National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for organic tentatively identified

  1. Tentative Agreement.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. TentativeAgreement.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1ThousandTentative

  3. Class 2 Permit Modification Request Revise Volatile Organic Compound...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Program scfm standard cubic feet per minute (ft 3 min) TCE trichloroethylene TIC tentatively identified compound TRU transuranic VOC volatile organic compound WIPP...

  4. Business Systems and Analytics With ever increasing amounts of data, organizations are identifying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    , business systems analysis and design, enterprise resource planning, project management and business process offered by the International Institute of Business Analysis, SAP, the Project MaBusiness Systems and Analytics With ever increasing amounts of data, organizations are identifying

  5. Business Systems Analysis With ever increasing amounts of data, organizations are identifying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    , business systems analysis and design, enterprise resource planning, project management and business process Institute of Business Analysis, SAP, the Project Management InBusiness Systems Analysis With ever increasing amounts of data, organizations are identifying

  6. SUMMER SCHOOL ON RENEWABLE ENERGY: POLICY AND DEVELOPMENT TENTATIVE COURSE OVERVIEW 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    (Center for Development Research) City of Bonn Panel Meet Young Political Leaders Morbach Energy Professionals UN-Campus (United Nations Organizations in Bonn) Solar World, Bonn IRENA InnovationSUMMER SCHOOL ON RENEWABLE ENERGY: POLICY AND DEVELOPMENT TENTATIVE COURSE OVERVIEW 2015 WEEK

  7. Emission, oxidation, and secondary organic aerosol formation of volatile organic compounds as observed at Chebogue Point,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    acid, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, tentatively identified formic acid and hydroxyacetone organic aerosol production. We clearly show these compounds do not originate from local sources. We also show these compounds match the oxidation products of isoprene observed in smog chamber studies, and we

  8. Future Direction of National Fusion Research Tentative translation to English

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Direction of National Fusion Research (Report) Tentative translation to English Office of Fusion Energy, Research and Development Bureau, MEXT January 8, 2003 Working Group on Fusion Research -----------------------------------------------------------------21 Attachment, Future Direction of National Fusion Research (Synopsis) ---------------28 #12

  9. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Signatures and Nitrogen Profile To Identify Adulteration in Organic Fertilizers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    growth regulators such as hormones, livestock antibiotics, food additives, genetically modified organisms

  10. Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, Anna C.; Russell, Marion; Lee, Wen-Yee; Apte, Michael; Maddalena, Randy

    2010-09-20

    The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 mu g/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to>500 mu g/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~;;15 mu g/m2/h while the new wood material emitted>100 mu g/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs.

  11. Tentative detection of the nitrosylium ion in space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Bailleux, S.; Alekseev, E.; Fuente, A.; Bachiller, R.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Treviño-Morales, S. P.; Marcelino, N.; Lefloch, B.

    2014-11-01

    We report the tentative detection in space of the nitrosylium ion, NO{sup +}. The observations were performed toward the cold dense core Barnard 1-b. The identification of the NO{sup +} J = 2-1 line is supported by new laboratory measurements of NO{sup +} rotational lines up to the J = 8-7 transition (953207.189 MHz), which leads to an improved set of molecular constants: B {sub 0} = 59597.1379(62) MHz, D {sub 0} = 169.428(65) kHz, and eQq {sub 0}(N) = –6.72(15) MHz. The profile of the feature assigned to NO{sup +} exhibits two velocity components at 6.5 and 7.5 km s{sup –1}, with column densities of 1.5 × 10{sup 12} and 6.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –2}, respectively. New observations of NO and HNO, also reported here, allow us to estimate the following abundance ratios: X(NO)/X(NO{sup +}) ? 511, and X(HNO)/X(NO{sup +}) ? 1. This latter value provides important constraints on the formation and destruction processes of HNO. The chemistry of NO{sup +} and other related nitrogen-bearing species is investigated by the means of a time-dependent gas phase model which includes an updated chemical network according to recent experimental studies. The predicted abundance for NO{sup +} and NO is found to be consistent with the observations. However, that of HNO relative to NO is too high. No satisfactory chemical paths have been found to explain the observed low abundance of HNO. HSCN and HNCS are also reported here with an abundance ratio of ? 1. Finally, we have searched for NNO, NO{sub 2}, HNNO{sup +}, and NNOH{sup +}, but only upper limits have been obtained for their column density, except for the latter for which we report a tentative 3? detection.

  12. Data Mining and CRM Applications: MKTG 5963, Section 503 (Tentative Syllabus for Spring 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data Mining and CRM Applications: MKTG 5963, Section 503 (Tentative Syllabus for Spring 2015 for clarification or software help is ok). Required Text: Text Mining and Analysis: Practical methods, Examples. Reference Texts (Optional materials ­ some of these will be put in reserve at the library) · Data Mining

  13. GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 -GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 - GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS Description: Investigation of the geological and geotechnical aspects of offshore wind projects. Emphasis will be designed around geological and geotechnical topics that are relevant to the development of offshore wind

  14. National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation) 26 October 2005 Atomic Energy Commission Advisory Committee on Nuclear Fusion #12;2 Contents Preface Chapter and Environmental Problems 1.2 Significance and Necessity of Fusion R&D in Nuclear Energy Policy Chapter 2 Status

  15. Tentative Agreement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. UF in ItalyFOOD PRODUCTION to CONSUMPTION Summer C: June 5 -23, 2016 (Tentative)| International Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    UF in ItalyFOOD PRODUCTION to CONSUMPTION Summer C: June 5 - 23, 2016 (Tentative)| International credits studying Italian food from production to consumption. The course will cover important aspects and cuisine of different regions of Italy ALS 4404 Italian Food: From Production to Consumption Courses

  17. Identifying Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Adrian S

    2009-01-01

    Identification of active constraints in constrained optimization is of interest from both practical and theoretical viewpoints, as it holds the promise of reducing an inequality-constrained problem to an equality-constrained problem, in a neighborhood of a solution. We study this issue in the more general setting of composite nonsmooth minimization, in which the objective is a composition of a smooth vector function c with a lower semicontinuous function h, typically nonsmooth but structured. In this setting, the graph of the generalized gradient of h can often be decomposed into a union (nondisjoint) of simpler subsets. "Identification" amounts to deciding which subsets of the graph are "active" in the criticality conditions at a given solution. We give conditions under which any convergent sequence of approximate critical points finitely identifies the activity. Prominent among these properties is a condition akin to the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, which ensures boundedness of the set of...

  18. CONSTRAINING THE DISTRIBUTION OF DARK MATTER IN THE INNER GALAXY WITH AN INDIRECT DETECTION SIGNAL: THE CASE OF A TENTATIVE 130 GeV {gamma}-RAY LINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Ruizhi; Feng Lei; Li Xiang; Fan Yizhong

    2013-06-20

    Dark matter distribution in the very inner region of our Galaxy is still debated. In N-body simulations, a cuspy dark matter halo density profile is favored. Several dissipative baryonic processes, however, are found to be able to significantly flatten dark matter distribution, and a cored dark matter halo density profile is possible. Baryons dominate the gravitational potential in the inner Galaxy, hence a direct constraint on the abundance of dark matter particles is rather challenging. Recently, a few groups have identified a tentative 130 GeV line signal in the Galactic center, which could be interpreted as the signal of dark matter annihilation. Using current 130 GeV line data and adopting the generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile of the dark matter halo-local dark matter density {rho}{sub 0} = 0.4 GeV cm{sup -3} and r{sub s} = 20 kpc-we obtain a 95% confidence level lower (upper) limit on the inner slope of dark matter density distribution, {alpha} = 1.06 (the cross section of dark matter annihilation into {gamma}-rays ({sigma}v){sub {chi}{chi}{sub {yields}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}}} = 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). Such a slope is consistent with the results of some N-body simulations and, if the signal is due to dark matter, suggests that baryonic processes may be unimportant.

  19. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: Surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhi; Sareen, Neha; McNeill, V Faye

    2011-01-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(\\pm2) dyn/cm in pure water and 62(\\pm1) dyn/cm in AS solutions. Surface t...

  20. Proposed Provisions on Seismic Design of Steel Shear Walls, proposed to BSSC TS6 by A. Astaneh, May 29, 2002 of 91 Tentatively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    Proposed Provisions on Seismic Design of Steel Shear Walls, proposed to BSSC TS6 by A. Astaneh, May 29, 2002 of 91 Tentatively Proposed Seismic Design Provisions and Commentary for Steel Shear Walls to the BSSC and the TS6's efforts in having seismic design provisions for steel shear walls included

  1. Tentative Schedule for the Weekend: September 2324, 2011 Friday Afternoon ETSU Fall Alumni Golf Classic Hosted at Cattails at the Marriott MeadowView

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Tentative Schedule for the Weekend: September 2324, 2011 · Friday Afternoon ­ ETSU Fall Alumni of the Alumni Divisions or against other Greek Two Person Teams For more information, http://etsu Contact you to join in! Email fulkersj@etsu.edu Phone 4234398328 Website http://www.etsu

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 22, PAGES 4243-4246, NOVEMBER 15, 2001 A tentative chronology for the EPICA Dome Concordia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwander, Jakob

    chronology for the EPICA Dome Concordia ice core Jakob Schwander,1 Jean Jouzel,2 Claus U. Hammer,3 Jean-Robert Petit,4 Roberto Udisti,5 Eric Wolff,6 Abstract. A tentative age scale (EDC1) for the last 45 kyr by analyzing samples of the core. There exist numerous methods for dat- ing ice cores [Hammer et al., 1978

  3. TENTATIVE EVIDENCE FOR RELATIVISTIC ELECTRONS GENERATED BY THE JET OF THE YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR DG Tau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ainsworth, Rachael E.; Ray, Tom P.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Scaife, Anna M. M.; Green, David A.; Buckle, Jane V.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron emission has recently been detected in the jet of a massive protostar, providing further evidence that certain jet formation characteristics for young stars are similar to those found for highly relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. We present data at 325 and 610 MHz taken with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope of the young, low-mass star DG Tau, an analog of the Sun soon after its birth. This is the first investigation of a low-mass young stellar object at such low frequencies. We detect emission with a synchrotron spectral index in the proximity of the DG Tau jet and interpret this emission as a prominent bow shock associated with this outflow. This result provides tentative evidence for the acceleration of particles to relativistic energies due to the shock impact of this otherwise very low-power jet against the ambient medium. We calculate the equipartition magnetic field strength B {sub min} ? 0.11 mG and particle energy E {sub min} ? 4 × 10{sup 40} erg, which are the minimum requirements to account for the synchrotron emission of the DG Tau bow shock. These results suggest the possibility of low energy cosmic rays being generated by young Sun-like stars.

  4. Tentative Syllabus Summer 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapp, Douglas A.

    for yourself, but will be checking out to you a TI-Nspire CX CAS that can be used with our wireless network. You are responsible for this device and must return it and its charger at the end of the course

  5. Camp Cosmos (Tentative Itinerary)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    includes Farquhar Globe, Planisphere, 10:45- 12:00 (Gullen Mall) 10:45- 12:00 10:45- 12:00 Detroit Sky-The Detroit Science Center fee is included in camp registration AST Lab Backyard Galileo, Hubble Jeopardy Hubble Field Trip* Fitness Outdoor/ Space Detroit 11:30-1:00 pm Center Hands On Telescope/ Historical

  6. Tentative Course Calendar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-11-10

    MA/STAT 25000. Course Calendar. Fall 2015. Unless otherwise stated, all homework will be due at the beginning of the following class. Date. Topic. Homework.

  7. TENTATIVE AGREEMENT ON NEGOTIATIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Personally Identifiable Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Websites and applications that collect data on individuals are gathering personally identifiable information (PII). PII is also often collected for customer surveys or user experience (UX) research.

  9. Metal alloy identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  10. Identifying Classified Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-03

    To establish the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD), Formerly Restricted Data (FRD), and Transclassified Foreign Nuclear Information (TFNI)] or Executive Order (E.O.) 13526 [National Security Information (NSI)], so that it can be protected against unauthorized dissemination. Supersedes DOE O 475.2A.

  11. Identifying Classified Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-06-03

    The Order establishes the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD), Formerly Restricted Data (FRD), and Transclassified Foreign Nuclear Information (TFNI)]or Executive Order (E.O.) 13526 [National Security Information (NSI)], so that it can be protected against unauthorized dissemination.

  12. Identifying Classified Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-01

    The Order establishes the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD), Formerly Restricted Data (FRD), and Transclassified Foreign Nuclear Information (TFNI)] or Executive Order (E.O.) 13526 [National Security Information (NSI)], so that it can be protected against unauthorized dissemination. Cancels DOE O 475.2 and DOE M 475.1-1B.

  13. Identifying Classified Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-08-28

    The Order establishes the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD) and Formerly Restricted Data (FRD)] or Executive Order 12958, as amended [National Security Information (NSI)], so that it can be protected against unauthorized dissemination. Canceled by DOE O 475.2

  14. Methodology using process integration for identifying suitable Organic Rankine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    .bendig@epfl.ch World energy-related CO emission savings by policy measure in the 450 scenario of the IEA. Source:IEA Energy Outlook, volume 2009. OECD/IEA, Paris. Maréchal, F., 2008, Pinch analysis, Chapter 3

  15. List of Acronyms and/or Identifiers Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (name change effective 7/1/2009) Org 14: CNAS ­ College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences Org 15 Resources (UC System-wide Program) ANR ­ Agricultural and Natural Resources (UC System-wide Program) UC (merged into FBO effective 7/1/2009) Org 18: Academic Senate Org 19: VCA ­ Administration/Vice Chancellor

  16. Aged black carbon identified in marine dissolved organic carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziolkowski, Lori A; Druffel, Ellen R.M.

    2010-01-01

    pool in the northeast Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Part I,?445‰ in the deep NE Pacific Ocean (Table S1). The Suwanneein the northeast Pacific Ocean. If the BC in the Amazon

  17. Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve the sustainability goals you've identified, take into account the network of roles essential to make or maintain the desired changes. As a rule of thumb, it may help to think about what roles are necessary for determining what changes to make, implementing those changes, and supporting or abiding by those changes. One place to start is by identifying leaders in your organization who have the authority, resources, and influence to make change happen. Those leadership roles typically include: Senior management Policy and technology officers Facilities and operations managers.

  18. Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

    1999-07-01

    Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

  19. TENTATIVE RESOLUTION OF DISPUTE AND

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  20. PFP Tentative Agreement.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Identifying the structural discontinuities of human interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grauwin, Sebastian; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Hövel, Philipp; Simini, Filippo; Vanhoof, Maarten; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo; Ratti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The idea of a hierarchical spatial organization of society lies at the core of seminal theories in human geography that have strongly influenced our understanding of social organization. In the same line, the recent availability of large-scale human mobility and communication data has offered novel quantitative insights hinting at a strong geographical confinement of human interactions within neighboring regions, extending to local levels within countries. However, models of human interaction largely ignore this effect. Here, we analyze several country-wide networks of telephone calls and uncover a systematic decrease of communication induced by borders which we identify as the missing variable in state-of-the-art models. Using this empirical evidence, we propose an alternative modeling framework that naturally stylize the damping effect of borders. We show that this new notion substantially improves the predictive power of widely used interaction models, thus increasing our ability to predict social activiti...

  2. Eigenbehaviors: Identifying Structure in Routine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pentland, Alex Paul

    Longitudinal behavioral data generally contains a significant amount of structure. In this work, we identify the structure inherent in daily behavior with models that can accurately analyze, predict, and cluster multimodal ...

  3. Manual for Identifying Classified Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-08-28

    The Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 475.2, Identifying Classified Information, dated 8/28/07. Cancels DOE M 475.1-1A; canceled by DOE O 475.2A

  4. Fermilab | About | Organization | Fermilab Organization | Explanation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Symbols Line Organization: sectors, divisions, sections Line Organization Matrix Organization: centers, projects and programs utilizing resources spanning the entire...

  5. Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable InformationProtected Health Information Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable InformationProtected Health...

  6. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  8. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Report Identifies Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Report Identifies Research Needed to Address Power Market Design Challenges National Renewable Energy Laboratory Report Identifies Research...

  9. Collecting Personally Identifiable Information Through the Web...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Requirements Collecting Personally Identifiable Information Through the Web and User Research Collecting Personally Identifiable Information Through the Web and User...

  10. Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout EventsOrganizing

  12. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing Committee

  13. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing

  14. Identifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomaterials for Hybrid Solar Cells Hongjun Xiang* and Su-Huai Wei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    developed photovoltaic technology, organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells have attracted great interest 3.5% so far. As an alternative polymer-based photovoltaic cell, the organic-inorganic hybrid solarIdentifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomaterials for Hybrid Solar Cells Hongjun Xiang* and Su-Huai Wei

  15. Identify key design elements of desired function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nawroth, Janna C.

    DESIGN Identify key design elements of desired function Identify functionally equivalent implementation of key design elements (e.g. structure, physiology, kinematics etc.) Quantify functional and standardize fabrication for repeatability . Test phase: Quantify implementation of key design elements

  16. Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    To establish a program within the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), to identify certain unclassified controlled information as Official Use Only (OUO) and to identify, mark, and protect documents containing such information.

  17. Energy Assessment Results: Most Commonly Identified Recommendations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Assessment Results: Most Commonly Identified Recommendations The Missouri Industrial Assessment Center shares its experience providing energy assessments to local...

  18. Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Joseph R. (Erial, NJ); Staskawicz, Brian J. (Castro Valley, CA); Bent, Andrew F. (Piedmont, CA); Innes, Roger W. (Bloomington, IN)

    1997-10-07

    A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described.

  19. Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

    1997-10-07

    A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

  20. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout Events

  1. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout

  2. Method to determine transcriptional regulation pathways in organisms...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Method to determine transcriptional regulation pathways in organisms The invention relates to computer-implemented methods and systems for identifying regulatory...

  3. Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is important to analyze formal and informal workplace rules governing the behavior of individuals and organizations to meet a federal agency's institutional change goals for sustainability. It is also important to determine how these rules actually affect people filling different roles in the organization, and how they mesh with the technologies, systems, and processes that constitute tools.

  4. International energy: Research organizations, 1986--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, P.; Jordan, S. )

    1991-03-01

    The International Energy: Research Organizations publication contains the standardized names of energy research organizations used in energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). This publication identifies current organizations doing research in all energy fields, standardizes the format for recording these organization names in bibliographic citations, assigns a numeric code to facilitate data entry, and identifies report number prefixes assigned by these organizations. These research organization names may be used in searching the databases Energy Science Technology'' on DIALOG and Energy'' on STN International. These organization names are also used in USDOE databases on the Integrated Technical Information System. Research organizations active in the past five years, as indicated by database records, were identified to form this publication. This directory includes approximately 34,000 organizations that reported energy-related literature from 1986 to 1990 and updates the DOE Energy Data Base: Corporate Author Entries.

