Protein Conjugates of Cotton Cellulose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of peptide and protein conjugates of cellulose on cotton fabrics provides promising leads for the development of wound healing, antibacterial, and decontaminating textiles. An approach to the design, synthesis, and analysis of bioconjugates containing cellulose peptide and protein conjugates includes: 1) computer graphic modeling for a rationally designed structure; 2) attachment of the peptide or protein to cotton cellulose through a linker amino acid, and 3) characterization of the resulting bioconjugate. Computer graphic simulation of protein and peptide cellulose conjugates gives a rationally designed biopolymer to target synthetic modifications to the cotton cellulose. Techniques for preparing these types of conjugates involve both sequential assembly of the peptide on the fabric and direct crosslinking of the peptide or protein as cellulose bound esters or carboxymethylcellulose amides.

Edwards, J. V.; Goheen, Steven C.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Review Of Rheology Modifiers For Hanford Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)'s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy - Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed - a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues: The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that do not appreciably change the pH of the waste; Organics are typically reductants and could impact glass REDOX if not accounted for in the reductant addition calculations; Stability of the modifiers in a caustic, radioactive environment is not known, but some of the modifiers tested were specifically designed to withstand caustic conditions; These acids will add to the total organic carbon content of the wastes. Radiolytic decomposition of the acids could result in organic and hydrogen gas generation. These potential impacts must be addressed in future studies with simulants representative of real waste and finally with tests using actual waste based on the rheology differences seen between SRS simulants and actual waste. The only non-organic modifier evaluated was sodium metasilicate. Further evaluation of this modifier is recommended if a reducing modifier is a concern.

Pareizs, J. M.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Waste processing air cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

Kriskovich, J.R.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1600°C2000°C 1200°C Scrubber H2, CO, CO2, H2O #12;THERMOSELECTDESTRUCTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (DIOXINS/FURANS) 1200 °C 2000 °C 70 °C Quench Degassing channel Gasifier Waste carries dioxins, furans Total destruction

Columbia University

304

Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

Nguyen, Quang A

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

306

Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

Li, Mo

307

The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA “Roadmap” objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled “The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases” was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by “pure” enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH “pretreatment” provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

Stipanovic, Arthur J [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand elasticities in the US ethanol fuel market. Energygreat opportunity for producing ethanol fuel. The new energyscenario for cellulosic ethanol fuel production, and speaks

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60,700 ETHANOL RECOVERY Dist. Column CondenserF2 Steam Exchanger Ethanol Absorber 10 ft. diameter. 38Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Progress Report, LBL-

Wilke, Charles R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOCONVERSION TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL BERKELEY PROGRAM--JulyXylose Fermentation to Ethanol (a) (b) Fusarium oxysporum (OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 Javier Perez I II. ETHANOL FERMENTATION STUDIES A. B.Development Studies of Ethanol Production--------------- 19of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol." (June 1979) and (b)

Wilke, Charles R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t uels Cellulosic biomass could help * meet California’smeasures are needed to help overcome the per- ceived risksrun; addition of the word "help." Laboratories at the Center

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization This pilot-scale integrated biorefinery will produce 250,000 gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol when...

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - advances cellulosic ethanol Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cellulosic ethanol. This would be 25... million annually to "share the cost of biomass feedstocks used by ... Source: Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural...

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - acs division cellulose Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 2 Study of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose for Production of Fuel Ethanol Summary: Study of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of...

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing persistent organic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

System Summary: SubParcel Composition results SoilAnalysis name type volume OrganicWaste Analysis Localisation 0..* Land 0..* OrganicWasteAnalysed... Analysis AllowedArea1...

317

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1982 19801205. Ethanol and fuel product production.The first generation fuel ethanol is derived from starch andfor bioconversion to fuel ethanol because it not only

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is typically disposed of by incineration and/or landfill.on air pollution from incineration have halted construction

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250.degree. C. to 500.degree. C. and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials.

Sealock, Jr., L. John (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250 to 500 C and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials. 7 figs.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Biogeochemical changes at early stage after the closure of radioactive waste geological repository in South Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemical changes at early stage after the closure of radioactive waste geological repository e Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD), 111, Daedeok-daero 989 beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305 Organic waste a b s t r a c t Permanent disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes

Ohta, Shigemi

324

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Zero Waste Planning Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recycling rate of 59%, with 43% operational waste diversion. Operational waste1 diversion targets are 70 considered: organics, mixed paper, returnable containers, cardboard, e-waste, construction materials (butUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Zero Waste Planning

325

2006/07 Field Testing of Cellulose Fiber Insulation Enhanced with Phase Change Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most recent improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that in the near future, residences will be routinely constructed to operate with very low heating and cooling loads. In that light, the application of novel building materials containing active thermal components (e.g., phase change materials [PCMs,] sub-venting, radiant barriers, and integrated hydronic systems) is like a final step in achieving relatively significant heating and cooling energy savings from technological improvements in the building envelope. It is expected that optimized building envelope designs using PCMs for energy storage can effectively bring notable savings in energy consumption and reductions in peak hour power loads. During 2006/07, a research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a series of laboratory and field tests of several wall and roof assemblies using PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. This report summarizes the test results from the perspective of energy performance. The ORNL team is working on both inorganic and organic PCMs; this report discusses only paraffinic PCMs. A limited economical analysis also is presented. PCMs have been tested as a thermal mass component in buildings for at least 40 years. Most of the research studies found that PCMs enhanced building energy performance. In the case of the application of organic PCMs, problems such as high initial cost and PCM leaking (surface sweating) have hampered widespread adoption. Paraffinic hydrocarbon PCMs generally performed well, with the exception that they increased the flammability of the building envelope.

Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Petrie, Thomas [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Syed, Azam M [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Isme Resolution. Appendices A through I provide supporting information. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 6 is the annual update of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

TU, T.A.

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

327

METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

BARKER, S.A.