  5. Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

  6. NREL Research Identifies Increased Potential for Perovskites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Identifies Increased Potential for Perovskites as a Material for Solar Cells October 30, 2015 Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  7. Geography 547: Fluvial Geomorphology Tentative Lecture Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    order & magnitude, Horton's laws of drainage composition Knighton, p.9-24; Easterbrook, p.138-141 30 Structural inferences from drainage patterns Easterbrook, p.141-152 [12] Stream Restoration Nov.4 Election stress, critical tractive force, bed sediment entrainment, lift and drag forces -------- 20 Fluvial

  8. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited. They are expected to anticipate and react quickly to prevent a potential threat while staying accountable to their public stakeholders, many of whom remain unaware of the very threats the organization is trying to address. When budgets are flush, it is easy to believe that money will solve all problems; but during times of economic hardship, managers must rely on creative and cost-effective management approaches to implement their missions. Fortunately, managers of nonproliferation organizations can draw on a wealth of research on organizational design and culture to help them identify the management strategies most appropriate for them. Such research can help nonproliferation managers think about their own organizational structures and cultures and adapt accepted management principles to their unique organizational mission. This analytical process is not straight forward, as some managers may find themselves taking risks that others might not take, such as making ostensibly risky investments for the common good, or supporting creative thinking to help mission accomplishment. Some management principles that are relatively straightforward for other organizations may be difficult to envision and implement in a nonproliferation organization. Therefore, the goal of this study is to help nonproliferation managers identify management principles that can be implemented in a nonproliferation organization and, in the process, help maximize the value of the organization's products and effectiveness of its mission.

  9. Identifying Sources and Biomagnification of Persistent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and glacial melt from surrounding mountains have been found to contain elevated levels of persistent organic pollutants originating from atmospheric inputs to snowpack and glacial runoff and from marine sources

  10. Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    The order establishes a program within DOE and NNSA to identify certain unclassified controlled information as Official Use Only (OUO) and to identify, mark, and protect documents containing such information. Chg 1 dated 1-12-11, supersedes DOE O 471.3.

  11. Guide to Identifying Official Use Only Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    This Guide supplements information contained in Department of Energy (DOE) O 471.3, Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information, dated 4-9-03, and DOE M 471.3-1, Manual for Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information, dated 4-9-03.

  12. Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Huidong "Warren"

    Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer Jie Chen1 , Hongxing He1 , Huidong Jin1 of identifying and describing risk groups for colorectal cancer (CRC) from population based administrative health are applied to the colorectal cancer patients' profiles in contrast to background pa- tients' profiles

  13. Identifying Best Practices in Hydraulic Fracturing Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Identifying Best Practices in Hydraulic Fracturing Using Virtual Intelligence Techniques SPE 72385 Results & Discussion Conclusion #12;SPE 72385 OBJECTIVE To identify Best Practices in Hydraulic Fracturing, are fractured upon completion to provide economic amounts of gas. #12;SPE 72385 BACKGROUND A dataset

  14. IDENTIFYING CANDIDATE PROTEIN FOR REMOVAL OF ENVIRONMENTALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    IDENTIFYING CANDIDATE PROTEIN FOR REMOVAL OF ENVIRONMENTALLY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES Pharem Biotech products and technologies for removing environmental hazardous substances in our everyday life. The products can be applied in areas from the private customer up to the global corporate perspective

  15. Identifying Opportunities for Industrial Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The Energy Productivity Center of the Mellon Institute is engaged in a 2-year study to identify opportunities for improved U.S. industrial energy productivity. A distinguishing feature is the focus on energy services provided when fuels are consumed...

  16. Hierarchical Organization in Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erzsebet Ravasz; Albert-Laszlo Barabasi

    2002-09-01

    Many real networks in nature and society share two generic properties: they are scale-free and they display a high degree of clustering. We show that these two features are the consequence of a hierarchical organization, implying that small groups of nodes organize in a hierarchical manner into increasingly large groups, while maintaining a scale-free topology. In hierarchical networks the degree of clustering characterizing the different groups follows a strict scaling law, which can be used to identify the presence of a hierarchical organization in real networks. We find that several real networks, such as the World Wide Web, actor network, the Internet at the domain level and the semantic web obey this scaling law, indicating that hierarchy is a fundamental characteristic of many complex systems.

  17. IDENTIFYING COLLISIONAL FAMILIES IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, Robert A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Holman, Matthew J., E-mail: rmarcus@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-05-20

    The identification and characterization of numerous collisional families-clusters of bodies with a common collisional origin-in the asteroid belt has added greatly to the understanding of asteroid belt formation and evolution. More recent study has also led to an appreciation of physical processes that had previously been neglected (e.g., the Yarkovsky effect). Collisions have certainly played an important role in the evolution of the Kuiper Belt as well, though only one collisional family has been identified in that region to date, around the dwarf planet Haumea. In this paper, we combine insights into collisional families from numerical simulations with the current observational constraints on the dynamical structure of the Kuiper Belt to investigate the ideal sizes and locations for identifying collisional families. We find that larger progenitors (r {approx} 500 km) result in more easily identifiable families, given the difficulty in identifying fragments of smaller progenitors in magnitude-limited surveys, despite their larger spread and less frequent occurrence. However, even these families do not stand out well from the background. Identifying families as statistical overdensities is much easier than characterizing families by distinguishing individual members from interlopers. Such identification seems promising, provided the background population is well known. In either case, families will also be much easier to study where the background population is small, i.e., at high inclinations. Overall, our results indicate that entirely different techniques for identifying families will be needed for the Kuiper Belt, and we provide some suggestions.

  18. Environment, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Field Organization Directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This directory was developed by the Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) from an outgrowth of the Departments efforts to identify and establish the regulatory response lead persons in the Field Organizations. The directory was developed for intemal EH-231 use to identify both the DOE and DOE contractor Field Organizations in the Environment, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The Field Organization directory is divided into three substantive sections: (1) Environment; (2) Environmental Restoration; and (3) Waste Management which are organized to correspond to the management hierarchy at each Field Organization. The information provided includes the facility name and address, individual managers name, and telephone/fax numbers.

  19. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  20. Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tool is defined simply as a technology, system, or process used to meet a need. An example would be a time card, which is a system for tracking and verifying work hours. An organization's tools support its standard operations and ensure consistency over the long term; tools both allow and constrain behavior practices.

  1. Identifying rare variants from exome scans: the GAW17 experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    logistics, including interaction with participants, organizers, editors, and publisher; data distribution; site selection and liaison with local organizers; maintenance

  2. Identifying Geographic Clusters: A Network Analytic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catini, Roberto; Penner, Orion; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the role of networks and clusters in the global economy. Despite being a popular research topic in economics, sociology and urban studies, geographical clustering of human activity has often studied been by means of predetermined geographical units such as administrative divisions and metropolitan areas. This approach is intrinsically time invariant and it does not allow one to differentiate between different activities. Our goal in this paper is to present a new methodology for identifying clusters, that can be applied to different empirical settings. We use a graph approach based on k-shell decomposition to analyze world biomedical research clusters based on PubMed scientific publications. We identify research institutions and locate their activities in geographical clusters. Leading areas of scientific production and their top performing research institutions are consistently identified at different geographic scales.

  3. Scientometric methods for identifying emerging technologies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Schlicher, Bob G; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2015-11-03

    Provided is a method of generating a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, worldwide patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain.

  4. Identifying Water Savings in Industrial Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T.

    2015-01-01

    Solutions, L.L.C. Identifying Water Savings in Industrial Operations IETC June 4, 2015 Tom Theising, C.E.M., C.D.S.M. (979) 709-6389 tom.theising@yahoo.com ESL-IE-15-06-23a Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 SES Sustainable Energy Solutions, L.L.C. Energy Optimization Services: • Energy Efficiency Evaluation • Energy Management Program Development • Energy Maintenance Best Practices Energy Reliability Services: • Identify solutions...

  5. A 3-D mathematical model to identify organ-specific risks in rats during thermal stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    outcomes associated with heat stress is critical for effective management and mitigation of injury, which in a rat exposed to heat stress in an attempt to understand the correlation between heat load core temperature measurements in control and heat-stressed rats and other published experimental data

  6. Molecular modeling, organ culture and reverse genetics for a newly identified human rhinovirus C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of HRV-A, HRV-B and HRV-C. Supplementary Figure 2. Construction of the full-length cDNA copy of HRV-C15DNA copy of HRV- C15. Supplementary Methods Supplementary References #12;100 88 100 100 99 95 94 52 57 45 51 89 74 87 81 80 52 80 44 81 72 100 05101520 p-distance (% change) HRV-B HRV-A HRV-C HEV HRV-A A7

  7. Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

    2013-01-08

    The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

  8. Identifying Lights with their Switches Jayadev Misra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Identifying Lights with their Switches Jayadev Misra 09/07/2012 Problem Description Given are N switches and N lights where each switch controls exactly one light and each light is controlled by exactly one switch. The wiring diagram is unavailable and the wiring itself is hidden. A step consists

  9. Identifying Relevant Databases for Multidatabase Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Huan

    Identifying Relevant Databases for Multidatabase Mining Huan Liu, Hongjun Lu, Jun Yao Department,luhj,yaojung@iscs.nus.edu.sg Abstract. Various tools and systems for knowledge discovery and data mining are developed and available is where we should start mining. In this paper, breaking away from the conventional data mining assumption

  10. Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A finely detailed defraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the defraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating.

  11. Call Identifier: CIP-IEE-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cindio, Fiorella

    ://ec.europa.eu/intelligentenergy #12;Intelligent Energy ­ Europe Call for Proposals 2009 2/17 CALL FOR PROPOSALS 2009 FOR ACTIONS UNDER THE PROGRAMME "INTELLIGENT ENERGY ­ EUROPE" Call Identifier: CIP-IEE-2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. THE INTELLIGENT ENERGY ­ EUROPE PROGRAMME 3 2. BUDGET, FUNDING RATES AND ELIGIBILITY OF COSTS 5 3. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA 5

  12. Method To Identify Specific Inhibiutors Of Imp Dehydrogenase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collart, Frank R. (Bolingbrook, IL); Huberman, Eliezer (LaGrange, IL)

    2000-11-28

    This invention relates to methods to identify specific inhibitors of the purine nucleotide synthesis enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is an essential enzyme found in all free-living organisms from humans to bacteria and is an important therapeutic target. The invention allows the identification of specific inhibitors of any IMPDH enzyme which can be expressed in a functional form in a recombinant host cell. A variety of eukaryotic or prokaryotic host systems commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins are suitable for the practice of the invention. The methods are amenable to high throughput systems for the screening of inhibitors generated by combinatorial chemistry or other methods such as antisense molecule production. Utilization of exogenous guanosine as a control component of the methods allows for the identification of inhibitors specific for IMPDH rather than other causes of decreased cell proliferation.

  13. Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

  14. Departmental Organization and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-06-10

    Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

  15. Consistent nonlinear dynamics: identifying model inadequacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

    2004-03-09

    Empirical modelling often aims for the simplest model consistent with the data. A new technique is presented which quantifies the consistency of the model dynamics as a function of location in state space. As is well-known, traditional statistics of nonlinear models like root-mean-square (RMS) forecast error can prove misleading. Testing consistency is shown to overcome some of the deficiencies of RMS error, both within the perfect model scenario and when applied to data from several physical systems using previously published models. In particular, testing for consistent nonlinear dynamics provides insight towards (i) identifying when a delay reconstruction fails to be an embedding, (ii) allowing state dependent model selection and (iii) optimising local neighbourhood size. It also provides a more relevant (state dependent) threshold for identifying false nearest neighbours.

  16. Guidelines for identifying suspect/counterfeit material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    These guidelines are intended to assist users of products in identifying: substandard, misrepresented, or fraudulently marked items. The guidelines provide information about such topics as: precautions, inspection and testing, dispositioning identified items, installed inspection and reporting suspect/counterfeit materials. These guidelines apply to users who are developing procurement documents, product acceptance/verification methods, company procedures, work instructions, etc. The intent of these SM guidelines in relation to the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and implementing company Management Control Procedures is not to substitute or replace existing requirements, as defined in either the QAPD or company implementing instructions (Management Control Procedures). Instead, the guidelines are intended to provide a consolidated source of information addressing the issue of Suspect/Counterfeit materials. These guidelines provide an extensive suspect component listing and suspect indications listing. Users can quickly check their suspect items against the list of manufacturers products (i.e., type, LD. number, and nameplate information) by consulting either of these listings.

  17. Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-03-26

    A finely detailed diffraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the diffraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating. 7 figures.

  18. Identify Potential HITs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingREnergy Tools for Sustainability Identify

  19. Identifying Needs and Goals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagement »HydrogenINTERACTIVE:Identify

  20. Multivariate Techniques for Identifying Diffractive Interactions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikael Kuusela; Jerry W. Lamsa; Eric Malmi; Petteri Mehtala; Risto Orava

    2009-09-16

    Close to one half of the LHC events are expected to be due to elastic or inelastic diffractive scattering. Still, predictions based on extrapolations of experimental data at lower energies differ by large factors in estimating the relative rate of diffractive event categories at the LHC energies. By identifying diffractive events, detailed studies on proton structure can be carried out. The combined forward physics objects: rapidity gaps, forward multiplicity and transverse energy flows can be used to efficiently classify proton-proton collisions. Data samples recorded by the forward detectors, with a simple extension, will allow first estimates of the single diffractive (SD), double diffractive (DD), central diffractive (CD), and non-diffractive (ND) cross sections. The approach, which uses the measurement of inelastic activity in forward and central detector systems, is complementary to the detection and measurement of leading beam-like protons. In this investigation, three different multivariate analysis approaches are assessed in classifying forward physics processes at the LHC. It is shown that with gene expression programming, neural networks and support vector machines, diffraction can be efficiently identified within a large sample of simulated proton-proton scattering events. The event characteristics are visualized by using the self-organizing map algorithm.

  1. Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong; Pak C. (Richland, WA), Wong; Kwong K. (Sugar Land, TX), Foote; Harlan P. (Richland, WA)

    2006-06-06

    Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

  2. Method of identifying defective particle coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Mark E. (San Diego, CA); Whiting, Carlton D. (San Diego, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A method for identifying coated particles having defective coatings desig to retain therewithin a build-up of gaseous materials including: (a) Pulling a vacuum on the particles; (b) Backfilling the particles at atmospheric pressure with a liquid capable of wetting the exterior surface of the coated particles, said liquid being a compound which includes an element having an atomic number higher than the highest atomic number of any element in the composition which forms the exterior surface of the particle coating; (c) Drying the particles; and (d) Radiographing the particles. By television monitoring, examination of the radiographs is substantially enhanced.

  3. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  4. Organic photovoltaics and concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapel, Jonathan King

    2008-01-01

    The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

  5. Method of identifying features in indexed data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarman, Kristin H. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Daly, Don Simone (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Anderson, Kevin K. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-06-26

    The present invention is a method of identifying features in indexed data, especially useful for distinguishing signal from noise in data provided as a plurality of ordered pairs. Each of the plurality of ordered pairs has an index and a response. The method has the steps of: (a) providing an index window having a first window end located on a first index and extending across a plurality of indices to a second window end; (b) selecting responses corresponding to the plurality of indices within the index window and computing a measure of dispersion of the responses; and (c) comparing the measure of dispersion to a dispersion critical value. Advantages of the present invention include minimizing signal to noise ratio, signal drift, varying baseline signal and combinations thereof.

  6. Vulnerability of critical infrastructures : identifying critical nodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Roger Gary; Robinson, David Gerald

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this research was the development of tools and techniques for the identification of critical nodes within critical infrastructures. These are nodes that, if disrupted through natural events or terrorist action, would cause the most widespread, immediate damage. This research focuses on one particular element of the national infrastructure: the bulk power system. Through the identification of critical elements and the quantification of the consequences of their failure, site-specific vulnerability analyses can be focused at those locations where additional security measures could be effectively implemented. In particular, with appropriate sizing and placement within the grid, distributed generation in the form of regional power parks may reduce or even prevent the impact of widespread network power outages. Even without additional security measures, increased awareness of sensitive power grid locations can provide a basis for more effective national, state and local emergency planning. A number of methods for identifying critical nodes were investigated: small-world (or network theory), polyhedral dynamics, and an artificial intelligence-based search method - particle swarm optimization. PSO was found to be the only viable approach and was applied to a variety of industry accepted test networks to validate the ability of the approach to identify sets of critical nodes. The approach was coded in a software package called Buzzard and integrated with a traditional power flow code. A number of industry accepted test networks were employed to validate the approach. The techniques (and software) are not unique to power grid network, but could be applied to a variety of complex, interacting infrastructures.

  7. International energy: Research organizations, 1988--1992. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, P.; Jordan, S.

    1993-06-01

    This publication contains the standardized names of energy research organizations used in energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the US DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). ETDE member countries are also members of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). Nuclear organization names recorded for INIS by these ETDE member countries are also included in the ETDE Energy Database. Therefore, these organization names are cooperatively standardized for use in both information systems. This publication identifies current organizations doing research in all energy fields, standardizes the format for recording these organization names in bibliographic citations, assigns a numeric code to facilitate data entry, and identifies report number prefixes assigned by these organizations. These research organization names may be used in searching the databases ``Energy Science & Technology`` on DIALOG and ``Energy`` on STN International. These organization names are also used in USDOE databases on the Integrated Technical Information System. Research organizations active in the past five years, as indicated by database records, were identified to form this publication. This directory includes approximately 31,000 organizations that reported energy-related literature from 1988 to 1992 and updates the DOE Energy Data Base: Corporate Author Entries.

  8. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  9. These six seminars on College Biology Teaching repeat after three years, the tentative schedule is noted. Doctor of Arts students are required to take four seminars, but all six are highly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Rosemary J.

    of research in education, types of experimental design (quantitative, qualitative, quasi-experimental, survey), types of sampling, measurement and data collection, and data analysis. Students will design a research education research Students locate relevant journals, read and critique research articles, and identify

  10. Identifying Wind and Solar Ramping Events: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.

    2013-01-01

    Wind and solar power are playing an increasing role in the electrical grid, but their inherent power variability can augment uncertainties in power system operations. One solution to help mitigate the impacts and provide more flexibility is enhanced wind and solar power forecasting; however, its relative utility is also uncertain. Within the variability of solar and wind power, repercussions from large ramping events are of primary concern. At the same time, there is no clear definition of what constitutes a ramping event, with various criteria used in different operational areas. Here the Swinging Door Algorithm, originally used for data compression in trend logging, is applied to identify variable generation ramping events from historic operational data. The identification of ramps in a simple and automated fashion is a critical task that feeds into a larger work of 1) defining novel metrics for wind and solar power forecasting that attempt to capture the true impact of forecast errors on system operations and economics, and 2) informing various power system models in a data-driven manner for superior exploratory simulation research. Both allow inference on sensitivities and meaningful correlations, as well as the ability to quantify the value of probabilistic approaches for future use in practice.

  11. Identifying dark matter interactions in monojet searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Rentala, Vikram

    2014-05-01

    We study the discrimination of quark-initiated jets from gluon-initiated jets in monojet searches for dark matter using the technique of averaged jet energy profiles. We demonstrate our results in the context of effective field theories of dark matter interactions with quarks and gluons, but our methods apply more generally to a wide class of models. Different effective theories of dark matter and the standard model backgrounds each have a characteristic quark/gluon fraction for the leading jet. When used in conjunction with the traditional cut-and-count monojet search, the jet energy profile can be used to set stronger bounds on contact interactions of dark matter. In the event of a discovery of a monojet excess at the 14 TeV LHC, contact interactions between dark matter with quarks or with gluons can be differentiated at the 95% confidence level. For a given rate at the LHC, signal predictions at direct detection experiments for different dark matter interactions can span five orders of magnitude. The ability to identify these interactions allows us to make a tighter connection between LHC searches and direct detection experiments.

  12. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsuk Kang; Young-Gui Yoon; D. Thirumalai; Changbong Hyeon

    2015-06-03

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yeast ($N\\approx 1.2\\times 10^7$, $\\phi<\\phi_c^{\\infty}$) are equilibrated with no clear signature of such organization.

  13. Rice University Policy No. 808 PROTECTION OF PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Rice University Policy No. 808 PROTECTION OF PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION General Policy of confidential or sensitive personally identifiable information in conducting university business. Personally identifiable information is data which is tied to, or otherwise enables identification of, a specific person

  14. Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for...

  15. A Workshop to Identify Research Needs and Impacts in Predictive...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Identify Research Needs and Impacts in Predictive Simulation for Internal Combustion Engines (PreSICE) A Workshop to Identify Research Needs and Impacts in Predictive...

  16. SUCCESS FACTORS IN INFORMATION SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    SUCCESS FACTORS IN INFORMATION SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS Maryam Al-Awadi University This paper will explore and identify success factors related to the implementation of information security was to identify those factors required to ensure successful implementation of information security, particularly

  17. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peumans, Peter; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-01-22

    A photoactive device is provided. The device includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between and electrically connected to the first and second electrodes. The photoactive region further includes an organic donor layer and an organic acceptor layer that form a donor-acceptor heterojunction. The mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region are different by a factor of at least 100, and more preferably a factor of at least 1000. At least one of the mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region is greater than 0.001 cm.sup.2/V-sec, and more preferably greater than 1 cm.sup.2/V-sec. The heterojunction may be of various types, including a planar heterojunction, a bulk heterojunction, a mixed heterojunction, and a hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction.

  18. Nonlinear organic plasmonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainberg, B D

    2015-01-01

    Purely organic materials with negative and near-zero dielectric permittivity can be easily fabricated. Here we develop a theory of nonlinear non-steady-state organic plasmonics with strong laser pulses. The bistability response of the electron-vibrational model of organic materials in the condensed phase has been demonstrated. Non-steady-state organic plasmonics enable us to obtain near-zero dielectric permittivity during a short time. We have proposed to use non-steady-state organic plasmonics for the enhancement of intersite dipolar energy-transfer interaction in the quantum dot wire that influences on electron transport through nanojunctions. Such interactions can compensate Coulomb repulsions for particular conditions. We propose the exciton control of Coulomb blocking in the quantum dot wire based on the non-steady-state near-zero dielectric permittivity of the organic host medium.

  19. Organization and Functions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organization and Functions Mission Unit EM-30 Deputy Assistant SecretaryADAS Waste Management Director Office of Packaging and Transportation EM-33 Regulations & Standards...

  20. Astatinated organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milius, R.A.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1989-05-02

    Methods and kits for incorporating a radioactive astatine isotope (particularly [sup 211]At) into an organic compound by electrophilic astatodestannylation of organostannanes. 3 figs.

  1. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2012-10-23

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  2. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; ENGINES; NOISE POLLUTION ABATEMENT; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; ELECTRIC GENERATORS",,"No abstract...

  3. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BIOLOGY; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; DISEASES; DISSOCIATION; NERVES; ORGANS; POTASSIUM; PROTEINS; REGULATIONS; RESIDUES; TARGETS; TYROSINE",,"The parasympathetic branch of the...

  4. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy (US)","37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SYNTHESIS; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; THIN FILMS; SILANES; HYDROLYSIS;...

  5. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; FREE ENERGY; MELTING; PROTEINS; THERMODYNAMICS; TOPOLOGY protein folding protein...

  6. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-05-04

    Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was the only one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 mu g m-2 h 1 in the morning and 257 to 347 mu g m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 mu g m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 mu g/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 mu g/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (material surface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde.

  7. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  8. Departmental Organization Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-27

    Public Law 95-91, 42 United States Code 7101, Department of Energy Organization Act, Section 642 gives to the Secretary of the Department of Energy the responsibility to approve organization changes affecting the number, designation, or mission of Departmental Elements and to approve the addition, deletion, or transfer of missions and/or functions of or between Departmental Elements. In order to streamline the organizational change process, the Secretary has delegate to the Heads of Departmental Headquarters and Field Elements the authority to approve organization changes. No cancellations.

  9. On Pictorial Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wollheim, Richard

    2002-01-01

    , 2001 © Copyright 200~ by Department of Philosophy University of Kansas On Pictorial Organization Richard Wollhcim U nivcrsity of California, Berkeley 1. Paintings arc organized objects. That much we know, and, in an area where not much is secure... painting works or doesn't work has something to do with its organization, and this idea gains support from the fact that it is only at a late stage in the creative process that the painter will start to think about the painting's working. No serious...

  10. FIRE SYSTEMS Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    FIRE SYSTEMS Professional Organizations: American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) Society for Fire Protection Engineers (SFPE) National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) Events & Training: UVa Center for Leadership Excellence classes SkillSoft classes American Fire Sprinkler Association events American Fire

  11. Allies in Sport Organizations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Elizabeth

    2012-10-19

    Employee support is a key factor in creating more welcoming and accepting work environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals in sport. As such, organizations need to understand what factors ...

  12. Organic Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funds research and development projects related to organic photovoltaics (OPV) due to the unique benefits of the technology. Below is a list of the projects, summary of the benefits, and...

  13. ENGINEERING Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    ENGINEERING Professional Organizations: National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) Virginia Society of Professional Engineers (VSPE) American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) American Institute

  14. PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations: Association of Collegiate Computing Services) Project Management Institute (PMI) Events & Training: UVA Local Support Partners (LSP) program training Project Management Institute webinars Project Management Institute events Scrum Alliance events Learning

  15. RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION Professional Organizations: Society of Research Administrators (SRA) International National Council of University Research Administrators (NCURA) National Council of University Research Administrators (NCURA) Region III Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA) Central Virginia

  16. PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations: Project Management Institute International Association of Project and Program Management (IAPPM) Events & Training: UVa Center for Leadership Excellence classes SkillSoft classes PMO Symposium through PMI Project Management Institute (PMI) webinars American

  17. ORGANIZATIONS Wisconsin Foundation &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS Wisconsin Foundation & Alumni Association UW Medical Foundation The Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Organizational Chart Vice Management Division Faculty and Staff Programs General Library System HIPAA Quality Improvement, Office

  18. Identifying protein-protein interactions of a cell cycle regulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amos, Joseph Edward

    2013-02-22

    The role of anachronism (ana) protein in stem cell division of Drosophila melanogaster was examined. Synthesis of identifiable ana protein was necessary. The identifying method exploited was that of antibody tagging using ...

  19. Can the investigator identify the Does my stem cell research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    Can the investigator identify the donors? Does my stem cell research require ESCRO review? Are only (previously derived)? YES NO Can the investigator identify the donors? Does my stem cell research require CCI

  20. Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    field. Identify opportunities in mature fields: Sweet spots for infill drilling. Underperformer wellsIdentifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using Monthly Production wells rather than the entire field. #12;Introduction Objective Methodology Results Conclusion Objective

  1. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014DepartmentCouncilOffice of theOpenOrganizationOrganization

  2. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014DepartmentCouncilOffice ofOrganization Organization

  3. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServices »About Us » Organization Organization

  4. Organic contaminant separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Mar, P.

    1993-12-28

    A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

  5. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Technology Laboratory - In-house Research","USDOE FE Office of Clean Coal (FE-20)","58 GEOSCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL...

  6. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interface. That is, we wanted to develop our understanding of the biology of these microbes at all scales of biological organization, from individual cell design to the dynamics...

  7. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of mass, radius, conformations, assembly, and shape changes associated with protein folding and functions. SAXS can efficiently reveal the spatial organization of protein...

  8. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ascomycete yeast that accumulates large amounts of lipids and has potential as a biofuel producing organism. Despite a growing scientific literature focused on lipid...

  9. Food Exemption Request Organization Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Exemption Request Organization Information Organization Received ______ Organizations are permitted one food exemption per semester. Requests must be submitted and Regulations Your group has requested a food exemption for an event. The rules and regulations for use

  10. Water purification using organic salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  11. EPOK Centre for Organic Food & Farming ORGANIC FOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPOK ­ Centre for Organic Food & Farming ORGANIC FOOD ­ food quality and potential health effects.slu.se/epok/english #12;ORGANIC FOOD ­ food quality and potential health effects Publishing year: 2015, Uppsala Publisher: SLU, EPOK ­ Centre for Organic Food & Farming Lay-out: Pelle Fredriksson, SLU, EPOK Photo, cover: i

  12. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  13. Organic aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  14. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  15. Washington and Lee University STUDENT ORGANIZATION APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Washington and Lee University STUDENT ORGANIZATION APPLICATION Organization Name mission statement of your organization. How will your organization be beneficial to Washington and Lee

  16. Insights from Smart Meters: Identifying Specific Actions, Behaviors...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Characteristics That Drive Savings in Behavior-Based Programs Insights from Smart Meters: Identifying Specific Actions, Behaviors, and Characteristics That Drive...

  17. Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    goals are to be achieved. Start by identifying the organizational rules, roles, and tools that shape the current context and may influence success in achieving these goals....

  18. Low Bias Electron Scattering in Structure-Identified Single Wall...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2011-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1100843 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 107;...

  19. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    throughput diffusion chamber cultivation approach to isolation of novel environmental bacteria relevant to DOE missions. 2. To use the optimized method to identify and cultivate...

  20. Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial Blueprint for Root-carbon Transformations in Soil Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mapping...

  1. Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In-Document Search Title: Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial Blueprint for Root-carbon Transformations in Soil Erin Nuccio, Lawrence...

  2. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    developing rapid screening methods to assess surfactant performance for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) from fractured carbonate reservoirs. The desired outcome is to identify...

  3. ALCF supercomputer helps identify materials to improve fuel production...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALCF supercomputer helps identify materials to improve fuel production Author: Jim Collins . April 24, 2015 Printer-friendly version With access to supercomputing resources at the...

  4. Briefing, DOE Order 475.2B, Identifying Classified Information...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    regarding the changes to the DOE Order on Identifying Classified Information. Subjects include DC responsibilities regarding classification challenges and the process for...

  5. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    level movements with quasi-periodicity of 430,000 years are identified in the marine sedimentary units of the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain of Mississippi, Alabama and...

  6. Radiokrypton Dating Identifies Ancient Antarctic Ice | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Radiokrypton Dating Identifies Ancient Antarctic Ice Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science...

  7. Registered Student Organization Officer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    website: gradorg.syr.edu #12;Important Information Registered Graduate Student Organization Handbook Fiscal Policy document provides additional fiscal guidelines and procedures ­ The Fiscal Policy can with Office of Student Activities If any of the required information changes, contact Internal VP

  8. Project organizations and schedules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1990-07-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) faces the challenge of simultaneously carrying out a large-scale construction project with demanding cost, schedule, and performance goals; and creating a scientific laboratory capable of exploiting this unique scientific instrument. This paper describes the status of the laboratory organization developed to achieve these goals, and the major near-term schedule objectives of the project.

  9. FOOD SERVICE Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    FOOD SERVICE Professional Organizations: National Association of College and University Food National Association of College and University Food Services (NACUFS) conference NACUFS Mid-Atlantic Region of Colleges and University Food Services e-newsletter Social Media: National Association of College

  10. Metal Organic Framework Research: High Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal Organic Framework for CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-08-01

    IMPACCT Project: LBNL is developing a method for identifying the best metal organic frameworks for use in capturing CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Metal organic frameworks are porous, crystalline compounds that, based on their chemical structure, vary considerably in terms of their capacity to grab hold of passing CO2 molecules and their ability to withstand the harsh conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Owing primarily to their high tunability, metal organic frameworks can have an incredibly wide range of different chemical and physical properties, so identifying the best to use for CO2 capture and storage can be a difficult task. LBNL uses high-throughput instrumentation to analyze nearly 100 materials at a time, screening them for the characteristics that optimize their ability to selectively adsorb CO2 from coal exhaust. Their work will identify the most promising frameworks and accelerate their large-scale commercial development to benefit further research into reducing the cost of CO2 capture and storage.

  11. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at Par Pond consists of 48 fiberglass tanks that can maintain small organisms such as fish and amphibians. Thirty of the tanks have sealed sup 137Cs sources suspended above...

  12. Identifying Sex Differences in Spatial Cognition in Laboratory Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettis, Tania

    2011-01-01

    ecological niches. Rats are semi-aquatic while the houseEcological Economics 30 (3):405-415 Chambers L, Singleton G, Krebs C (2000) Movements and social organization of wild house

  13. Identifying Vulnerabilities and Critical Requirements Using Criminal Court Proceeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breaux, Travis D.

    , as applied to criminal court records to identify mitigating requirements that improve privacy protectionsIdentifying Vulnerabilities and Critical Requirements Using Criminal Court Proceeding Travis D,jdlewis,pnotto,anton}@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT Information systems governed by laws and regulations are subject to civil and criminal violations

  14. Identifying Vulnerabilities and Critical Requirements Using Criminal Court Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    and goal models, as applied to criminal court records to identify mitigating requirements. In a sustainableIdentifying Vulnerabilities and Critical Requirements Using Criminal Court Proceedings Travis D,jdlewis,pnotto,anton}@ncsu.edu Abstract Information systems governed by laws and regulations are subject to both civil and criminal

  15. Use of Strontium Isotopes to Identify Buried Water Main Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Use of Strontium Isotopes to Identify Buried Water Main Leakage Into Groundwater in a Highly water mains. The identification of leakage locations was done by conventional water quality parameters to identify leakage locations especially where the leakage is from drinking water mains because the chemical

  16. A taxonomy for identifying requirement interactions in software systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberlein, Armin

    A taxonomy for identifying requirement interactions in software systems Mohamed Shehata a taxonomy for classifying and identifying requirement interactions in software systems. The proposed taxonomy is in the form of a four-layered pyramid that defines 6 Main Interaction Categories in the first

  17. Status Organizing Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Joseph; Rosenholtz, Susan J; Zelditch, Morris Jr

    2015-08-15

    STATUS ORGANIZING PROCESSES Joseph Berger Susan J. Rosenholtz Morris Zelditch, Jr. Technical Report #77 Stanford University January 1980 To appear in the Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 6, 1980. This paper was prepared while Or. Rosenholtz was a... to take place--in such a way that the expectation-states are confirmed, hence maintained, by the very interaction that depends on them (Berger, 1958; Berger & Snell, 1961; Berger, Conner & McKeown, 1969; Berger & Conner, 1969, 1974; Fisek, 1968, 1974...

  18. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014DepartmentCouncilOffice of theOpenOrganization

  19. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServices »About Us » Organization

  20. Industrial Partnerships, 20122013 The following list identifies those organizations that funded Faculty research in the 20122013 fiscal year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corp. ­ Calgon Carbon Corp. ­ Canadian Solar Inc. ­ Canadian Transportation Research Forum ­ Canadian Distribution Inc. ­ Energent Inc. ­ Engineering Services Inc. ­ ERCO Worldwide ­ Exar Corp. ­ Facca Inc Living Innovations Inc. ­ Greencore Composites ­ Groupe Mequaltech Inc. ­ Hanwha Solar Canada ­ Hatch Ltd

  1. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G.; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  2. Hazard Labeling Elements 1. Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can be (but is not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Hazard Labeling Elements 1. Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can of severity of hazard and alert the reader to a potential hazard on the label. There are only two signal words, "Danger" and "Warning." Within a specific hazard class, "Danger" is used for the more severe hazards

  3. Academic Planning Join a campus organization of interest to you.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Academic Planning · Join a campus organization of interest to you. · Continue completion of general hours, declare a major. Career Planning · Identify different career interests and begin researching-related skills. SophomoreYear Academic Planning · Complete all major coursework and any other outstanding

  4. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

  5. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Identifying and removing sources of imprecision in polynomial regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brauner, Neima

    Identifying and removing sources of imprecision in polynomial regression Neima Braunera and removal of imprecision in polynomial regression, originating from random errors (noise) in the independent.V. Keywords: Regression; Polynomial; Precision; Noise; Collinearity 1. Introduction Mathematical modeling

  9. Identifying Callous-Unemotional Subtypes among Justice-Involved Youth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magyar, Melissa Sue

    2014-08-06

    Considerable evidence suggests that the presence of a callous and unemotional interpersonal style identifies an important subgroup of antisocial and aggressive youth. Relative to other children with conduct problems, youth high on callous...

  10. Automatically Identifying Candidate Treatments from Existing Medical Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Wanda

    fish oil to treat Raynaud's disease (Swanson and Smalheiser 1997). Medical scientists are nowAutomatically Identifying Candidate Treatments from Existing Medical Literature Catherine Blake to transform the titles to known medical concepts, and the other applied additional semantic constraints

  11. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DR. F. JEFFREY MARTIN for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  12. Microfluidic in vivo screen identifies compounds enhancing neuronal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggarty, Stephen J.

    Compound screening is a powerful tool to identify new therapeutic targets, drug leads, and elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of biological processes. We report here the results of the first in vivo small-molecule screens ...

  13. Manual for Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.3, Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information, dated 4-9-03. Admin Chg dated 1-13-11.

  14. Ab initio thermodynamic approach to identify mixed solid sorbents...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Identifier: 1223713 Report Number(s): NETL-PUB-20049 Journal ID: ISSN 2296-665X Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Frontiers in Environmental Science;...

  15. Identifying and Developing New, Carbon Dioxide Consuming Processes , Sudheer Indalaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    acceptable, catalytic processes have been identified that can use excess high purity carbon dioxide as a raw in the ethylbenzene-to-styrene reaction, and it can be used in dehydrogenation and reforming reactions. The criteria

  16. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-002

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by BATTELLE MEMORIAL INSTITUTE for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  17. Using patient­identifiable data for observational research and audit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shahi, Rustam; Warlow, Charles P

    2000-01-01

    Across the world rapid changes in the law, technology, and society are reshaping the way identifiable information about patients is handled. In Britain, doctors' longstanding common law duty of confidentiality to their ...