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: CASE nutrient management, organic waste, wastewater and septage that contained high concentration of nutrients area. The nitrogen fluxes in relation to organic waste and wastewater were chosen as indicators

Richner, Heinz

329

Composting Waste Alternatives University of Florida Soil and Water Science Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department Disposal of organic waste generated by humans is becoming a problem due to increasing population et al., 2001). Composting organic wastes is a low external energy input microbial decomposition In Florida alone, about 37 tons of municipal solid waste was collected for recycling in 2005 (Li et al., 2010

Ma, Lena

330

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

331

Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment ofCarrie Noonan About UsEnergy SheriCellulosic Liquid Fuels

332

Investigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture: a choice experiment approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in France (excluding agriculture waste) [1], the recycling of urban organic waste is a strong environmentalInvestigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture or mineral fertilizers. The paper addresses in particular 3 environmental effects: the organic waste

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

333

Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

335

Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), the Center for Non-Linear Studies, and the Laboratory are central to cost-effective biofuel production and the subject of new research from Los Alamos National and designer enzymes for biofuel production from cellulosic--or non-food--plant derived biomass. "Cellulose

336

Comparison of low-energy radiation effects in polyethylene and cellulose Jussi Polvi, Kai Nordlund  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of low-energy radiation effects in polyethylene and cellulose Jussi Polvi, Kai Nordlund, for a carbon atom in polyethylene chain, and for one of the carbon atoms in cellulose chain. Our analysis shows and on average slightly higher for the carbon atoms in the polyethylene chain than for the target carbon atom

Nordlund, Kai

337

1 Electrospun Polyethylene Oxide/Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite 2 Nanofibrous Mats with Homogeneous and Heterogeneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Electrospun Polyethylene Oxide/Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite 2 Nanofibrous Mats(acrylic acid) (PAA),14 polyethylene oxide (PEO),15 poly(lactic 57acid) (PLA),16,17 polystyrene (PS),18 was successfully used 9 to fabricate polyethylene oxide/cellulose nanocrystal (PEO/ 10 CNC) composite nanofibrous

338

Cellulosic Ethanol Technology on Track to Being Competitive With Other Transportation Fuels (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been driving down the cost of cellulosic ethanol and overcoming the technical challenges that surround it-major milestones toward the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation and Their Selective Inclusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation-performance supramolecular polysaccharide composites from cellulose (CEL), chitosan (CS), and (2,3,6-tri to dissolve and prepare the composites. Because a majority (>88%) of the IL used was recovered for reuse

Reid, Scott A.

340

What is the Viability of Cellulosic Ethanol as an Alternative to Fossil Fuels in today's Economy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the Viability of Cellulosic Ethanol as an Alternative to Fossil Fuels in today's Economy. Assessing the viability of cellulosic ethanol as an alternative to fossil fuels in today's and future the world. The consequences from anthropogenic burning of fossil fuels experienced over the last few decades

Iglesia, Enrique

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Topic T4 Claudia Hildenbrand #274 EDLC electrodes from cellulose-based carbon aerogels: influence of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topic T4 Claudia Hildenbrand #274 EDLC electrodes from cellulose-based carbon aerogels: influence performance if used as EDLC electrode material. Carbon aerogels were synthesized by crosslinking cellulose atmosphere (1000°C, nitrogen atmosphere). Subsequently, the surface chemistry of the carbon aerogels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

342

Evaluation of interphase properties in a cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene composite by nanoindentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fiber and polypropylene (PP) matrix in a cellulose fiber-reinforced PP composite were investigatedEvaluation of interphase properties in a cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene composite of Material Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, United States c Metals and Ceramic Division, Oak

Wang, Siqun

343

Cellulose swelling and dissolution as a tool to study the fiber structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ methylmorpholine N-oxide and water mixtures, or soda solutions) or in ionic liquids are studied. Some cellulose. Key words: cellulose, swelling, dissolution, N ­ methylmorpholine N-oxide, ionic liquids, structure; 1 cells grow (2) . Whatever the origin of the native fiber cells, some common morphological architecture

Boyer, Edmond

344

Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Coupled With Electricity Generation in a Microbial Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens generated electricity, and the power generated using soluble celluloseARTICLE Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Coupled With Electricity Generation in a Microbial Fuel.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22015 ABSTRACT: Electricity can be directly generated by bacteria in microbial fuel

345

Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT: In dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, lignin has been shown formed by hydrothermal pretreatment of a mixture of Avicel cellulose and poplar wood showed that lignin

California at Riverside, University of

346

Author's personal copy Fabrication and properties of transparent polymethylmethacrylate/cellulose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy consumption, easy pro- cessability, renewable nature, and recyclability, cellulose nano- crystals/cellulose nanocrystals composites Haiyun Liu, Dagang Liu, Fei Yao, Qinglin Wu * School of Renewable Natural Resources with that of the pure PMMA sheets. The glass transition of the nanocomposites was shifted to lower temperatures

347

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Long-Term Stabilization of Foams and Emulsions with In-Situ Formed Microparticles from Hydrophobic Cellulose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ethanol/ water mixtures. As these HP stock solutions were sheared in aqueous media, micron sized cellulose Cellulose Hartmut A. Wege, Sejong Kim, Vesselin N. Paunov, Qixin Zhong,*,§ and Orlin D. Velev*, Department a simple method to produce foams and emulsions of extraordinary stability by using hydrophobic cellulose

Velev, Orlin D.

349

Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35–50% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on various geographical factors and the types of systems used for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefi neries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that infl uence pioneer biorefi nery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial scenarios were postulated to develop a pioneer dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this pioneer design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply system improvements, and technology advancements to achieve government and private sector cost targets. Analysis of the pioneer supply system resulted in a delivered feedstock cost to the throat of the pretreatment reactor of $37.00 per dry tonne (2002 $). Pioneer supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefi neries using specifi c feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. As the industry develops and cost barriers are addressed, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefi neries located in different regions.

J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

Nilsen, David N. (Lebanon, OR); Galvan, Gloria J. (Albany, OR); Hundley, Gary L. (Corvallis, OR); Wright, John B. (Albany, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Defense: 221. EPA (1994). "Composting Yard Trimmings andA novel model of organic waste composting in Taiwan miliarty822. Bost, J. (2004). "Composting solid waste in overseas

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Life cycle analysis of waste management options for EBI in Quebec  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quebec has issued a mandate requiring all waste management facilities to ban the landfilling of organic waste by 2020. EBI is considering Anaerobic Digestion as one of its alternative options, but is uncertain if it is the ...

Wilson, Jaclyn D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

356

Waste Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22PrimaryWaste

357

Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

lead to the wide-scale use of non-food based biomass, such as agricultural waste, trees, forest residues, and perennial grasses in the production of transportation fuels,...

358

Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data supplied by a recent report from the National Research Council (NRC). The thermochemical system analysis revealed that most of the system inefficiency is associated with the gasification process and subsequent tar reforming step. For the biochemical process, the steam generation from residue combustion, providing the requisite heating for the conventional pretreatment and alcohol distillation processes, was shown to dominate the exergy loss. An overall energy balance with different potential distillation energy requirements shows that as much as 30% of the biomass energy content may be available in the future as a feedstock for thermochemical production of liquid fuels.

Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Containment and stabilization technologies for mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prevalent approach to the cleanup of waste sites contaminated with hazardous chemicals and radionuclides is to contain and/or stabilize wastes within the site. Stabilization involves treating the wastes in some fashion, either in situ or above ground after retrieval, to reduce the leachability and release rate of waste constituents to the environment. This approach is generally reserved for radionuclide contaminants, inorganic hazardous contaminants such as heavy metals, and nonvolatile organic contaminants. This paper describes the recent developments in the technical options available for containing and stabilizing wastes. A brief description of each technology is given along with a discussion of the most recent developments and examples of useful applications.

Buelt, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method for treating liquid wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering {sup 99}Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of {sup 99}Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester {sup 99}Tc from those liquids. 6 figs.

Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Singh, P.; Ketring, A.R.

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method for treating liquid wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering .sup.99 Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of .sup.99 TcO.sub.4.sup.- from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of .sup.99 Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester .sup.99 Tc from those liquids.

Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

363

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

364

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

365

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

366

Nuclear Waste Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Reduction Pyroprocessing is a promising technology for recycling used nuclear fuel and improving the associated waste management options. The process...

367

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

369

Waste management/waste certification plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Waste Management/Waste Certification (C) Plan, written for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), outlines the criteria and methodologies to be used in the management of waste generated during ORNL ER field activities. Other agreed upon methods may be used in the management of waste with consultation with ER and Waste Management Organization. The intent of this plan is to provide information for the minimization, handling, and disposal of waste generated by ER activities. This plan contains provisions for the safe and effective management of waste consistent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) guidance. Components of this plan have been designed to protect the environment and the health and safety of workers and the public. It, therefore, stresses that investigation derived waste (IDW) and other waste be managed to ensure that (1) all efforts be made to minimize the amount of waste generated; (2) costs associated with sampling storage, analysis, transportation, and disposal are minimized; (3) the potential for public and worker exposure is not increased; and (4) additional contaminated areas are not created.

Clark, C. Jr.; Hunt-Davenport, L.D.; Cofer, G.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

International waste management fact book  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many countries around the world are faced with nuclear and environmental management problems similar to those being addressed by the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this Fact Book is to provide the latest information on US and international organizations, programs, activities and key personnel to promote mutual cooperation to solve these problems. Areas addressed include all aspects of closing the commercial and nuclear fuel cycle and managing the wastes and sites from defense-related, nuclear materials production programs.

Amaya, J.P.; LaMarche, M.N.; Upton, J.F.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Radioactive and chemotoxic wastes: Only radioactive wastes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste arising from Italian Nuclear Power Plants and Research Centers, classified as 1st and 2nd Category wastes, are managed only as radioactive wastes following the Technical Guide No. 26 issued by the Italian Regulatory Body: ENEA DISP on 1987. A very important Regulatory Regime revision for Italian Nuclear Activities started at the end of 1991. This paper considers the need to develop a new strategy dedicated to mixed waste in line with current international trends.

Eletti, G.F.; Tocci, M. [ENEA DISP, Rome (Italy)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

373

Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Template Synthesis of Nanostructured Metals using Cellulose Nanocrystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this chapter, cellulose nanocrystal (CNXL) has been used as a template and reducing agent for synthesizing nanoscale inorganic solids such as metal oxide, metal carbide, and nanocrystalline metals. CNXL selectively nucleates metal or metal oxide phases in ordered arrangements commensurate with the attendant structure and chemistry of the fiber. The reaction has an analogy to the well-known Tollen’s reagent where addition of an aldehyde or glucose analyte to a glass vessel containing a soluble ammoniacal silver complex causes reduction of the silver to form a mirror on the vessel surface. For the synthesis of TiO2, CNXL produced mesoporous anatase with 5-10 nm particle sizes and 170-200 m2/g surface area after air-calcination. Silica-infiltrated CNXL produced very homogeneous SiC nanowires with 70 nm in diameter at 1400 oC in Ar. For the syntheses of metal nanoparticles, upon addition of aqueous metal ion containing solutions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Ag(I), Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(IV), or even selenite, Se(IV)) into the CNXL suspension, reduction to the metal occurs under hydrothermal conditions to form ordered metal nanostructures. Ni (II) and Cu(II) ions required high temperature (300-400 oC) to be reduced due to their low reduction potentials. However, metal ions including Ag(I), Au(III), Pt(IV), Pd(II), Se(IV) needed lower temperatures (160-200 oC) to be reduced. Enhanced catalytic activity on these templated surfaces has been demonstrated for a methylene-blue dye photo-induced decomposition (Se nanocrystals resident on crystalline cellulose).

Shin, Yongsoon; Exarhos, Gregory J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

376

Robust Solution to Difficult Hydrogen Issues When Shipping Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been open, receiving, and disposing of transuranic (TRU) waste since March 26, 1999. The majority of the waste has a path forward for shipment to and disposal at the WIPP, but there are about two percent (2%) or approximately 3,020 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of the volume of TRU waste (high wattage TRU waste) that is not shippable because of gas generation limits set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste includes plutonium-238 waste, solidified organic waste, and other high plutonium-239 wastes. Flammable gases are potentially generated during transport of TRU waste by the radiolysis of hydrogenous materials and therefore, the concentration at the end of the shipping period must be predicted. Two options are currently available to TRU waste sites for solving this problem: (1) gas generation testing on each drum, and (2) waste form modification by repackaging and/or treatment. Repackaging some of the high wattage waste may require up to 20:1 drum increase to meet the gas generation limits of less than five percent (5%) hydrogen in the inner most layer of confinement (the layer closest to the waste). (This is the limit set by the NRC.) These options increase waste handling and transportation risks and there are high costs and potential worker exposure associated with repackaging this high-wattage TRU waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is pursuing a twofold approach to develop a shipping path for these wastes. They are: regulatory change and technology development. For the regulatory change, a more detailed knowledge of the high wattage waste (e.g., void volumes, gas generation potential of specific chemical constituents) may allow refinement of the current assumptions in the gas generation model for Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging for Contact-Handled (CH) TRU waste. For technology development, one of the options being pursued is the use of a robust container, the ARROW-PAK{trademark} System. (1) The ARROW-PAK{trademark} is a macroencapsulation treatment technology, developed by Boh Environmental, LLC, New Orleans, Louisiana. This technology has been designed to withstand any unexpected hydrogen deflagration (i.e. no consequence) and other benefits such as criticality control.

Countiss, S. S.; Basabilvazo, G. T.; Moody, D. C. III; Lott, S. A.; Pickerell, M.; Baca, T.; CH2M Hill; Tujague, S.; Svetlik, H.; Hannah, T.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to significantly alter the mixture of fermentation products. The initial application of this system successfully engineered a strain with high ethanol productivity from complex biomass substrates.

Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Liao, James C [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Biodegradation and flushing of MBT wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Stabilization was achieved for MBT wastes of different degrees of pretreatment. • About 92% reduction in the gas generation compared with raw MSW. • Pretreatment resulted in reduced TOC, nitrogen and heavy metals in leachate. • A large proportion of carbon and nitrogen remained in the waste material. - Abstract: Mechanical–biological treatment (MBT) processes are increasingly being adopted as a means of diverting biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill, for example to comply with the EU Landfill Directive. However, there is considerable uncertainty concerning the residual pollution potential of such wastes. This paper presents the results of laboratory experiments on two different MBT waste residues, carried out to investigate the remaining potential for the generation of greenhouse gases and the flushing of contaminants from these materials when landfilled. The potential for gas generation was found to be between 8% and 20% of that for raw MSW. Pretreatment of the waste reduced the potential for the release of organic carbon, ammoniacal nitrogen, and heavy metal contents into the leachate; and reduced the residual carbon remaining in the waste after final degradation from ?320 g/kg dry matter for raw MSW to between 183 and 195 g/kg dry matter for the MBT wastes.

Siddiqui, A.A., E-mail: aasiddiqui.cv@amu.ac.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Richards, D.J.; Powrie, W. [Waste Management Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs are encouraging energy intensive industries to investigate alternative means of waste heat recovery from process streams. The use of organic fluids in Rankine cycles offers improved potential for economical cogeneration from...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum pro- duction wastes. Some aluminum-bearing waste materials, particularly aluminum production wastes

385

EA-1705: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Mascoma Corporation, Kinross Charter Township, Michigan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The frontier Project consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a proprietary pretreatment and fermentation process.

386

Microbiology and physiology of anaerobic fermentations of cellulose. Progress report, September 1, 1979-May 15, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reseach progress is reported for the period September, 1979 to May, 1980. Studies on the mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms fermenting cellulose to various products (ethanol, acetate, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, and methane) are summarized. (ACR)

Peck, H.D. Jr.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of22 Mohammad Riaz ETHANOL FERMENTATION STUDIES II I. A. B.Hydrolyzates to Ethanol J2 Ren-Der Yang

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid swollen cellulose Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in water to remove any traces of NaOH and acid. Swollen... on cellulose-based carbon aerogel 1 LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRSGrenoble-INPUJF, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d......

389

DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plenary I: Progress in Advanced Biofuels DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise William Provine, Director–Science and Technology External Affairs, DuPont

390

Comparison of cellulose consumption between Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes flavipes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) under laboratory conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are interested in determining the effects of subterranean termite soldier ratios on the overall cellulose consumption of Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes flavipes. In nature, Coptotermes formosanus is found in very large colonies and a...

Lancaster, Denise

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Journal of Biotechnology 77 (2000) 3747 H NMR study of cellulose metabolism by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-echo difference 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The degradation of unlabelled cellulose synthesised by Acetobacter xylinum bacterial fermentation products (glycogen, succinate, acetate). During the pre-incubation period of F

Hemminga, Marcus A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cellulose and/or hemicellulose to monomer sugars that could be subsequently fermented into ethanol andcellulose and hemicellulose must be broken down fully to monomers for fermentation to ethanol

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Development of an Efficient, Cost- Effective System to Recover Medium- Grade...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian waste wise Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water processing have led to considerable diversification... of sludge to land. Fourthly, sewage sludge is only one of several types of organic waste now being produced... and for...

395

Organic solvent topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

COWLEY, W.L.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

396

Radioactive mixed waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WMG QAP is an integral part of a management system designed to ensure that WMG activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified in a manner that assures a quality product. A quality product is one that meets all waste acceptance criteria, conforms to all permit and regulatory requirements, and is accepted at the offsite treatment, storage, and disposal facility. In addition to internal processes, this QA Plan identifies WMG processes providing oversight and assurance to line management that waste is managed according to all federal, state, and local requirements for waste generator areas. A variety of quality assurance activities are integral to managing waste. These QA functions have been identified in the relevant procedures and in subsequent sections of this plan. The WMG QAP defines the requirements of the WMG quality assurance program. These requirements are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, Contractor Requirements Document, the LBNL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), and other applicable environmental compliance documents. The QAP and all associated WMG policies and procedures are periodically reviewed and revised, as necessary, to implement corrective actions, and to reflect changes that have occurred in regulations, requirements, or practices as a result of feedback on work performed or lessons learned from other organizations. The provisions of this QAP and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by the WMG; WMG personnel, contractors, and vendors; and personnel from other associated LBNL organizations, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WMG-approved QA programs.

Waste Management Group

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

400

MANAGING HANFORD'S LEGACY NO-PATH-FORWARD WASTES TO DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has adopted the 2015 Vision for Cleanup of the Hanford Site. This vision will protect the Columbia River, reduce the Site footprint, and reduce Site mortgage costs. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company's (CHPRC) Waste and Fuels Management Project (W&FMP) and their partners support this mission by providing centralized waste management services for the Hanford Site waste generating organizations. At the time of the CHPRC contract award (August 2008) slightly more than 9,000 m{sup 3} of waste was defined as 'no-path-forward waste.' The majority of these wastes are suspect transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes which are currently stored in the low-level Burial Grounds (LLBG), or stored above ground in the Central Waste Complex (CWC). A portion of the waste will be generated during ongoing and future site cleanup activities. The DOE-RL and CHPRC have collaborated to identify and deliver safe, cost-effective disposition paths for 90% ({approx}8,000 m{sup 3}) of these problematic wastes. These paths include accelerated disposition through expanded use of offsite treatment capabilities. Disposal paths were selected that minimize the need to develop new technologies, minimize the need for new, on-site capabilities, and accelerate shipments of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

WEST LD

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Method for destroying hazardous organics and other combustible materials in a subcritical/supercritical reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A waste destruction method using a reactor vessel to combust and destroy organic and combustible waste, including the steps of introducing a supply of waste into the reactor vessel, introducing a supply of an oxidant into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste forming a waste and oxidant mixture, introducing a supply of water into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste and oxidant mixture forming a waste, water and oxidant mixture, reciprocatingly compressing the waste, water and oxidant mixture forming a compressed mixture, igniting the compressed mixture forming a exhaust gas, and venting the exhaust gas into the surrounding atmosphere.