  18. LEAN ENERGY ANALYSIS: IDENTIFYING, DISCOVERING AND TRACKING ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    LEAN ENERGY ANALYSIS: IDENTIFYING, DISCOVERING AND TRACKING ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIAL KELLY KISSOCK DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON DAYTON, OHIO JOHN SERYAK ENERGY AND RESOURCE SOLUTIONS HAVERHILL, MASSECHUTSETTS ABSTRACT Energy in manufacturing facilities is used for direct

  19. Coupling Groundwater Modeling with Biology to Identify Strategic Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coupling Groundwater Modeling with Biology to Identify Strategic Water Resources Didier Graillot 1 ABSTRACT The identification of hydraulic interactions between rivers and groundwater is part and parcel hinders groundwater modeling everywhere and simulating water management scenarios in every place

  20. Oxidation of atmospheric organic carbon : interconnecting volatile organic compounds, intermediate-volatility organic compounds, and organic aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, James Freeman

    2015-01-01

    .Organic molecules have many important roles in the atmosphere, acting as climate and biogeochemical forcers, and in some cases as toxic pollutants. The lifecycle of atmospheric organic carbon is extremely complex, with ...

  1. STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hingers, Robert H.

    1976-01-01

    of businesses and marriages, and (2) failure rates of variously structured intentional communities. Both tests support the hypothesis that communal organizations, which permit structural freewheeling, are more stable than formal organizations, which donot....

  2. 2011-12 LITERATURE CURRICULUM (TENTATIVE) General Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Pre and Early Modern Studies LTPR 134/The Idea of Poetry/Ursell/PO, PR Spanish/Latin American/Latino Literatures (Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required) LTSP 60/Introduction to Literary

  3. 2013-14 LITERATURE CURRICULUM (TENTATIVE) General Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    /Deutsch/PR Spanish/Latin American/Latino Literatures (Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required

  4. 2012-13 LITERATURE CURRICULUM (TENTATIVE) General Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    /Selden/GL, PR LTPR 146/The Phenomenon of Tragedy/Heald/PR LTPR 152/Continental Renaissance/Heald/PR Spanish/Latin American/Latino Literatures (Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required) LTSP 60/Klahn/GL, MO, SP LTSP 154/Short Stories of the Spanish Golden Age/Aladro/PR, SP World Literature and Cultural

  5. MATH3710: A Tentative Syllabus Examples of Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Daniel

    formula and permutation representations. Lecture 17: Finite subgroups of SO3. Lecture 18: Finite subgroups of SO3 continued. Finer theory of groups. Lecture 19: Class equation and consequences. Lecture 20

  6. La premire tentative srieuse de rsolution mathmatique d'un

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derrida, Bernard

    '«Ève mitochondriale » etde l'«Adam du chromosome Y » dans un passé étonnamment proche. Les mito- chondries portées par

  7. A tentative programme towards a full scale energy amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubbia, Carlo

    1996-01-01

    We present a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier (EA), following the conceptual design of Ref. [1]. Unlike the presently on going CERN experiments, reaction rates will be sufficiently massive to permit demonstrating the practical feasibility of energy generation on an industrial scale and to tackle the complete family chains of [1] the breeding process in Thorium fuel, [2] the burning of the self-generated Actinides, [3] the Plutonium (higher Actinides) burning of spent fuel from ordinary Reactors and [4] Fuel reprocessing/regeneration. The accelerator must provide a beam power which is commensurate to the rate of transformations which are sought. No existing accelerator can meet such a performance and a dedicated facility must be built. We describe an alternative based on the superconducting cavities (SC) now in standard use at the LEP \\[e^+-e^-\\] collider which is scheduled to terminate its operation by year 200 After this time, with reasonable modifications, the fully opera...

  8. Tentative Agreement as it went to public comment.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1Thousand

  9. Supporting Organizations | National Security | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the following three organizations: Measurement Science and Systems Engineering Division Nuclear Security and Isotope Technology Division Computational Sciences and Engineering...

  10. Supporting Organizations | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Engineering Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Supporting Organizations SHARE Supporting...

  11. Melody Meyer: Organic Foods Distributor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    out. Farmer: Yes, with GMO [genetically modified organism]said that in some instances, GMO products can be better for

  12. Rapidly assessing the activation conditions and porosity of metal-organic frameworks using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, TM; Bloch, ED; Long, JR

    2015-01-01

    A methodology utilizing a thermogravimetric analyzer to monitor propane uptake following incremental increases of the temperature is demonstrated as a means of rapidly identifying porous materials and determining the optimum activation conditions of metal-organic frameworks.

  13. Industrially challenging separations via adsorption in metal-organic frameworks : a computational exploration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennox, Matthew James

    2015-06-29

    In recent years, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been identified as promising adsorbents in a number of industrially relevant, yet challenging, separations, including the removal of propane from propane/propylene ...

  14. Project Organization name Project title 1 Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    City Studio, City of Vancouver Identify Local Food Waste Market and Food Canada 2014 Summer Games on Campus: Sustainable Food Materials & Waste ProceduresProject Organization name Project title 1 Centre for Sustainable Food

  15. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Golden, CO); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  16. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Menlo Park, CA); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  17. Organizations | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout Events About Us

  18. Organizations | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout Events About Us

  19. FUNDING BY ORGANIZATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtrans -ORGANIZATION FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015

  20. FUNDING BY ORGANIZATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services » Program ManagementAct FAQs RelatedInc.8ORGANIZATION FY

  1. Persistent Organic By Steven Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Persistent Organic Pollutants By Steven Jackson #12;What are POP's? · POP's are organic compounds ¹,²- (Fungicide) Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) ¹,² (Industrial processes eg paint additives) Polychlorinated by accumulating in the body fat of living organisms and becoming more concentrated as they move from one creature

  2. Insect Controls for Organic Gardeners. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Kenneth R.; Turney, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    ................................................................... 9 Acknowledgments ...................................................... 10 References ............................................................. 10 INSECT CONTROLS FOR ORGANIC GARDENERS Kenneth R. Lewis and H. A. Turney* Interest in organic... gardening has increased in recent years. Organic gardening means enriching the garden soil with natural products (mulches, composts and animal manures) and controlling insects, diseases and weeds with cultural, mechanical and biological methods rather...

  3. Nuclear Organization and Genome Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corces, Victor G.

    Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

  4. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  5. Method for identifying type I diabetes mellitus in humans

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metz, Thomas O [Kennewick, WA; Qian, Weijun [Richland, WA; Jacobs, Jon M [Pasco, WA

    2011-04-12

    A method and system for classifying subject populations utilizing predictive and diagnostic biomarkers for type I diabetes mellitus. The method including determining the levels of a variety of markers within the serum or plasma of a target organism and correlating this level to general populations as a screen for predisposition or progressive monitoring of disease presence or predisposition.

  6. Identifying, examining, and validating a description of the agriculture industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward Wayne

    2009-05-15

    of fundamental knowledge in mathematics and sciences, 11 percent; and sixth, peer pressure/family against agricultural sciences studies, 7 percent. These disturbing data are indicative of some of the challenges faced by many colleges and land... .................................................................. 20 Occupational Outlook Handbook ................................................... 22 Career Guide to Industries .............................................................. 24 National FFA Organization Career Explorer...

  7. A Study of Scientometric Methods to Identify Emerging Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL] [ORNL; Udoeyop, Akaninyene W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This work examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, worldwide patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain we investigated.

  8. Registered Graduate Student Organization TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    Graduate Student Organizations 5 IV. New Graduate Student Organization Recognition Process 8 V. Funding prepare students for particular professions after graduation. d. Religious i. Any organization that has

  9. Organization Chart and Contacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Organization Chart and Contacts Organization Chart and Contacts Organization Chart and Contacts Contact Information U.S. Department of...

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    T. Recent Advances in Organic Solar Cells. Advances incharacterization of organic solar cells. Adv Funct Mater.Voltage Characteristics of Organic Solar Cells. [cited 2010;

  11. Project ATHENA creates surrogate human organ systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project ATHENA creates surrogate human organ systems Project ATHENA creates surrogate human organ systems The development of miniature surrogate human organs, coupled with highly...

  12. Industry-identified combustion research needs: Special study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.G.; Soelberg, N.R.; Kessinger, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses the development and demonstration of innovative combustion technologies that improve energy conservation and environmental practices in the US industrial sector. The report includes recommendations by industry on R&D needed to resolve current combustion-related problems. Both fundamental and applied R&D needs are presented. The report assesses combustion needs and suggests research ideas for seven major industries, which consume about 78% of all energy used by industry. Included are the glass, pulp and paper, refinery, steel, metal casting, chemicals, and aluminum industries. Information has been collected from manufacturers, industrial operators, trade organizations, and various funding organizations and has been supplemented with expertise at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to develop a list of suggested research and development needed for each of the seven industries.

  13. Identifying Pollutant Sources in Tidally Mixed Systems: Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    sitessas a primary source of fecal indicator bacteria in the water column and subtidal sediments and magnitude of pollutant sources potentially responsible for the impairment. While this information mayIdentifying Pollutant Sources in Tidally Mixed Systems: Case Study of Fecal Indicator Bacteria from

  14. Identifying Sources of Nitrogen to Hanalei Bay, Kauai, Utilizing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Identifying Sources of Nitrogen to Hanalei Bay, Kauai, Utilizing the Nitrogen Isotope Signature, Menlo Park, California 94025, and P.O. Box 681, Kilauea, Hawaii 96754 Sewage effluent, storm runoff of land derived nutrients into Hanalei Bay, Kauai. We determined the nitrogen isotopic signatures (15N

  15. AN ANALYSIS PROCESS FOR IDENTIFYING AND FORMALIZING LMS INSTRUCTIONAL LANGUAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laforcade, Pierre

    AN ANALYSIS PROCESS FOR IDENTIFYING AND FORMALIZING LMS INSTRUCTIONAL LANGUAGE Aymen Abedmouleh. Abstract: Today, the LMS systems require some reengineering works or some additional design approaches designing their learning scenarios. In this paper, we propose an LMS centered instructional design approach

  16. Identifying Proxy Nodes in a Tor Anonymization Circuit Sambuddho Chakravarty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    Identifying Proxy Nodes in a Tor Anonymization Circuit Sambuddho Chakravarty Columbia University, and effective mechanism that exposes the identity of Tor relays participating in a given circuit. Such an attack), we create observable fluctuations that propagate through the Tor network and the Internet to the end

  17. Engineering Identifying the source of an atmospheric pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    associated with increased mortality and lung disease) whose sources in models used to develop air pollutionChemical Engineering Abstract Identifying the source of an atmospheric pollutant or phenomena challenge currently facing the US EPA in developing secondary standards for the control of this pollutant

  18. Integrative Genomic Approaches Identify IKBKE as a Breast Cancer Oncogene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that activation of the ERK and phos- phatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling path- ways cooperate to transform T (LT) and small t (ST) oncoproteins, and an activated allele of H-RAS (H-RASV12 ) render a wide range exhibited by human epi- thelial cancers complicates efforts to identify mutations critical for malignant

  19. A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood (FINAL) Submitted June 23, 2006 Amy Omae-TREATED WOOD II.1 Applying Phosphate Stains to Arsenate Stains 7 II.2 A Potential Arsenic-Test Kit 14 II.3 Whole Wood Application of the Modified Stannous Chloride Stain 19 II.4 Other Attempted Stain

  20. Classifying Web Search Queries to Identify High Revenue Generating Customers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, James

    searching, the set of terms for which a user searches is called the query. If a user enters a query and then clicks on a result, these query terms are embedded within the URL that is passed from the search engineClassifying Web Search Queries to Identify High Revenue Generating Customers Adan Ortiz-Cordova 329

  1. A SIMPLE ALGORITHM FOR IDENTIFYING ABBREVIATION DEFINITIONS IN BIOMEDICAL TEXT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hearst, Marti

    A SIMPLE ALGORITHM FOR IDENTIFYING ABBREVIATION DEFINITIONS IN BIOMEDICAL TEXT ARIEL S. SCHWARTZ of biomedical text is growing at a fast rate, creating challenges for humans and computer systems alike. One of these challenges arises from the frequent use of novel abbreviations in these texts, thus requiring that biomedical

  2. Identifying Differences in Cultural Behavior in Online Groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Engel, David W.; Bell, Eric B.; Mcgrath, Liam R.

    2012-07-23

    We have developed methods to identify online communities, or groups, using a combination of structural information variables and content information variables from weblog posts and their comments to build a characteristic footprint for groups. We have worked with both explicitly connected groups and 'abstract' groups, in which the connection between individuals is in interest (as determined by content based features) and behavior (metadata based features) as opposed to explicit links. We find that these variables do a good job at identifying groups, placing members within a group, and helping determine the appropriate granularity for group boundaries. The group footprint can then be used to identify differences between the online groups. In the work described here we are interested in determining how an individual's online behavior is influenced by their membership in more than one group. For example, individuals belong to a certain culture; they may belong as well to a demographic group, and other 'chosen' groups such as churches or clubs. There is a plethora of evidence surrounding the culturally sensitive adoption, use, and behavior on the Internet. In this work we begin to investigate how culturally defined internet behaviors may influence behaviors of subgroups. We do this through a series of experiments in which we analyze the interaction between culturally defined behaviors and the behaviors of the subgroups. Our goal is to (a) identify if our features can capture cultural distinctions in internet use, and (b) determine what kinds of interaction there are between levels and types of groups.

  3. Identifying Cross-Cutting Concerns Using Software Repository Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidman, Andy

    Identifying Cross-Cutting Concerns Using Software Repository Mining Frank Mulder Software and/or a fee. IWPSE-EVOL'10 September 20-21, 2010 Antwerp, Belgium Copyright 2010 ACM 978 Framework #12;3.2 Tool-chain Structure 3.3 Data Acquisition 3.4 Frequent Itemset Mining 3.4.1 Definition #12

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Marine flooding event in continental Triassic facies identified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    representing a high-energy event and records exceptional marine flooding in a distal fluvial environmentORIGINAL ARTICLE Marine flooding event in continental Triassic facies identified by a nothosaur Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Sudden marine flooding within otherwise con- tinental

  5. Sequencing and comparison of yeast species to identify genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    *, Nick Patterson*, Matthew Endrizzi*, Bruce Birren* & Eric S. Lander* * Whitehead/MIT Center for Genome ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Identifying the functional elements encoded in a genome is one of the principal challenges in modern biology. Comparative genomics should offer a powerful, general approach. Here, we present a comparative analysis

  6. All-codon scanning identifies p53 cancer rescue mutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Richard H.

    . We have used ACS to produce single amino-acid changes in small and large regions of the human tumor suppressor protein p53 to identify single amino-acid substitutions that can restore activity to inactive p53 in a single codon, typically do not achieve saturation, may introduce multiple amino acid changes per product

  7. Method of doping organic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kloc, Christian Leo (Constance, DE); Ramirez, Arthur Penn (Summit, NJ); So, Woo-Young (New Providence, NJ)

    2010-10-26

    An apparatus has a crystalline organic semiconducting region that includes polyaromatic molecules. A source electrode and a drain electrode of a field-effect transistor are both in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. A gate electrode of the field-effect transistor is located to affect the conductivity of the crystalline organic semiconducting region between the source and drain electrodes. A dielectric layer of a first dielectric that is substantially impermeable to oxygen is in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. The crystalline organic semiconducting region is located between the dielectric layer and a substrate. The gate electrode is located on the dielectric layer. A portion of the crystalline organic semiconducting region is in contact with a second dielectric via an opening in the dielectric layer. A physical interface is located between the second dielectric and the first dielectric.

  8. Ability - Not Disability: Organizing Housework. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, Linda J.

    1981-01-01

    -------Th-eT -exas-A&M~ ----:8-1259 University System ~ Texas Agricu ~tura I Extension Service Daniel C Plannstiel . DIrector College Station ABILITY NOT DISABILITY Organizing Housework [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] ~. '!". ABILITY... - NOT DISABILITY: ORGANIZING HOUSEWORK Linda J. McCormack? Before organizing housework, think about Rudyard Kipling's poem, "I Keep Six Honest Service Men." "I keep six honest serving men (they taught me all I know) their names are What and Why and When...

  9. Digestive System general organization throughout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houde, Peter

    Digestive System general organization throughout: mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa, serosa digestive glands salivary pancreas liver (lobes: right, left, caudate, quadrate, diaphragmatic surface, bare

  10. Organic rankine cycle fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brasz, Joost J.; Jonsson, Ulf J.

    2006-09-05

    A method of operating an organic rankine cycle system wherein a liquid refrigerant is circulated to an evaporator where heat is introduced to the refrigerant to convert it to vapor. The vapor is then passed through a turbine, with the resulting cooled vapor then passing through a condenser for condensing the vapor to a liquid. The refrigerant is one of CF.sub.3CF.sub.2C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CFC(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.2C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.3C(O)CF(CG.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.5C(O)CF.sub.3, CF.sub.3CF.sub.2C(O)CF.sub.2CF.sub.2CF.sub.3, CF.sub.3C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2.

  11. Micro-Spectroscopic Imaging and Characterization of Individually Identified Ice Nucleating Particles from a Case Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knopf, Daniel A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Wang, Bingbing; O'Brien, Rachel E.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.

    2014-09-03

    The effect of anthropogenic and biogenic organic particles on atmospheric glaciation processes is poorly understood. We use an optical microscopy (OM) setup to identify the location of ice nuclei (IN) active in immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation for temperatures of 200-273 K within a large population of particles sampled from an ambient environment. Applying multi-modal micro-spectroscopy methods we characterize the physicochemical properties of individual IN in particle populations collected in central California. Chemical composition and mixing state analysis of particle populations are performed to identify characteristic particle-type classes. All particle-types contained organic material. Particles in these samples take up water at subsaturated conditions, induce immersion freezing at subsaturated and saturated conditions above 226 K, and act as deposition IN below 226 K. The identified IN belong to the most common particle-type classes observed in the field samples: organic coated sea salt, Na-rich, and secondary and refractory carbonaceous particles. Based on these observations, we suggest that the IN are not always particles with unique chemical composition and exceptional ice nucleation propensity; rather, they are common particles in the ambient particle population. Thus, particle composition and morphology alone are insufficient to assess their potential to act as IN. The results suggest that particle-type abundance is also a crucial factor in determining the ice nucleation efficiency of specific IN types. These findings emphasize that ubiquitous organic particles can induce ice nucleation under atmospherically relevant conditions and that they may play an important role in atmospheric glaciation processes.

  12. Methods for identifying an essential gene in a prokaryotic microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shizuya, Hiroaki

    2006-01-31

    Methods are provided for the rapid identification of essential or conditionally essential DNA segments in any species of haploid cell (one copy chromosome per cell) that is capable of being transformed by artificial means and is capable of undergoing DNA recombination. This system offers an enhanced means of identifying essential function genes in diploid pathogens, such as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  13. Identifying, Implementing and Complying with Environment, Safety and Health Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15

    This Policy sets forth the framework for identifying, implementing and complying with environment, safety and health (ES&H) requirements so that work is performed in the DOE complex in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public and the environment. Ownership of this policy is shared between GC and HS. Cancels DOE P 450.2. Canceled by DOE P 450.4A.