Janikowski, Stuart K. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Country report Municipal solid waste composition determination supporting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for classifying the collected wastes into the following cate- gories: plastics, paper, metals, aluminium, leather categories were determined: organic wastes, paper and plastics, which combined represent 76% of the total management demands. Ó 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The cornerstone of successful

Columbia University

403

Recycling Realities: ASU's Quest for Zero Solid Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recycling Realities: ASU's Quest for Zero Solid Waste Dawn RatcliffePast Recycling Coordinator in the sustainability and animal-advocacy fields. She has organized several Earth Day events, recycling events and recycling. She has run recycling and solid waste programs for The University of Arizona, MIT in Cambridge

Zhang, Junshan

404

Energy recovery system using an organic rankine cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermodynamic system for waste heat recovery, using an organic rankine cycle is provided which employs a single organic heat transferring fluid to recover heat energy from two waste heat streams having differing waste heat temperatures. Separate high and low temperature boilers provide high and low pressure vapor streams that are routed into an integrated turbine assembly having dual turbines mounted on a common shaft. Each turbine is appropriately sized for the pressure ratio of each stream.

Ernst, Timothy C

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Waste Information Management System with 2012-13 Waste Streams - 13095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Information Management System (WIMS) 2012-13 was updated to support the Department of Energy (DOE) accelerated cleanup program. The schedule compression required close coordination and a comprehensive review and prioritization of the barriers that impeded treatment and disposition of the waste streams at each site. Many issues related to waste treatment and disposal were potential critical path issues under the accelerated schedule. In order to facilitate accelerated cleanup initiatives, waste managers at DOE field sites and at DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., needed timely waste forecast and transportation information regarding the volumes and types of radioactive waste that would be generated by DOE sites over the next 40 years. Each local DOE site historically collected, organized, and displayed waste forecast information in separate and unique systems. In order for interested parties to understand and view the complete DOE complex-wide picture, the radioactive waste and shipment information of each DOE site needed to be entered into a common application. The WIMS application was therefore created to serve as a common application to improve stakeholder comprehension and improve DOE radioactive waste treatment and disposal planning and scheduling. WIMS allows identification of total forecasted waste volumes, material classes, disposition sites, choke points, technological or regulatory barriers to treatment and disposal, along with forecasted waste transportation information by rail, truck and inter-modal shipments. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida, developed and deployed the web-based forecast and transportation system and is responsible for updating the radioactive waste forecast and transportation data on a regular basis to ensure the long-term viability and value of this system. (authors)

Upadhyay, H.; Quintero, W.; Lagos, L.; Shoffner, P.; Roelant, D. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Thermocatalytic conversion of food processing wastes: Topical report, FY 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient utilization of waste produced during food processing operations is a topic of growing importance to the industry. While incineration is an attractive option for wastes with relatively low ash and moisture contents (i.e., under about 50 wt % moisture), it is not suitable for wastes with high moisture contents. Cheese whey, brewer's spent grain, and fruit pomace are examples of food processing wastes that are generally too wet to burn efficiently and cleanly. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a thermocatalytic conversion process that can convert high-moisture wastes (up to 98 wt % moisture) to a medium-Btu fuel gas consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. At the same time, the COD of these waste streams is reduced by 90% to 99%, Organic wastes are converted by thermocatalytic treatment at 350/degree/C to 400/degree/C and 3000 to 4000 psig. The process offers a relatively simple solution to waste treatment while providing net energy production from wastes containing as little as 2 wt % organic solids (this is equivalent to a COD of approximately 25,000 mg/L). This report describes continuous reactor system (CRS) experiments that have been conducted with food processing wastes. The purpose of the CRS experiments was to provide kinetic and catalyst lifetime data, which could not be obtained with the batch reactor tests. These data are needed for commercial scaleup of the process.

Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

408

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revision 6 Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan Waste6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan LBNL/4 Management Quality Assurance

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly...

410

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300-800.degree. C. to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000-1,550.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (North Augusta, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Method for recovering materials from waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, a vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800{degrees}C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1000--1550{degrees}C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800 C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000--1,550 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification. 2 figs.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle...

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Complexant stability investigation. Task 2. Organic complexants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety of high-level defense waste operations has always been given highest priority at the Hanford site. This document is part of the continued effort to appraise and reevaluate the safety of the waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Reservation. Hanford high-level defense waste consists mainly of moist, inorganic salts, NaNO/sub 3/, NaAl(OH)/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and other sodium salts. However, in addition to these salts, quantities of organic compounds constitute a significant portion of the waste. The potential reaction of the organic compounds with inorganic salts to form explosive substances is examined and found to be nonexistent or negligible. The concept that the waste mixture might react exothermically is found to be untenable under the present storage conditions. The phenomenon of slurry growth in double-shell waste storage tanks is expected to cause no increase in exothermic reaction potential within the waste. The results of this study indicate that the presence of organic material in the high-level defense waste does not constitute undue hazard under the present storage conditions.

Martin, E.C.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development of Polymeric Waste Forms for the Encapsulation of Toxic Wastes Using an Emulsion-Encapsulation Based Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developed technologies in vitrification, cement, and polymeric materials manufactured using flammable organic solvents have been used to encapsulate solid wastes, including low-level radioactive materials, but are impractical for high salt-content waste streams (Maio, 1998). In this work, we investigate an emulsification process for producing an aqueous-based polymeric waste form as a preliminary step towards fabricating hybrid organic/inorganic polyceram matrices. The material developed incorporates epoxy resin and polystyrene-butadiene (PSB) latex to produce a waste form that is non-flammable, light weight, of relatively low cost, and that can be loaded to a relatively high weight content of waste materials. Sodium nitrate was used as a model for the salt waste. Small-scale samples were manufactured and analyzed using leach tests designed to measure the diffusion coefficient and leachability index for the fastest diffusing species in the waste form, the salt ions. The microstructure and composition of the samples were probed using SEM/EDS techniques. The results show that some portion of the salt migrates towards the exterior surfaces of the waste forms during the curing process. A portion of the salt in the interior of the sample is contained in polymer corpuscles or sacs. These sacs are embedded in a polymer matrix phase that contains fine, well-dispersed salt crystals. The diffusion behavior observed in sections of the waste forms indicates that samples prepared using this emulsion process meet or exceed the leachability criteria suggested for low level radioactivity waste forms.

Evans, R.; Quach, A.; Birnie, D. P.; Saez, A. E.; Ela, W. P.; Zeliniski, B. J. J.; Xia, G.; Smith, H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added in an excess amount needed. 3 figures.