  14. Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grate, Jay W.; Wise, Barry M.

    2003-08-12

    Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

  15. Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Wise, Barry M [Manson, WA

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

  16. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  17. Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingREnergy Tools for Sustainability Identify Institutional

  18. Identify and Protect Your Vital Records | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagement »HydrogenINTERACTIVE:Identify and

  19. Identifying, studying and making good use of macromolecular crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calero, Guillermo; Cohen, Aina E.; Luft, Joseph R.; Newman, Janet; Snell, Edward H.

    2014-07-25

    As technology advances, the crystal volume that can be used to collect useful X-ray diffraction data decreases. The technologies available to detect and study growing crystals beyond the optical resolution limit and methods to successfully place the crystal into the X-ray beam are discussed. Structural biology has contributed tremendous knowledge to the understanding of life on the molecular scale. The Protein Data Bank, a depository of this structural knowledge, currently contains over 100 000 protein structures, with the majority stemming from X-ray crystallography. As the name might suggest, crystallography requires crystals. As detectors become more sensitive and X-ray sources more intense, the notion of a crystal is gradually changing from one large enough to embellish expensive jewellery to objects that have external dimensions of the order of the wavelength of visible light. Identifying these crystals is a prerequisite to their study. This paper discusses developments in identifying these crystals during crystallization screening and distinguishing them from other potential outcomes. The practical aspects of ensuring that once a crystal is identified it can then be positioned in the X-ray beam for data collection are also addressed.

  20. 4, 719745, 2007 Fluvial organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    changes and targets for carbon sequestration set by the Kyoto Protocol. In the UK the largest componentHESSD 4, 719­745, 2007 Fluvial organic carbon flux from an eroding peatland R. R. Pawson et al System Sciences Fluvial organic carbon flux from an eroding peatland catchment, southern Pennines, UK R

  1. Spring 2014 Organization Development & Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Spring 2014 Organization Development & Training Catalog University of Central Florida Office of Organization Development & Training 3280 Progress Drive Orlando, FL 32826-2912 (407) 823-0440 February 7, 2014 Volume 2, Number 3 The current Catalog is published at http://www.hr.ucf.edu/web/training

  2. Weed Management in Organic Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Weed Management in Organic Crops Research Results Update Bill Curran Penn State University #12;Weed management tactics for organic production · Crop rotation · Cover crops - dead mulches and green manures · Primary and secondary tillage · Irrigation and drainage · Crop residue management · Planting date

  3. Systems engineering study: tank 241-C-103 organic skimming,storage, treatment and disposal options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klem, M.J.

    1996-10-23

    This report evaluates alternatives for pumping, storing, treating and disposing of the separable phase organic layer in Hanford Site Tank 241-C-103. The report provides safety and technology based preferences and recommendations. Two major options and several varations of these options were identified. The major options were: 1) transfer both the organic and pumpable aqueous layers to a double-shell tank as part of interim stabilization using existing salt well pumping equipment or 2) skim the organic to an above ground before interim stabilization of Tank 241-C-103. Other options to remove the organic were considered but rejected following preliminary evaluation.

  4. Geothermal Target Areas in Colorado as Identified by Remote Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Target Areas Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as targets of potential geothermal activity. The Criteria used to identify the target areas include: hot/warm surface exposures modeled from ASTER/Landsat satellite imagery and geological characteristics, alteration mineral commonly associated with hot springs (clays, Si, and FeOx) modeled from ASTER and Landsat data, Coloradodo Geological Survey (CGS) known thermal hot springs/wells and heat-flow data points, Colorado deep-seated fault zones, weakened basement identified from isostatic gravity data, and Colorado sedimentary and topographic characteristics Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546251.530446 m Left: 151398.567298 m Right: 502919.587395 m Bottom: 4095100.068903 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Identification and quantification of organic chemicals in supplemental fuel blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salter, F.

    1996-12-31

    Continental Cement Company, Inc. (Continental) burns waste fuels to supplement coal in firing the kiln. It is to be expected that federal and state agencies want an accounting of the chemicals burned. As rules and regulations become more plentiful, a company such as Continental must demonstrate that it has made a reasonable attempt to identify and quantify many specific organic compounds. The chemicals on the SARA 313 list can change frequently. Also the number and concentrations of compounds that can disqualify a material from consideration as a supplemental fuel at Continental continues to change. A quick and reliable method of identifying and quantifying organics in waste fuel blends is therefore crucial. Using a Hewlett-Packard 5972 GC/MS system Continental has developed a method of generating values for the total weight of compounds burned. A similar procedure is used to verify that waste streams meet Continental`s acceptance criteria.

  6. Identifying the Theory of Dark Matter with Direct Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Gluscevic; Moira I. Gresham; Samuel D. McDermott; Annika H. G. Peter; Kathryn M. Zurek

    2015-06-15

    Identifying the true theory of dark matter depends crucially on accurately characterizing interactions of dark matter (DM) with other species. In the context of DM direct detection, we present a study of the prospects for correctly identifying the low-energy effective DM-nucleus scattering operators connected to UV-complete models of DM-quark interactions. We take a census of plausible UV-complete interaction models with different low-energy leading-order DM-nuclear responses. For each model (corresponding to different spin-, momentum-, and velocity-dependent responses), we create a large number of realizations of recoil-energy spectra, and use Bayesian methods to investigate the probability that experiments will be able to select the correct scattering model within a broad set of competing scattering hypotheses. We conclude that agnostic analysis of a strong signal (such as Generation-2 would see if cross sections are just below the current limits) seen on xenon and germanium experiments is likely to correctly identify momentum dependence of the dominant response, ruling out models with either "heavy" or "light" mediators, and enabling downselection of allowed models. However, a unique determination of the correct UV completion will critically depend on the availability of measurements from a wider variety of nuclear targets, including iodine or fluorine. We investigate how model-selection prospects depend on the energy window available for the analysis. In addition, we discuss accuracy of the DM particle mass determination under a wide variety of scattering models, and investigate impact of the specific types of particle-physics uncertainties on prospects for model selection.

  7. Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

    2008-06-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

  8. Identifying the Host Galaxy of Gravitational Wave Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura K Nuttall; Patrick J Sutton

    2011-11-29

    One of the goals of the current LIGO-GEO-Virgo science run is to identify transient gravitational wave (GW) signals in near real time to allow follow-up electromagnetic (EM) observations. An EM counterpart could increase the confidence of the GW detection and provide insight into the nature of the source. Current GW-EM campaigns target potential host galaxies based on overlap with the GW sky error box. We propose a new statistic to identify the most likely host galaxy, ranking galaxies based on their position, distance, and luminosity. We test our statistic with Monte Carlo simulations of GWs produced by coalescing binaries of neutron stars (NS) and black holes (BH), one of the most promising sources for ground-based GW detectors. Considering signals accessible to current detectors, we find that when imaging a single galaxy, our statistic correctly identifies the true host ~20% to ~50% of the time, depending on the masses of the binary components. With five narrow-field images the probability of imaging the true host increases to ~50% to ~80%. When collectively imaging groups of galaxies using large field-of-view telescopes, the probability improves to ~30% to ~60% for a single image and to ~70% to ~90% for five images. For the advanced generation of detectors (c. 2015+), and considering binaries within 100 Mpc (the reach of the galaxy catalogue used), the probability is ~40% for one narrow-field image, ~75% for five narrow-field images, ~65% for one wide-field image, and ~95% for five wide-field images, irrespective of binary type.

  9. Apparatus for controlling system state based on unique identifiers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drotning, William D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus allows workers to assert and release control over the energization of a system. The apparatus does not require the workers to carry any additional paraphernalia, and is not be easily defeated by other workers. Users asserting and releasing control present tokens uniquely identifying each user to a reader, and the apparatus prevents transition of the system to an undesired state until an appropriate number of users are currently asserting control. For example, a dangerous manufacturing robot can be prevented from energizing until all the users that have asserted control when entering the robot's controlled space have subsequently released control when leaving the robot's controlled space.

  10. Portable data collection device with self identifying probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick D. (Aurora, CO)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of time. The sensor may also store a unique sensor identifier.

  11. Portable data collection device with self identifying probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, P.D.

    1998-11-17

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of time. The sensor may also store a unique sensor identifier. 13 figs.

  12. Research identifies designs for lowering subsea production cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothberg, R.H.; Hall, J.E. ); Douglas, L.D. ); Manuel, W.S. ); Kirkland, K.G.

    1993-03-08

    To reduce costs and simplify installation operations for subsea hardware, Amoco Production Co. in 1986 began the development of a diverless subsea production system (DSPS). At present, Amoco has completed the testing phase for selected prototype components and has completed a deepwater system design that incorporates many of these ideas. This program has yielded several configurations suitable for full-field development; however, the emphasis of the research and development program has been to identify, design, and test components of key subsystems. This first of a three-part series describes the design considerations, equipment configuration, and subsea trees.

  13. Identifying Critical Pathways to High-Performance PV: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Symko-Davies, M.; Noufi, R.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV)Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of photovoltaics (PV) for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to our energy supply and our environment in the 21st century. To accomplish this, the NCPV directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices. Details of the subcontractor and in-house progress will be described toward identifying critical pathways of 25% polycrystalline thin-film tandem cells and developing multijunction concentrator modules to 33%.

  14. Two-Factor Identify Proofing Process | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report1538-1950 Timeline ofTurkey Near-Zero Zone TurkeyofofIdentify

  15. Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Wastewater by Pervaporation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijmans, J. G.; Kaschemekat, J.; Baker, R. W.; Simmons, V. L.

    1991-01-01

    -CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Research Director Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT The removal and recovery of organic... contaminants from aqueous streams by pervaporation membrane systems is a viable and economical treatment for many waste streams. Specific opportunities for the technology are identified in this paper. La~oratory and pilot system data are used to develop...

  16. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Megan R. ; Crooker, Scott A. ; Nie, Wanyi ; Mohite, Aditya D. ; Ruden, P. Paul ; Smith, Darryl L. Publication Date: 2014-12-22 OSTI Identifier: 1181137 Type: Publisher's...

  17. Identifying Requirements for Effective Human-Automation Teamwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; John O'Hara; Heather D. Medema; Johanna H. Oxstrand

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that poorly designed human-automation collaboration, such as poorly designed communication protocols, often leads to problems for the human operators, such as: lack of vigilance, complacency, and loss of skills. These problems often lead to suboptimal system performance. To address this situation, a considerable amount of research has been conducted to improve human-automation collaboration and to make automation function better as a “team player.” Much of this research is based on an understanding of what it means to be a good team player from the perspective of a human team. However, the research is often based on a simplified view of human teams and teamwork. In this study, we sought to better understand the capabilities and limitations of automation from the standpoint of human teams. We first examined human teams to identify the principles for effective teamwork. We next reviewed the research on integrating automation agents and human agents into mixed agent teams to identify the limitations of automation agents to conform to teamwork principles. This research resulted in insights that can lead to more effective human-automation collaboration by enabling a more realistic set of requirements to be developed based on the strengths and limitations of all agents.

  18. Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2010-01-01

    continuity established. Energy efficiency integrated intoof your organization’s energy performance attained.$200,000 per Year with Energy-Efficient Motors. New York,

  19. DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interaction with Standards Development Organizations- August 1, 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This procedure identifies the process by which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction of DOE and contractor employees with Standards Development Organizations (SDOs).

  20. Reducing recombination in organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Jason M. (Jason Michael)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I consider two methods to improve organic photovoltaic efficiency: energy level cascades and promotion of triplet state excitons. The former relies on a thin layer of material placed between the active ...

  1. Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-scale synthesis of inorganic and organic nanomaterials (single-crystalline nanowires and functionalized conducting polymer thin films) together with strategies for large-scale assembly are discussed

  2. HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Professional Organizations: Coding: American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) Charlottesville Chapter Administration Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM) Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA

  3. Empirical essays in industrial organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiou, Lesley C

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation, I present three empirical essays that encompass topics in industrial organization. The first essay examines the degree of competition and spatial differentiation in the retail industry by exploiting ...

  4. Engineering Organization Chart Assistant Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Engineering Organization Chart Fall `12 Assistant Dean Outreach & Recruiting Matthew Cavalli and Geological Engineering Joseph Hartman Chair, Petroleum Engineering Steve Benson Chair, Electrical Engineering Forrest Ames (interim) Chair, Mechanical Engineering Matthew Cavalli Chair, Chemical Engineering Mike Mann

  5. Ambient-pressure organic superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

    1986-01-01

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

  6. Neighborhood Progress Through Organized Action. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eula; Cox, Bonnie; Martin, E. C.

    1955-01-01

    -measure of a people's civilization is their ability to work together." - Calvin Coolidge ;T OF US WANT to live in the best possible community. lroblem is getting together and working om an improve- rogram. - --- r-- ment p ning a intere munil "L... coord: lent r peo plt 1. mmunity organization is successful when all families erested groups participate. Such an organization may inate interest in the community and provide an excel- neans for channeling most programs. The interest...

  7. 70 DA WHITE DWARFS IDENTIFIED IN LAMOST PILOT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. K.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, G. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Oswalt, T. D., E-mail: zjk@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: lal@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu [Physics and Space Science Department, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We present a spectroscopically identified catalog of 70 DA white dwarfs (WDs) from the LAMOST pilot survey. Thirty-five are found to be new identifications after cross-correlation with the Eisenstein et al. and Villanova catalogs. The effective temperature and gravity of these WDs are estimated by Balmer lines fitting. Most of them are hot WDs. The cooling times and masses of these WDs are estimated by interpolation in theoretical evolution tracks. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be {approx}0.6 M {sub Sun }, which is consistent with prior work in the literature. The distances of these WDs are estimated using the method of synthetic spectral distances. All of these WDs are found to be in the Galactic disk from our analysis of space motions. Our sample supports the expectation that WDs with high mass are concentrated near the plane of the Galactic disk.

  8. Interstellar HI Shells Identified in the SETHI Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sallmen, Shauna M; Bellehumeur, Brooke; Tennyson, Elizabeth M; Grunwald, Kurt; Lo, Cheuk Man

    2015-01-01

    Galactic HI (neutral hydrogen) shells are central to our understanding of the interstellar medium (ISM), which plays a key role in the development and evolution of galaxies, including our own. Several models involving supernovae and stellar winds have contributed to our broad understanding, but a complete, detailed picture remains elusive. To extend existing Galactic shell catalogs, we visually examined the SETHI (Search for Extraterrestrial HI) database to identify shell-like structures. This high-sensitivity 21-cm radio survey covering the Arecibo sky uniquely provides high-resolution data on shells at a wide range of Galactic latitudes. We present basic information (location, radial velocity, angular size, shape) for 74 previously unidentified HI shells. Due to limitations of coverage and data quality, and the biases inherent in search techniques, our catalog is not a complete sample of Galactic shells. We discuss the catalog completeness, and comment on the new shells' relationship with known interstellar...

  9. Identifying Calcium Channels and Porters in Plant Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, Heven

    1998-04-01

    The overall objectives of the proposal submitted in 6/90 was to understand how Ca was transported across plant membranes, and how these transport pathways were regulated. Ca participates in many cellular processes, including the transduction of hormonal and environmental signals, secretion, and protein folding. These processes depend on the coordination of passive Ca fluxes via channels and active Ca pumps; however these transport pathways are poorly understood in plants. We had, therefore, proposed to identify and characterize Ca transport proteins, such as the inositol-1 ,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca channels and Ca pumps. We have had difficulties characterizing and cloning the IP3-sensitive Ca channel, but have made considerable progress on the biochemical characterization, and partial purification of a 120 kD Ca-pumping ATPase. We have begun to determine the structure of Ca pumps by molecular cloning and have already obtained a partial cDNA with features characteristic of Ca pumps.

  10. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    contacts for tandem organic solar cells,? Journal of AppliedITO-free flexible organic solar cells with printed currentC. de Mello, “ Efficient organic solar cells with solution-

  11. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles: Marine Aerosol Organic Mass Composition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-26

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemicalmore »reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group peak location is closer to that of polysaccharides. This may result from the larger saccharides preferentially remaining in the seawater during gPMA and aPMA production« less

  12. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles: Marine Aerosol Organic Mass Composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frossard, Amanda A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; Russell, Lynn M. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; Burrows, Susannah M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC); Elliott, Scott M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bates, Timothy S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Seattle, WA (United States). Pacific Marine Environmental Lab. (PMEL); Quinn, Patricia K. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Seattle, WA (United States). Pacific Marine Environmental Lab. (PMEL)

    2014-11-26

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemical reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group peak location is closer to that of polysaccharides. This may result from the larger saccharides preferentially remaining in the seawater during gPMA and aPMA production

  13. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-03-17

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOAs) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem (Global Earth Observing System Chemistry) model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Modelmore »predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOAs observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOAs have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having >10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  14. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2014-09-09

    Marine organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in goodmore »agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  15. Performance Analysis: Work Control Events Identified January - August 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Grange, C E; Freeman, J W; Kerr, C E; Holman, G; Marsh, K; Beach, R

    2011-01-14

    This performance analysis evaluated 24 events that occurred at LLNL from January through August 2010. The analysis identified areas of potential work control process and/or implementation weaknesses and several common underlying causes. Human performance improvement and safety culture factors were part of the causal analysis of each event and were analyzed. The collective significance of all events in 2010, as measured by the occurrence reporting significance category and by the proportion of events that have been reported to the DOE ORPS under the ''management concerns'' reporting criteria, does not appear to have increased in 2010. The frequency of reporting in each of the significance categories has not changed in 2010 compared to the previous four years. There is no change indicating a trend in the significance category and there has been no increase in the proportion of occurrences reported in the higher significance category. Also, the frequency of events, 42 events reported through August 2010, is not greater than in previous years and is below the average of 63 occurrences per year at LLNL since 2006. Over the previous four years, an average of 43% of the LLNL's reported occurrences have been reported as either ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' In 2010, 29% of the occurrences have been reported as ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' This rate indicates that LLNL is now reporting fewer ''management concern'' and ''near miss'' occurrences compared to the previous four years. From 2008 to the present, LLNL senior management has undertaken a series of initiatives to strengthen the work planning and control system with the primary objective to improve worker safety. In 2008, the LLNL Deputy Director established the Work Control Integrated Project Team to develop the core requirements and graded elements of an institutional work planning and control system. By the end of that year this system was documented and implementation had begun. In 2009, training of the workforce began and as of the time of this report more than 50% of authorized Integration Work Sheets (IWS) use the activity-based planning process. In 2010, LSO independently reviewed the work planning and control process and confirmed to the Laboratory that the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) System was implemented. LLNL conducted a cross-directorate management self-assessment of work planning and control and is developing actions to respond to the issues identified. Ongoing efforts to strengthen the work planning and control process and to improve the quality of LLNL work packages are in progress: completion of remaining actions in response to the 2009 DOE Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) evaluation of LLNL's ISM System; scheduling more than 14 work planning and control self-assessments in FY11; continuing to align subcontractor work control with the Institutional work planning and control system; and continuing to maintain the electronic IWS application. The 24 events included in this analysis were caused by errors in the first four of the five ISMS functions. The most frequent cause was errors in analyzing the hazards (Function 2). The second most frequent cause was errors occurring when defining the work (Function 1), followed by errors during the performance of work (Function 4). Interestingly, very few errors in developing controls (Function 3) resulted in events. This leads one to conclude that if improvements are made to defining the scope of work and analyzing the potential hazards, LLNL may reduce the frequency or severity of events. Analysis of the 24 events resulted in the identification of ten common causes. Some events had multiple causes, resulting in the mention of 39 causes being identified for the 24 events. The most frequent cause was workers, supervisors, or experts believing they understood the work and the hazards but their understanding was incomplete. The second most frequent cause was unclear, incomplete or confusing documents directing the work. Together, these two causes were mentioned 17 times and co

  16. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    photodiodes, and photovoltaic cells,? Applied PhysicsTang, “Two-layer organic photovoltaic cell,” Applied Physicsprocessable polymer photovoltaic cells by self-organization

  17. Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

  18. Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    olds among minimal organisms andthose observed between minimal organisms and other bacteria. Conclusion:We find that proteins performing essential cellular functions...

  19. Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Collaboration Key to Enabling On-The-Fly HPC...

  20. LANL named 2010 top corporate volunteer organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 top corporate volunteer organization LANL named 2010 top corporate volunteer organization The Laboratory ranked ahead of dozens of other qualifying companies with 10,000 or...

  1. Spirit Program Organization Chart March 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Spirit Program Organization Chart March 2015 Dr. Juan Munoz Vice Provost Appearances Spirit Organizations Financial Support Saddle Tramps High Riders Goin

  2. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt W. (Rochester, MN); Wallenfelt, Brian P. (Eden Prairie, MN)

    2010-08-24

    Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

  8. 49 new T dwarfs identified using methane imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, C V; Smart, R L; van Spaandonk, L; Baker, D; Smith, L C; Andrei, A H; Bucciarelli, B; Dhital, S; Jones, H R A; Lattanzi, M G; Magazzu, A; Pinfield, D J; Tinney, C G

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of 49 new photometrically classified T dwarfs from the combination of large infrared and optical surveys combined with follow-up TNG photometry. We used multi-band infrared and optical photometry from the UKIRT and Sloan Digital Sky Surveys to identify possible brown dwarf candidates, which were then confirmed using methane filter photometry. We have defined a new photometric conversion between CH4s - CH4l colour and spectral type for T4 to T8 brown dwarfs based on a part of the sample that has been followed up using methane photometry and spectroscopy. Using methane differential photometry as a proxy for spectral type for T dwarfs has proved to be a very efficient technique. Of a subset of 45 methane selected brown dwarfs that were observed spectroscopically, 100% were confirmed as T dwarfs. Future deep imaging surveys will produce large samples of faint brown dwarf candidates, for which spectroscopy will not be feasible. When broad wavelength coverage is unavailable, methane imaging...

  9. IDENTIFYING THE RADIO BUBBLE NATURE OF THE MICROWAVE HAZE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobler, Gregory, E-mail: dobler@kitp.ucsb.edu [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara Kohn Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    Using seven-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, I identify a sharp 'edge' in the microwave haze at high southern Galactic latitude (-55 Degree-Sign < b < -35 Degree-Sign ) that is spatially coincident with the southern edge of the 'Fermi haze/bubbles'. This finding proves conclusively that the edge in the gamma rays is real (and not a processing artifact), demonstrates explicitly that the microwave haze and the gamma-ray bubbles are indeed the same structure observed at multiple wavelengths, and strongly supports the interpretation of the microwave haze as a separate component of Galactic synchrotron (likely generated by a transient event) as opposed to a simple variation of the spectral index of disk synchrotron. In addition, combining these data sets allows for the first determination of the magnetic field within a radio bubble using microwaves and gamma rays by taking advantage of the fact that the inverse Compton gamma rays are primarily generated by scattering of cosmic microwave background photons at these latitudes, thus minimizing uncertainty in the target radiation field. Assuming uniform volume emissivity, I find that the magnetic field within the southern Galactic microwave/gamma-ray bubble is {approx}5 {mu}G above 6 kpc off of the Galactic plane.

  10. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, AZ 85287 (United States); Cucchiara, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México, D. F. (Mexico); Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ? 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  11. Effect of moisture on air stripping of non volatile organic contaminants from soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Roberto

    1991-01-01

    of the unsaturated soil zone by organic chemicals has been receiving considerable attention recently since it is the major source of ground water pollution. The main objective of this work was to study the viability of air stripping non volatile organic... in the solid phase. Phenol, an EPA priority pollutant which has been identified in ground water supplies, was the model contaminant. Studies involved stripping the contaminant from a column of Norwood/Westwood soil under several moisture conditions. Removal...

  12. Identified hadron production inIdentified hadron production in d+Au and p+p collisions at RHICd+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identified hadron production inIdentified hadron production in d+Au and p+p collisions at RHICd particle production in d+Au and p+p collisions at RHIIdentified particle production in d+Au and p--protonsprotons SummarySummary #12;20072007--33--2727 Identified particle production in d+Au and p+p collisions

  13. Omen: identifying potential spear-phishing targets before the email is sent.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a two year project focused on a common social engineering attack method called %22spear phishing%22. In a spear phishing attack, the user receives an email with information specifically focused on the user. This email contains either a malware-laced attachment or a link to download the malware that has been disguised as a useful program. Spear phishing attacks have been one of the most effective avenues for attackers to gain initial entry into a target network. This project focused on a proactive approach to spear phishing. To create an effective, user-specific spear phishing email, the attacker must research the intended recipient. We believe that much of the information used by the attacker is provided by the target organization's own external website. Thus when researching potential targets, the attacker leaves signs of his research in the webserver's logs. We created tools and visualizations to improve cybersecurity analysts' abilities to quickly understand a visitor's visit patterns and interests. Given these suspicious visitors and log-parsing tools, analysts can more quickly identify truly suspicious visitors, search for potential spear-phishing targeted users, and improve security around those users before the spear phishing email is sent.

  14. NREL-Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL-Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Using RETScreen To Identify the Most...

  15. Membrane-Organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, James K.

    2014-09-18

    This project has three interrelated goals relevant to solar water photolysis, which are to develop: (1) vesicle-organized assemblies for H2 photoproduction that utilize pyrylium and structurally related compounds as combined photosensitizers and cyclic electroneutral transmembrane electron carriers; (2) transmembrane redox systems whose reaction rates can be modulated by light; and (3) homogeneous catalysts for water oxidation. . In area (1), initial efforts to photogenerate H2 from vectorially-organized vesicles containing occluded colloidal Pt and commonly available pyrylium ions as transmembrane redox mediators were unsuccessful. New pyrylium compounds with significantly lower reduction potentials have been synthesized to address this problem, their apparent redox potentials in functioning systems have been now evaluated by using a series of occluded viologens, and H2 photoproduction has been demonstrated in continuous illumination experiments. In area (2), spirooxazine-quinone dyads have been synthesized and their capacity to function as redox mediators across bilayer membranes has been evaluated through continuous photolysis and transient spectrophotometric measurements. Photoisomerization of the spiro moiety to the ring-open mero form caused net quantum yields to decrease significantly, providing a basis for photoregulation of transmembrane redox. Research on water oxidation (area 3) has been directed at understanding mechanisms of catalysis by cis,cis-[(bpy)2Ru(OH2)]2O4+ and related polyimine complexes. Using a variety of physical techniques, we have: (i) identified the redox state of the complex ion that is catalytically active; (ii) shown using 18O isotopic labeling that there are two reaction pathways, both of which involve participation of solvent H2O; and (iii) detected and characterized by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopies new species which may be key intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  16. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This document provides functional organization charts for all NRC Offices and Regions, and their components.

  17. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-30

    Functional organization charts for the NRC Commission Offices, Divisions, and Branches are presented.

  18. 1, 122, 2001 Organic TDMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 1, 1­22, 2001 Organic TDMA Joutsensaari et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References Tables Figures Back Close Print Version Interactive Discussion c EGS 2001 Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 1, 1­22, 2001 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/1/1/ c European Geophysical Society 2001 Atmospheric

  19. Method of doping organic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kloc, Christian Leo (Constance, DE); Ramirez, Arthur Penn (Summit, NJ); So, Woo-Young (New Providence, NJ)

    2012-02-28

    A method includes the steps of forming a contiguous semiconducting region and heating the region. The semiconducting region includes polyaromatic molecules. The heating raises the semiconducting region to a temperature above room temperature. The heating is performed in the presence of a dopant gas and the absence of light to form a doped organic semiconducting region.

  20. The Anaerobic Digestion of Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Separation in California 2.3. Biochemical Process 2.4. End-use 2.4.1. Biogas 2.4.1. Biomethane 2.5. Current and commercialization. Anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic municipal solid waste and subsequent biogas and methane as biomethane production; by emphasizing these benefits and implementing certain policies, expanding

  1. ORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a way that preserves the greatest possible knowledge base, while making the most efficient and effectiveORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES Society for Range Management Annual Meeting Ecological effectively for planning, restoration, and management. Arranging the various elements within the ecosystem

  2. Organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser WorkEPVisitingOilOpportunities

  3. Organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scale ScientificOregonFacility

  4. Differential Network Analyses of Alzheimer’s Disease Identify Early Events in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xia, Jing; Rocke, David M.; Perry, George; Ray, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD), multiple brain regions are not affected simultaneously. Comparing the gene expression of the affected regions to identify the differences in the biological processes perturbed can lead to greater insight into AD pathogenesis and early characteristics. We identified differentially expressed (DE) genes from single cell microarray data of four AD affected brain regions: entorhinal cortex (EC), hippocampus (HIP), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and middle temporal gyrus (MTG). We organized the DE genes in the four brain regions into region-specific gene coexpression networks. Differential neighborhood analyses in the coexpression networks were performed to identify genes with lowmore »topological overlap (TO) of their direct neighbors. The low TO genes were used to characterize the biological differences between two regions. Our analyses show that increased oxidative stress, along with alterations in lipid metabolism in neurons, may be some of the very early events occurring in AD pathology. Cellular defense mechanisms try to intervene but fail, finally resulting in AD pathology as the disease progresses. Furthermore, disease annotation of the low TO genes in two independent protein interaction networks has resulted in association between cancer, diabetes, renal diseases, and cardiovascular diseases.« less

  5. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 475.2A, Identifying Classified Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-03-06

    The revision will incorporate changes that were identified during the 1-year review after initial issuance

  6. Thermal properties of organic and inorganic aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Material Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-9900 (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Aerogels are open-cell foams that have already been shown to be among the best thermal insulating solid materials known. This paper examines the three major contributions to thermal transport through porous materials; solid, gaseous, and radiative, to identify how to reduce the thermal conductivity of air-filled aerogels. We find that significant improvements in the thermal insulation property of aerogels are possible by; (i) employing materials with a low intrinsic solid conductivity, (ii) reducing the average pore size within aerogels, and (iii) affecting an increase of the infrared extinction in aerogels. Theoretically, polystyrene is the best of the organic materials and zirconia is the best inorganic material to use for the lowest achievable conductivity. Significant reduction of the thermal conductivity for all aerogel varieties is predicted with only a modest decrease of the average pore size. This might be achieved by modifying the sol-gel chemistry leading to aerogels. For example, a thermal resistance value of [ital R]=20 per inch would be possible for an air-filled resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogel at a density of 156 kg/m[sup 3], if the average pore size was less than 35 nm. An equation is included which facilitates the calculation of the optimum density for the minimum total thermal conductivity, for all varieties of aerogels.

  7. Megahertz organic/polymer diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Howard Edan; Sun, Jia; Pal, Nath Bhola

    2012-12-11

    Featured is an organic/polymer diode having a first layer composed essentially of one of an organic semiconductor material or a polymeric semiconductor material and a second layer formed on the first layer and being electrically coupled to the first layer such that current flows through the layers in one direction when a voltage is applied in one direction. The second layer is essentially composed of a material whose characteristics and properties are such that when formed on the first layer, the diode is capable of high frequency rectifications on the order of megahertz rectifications such as for example rectifications at one of above 100KHz, 500KhZ, IMHz, or 10 MHz. In further embodiments, the layers are arranged so as to be exposed to atmosphere.

  8. Economics of Organic Rankine Cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    RANKINE CYCLE WILLIAM J. O'BRIEN Energy Ccnsultant Encon Associates 231 Torrey Pines Drive Toms River, New Jersey ABSTRACT This report determines the conditions needed for an Organic Rankine Cycle to be economically attractive to recover heat... going to air fins or cooling water. It includes discussion of some installations, and the impact of pinch technology on the analysis of Rankine Cycle opportunities. Some graphs to assist in deciding whether a poten tial application is economic...

  9. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-06

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  10. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  11. Identifying and Mitigating Potential Nutrient and Sediment Hot Spots under a Future Scenario in the Missouri River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, May; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2015-09-01

    Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for large-scale watershed modeling could be useful for evaluating the quality of the water in regions that are dominated by nonpoint sources in order to identify potential “hot spots” for which mitigating strategies could be further developed. An analysis of water quality under future scenarios in which changes in land use would be made to accommodate increased biofuel production was developed for the Missouri River Basin (MoRB) based on a SWAT model application. The analysis covered major agricultural crops and biofuel feedstock in the MoRB, including pasture land, hay, corn, soybeans, wheat, and switchgrass. The analysis examined, at multiple temporal and spatial scales, how nitrate, organic nitrogen, and total nitrogen; phosphorus, organic phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, and total phosphorus; suspended sediments; and water flow (water yield) would respond to the shifts in land use that would occur under proposed future scenarios. The analysis was conducted at three geospatial scales: (1) large tributary basin scale (two: Upper MoRB and Lower MoRB); (2) regional watershed scale (seven: Upper Missouri River, Middle Missouri River, Middle Lower Missouri River, Lower Missouri River, Yellowstone River, Platte River, and Kansas River); and (3) eight-digit hydrologic unit (HUC-8) subbasin scale (307 subbasins). Results showed that subbasin-level variations were substantial. Nitrogen loadings decreased across the entire Upper MoRB, and they increased in several subbasins in the Lower MoRB. Most nitrate reductions occurred in lateral flow. Also at the subbasin level, phosphorus in organic, sediment, and soluble forms was reduced by 35%, 45%, and 65%, respectively. Suspended sediments increased in 68% of the subbasins. The water yield decreased in 62% of the subbasins. In the Kansas River watershed, the water quality improved significantly with regard to every nitrogen and phosphorus compound. The improvement was clearly attributable to the conversion of a large amount of land to switchgrass. The Middle Lower Missouri River and Lower Missouri River were identified as hot regions. Further analysis identified four subbasins (10240002, 10230007, 10290402, and 10300200) as being the most vulnerable in terms of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus loadings. Overall, results suggest that increasing the amount of switchgrass acreage in the hot spots should be considered to mitigate the nutrient loads. The study provides an analytical method to support stakeholders in making informed decisions that balance biofuel production and water sustainability.

  12. Secondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic mass at Bakersfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Secondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic mass is fossil fuel combustion from gasoline- and diesel- powered vehicles and other industrial activities (e

  13. A simple method for the removal of dissolved organic matter and N analysis of NO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    ,11] or by the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide gas (N2O) by bacteria[12,13] or by using cadmium or sodium in nitrate (NO3 ­ ) are frequently used to identify nitrate sources and to study nitrogen (N) transformation, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) can interfere with the d15 N signature of nitrate. We therefore have

  14. Student Organization Licensing Agreement WHEREAS, the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma ("University") owns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    of Oklahoma ("University") owns certain marks, logos and other intellectual property related to the University; and WHEREAS, the Student Organization wishes to use the mark "Sooner", "Sooners" or "Oklahoma" in its, nontransferable license to use "Sooner", "Sooners" or "Oklahoma" to promote or identify itself. 2. The Student

  15. SPECTROSCOPIC METHODS FOR ANALYZING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN FLUID INCLUSIONS DURING PLANETARY EXPLORATION. A. Mazzini 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    to support of life, and could even contain direct biomolecular signatures of life. Accessing the fluid which provide data on organic compounds in fluid inclusions. The techniques used are Ra- man entrapped in chemosynthetic carbonate at a modern cold seep site. Cold seeps have been identified as targets

  16. Adapting to contradiction : competing models of organization in the United States organic foods industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haedicke, Michael Anthony

    2008-01-01

    M. Zald (Eds. ), Social movements and organization theory (mobilization and social movements: A partial theory.current encounter of social movements and organizations. In

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    electrodes in Organic Solar Cells One of the early problemslow efficiencies in one layer organic solar cells made themgraphene based solar cells can be reached up to one tenth of

  18. Representation, Organization, Classification, and Meaning-Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    1 Representation, Organization, Classification, and Meaning-Making Description Fundamental epistemological and ontological issues in the use of knowledge and information in human activities. Analysis, department store, grocery store, children's library, a menu, a store catalogue) and analyze that organization

  19. Spin injection and manipulation in organic semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraman, Karthik (Karthik Raman)

    2011-01-01

    The use of organic semiconductors to enable organic spintronic devices requires the understanding of transport and control of the spin state of the carriers. This thesis deals with the above issue, focusing on the interface ...

  20. Rational design of hybrid organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lentz, Levi (Levi Carl)

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we will present a novel design for a nano-structured organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic material that will address current challenges in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic-based solar cell materials. ...

  1. and Self-Organization for Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAD-Drawings: Udo Schminke Photos: Kai Bröking, Irene Böttcher-Gajewski, Will Brunner, Ragnar-Organization in the Visual Cortex 10 2.1.3.2 Self-Organized Criticality in the Activity Dynamics of Neural Networks 13 2

  2. Sustainable and Organic Horticulture Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Sustainable and Organic Horticulture Program of Study The Sustainable and Organic, community food systems and urban agriculture. This option is also excellent for students interested in graduate study. The "Sustainability" or "Sustainable Agriculture and Food System" specializations may also

  3. Microfiltration of colloids and natural organic matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Schwicke, U.; Fischer, M. M.; Fane, Anthony G.; Waite, T. D.

    2000-01-01

    Surface waters contain colloids and natural organic matter, largely composed of humic substances. In this work the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) and humic substances (IHSS stream humic and fulvic acid reference ...

  4. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    status and future potential,? Solar Energy, 2005, 79(1), 78-Organic solar cells: their developments and potentials,?Therefore, organic solar cells, with potential in low-cost

  5. Data quality objective to support resolution of the organic fuel rich tank safety issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, L.L.