Moens, L.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biological production of ethanol from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products is disclosed. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various product, such as organic acids, alcohols H.sub.2, SCP, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

419

Sustainable Waste Management in Africa Accra, Ghana, May 26th-30th, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and will encompass the full hierarchy of waste management from materials recovery (recycling) to energy recovery (Waste-to-Energy or WTE), and sanitary landfilling with methane capture. The organizing committeeSustainable Waste Management in Africa Accra, Ghana, May 26th-30th, 2014 The Earth Engineering

420

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstration LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MSW Municipal Solid Waste OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration PPE Personal Protective Equipment POTW Publicly Owned Treatment Works RCRA Resource

422

Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Medical waste treatment and decontamination system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which hybrid microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional hybrid microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Integrated Waste Tracking Systems (IWTS) - A Comprehensive Waste Management Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site located near Idaho Falls, ID USA, has developed a comprehensive waste management and tracking tool that integrates multiple operational activities with characterization data from waste declaration through final waste disposition. The Integrated Waste Tracking System (IWTS) provides information necessary to help facility personnel properly manage their waste and demonstrate a wide range of legal and regulatory compliance. As a client?server database system, the IWTS is a proven tracking, characterization, compliance, and reporting tool that meets the needs of both operations and management while providing a high level of flexibility. This paper describes some of the history involved with the development and current use of IWTS as a comprehensive waste management tool as well as a discussion of IWTS deployments performed by the INL for outside clients. Waste management spans a wide range of activities including: work group interactions, regulatory compliance management, reporting, procedure management, and similar activities. The IWTS documents these activities and performs tasks in a computer-automated environment. Waste characterization data, container characterization data, shipments, waste processing, disposals, reporting, and limit compliance checks are just a few of the items that IWTS documents and performs to help waste management personnel perform their jobs. Throughout most hazardous and radioactive waste generating, storage and disposal sites, waste management is performed by many different groups of people in many facilities. Several organizations administer their areas of waste management using their own procedures and documentation independent of other organizations. Files are kept, some of which are treated as quality records, others not as stringent. Quality records maintain a history of: changes performed after approval, the reason for the change(s), and a record of whom and when the changes were made. As regulations and permits change, and as the proliferation of personal computers flourish, procedures and data files begin to be stored in electronic databases. With many different organizations, contractors, and unique procedures, several dozen databases are used to track and maintain aspects of waste management. As one can see, the logistics of collecting and certifying data from all organizations to provide comprehensive information would not only take weeks to perform, but usually presents a variety of answers that require an immediate unified resolution. A lot of personnel time is spent scrubbing the data in order to determine the correct information. The issue of disparate data is a concern in itself, and is coupled with the costs associated with maintaining several separate databases. In order to gain waste management efficiencies across an entire facility or site, several waste management databases located among several organizations would need to be consolidated. The IWTS is a system to do just that, namely store and track containerized waste information for an entire site. The IWTS has proven itself at the INL since 1995 as an efficient, successful, time saving management tool to help meet the needs of both operations and management for hazardous and radiological containerized waste. Other sites have also benefited from IWTS as it has been deployed at West Valley Nuclear Services Company DOE site as well as Ontario Power Ge

Robert S. Anderson

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

426

A model for a national low level waste program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

In July of 2003, the organizations of Printing Services; Planning, Construction & Maintenance; Parking; Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, systems & controls, and waste transfer & recycling. Planning Division: The primary focus of our Planning · Parking · Printing · Space Management · Stores · Waste Management & Recycling · Copying ServicesAbout In July of 2003, the organizations of Printing Services; Planning, Construction & Maintenance

Shim, Moonsub

429

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500 C with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO{sub 2} gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO{sub 2} gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO{sub 2} absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described. 8 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Solid Waste Management Written Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste.................................................................... 4 4.2.1 Compost Solid Waste Treatment Facility.................................................................... 4 4.2.2 Pathological Solid Waste Treatment Facility

Pawlowski, Wojtek

432

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

433

www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the International Solid Waste Association, GIZ/SWEEP-Net, the Waste to Energy Research Council (WTERT) and the Solidwww.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com Acharnon 141 10446 ATHENS GREECE T: +30 2155302449 F: +30 2155302447 For Release November 13, 2013 Waste Atlas shows how the world handles its refuse D-Waste

434

Cornell Cooperative Extension Cornell Waste Management Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-255-1187 by: Mary Schwarz Jean Bonhotal Composting at Home - The Green and Brown Alternative Sustainability composting steps in; organic waste can be recycled through composting and the resulting product can be used composting program or for composting at home conserves energy and natural resources, reduces air and water

435

Adequacy of a Small Quantity Site RH-TRU Waste Program in Meeting Proposed WIPP Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste is expected to be permanently disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The first RH-TRU waste shipments are scheduled from the Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) to WIPP in order to facilitate compliance with BCL Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) milestones. Milestones requiring RH-TRU waste containerization and removal from the site by 2004 in order to meet a 2006 site closure goal, established by Congress in the Defense Facilities Closure Projects account, necessitated the establishment and implementation of a site-specific program to direct the packaging of BCLDP RH-TRU waste prior to the finalization of WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements. The program was designed to collect waste data, including audio and videotape records of waste packaging, such that upon completion of waste packaging, comprehensive data records exist from which compliance with final WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements can be demonstrated. With the BCLDP data records generated to date and the development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) of preliminary documents proposing the WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization program, it is possible to evaluate the adequacy of the BCLDP program with respect to meeting proposed characterization objectives. The BCLDP characterization program uses primarily acceptable knowledge (AK) and visual examination (VE) during waste packaging to characterize RH-TRU waste. These methods are used to estimate physical waste parameters, including weight percentages of metals, cellulosics, plastics, and rubber in the waste, and to determine the absence of prohibited items, including free liquids. AK combined with computer modeling is used to estimate radiological waste parameters, including total activity on a waste container basis, for the majority of BCLDP RH-TRU waste. AK combined with direct analysis is used to characterize radiological parameters for the small populations of the RH-TRU waste generated by the BCLDP. All characterization based on AK is verified. Per its design for comprehensive waste data collection, the BCLDP characterization program using AK and waste packaging procedures, including VE during packaging, meets the proposed WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization objectives. The conservative program design implemented generates certification data that will be adequate to meet any additional program requirements that may be imposed by the CBFO.

Biedscheid, J.; Stahl, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Peters, K.; Eide, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

437

Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

438

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

439

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages...

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

NONE

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

442

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

443

Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

principles of EU waste policies. The environmental damage caused by waste depends on which type of manage, Environmental Assessment Institute For further information please contact: Environmental Assessment Institute.imv.dk #12;Environmental Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations

444

Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

NONE

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

445

ivestock and poultry operations frequently use anaerobic lagoons as liquid waste storage and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L ivestock and poultry operations frequently use anaerobic lagoons as liquid waste storage and treatment structures. In a lagoon, organic waste is diluted with water and bacteria decompose the organic as fertilizer. Effluent also can be recycled for manure handling in a flush system. Efficiency To be efficient

Mukhtar, Saqib

446

Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

448

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

449

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

Cationic quaternization of cellulose with methacryloyloxy ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride via ATRP method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis of a cationic cellulose copolymer from cellulose macro-initiator (MCC-BiB) and quaternary compound monomer (METMA) via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was studied. By using dimethylformamide (DMF), the optimum condition for successful synthesis was at the mole ratio of MCC-BIB:Catalyst:METMA = 1:1:26. The highest copolymer recovery was 93.2 % for 6 h and at 40°C. The copolymer was insoluble in weak polar solvents such as THF and DMF but soluble in methanol and water. The chemistry of cellulose copolymer was confirmed by the FTIR and TGA in which the METMA monomer was used as a reference. The absence of CC bond in the CiB-g-METMA spectrum indicated that graft copolymerization occurred.

Supeno [Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia and School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Daik, Rusli, E-mail: rusli@ukm.edu.my [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); El-Sheikh, Said M. [Nano-Structured Materials Division, Advanced Materials Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute, Cairo (Egypt)

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

452

The influence of various levels of cellulose and lipid and lipid sources on apparent digestibility and apparent protein digestibility in penaeid shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this study decreased with any addition of cellulose, it is interesting to note the smaller negative effect of adding cellulose to P. aztecus diets. This could be attributed to differing environmental conditions between experiments or varying abilities... of the two species tested, P, aztecus and P. vannamei, to digest cellulose itself or minimize the negative effects of cellulose on the digestibility of other feed ingredients. The need for fiber identified by Venakataramiah could also be attributed...

Borrer, Shellie Earle

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

Francis, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Development of Alternative Technetium Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UREX+1 process is under consideration for the separation of transuranic elements from spent nuclear fuel. The first steps of this process extract the fission product technicium-99 ({sup 99}Tc) into an organic phase containing tributylphosphate together with uranium. Treatment of this stream requires the separation of Tc from U and placement into a suitable waste storage form. A potential candidate waste form involves immobilizing the Tc as an alloy with either excess metallic zirconium or stainless steel. Although Tc-Zr alloys seem to be promising waste forms, alternative materials must be investigated. Innovative studies related to the synthesis and behavior of a different class of Tc materials will increase the scientific knowledge related to development of Tc waste forms. These studies will also provide a better understanding of the behavior of {sup 99}Tc in repository conditions. A literature survey has selected promising alternative waste forms for further study: technetium metallic alloys, nitrides, oxides, sulfides, and pertechnetate salts. The goals of this project are to 1) synthesize and structurally characterize relevant technetium materials that may be considered as waste forms, 2) investigate material behavior in solution under different conditions of temperature, electrochemical potential, and radiation, and 3) predict the long-term behavior of these materials.

Czerwinski, Kenneth

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

Municipal solid waste disposal in Portugal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal has been one of the most important environmental problems for all of the Portuguese regions. The basic principles of MSW management in Portugal are: (1) prevention or reduction, (2) reuse, (3) recovery (e.g., recycling, incineration with heat recovery), and (4) polluter-pay principle. A brief history of legislative trends in waste management is provided herein as background for current waste management and recycling activities. The paper also presents and discusses the municipal solid waste management in Portugal and is based primarily on a national inquiry carried out in 2003 and directed to the MSW management entities. Additionally, the MSW responsibility and management structure in Portugal is presented, together with the present situation of production, collection, recycling, treatment and elimination of MSW. Results showed that 96% of MSW was collected mixed (4% was separately collected) and that 68% was disposed of in landfill, 21% was incinerated at waste-to-energy plants, 8% was treated at organic waste recovery plants and 3% was delivered to sorting. The average generation rate of MSW was 1.32 kg/capita/day.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Didelet, Filipe [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Hanford site transuranic waste sampling plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sampling plan (SP) describes the selection of containers for sampling of homogeneous solids and soil/gravel and for visual examination of transuranic and mixed transuranic (collectively referred to as TRU) waste generated at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The activities described in this SP will be conducted under the Hanford Site TRU Waste Certification Program. This SP is designed to meet the requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (CAO-94-1010) (DOE 1996a) (QAPP), site-specific implementation of which is described in the Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Characterization Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (HNF-2599) (Hanford 1998b) (QAPP). The QAPP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements and protocols for TRU waste characterization activities at the Hanford Site. In addition, the QAPP identifies responsible organizations, describes required program activities, outlines sampling and analysis strategies, and identifies procedures for characterization activities. The QAPP identifies specific requirements for TRU waste sampling plans. Table 1-1 presents these requirements and indicates sections in this SP where these requirements are addressed.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

457

Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress response to heavy carbon load and accumulation of metabolic products. These findings provide new perspectives to enhance the ability of cellulolytic bacteria to produce biofuels and biocommodities with high efficiency and at low cost directly from lignocellulosic biomass.

Li, Yongchao [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Tao [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL] [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL] [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Chapter 18: Understanding the Developing Cellulosic Biofuels Industry through Dynamic Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to discuss a system dynamics model called the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the burgeoning cellulosic biofuels industry in the United States. The model has also recently been expanded to include advanced conversion technologies and biofuels (i.e., conversion pathways that yield biomass-based gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, and butanol), but we focus on cellulosic ethanol conversion pathways here. The BSM uses a system dynamics modeling approach (Bush et al., 2008) built on the STELLA software platform.

Newes, E.; Inman, D.; Bush, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Process Design of Wastewater Treatment for the NREL Cellulosic Ethanol Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a preliminary process design for treating the wastewater from NREL's cellulosic ethanol production process to quality levels required for recycle. In this report Brown and Caldwell report on three main tasks: 1) characterization of the effluent from NREL's ammonia-conditioned hydrolyzate fermentation process; 2) development of the wastewater treatment process design; and 3) development of a capital and operational cost estimate for the treatment concept option. This wastewater treatment design was incorporated into NREL's cellulosic ethanol process design update published in May 2011 (NREL/TP-5100-47764).