    1995-04-28

    During years of Hanford process history, large quantities of complexants used in waste management operations as well as an unknown quantity of degradation products of the solvents used in fuel reprocessing and metal recovery were added to man of the 149 single-shell tanks. These waste tanks also contain a presumed stoichiometric excess of sodium nitrate/nitrite oxidizers, sufficient to exothermically oxidize the organic compounds if suitably initiated. This DQO identifies the questions that must be answered to appropriately disposition organic watchlist tanks, identifies a strategy to deal with false positive or negative judgements associated with analytical uncertainty, and list the analytes of concern to support dealing with organic watchlist concerns. Uncertainties associated with both assay limitations and matrix effects complicate selection of analytes. This results in requiring at least two independent measures of potential fuel reactivity.

  6. Leveraging Partnerships with Faith-Based Organizations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar, presented May 17, 2011, covered two projects between faith-based organizations and energy efficiency programs.

  7. Project Management Coordination Office Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project Management Coordination Office Organization Chart, U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    into organic solar cells resulted in remarkable improvementssolar cells, hole collection is enhanced more. When the reasons of these improvements

  9. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Herbst, R. Scott (Idaho Falls, ID); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Smirnov, Igor V. (St.-Petersburg, RU); Babain, Vasily A. (St-Petersburg, RU); Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M. (St-Petersburg, RU)

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  10. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-15

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  11. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  12. Comprehensive metabolomic, lipidomic and microscopic profiling of Yarrowia lipolytica during lipid accumulation identifies targets for increased lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomraning, Kyle R.; Wei, Siwei; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Dohnalkova, Alice; Arey, Bruce W.; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Orr, Galya; Metz, Thomas O.; Baker, Scott E.

    2015-04-23

    Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous ascomycete yeast that accumulates large amounts of lipids and has potential as a biofuel producing organism. Despite a growing scientific literature focused on lipid production by Y. lipolytica, there remain significant knowledge gaps regarding the key biological processes involved. We applied a combination of metabolomic and lipidomic profiling approaches as well as microscopic techniques to identify and characterize the key pathways involved in de novo lipid accumulation from glucose in batch cultured, wild-type Y. lipolytica. We found that lipids accumulated rapidly and peaked at 48 hours during the five day experiment, concurrent with a shift in amino acid metabolism. We also report that Y. lipolytica secretes disaccharides early in batch culture and reabsorbs them when extracellular glucose is depleted. Exhaustion of extracellular sugars coincided with thickening of the cell wall, suggesting that genes involved in cell wall biogenesis may be a useful target for improving the efficiency of lipid producing yeast strains.

  13. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  14. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY)

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  15. Our Organization | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Careers/ HumanOur Mission AboutOrganization

  16. Department of Energy Idaho - Organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novoEmergency PublicOrganization Chart

  17. Organization | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganization

  18. Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServices » NEPANewsOffice2.0K-12Organization

  19. Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets Erin T. Mansur and Matthew W. White October 2007 ­ Draft Abstract Electricity markets exhibit two different forms of organization costs. Our analysis points to the merits of organized market institutions for electricity, a central

  20. 5, 11391174, 2008 Organic carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 5, 1139­1174, 2008 Organic carbon and nutrient export from disturbed peatlands S. Waldron et al of Biogeosciences The significance of organic carbon and nutrient export from peatland-dominated landscapes subject Union. 1139 #12;BGD 5, 1139­1174, 2008 Organic carbon and nutrient export from disturbed peatlands S

  1. Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risø National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

  2. Tariq Abdullah Mechanisms for Self-organizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of task execution or resource consumption. The system level self-organization involves understanding underTariq Abdullah Mechanisms for Self-organizing Ad Hoc Grids #12;#12;Mechanisms for Self Delft, The Netherlands, reservelid Tariq Abdullah Mechanisms for Self-organizing Ad Hoc Grids Delft: TU

  3. EXECUTIVE VICE CHANCELLOR -ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ORGANIZATION CHART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    EXECUTIVE VICE CHANCELLOR - ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ORGANIZATION CHART *Acts for the Executive Vice of organized research units. University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 Updated (1) Organized Research Units & Multicampus Research Units General Campus Non-Faculty Research

  4. Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

    1998-01-01

    A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

  5. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

  6. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up 15 wt% of total H2 uptake at 80 bar and 77 K. More importantly, the total H2 uptake by MOF-210 was 2.7 wt% at 80 bar and 298 K, which is the highest number reported for physisorptive materials.

  7. DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Invest up to 2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 DOE to Invest up to 2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western...

  8. Temperature dynamics of a proglacial stream: Identifying dominant energy balance components and inferring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    Temperature dynamics of a proglacial stream: Identifying dominant energy balance components. Kirchner (2012), Temperature dynamics of a proglacial stream: Identifying dominant energy balance forefield (Switzerland), we examined how longitudinal stream temperature changes can be used to infer reach

  9. 041510v1Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    041510v1Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Page 1 Policy Version: Responsible University Officer Chief Information Officer Responsible Office Information Technology Services Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying

  10. Identifying messaging completion in a parallel computer by checking for change in message received and transmitted count at each node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Hardwick, Camesha R. (Fayetteville, NC); McCarthy, Patrick J. (Rochester, MN); Wallenfelt, Brian P. (Eden Prairie, MN)

    2009-06-23

    Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying messaging completion on a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes, the compute nodes coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks including a binary tree data communications network optimal for collective operations that organizes the nodes as a tree and a torus data communications network optimal for point to point operations that organizes the nodes as a torus. Embodiments include reading all counters at each node of the torus data communications network; calculating at each node a current node value in dependence upon the values read from the counters at each node; and determining for all nodes whether the current node value for each node is the same as a previously calculated node value for each node. If the current node is the same as the previously calculated node value for all nodes of the torus data communications network, embodiments include determining that messaging is complete and if the current node is not the same as the previously calculated node value for all nodes of the torus data communications network, embodiments include determining that messaging is currently incomplete.

  11. Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Fins, Tails and Scales: Identifying Great Lakes Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hands ­ On Science with NOAA TITLE: Fins, Tails and Scales: Identifying Great Lakes Fish OVERVIEW: Working with a set of illustrated Great Lakes fish cards, students identify distinguishing characteristics of fish and learn to identify 10 common fish families and how why dichotomous keys are used. MATERIALS

  12. Guideline for Identifying an Information System as a National Security System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guideline for Identifying an Information System as a National Security System NIST Special Publication 800-59 Guideline for Identifying an Information System as a National Security System William C;Guideline for Identifying an Information System as a National Security System Reports on Computer Systems

  13. Identifying Waste: Applications of Construction Process Analysis Proceedings IGLC-7 63

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    Identifying Waste: Applications of Construction Process Analysis Proceedings IGLC-7 63 IDENTIFYING WASTE: APPLICATIONS OF CONSTRUCTION PROCESS ANALYSIS Seung-Hyun Lee 1 , James E. Diekmann2 , Anthony D, construction management often fails to identify or address waste in the construction process. One reason waste

  14. Building Finder: A System to Automatically Identify Buildings in Satellite Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    1 Building Finder: A System to Automatically Identify Buildings in Satellite Imagery Ching with these applications is to accurately and automatically identify objects, such as roads or buildings, in the satellite researchers have been working on trying to identify features, such as roads, buildings, and other features

  15. Adapting to contradiction : competing models of organization in the United States organic foods industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haedicke, Michael Anthony

    2008-01-01

    synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; orthe use of municipal sewage sludge as fertilizer on organic

  16. Regeneration of Tissues and Organs Using Autologous Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Atala

    2010-04-28

    The Joint Commission for Health Care Organizations recently declared the shortage of transplantable organs and tissues a public health crisis. As such, there is about one death every 30 seconds due to organ failure. Complications and rejection are still significant albeit underappreciated problems. It is often overlooked that organ transplantation results in the patient being placed on an immune suppression regimen that will ultimate shorten their life span. Patients facing reconstruction often find that surgery is difficult or impossible due to the shortage of healthy autologous tissue. In many cases, autografting is a compromise between the condition and the cure that can result in substantial diminution of quality of life. The national cost of caring for persons who might benefit from engineered tissues or organs has reached $600 billion annually. Autologous tissue technologies have been developed as an alternative to transplantation or reconstructive surgery. Autologous tissues derived from the patient's own cells are capable of correcting numerous pathologies and injuries. The use of autologous cells eliminates the risks of rejection and immunological reactions, drastically reduces the time that patients must wait for lifesaving surgery, and negates the need for autologous tissue harvest, thereby eliminating the associated morbidities. In fact, the use of autologous tissues to create functional organs is one of the most important and groundbreaking steps ever taken in medicine. Although the basic premise of creating tissues in the laboratory has progressed dramatically, only a limited number of tissue developments have reached the patients to date. This is due, in part, to the several major technological challenges that require solutions. To that end, we have been in pursuit of more efficient ways to expand cells in vitro, methods to improve vascular support so that relevant volumes of engineered tissues can be grown, and constructs that can mimic the native tissue environment to ensure tissue integration, maturation, and survival. Other long-term benefits of this research are likely to be cell-based drug delivery mechanisms, intelligent biomaterials, bio-nano technologies, as well as controlled delivery using advances in materials science. The major challenges to the goal of producing tissues and organs for transplantation and reconstruction are three-fold and will form the basis for the goals of this research. These include (1) Identifying sources of autologous cells and developing methods to expand them in large number in vitro, (2) Providing vascular support for growing constructs, and (3) Developing biomaterials and bioreactor systems that mimic the native tissue environment.

  17. Microwave separation of organic chemicals from mixed hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.A.; Albano, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing the differential heating characteristics of microwave energy (MW) to aid in the chemical extraction and separation process of hazardous organic compounds from mixed hazardous waste, was studied at the INEL. The long-term objective of this work was to identify a practical method of separating or enhancing the separation process of organic hazardous waste components from mixed waste using microwave (MW) frequency radiation. Methods using MW energy for calcination, solidification, and drying of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities is becoming more attractive. In order to study the effectiveness of MW heating, samples of several organic chemicals simulating those which may be found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL were exposed to MW energy. Vapor collection and analysis was performed as a function of time, signal frequency, and MW power throughout the process. Signal frequencies ranging from 900 MHz t 8000 MHz were used. Although the signal frequency bandwidth of the selectivity was quite broad, for the material tested an indication of the frequency dependence in the selectivity of MW heating was given. Greater efficiency in terms of energy used and time required was observed. The relatively large electromagnetic field intensities generated at the resonant frequencies which were supported by the cavity sample holder demonstrated the use of cavity resonance to aid in the process of differential heating.

  18. Microwave separation of organic chemicals from mixed hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.A.; Albano, R.K.

    1992-08-01

    The feasibility of utilizing the differential heating characteristics of microwave energy (MW) to aid in the chemical extraction and separation process of hazardous organic compounds from mixed hazardous waste, was studied at the INEL. The long-term objective of this work was to identify a practical method of separating or enhancing the separation process of organic hazardous waste components from mixed waste using microwave (MW) frequency radiation. Methods using MW energy for calcination, solidification, and drying of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities is becoming more attractive. In order to study the effectiveness of MW heating, samples of several organic chemicals simulating those which may be found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL were exposed to MW energy. Vapor collection and analysis was performed as a function of time, signal frequency, and MW power throughout the process. Signal frequencies ranging from 900 MHz t 8000 MHz were used. Although the signal frequency bandwidth of the selectivity was quite broad, for the material tested an indication of the frequency dependence in the selectivity of MW heating was given. Greater efficiency in terms of energy used and time required was observed. The relatively large electromagnetic field intensities generated at the resonant frequencies which were supported by the cavity sample holder demonstrated the use of cavity resonance to aid in the process of differential heating.

  19. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraus, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-30

    An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

  20. 5.13 Organic Chemistry II, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamison, Timothy F.

    Intermediate organic chemistry. Synthesis, structure determination, mechanism, and the relationships between structure and reactivity emphasized. Special topics in organic chemistry included to illustrate the role of organic ...

  1. Structure-Function Relationships in Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavulak, David Fredric Joel

    2010-01-01

    properties for organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Space-chargePolymers for Organic Photovoltaics By David Fredric JoelPolymers for Organic Photovoltaics by David Fredric Joel

  2. An Oligomer Approach for Advancing the Field of Organic Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    heteroacenes for organic electronics. Chem. Rev. 106, 5028-the Field of Organic Electronics A dissertation submitted inthe Field of Organic Electronics By Yue Wang Doctor of

  3. Conjugated Polymer Design and Engineering for Organic Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woo, Claire Hoi Kar

    2011-01-01

    W. ; Forrest, S. R. Organic Electronics 2003, 4, 77-87. (24)Aspects of Organic Electronics: From Fundamentals toof solution-processed organic electronics rapidly advancing,

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guvenc, Ali Bilge

    2012-01-01

    characterization of organic solar cells, Advanced Functionaland D. Meissner, Organic Solar-Cells, Advanced Materials 3 (devices based on organic solar cells became a very hot topic

  5. Conjugated Polymer Design and Engineering for Organic Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woo, Claire Hoi Kar

    2011-01-01

    conversion efficiencies in organic solar cells is reported.operation of an organic solar cell and the correspondingOrganic Solar Cells

  6. Structure-Function Relationships in Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavulak, David Fredric Joel

    2010-01-01

    mechanism by which organic solar cells operate, and then tomechanism of an organic solar cell. (1) Absorption ofthe improvement of organic solar cells. The photophysics of

  7. The Development of Semiconducting Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Jessica D.

    2013-01-01

    the heterojunction. Organic solar cells operate through thisprocess in excitonic, organic solar cells occurs within thepolymer for use in BHJ organic solar cells. We demonstrated

  8. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  9. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  10. The first step in the development of text mining technology for cancer risk assessment: identifying and organizing scientific evidence in risk assessment literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korhonen, Anna; Silins, Ilona; Sun, Lin; Stenius, Ulla

    2009-09-22

    the annotation task harder, given the high proportion of rele- vant abstracts among the 15 journals used for corpus cre- ation. The resulting test data contains 208 abstracts in total. The test set was kept intentionally small to facilitate thorough error...

  11. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento–San Joaquin River Basin, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Lee Davisson, M.; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2010-01-01

    peat soils, Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California: implications for drinking-water quality. Water-Resources

  12. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento–San Joaquin River Basin, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Lee Davisson, M.; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Water Project and -152% in the Sacramento River. Electronicof Water Resources, Sacramento, CA 95814, USA e-mail:United States Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA, USA e-mail:

  13. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. The model combines Köhler theory with semi-empirical group contribution methods to estimate molar volumes, activity coefficients and liquid-liquid phase boundaries tomore »predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of two. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging testbeds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger scale models.« less

  14. Locally enhanced or decreased microbially driven biogeochemical activity can often be identified in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditions (Stolp 1988). Microbes, as well as other organisms living within or above the soil or sediment, or above a soil or sediment patch, they can change the availability of microbial resources as well organisms can modify environments (e.g., by digging, bur- rowing, or damming), a variety of environments

  15. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for organization 1700.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerard, Morgan Evan

    2007-06-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Organization 1700 in June, 2006. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist Organization 1700 in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, analyses performed and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Pollution Prevention staff will continue to work with Organization 1700 to implement the recommendations.

  16. Theoretical investigations of the electronic processes in organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Shane Robert

    2013-01-01

    The design of more efficient organic photovoltaics starts with an increase in understanding of the fundamental processes related to organic photovoltaics, such as the charge separation processes at the organic/organic ...

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    Best research solar cells efficiencies. [cited 2010; ChartHisikawa Y, Warta W. Solar cell efficiency tables (Versionusing organic solar cells, the efficiencies of these devices

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    Diodes, Photodiodes, and Photovoltaic Cells. Applied Physicsprocessable polymer photovoltaic cells by self-organizationAJ. Polymer Photovoltaic Cells - Enhanced Efficiencies Via a

  19. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The...

  20. Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sealock, Jr., L. John (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250.degree. C. to 500.degree. C. and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials.

  1. Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1997-05-20

    A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250 to 500 C and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials. 7 figs.

  2. Data management system for organic soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinnette, P.

    1999-07-01

    A Data Management System for Organic Soil (DMSOS) has been developed that enables the acquisition, management and analysis of organic soil data as well as the presentation of results to be conducted effectively through a common interface. This development was in response to the data management needs of research investigating the engineering properties of organic soil and its extension to the stabilization of organic soil through dynamic replacement (DR). It is shown how the above functions are implemented efficiently using Windows-based software to perform comprehensive data management and analysis of data gathered from both laboratory and field tests. When the engineering properties of a given organic soil deposit are needed, a build-in Computer Advisor for Organic Soil Projects (CAOSP) predicts the properties from DMSOS based correlations. A unique and useful feature of the CAOSP is its ability to estimate the anticipated ultimate settlement of an organic soil deposit given the loading conditions and the moisture or organic content. Also incorporated in the DMSOS is a quality control system that utilizes computerized data acquisition/data management techniques in order to evaluate the degree of improvement of an organic soil layer at a given stage of treatment using DR.

  3. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Angeles Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation AOrganic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation by Chun-multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design,

  4. Finance 101 Student Organization Funding Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finance 101 Student Organization Funding Workshop #12;Finance Committee Mission Statement successful events Finance Committee Goals 2012-2013 2 #12;ASI Budget Allowance 5% Business & Administration

  5. Process for recovering organic vapors from air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Mountain View, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A process for recovering and concentrating organic vapor from a feed stream of air having an organic vapor content of no more than 20,000 ppm by volume. A thin semipermeable membrane is provided which has a feed side and a permeate side, a selectivity for organic vapor over air of at least 50, as measured by the ratio of organic vapor permeability to nitrogen permeability, and a permeability of organic vapor of at least 3.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.3 (STP) cm/cm.sup.2 sec.cm Hg. The feed stream is passed across the feed side of the thin semipermeable membrane while providing a pressure on the permeate side which is lower than the feed side by creating a partial vacuum on the permeate side so that organic vapor passes preferentially through the membrane to form an organic vapor depleted air stream on the feed side and an organic vapor enriched stream on the permeate side. The organic vapor which has passed through the membrane is compressed and condensed to recover the vapor as a liquid.

  6. Project Management Coordination Office Organization Chart | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office Organization Chart, U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. pmeorgchart101013.pdf More Documents & Publications Management Reform...