Steinwinder, T.; Gill, E.; Gerhardt, M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

463

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

465

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

466

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonconventional Fluids," ASME Jour of Engineering for Power,fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles," Applied Thermal Engineering,fluid in waste heat recovery," Applied Thermal Engineering,

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

469

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

470

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Method and compositions for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in chemical waste mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and process are disclosed for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in an organic waste mixture and a biologically pure, novel bacteria culture for accomplishing the same. A newly-discovered bacteria (a strain of Acinetobacter sp. ATCC 55587) is provided which is combined in a reactor vessel with a liquid waste mixture containing tributyl phosphate and one or more organic waste compounds capable of functioning as growth substrates for the bacteria. The bacteria is thereafter allowed to incubate within the waste mixture. As a result, the tributyl phosphate and organic compounds within the waste mixture are metabolized (degraded) by the bacteria, thereby eliminating such materials which are environmentally hazardous. In addition, the bacteria is capable of degrading waste mixtures containing high quantities of tributyl phosphate (e.g. up to about 1.0% by weight tributyl phosphate). 6 figs.

Stoner, D.L.; Tien, A.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

472

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

475

Operational waste volume projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

Koreski, G.M.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

476

Function analysis for waste information systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has a two-fold purpose. It seeks to identify the functional requirements of a waste tracking information system and to find feasible alternatives for meeting those requirements on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and the Portsmouth (PORTS) and Paducah (PGDP) facilities; identify options that offer potential cost savings to the US government and also show opportunities for improved efficiency and effectiveness in managing waste information; and, finally, to recommend a practical course of action that can be immediately initiated. In addition to identifying relevant requirements, it also identifies any existing requirements that are currently not being completely met. Another aim of this study is to carry out preliminary benchmarking by contacting representative companies about their strategic directions in waste information. The information obtained from representatives of these organizations is contained in an appendix to the document; a full benchmarking effort, however, is beyond the intended scope of this study.

Sexton, J.L.; Neal, C.T.; Heath, T.C.; Starling, C.D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Ab Initio Dynamics of Cellulose Pyrolysis: Nascent Decomposition Pathways at 327 and 600 C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reserves in lignocellulosic biomass.1 Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, which involves rapidAb Initio Dynamics of Cellulose Pyrolysis: Nascent Decomposition Pathways at 327 and 600 °C Vishal pyrolysis at 327 and 600 °C using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations with rare events

Auerbach, Scott M.

478

Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Woodward, J.

1987-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

479

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Cellulose: sustainable and renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Cellulose: sustainable and renewable material for many applications 17 November 2011, 5.45pm Harrison Building, Room 004 InspIrIngScience Professor Stephen Eichhorn Chair of Materials Science College of engineering, MatheMatiCs and PhysiCal sCienCes 2011ceMPS041

Mumby, Peter J.

480

Photocatalytic cellulosic electrospun fibers for the degradation of potent cyanobacteria toxin microcystin-LR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photocatalytic cellulosic electrospun fibers for the degradation of potent cyanobacteria toxin of titania nanoparticle (visible light activated or UV light activated), the surface area of the fiber mat-LR degradation under both visible and solar light irradiation. The difference in titania coverage, determined

Steckl, Andrew J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic wastes cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Study of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose for Production of Fuel Ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose for Production of Fuel Ethanol by the Simultaneous to ethanol, a promising alternative fuel, can be carried out efficiently and economically using are presented in light of the impact of enzymatic hydrolysis on fuel ethanol production. Key words: enzymatic

California at Riverside, University of

482

Application of cellulase and hemicellulase to pure xylan, pure cellulose, and switchgrass solids from leading pretreatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-glucosidase, Multifect xylanase, and beta-xylosidase were evaluated for hydrolysis of pure cellulose, pure xylan for transportation fuels are needed to replace depleting petroleum-based options and address global cli- mate change of technical and economical feasibilities (Wyman, 1994). A wide range of lignocellulosic biomass materials have

California at Riverside, University of

483

Bacterial cellulose based hydrogel (BC-g-AA) and preliminary result of swelling behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, hydrogel based on Bacterial cellulose (BC) or local known as Nata de Coco, which grafted with monomer: Acrylic acid (AA) is synthesis by using gamma radiation technique. These hydrogel (BC-g-AA) has unique characteristic whereby responsive to pH buffer solution.

Hakam, Adil; Lazim, Azwan Mat [UKM-MIMOS Laboratory, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM) (Malaysia); Abdul Rahman, I. Irman [Laboratory of Gamma Radiation Instrument, Science Nuclear Program, School of Applied Physics, National University of Malaysia (UKM) (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

484

Separable fluorous ionic liquids for the dissolution and saccharification of cellulose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulose (medium cotton linters, C6288) was from Sigma Chemical (St. Louis, MO). Other commercial chemicals silica gel was from Aldrich Chemical (Milwaukee, WI). The term "concentrated under reduced pressure unless indicated otherwise. Mass spectrometry was performed with a Micromass LCT (electrospray ionization

Raines, Ronald T.

485

Fabrication of "Roll-off" and "Sticky" Superhydrophobic Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to date are not biodegradable, renewable, or mechanically flexible and are often expensive, which limits their potential applications. In contrast, cellulose, a biodegradable, renewable, flexible, inexpensive properties: (1) surface roughness and (2) low surface energy. So far superhydrophobic surfaces have been

Breedveld, Victor

486

Hydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation and electrohydrogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primarily of: acetic, lactic, succinic, and formic acids and ethanol. An additional 800 Æ 290 mL H2/gHydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation Electrolysis cell Fermentation Lignocellulose a b s t r a c t A two-stage dark-fermentation

487

Access of Cellulase to Cellulose and Lignin for Poplar Solids Produced by Leading Pretreatment Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Access of Cellulase to Cellulose and Lignin for Poplar Solids Produced by Leading Pretreatment and adsorption of b-glucosidase for lignin left after enzymatic digestion of the solids from these pretreatments effectiveness was determined. Furthermore, Avicel hydrolysis inhibition by enzymatic and acid lignin of poplar

California at Riverside, University of

488

Nanoporous layered silicate AMH-3/cellulose acetate nanocomposite membranes for gas separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoporous layered silicate AMH-3/cellulose acetate nanocomposite membranes for gas separations Wun 20 March 2013 Available online 9 April 2013 Keywords: Layered silicates AMH-3 Composite membrane Exfoliation Interface CO2 separation a b s t r a c t Nanoporous layered silicate/polymer composite membranes

Nair, Sankar

489

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

490

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

491

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Solid Waste Management (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental...

493

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are...

494