  7. GEOL 482/582 Coal/Organic Petrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    , hydrocarbons (oil/gas), oil shales, and dispersed organics. · To be able to recognize organic components under

  8. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Hosseini, SeyedEhsan; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.; Jung, H.; Weise, David

    2013-01-07

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for “smoldering compounds” emitted by burning the semi-arid SW fuels should likely be increased by about a factor of 2.7 to better represent field fires. Based on the lab/field comparison, we present a table with emission factors for 365 pyrogenic species (including unidentified species) for 4 broad fuel types: pine understory, semi-arid shrublands, evergreen canopy, and duff. To our knowledge this is the most complete measurement of biomass burning emissions to date and it should enable improved representation of smoke in atmospheric models. The results provide important insights into the nature of smoke. For example, ~35% (range from 16-71%) of the mass of gas-phase NMOC species was attributed to the species that we could not identify. These unidentified species are likely not represented in most models, but some provision should be made for the fact that they will react in the atmosphere. In addition, the total mass of gas-phase NMOC divided by the mass of co-emitted PM2.5 averaged ~2.6 for the main fire types with a range from ~1.8-8.8. About 36-63% of the NMOC were likely semivolatile or of intermediate volatility. Thus, the gas-phase NMOC represent a large reservoir of potential precursors for secondary formation of organic aerosol. For the one fire in organic soil (Alaskan duff) about 28% of the emitted carbon was present as gas-phase NMOC in contrast to the other fuels for which NMOC accounted for only ~1-3% of emitted carbon. 71% of the mass of NMOC emitted by the smoldering duff was un-identified. The duff results highlight the need to learn more about the emissions from smoldering organic soils. The ?NMOC/“NOx-as-NO” ratio was consistently about ten for the main fire types when accounting for all NMOC, indicating strongly NOx-limited O3 production conditions. Finally, the fuel consumption per unit area was measured on 6 of the 14 prescribed fires and averaged 7.08 ± 2.09 (1?) Mg ha-1.

  9. Neural network system and methods for analysis of organic materials and structures using spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, B.J.; Sellers, J.P.; Thomsen, J.U.

    1993-06-08

    Apparatus and processes are described for recognizing and identifying materials. Characteristic spectra are obtained for the materials via spectroscopy techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared absorption analysis, x-ray analysis, mass spectroscopy and gas chromatography. Desired portions of the spectra may be selected and then placed in proper form and format for presentation to a number of input layer neurons in an offline neural network. The network is first trained according to a predetermined training process; it may then be employed to identify particular materials. Such apparatus and processes are particularly useful for recognizing and identifying organic compounds such as complex carbohydrates, whose spectra conventionally require a high level of training and many hours of hard work to identify, and are frequently indistinguishable from one another by human interpretation.

  10. Neural network system and methods for analysis of organic materials and structures using spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Bernd J. (Athens, GA); Sellers, Jeffrey P. (Suwanee, GA); Thomsen, Jan U. (Fredricksberg, DK)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and processes for recognizing and identifying materials. Characteristic spectra are obtained for the materials via spectroscopy techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared absorption analysis, x-ray analysis, mass spectroscopy and gas chromatography. Desired portions of the spectra may be selected and then placed in proper form and format for presentation to a number of input layer neurons in an offline neural network. The network is first trained according to a predetermined training process; it may then be employed to identify particular materials. Such apparatus and processes are particularly useful for recognizing and identifying organic compounds such as complex carbohydrates, whose spectra conventionally require a high level of training and many hours of hard work to identify, and are frequently indistinguishable from one another by human interpretation.

  11. Identifying and Resolving Issues in EnergyPlus and DOE-2 Window Heat Transfer Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booten, C.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

    2012-08-01

    Issues in building energy software accuracy are often identified by comparative, analytical, and empirical testing as delineated in the BESTEST methodology. As described in this report, window-related discrepancies in heating energy predictions were identified through comparative testing of EnergyPlus and DOE-2. Multiple causes for discrepancies were identified, and software fixes are recommended to better align the models with the intended algorithms and underlying test data.

  12. Using accelerometer "smart collars" to identify wolf behavioral states and energetic costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryce, Caleb M; Williams, T M; Wilmers, C C

    2013-01-01

    Using accelerometer “smart collars” to identify wolfconcern are ideal “smart collar” candidates because theor elusive species • E.g. “smart collars” currently being

  13. Developing a Framework to Identify Innovation in the Defense Research, Development, and Acquistion Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARCUM, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    a Framework to Identify Innovation in the Defense Research,methodology to characterize innovation factors in defenseof states. The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (

  14. $3.6 Million in Savings Identified in AMCAST Assessment (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    Summary of AMCAST Industrial Corporation's plant-wide assessment to identify energy and cost saving opportunities at the corporation's facility in Wapakoneta, Ohio.

  15. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Handheld Radionuclide Identifiers for Use in Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Handheld Radionuclide Identifiers for Use in Homeland Security................................................................................1 4. Test and evaluation steps .........................................................................................1 5. Recording test results

  16. Carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery: Identifying candidate sites for pilot study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Benson, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Process modeling of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas2001. Reichle, D. et al.. Carbon sequestration research andCarbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying

  17. The Official and Working Languages of the Organization - Use of German in the Food and Agricultural Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1967-01-01

    The Official and Working Languages of the Organization - Use of German in the Food and Agricultural Organization

  18. Changed climate : networking, professionalization, and grassroots organizing in U.S. environmental organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh Towery, Nathaniel S. (Nathaniel Stephen)

    2014-01-01

    My dissertation, "Changed Climate: Networking, Professionalization, and Grassroots Organizing in U.S Environmental Organizations," explores the efforts of four established U.S. environmental NGOs to change their organizational ...

  19. Adhesion in flexible organic and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting device and solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, D.; Kwabi, D.; Akogwu, O.; Du, J. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Oyewole, O. K. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete, Kwara State (Nigeria); Tong, T. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Anye, V. C.; Rwenyagila, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Asare, J.; Fashina, A. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2014-08-21

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the adhesion between bi-material pairs that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells on flexible substrates. Adhesion between the possible bi-material pairs is measured using force microscopy (AFM) techniques. These include: interfaces that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid combinations of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results of AFM measurements are incorporated into the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model for the determination of adhesion energies. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust organic and hybrid organic/inorganic electronic devices.

  20. JERRY W. KOEHLER PROFESSOR, MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jank, Wolfgang

    . Responsible for the day to day operations of the Department and for implementing Total Quality Management1 VITA JERRY W. KOEHLER PROFESSOR, MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT: (813) #12;2 I. EXPERIENCE A. ACADEMIC 1995-Present Professor, Department of Management and Organization

  1. LOCAL ORGANIC FOOD: THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    Sustainable production and consumption has risen up the political agenda over the last ten years, to becomeLOCAL ORGANIC FOOD: THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION By Gill Seyfang CSERGE Working Paper EDM 04-09 #12;Local Organic Food: The Social Implications of Sustainable Consumption By Gill

  2. Organizing Digital Libraries by Automated Text Categorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauber,Andreas

    Classification Scheme. When it was proclaimed that the Library contained all books, the first impression was oneOrganizing Digital Libraries by Automated Text Categorization Henri Avancini1 , Andreas Rauber2, that is of direct concern to organizing digital libraries. We exemplify this class of applications by discussing

  3. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, E.

    1995-05-23

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

  4. Student Organization Handbook Office of Student Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    providing a unique laboratory for learning for those involved. Student organizations provide opportunities, or simply a group focused on your favorite hobby, your involvement in a Johns Hopkins student organization students, and learn how to navigate getting things done at Homewood. Your membership will teach commitment

  5. Working Paper Proceedings Engineering Project Organizations Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blandford, Ann

    Working Paper Proceedings Engineering Project Organizations Conference Rheden, The Netherlands July, UK, f.deng.11@ucl.ac.uk #12;Canada-Benchmarking System (Rankin et al. 2008), Netherlands (Bakens et the performance of projects, can be applied to compare the performance of individual organizations

  6. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON BOTHELL GENERAL FACULTY ORGANIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON BOTHELL GENERAL FACULTY ORGANIZATION BYLAWS UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON of Washington Bothell (UWB) establishes herewith, under Faculty Code, Section 23-45A, its organization and rules of procedures. ARTICLE I PURPOSE AND FUNCTION Section 1. The purpose of the University of Washington Bothell

  7. Self-organizing criticality among Chinese cities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shujuan

    2010-07-14

    This dissertation employs the theory of self-organizing criticality (SOC) into the study of Chinese cities. SOC was proposed at the end of the 1980s to explain system complexity by combining both self-organizing and critical behaviors. SOC has been...

  8. Brain Organization and Computation Andreas Schierwagen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierwagen, Andreas

    Brain Organization and Computation Andreas Schierwagen Institute for Computer Science, Intelligent://www.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/~schierwa Abstract. Theories of how the brain computes can be differentiated in three general conceptions systems approach. The discussion of key features of brain organization (i.e. structure with function

  9. World Health Organization Laboratory biosafety manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    World Health Organization Geneva 2004 Laboratory biosafety manual Third edition #12;WHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data World Health Organization. Laboratory biosafety manual. ­ 3rd ed. 1 4.Manuals I.Title. ISBN 92 4 154650 6 (LC/NLM classification: QY 25) WHO/CDS/CSR/LYO/2004.11 © World

  10. Management effects on labile organic carbon pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodziej, Scott Michael

    2005-08-29

    Experimental Farm near College Station, TX prompted us to examine the effects of tillage and rotation on soil organic C (SOC), soil microbial biomass C (SMBC), 38-day cumulative C mineralization (38-day CMIN), hot-water extractable organic C (hot...

  11. Planning Organization & Logistics Deputy Director General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adin, Ron

    " Planning Organization & Logistics Deputy Director General Tel: 03 531 8553 : Fax: 03 535 4925 : P-O.Logistics@mail.biu.ac.il Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900, Israel · www.6. , . , . #12; " Planning Organization & Logistics Deputy Director General Tel: 03 531 8553 : Fax: 03 535

  12. Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations Final Report #12;Published by financing of a sample of African, Asian and European River Basin Organizations (RBOs). Its focus contributions to cov- er their regular run-ning costs. To a degree, the financial challenges some African RBOs

  13. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi Jon K. Magnuson and Linda L. Lasure 1. Introduction Many of the commercial production processes for organic acids are excellent examples of fungal overshadowed by the successful deploy- ment of the -lactam processes.Yet, in terms of productivity, fungal

  14. SUPPLIERS OF BENEFICIAL ORGANISMS IN NORTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    SUPPLIERS OF BENEFICIAL ORGANISMS IN NORTH AMERICA Charles D. Hunter Hippodamia convergens on commercial suppliers of benefical organisms in Mexico. I also thank Dr. Michael J. Oraze, Acting Director APHIS' views. DISCLAIMER Inclusion in this publication does not imply an endorsement of the suppliers

  15. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P. (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ)

    2011-05-24

    A photosensitive device includes a series of organic photoactive layers disposed between two electrodes. Each layer in the series is in direct contact with a next layer in the series. The series is arranged to form at least one donor-acceptor heterojunction, and includes a first organic photoactive layer comprising a first host material serving as a donor, a thin second organic photoactive layer comprising a second host material disposed between the first and a third organic photoactive layer, and the third organic photoactive layer comprising a third host material serving as an acceptor. The first, second, and third host materials are different. The thin second layer serves as an acceptor relative to the first layer or as a donor relative to the third layer.

  16. The dual influences of dissolved organic carbon on hypolimnetic metabolism: organic substrate and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Jonathan J.

    The dual influences of dissolved organic carbon on hypolimnetic metabolism: organic substrate investigated the effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on hypolimnetic metabolism (accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4)) in 21 lakes across a gradient of DOC concentrations (308 to 1540

  17. Photochemical deterioration of the organic/metal contacts in organic optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Qi; Williams, Graeme; Aziz, Hany; Tsui Ting

    2012-09-15

    We study the effect of exposure to light on a wide range of organic/metal contacts that are commonly used in organic optoelectronic devices and found that irradiation by light in the visible and UV range results in a gradual deterioration in their electrical properties. This photo-induced contact degradation reduces both charge injection (i.e., from the metal to the organic layer) and charge extraction (i.e., from the organic layer to the metal). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements reveal detectable changes in the interface characteristics after irradiation, indicating that the photo-degradation is chemical in nature. Changes in XPS characteristics after irradiation suggests a possible reduction in bonds associated with organic-metal complexes. Measurements of interfacial adhesion strength using the four-point flexure technique reveal a decrease in organic/metal adhesion in irradiated samples, consistent with a decrease in metal-organic bond density. The results shed the light on a new material degradation mechanism that appears to have a wide presence in organic/metal interfaces in general, and which likely plays a key role in limiting the stability of various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic light emitting devices, organic solar cells, and organic photo-detectors.

  18. Identifying evolving multivariate dynamics in individual and cohort time series, with application to physiological control systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemati, Shamim, 1980-

    2013-01-01

    Physiological control systems involve multiple interacting variables operating in feedback loops that enhance an organism's ability to self-regulate and respond to internal and external disturbances. The resulting multivariate ...

  19. Identifying a transcriptional signature for cell sensitivity to the cancer chemotherapy agent, BCNU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valiathan, Chandni Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Many organisms have evolved DNA damage response mechanisms to deal with the constant damage to DNA caused by endogenous and exogenous agents. These mechanisms activate cell cycle checkpoints to allow time for DNA repair ...

  20. Characterization of a circadian rhythm mutant identified in a genetic screen in Neurospora crassa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keasler, Victor Vasco

    2013-02-22

    Most organisms display daily rhythms in biochemical, physiological, and behavioral events. Examples of these rhythms include photosynthesis in plants and sleep/wake cycles in birds and mammals. These daily rhythms are controlled by an internal...

  1. Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

    2011-05-17

    A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

  2. Low-energy exclusive cross sections and inclusive production of identified charged hadrons with Babar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Low-energy exclusive cross sections and inclusive production of identified charged hadrons of low-energy exclusive e+e- cross sections, and recent results on the inclusive production of identified the cross sections to be measured at low energy and over an extended energy range. In addition, we present

  3. Identifying the Addressee in Human-Human-Robot Interactions based on Head Pose and Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Tanja

    Identifying the Addressee in Human-Human-Robot Interactions based on Head Pose and Speech Michael In this work we investigate the power of acoustic and visual cues, and their combination, to identify the addressee in a human-human-robot interaction. Based on eighteen audio- visual recordings of two human beings

  4. Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models and Mahalanobis distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models Keywords: Damage location Ambient vibration Vector Autoregressive model Statistical pattern recognition Bridges Structural health monitoring a b s t r a c t This paper presents a study for identifying damage

  5. Manipulation of Signaling Thresholds in ``Engineered Stem Cell Niches'' Identifies Design Criteria for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Manipulation of Signaling Thresholds in ``Engineered Stem Cell Niches'' Identifies Design Criteria Thresholds in ``Engineered Stem Cell Niches'' Identifies Design Criteria for Pluripotent Stem Cell Screens is the Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Bioengineering. The funders had no role in study design, data

  6. John von Neumann Institute for Computing Different Types of Protein Folding Identified with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachmann, Michael

    John von Neumann Institute for Computing Different Types of Protein Folding Identified://www.fz-juelich.de/nic-series/volume40 #12;Different Types of Protein Folding Identified with a Coarse-Grained Heteropolymer Model Stefan The identification of folding channels is one of the key tasks of protein folding studies. While secondary structures

  7. Information Content of Data for Identifying Soil Hydraulic Parameters from Outflow Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrugt, Jasper A.

    Information Content of Data for Identifying Soil Hydraulic Parameters from Outflow Experiments J. A sensitive to changes in the unknown parameters. Therefore we (Eching and Hopmans, 1993; Van Dam et al., 1994 with the uniqueness of the identified soil hydraulic properties. Identification Method based on the Localization of In

  8. Toward Improved Identifiability of Soil Hydraulic Parameters: On the Selection of a Suitable Parametric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrugt, Jasper A.

    hydraulic properties (Hopmans et al., 1992; van Dam useful description of parameter uncertainty and itsToward Improved Identifiability of Soil Hydraulic Parameters: On the Selection of a Suitable identifiability analysis of the soil hydraulic During the last two decades, a great deal of researchparameters

  9. Congestion Measures for Organized Markets in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Emily; Eto, Joseph H.

    2013-12-16

    Transmission lines deliver electricity that is generated at power plants to loads. When there is not sufficient transmission capacity to schedule or transport all desired electricity transfers, the transmission system is constrained, and the particular line, flowgate or interface is congested. While it is useful to measure congestion for several reasons—to identify where and how much congestion exists and how this changes over time, to determine whether or what to do about it, and to assess the effectiveness of actions taken—it is challenging to measure congestion in a meaningful and consistent way across markets or over time in the same market. This paper examines current public reporting of congestion measures for organized markets in the U.S., and what these measures can and cannot tell us about congestion across regions or over time in the same region.

  10. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Information Systems Analysis and Design CSC340 2002 Jaelson Castro and John Mylopoulos Organizations --1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mylopoulos, John

    Information Flow Organization ChartsOrganization Charts Feedback and Control within Organizations Jaelson Castro and John Mylopoulos Organizations -- 6 The Organization ChartThe Organization Chart The organization chartorganization chart defines areas of responsibility and lines of authority within

  12. Information Systems Analysis and Design CSC340 2002 Jaelson Castro and John Mylopoulos Organizations --1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mylopoulos, John

    Information Flow Organization ChartsOrganization Charts Feedback and Control within Organizations340 2002 Jaelson Castro and John Mylopoulos Organizations -- 6 The Organization ChartThe Organization Chart The organization chartorganization chart defines areas of responsibility and lines of authority

  13. Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Billingsley

    2005-12-01

    Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses, seismic mapping, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation indicate a lithologic and structural component to excessive in situ water permeability. Higher formation water salinity was found to be a good pay indicator. Thus spontaneous potential (SP) and resistivity ratio approaches combined with accurate formation water resistivity (Rw) information may be underutilized tools. Reservoir simulation indicates significant infill potential in the demonstration area. Macro natural fracture permeability was determined to be a key element affecting both gas and water production. Using the reservoir characterization results, we generated strategies for avoidance and mitigation of unwanted water production in the field. These strategies include (1) more selective perforation by improved pay determination, (2) using seismic attributes to avoid small-scale fault zones, and (3) utilizing detailed subsurface information to deliberately target optimally located small scale fault zones high in the reservoir gas column. Tapping into the existing natural fracture network represents opportunity for generating dynamic value. Recognizing the crucial role of stress release in the natural generation of permeability within tight reservoirs raises the possibility of manmade generation of permeability through local confining stress release. To the extent that relative permeabilities prevent gas and water movement in the deep subsurface a reduction in stress around a wellbore has the potential to increase the relative permeability conditions, allowing gas to flow. For this reason, future research into cavitation completion methods for deep geopressured reservoirs is recommended.

  14. Biomass burning and pollution aerosol over North America: Organic components and their influence on spectral optical properties and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    Biomass burning and pollution aerosol over North America: Organic components and their influence Received 11 July 2006; revised 5 April 2007; accepted 19 April 2007; published 9 June 2007. [1] Thermal and pollution plumes identified from trace gas measurements were evaluated for their aerosol physiochemical

  15. Being the partial proceedings of a conference co-organized by the South-African Regional Poverty Network,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Being the partial proceedings of a conference co-organized by the South-African Regional Poverty, Southern African governments have identified the eradication or alleviation of poverty as a key objective of developmental programmes. In spite of these repeated articulations and ongoing efforts poverty levels have

  16. Corrosion control of metals by organic coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooij, W.J. van; Bierwagen, G.P.; Skerry, B.S.; Mills, D.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a comprehensive treatment of the entire field of corrosion control of metals, from mechanisms and testing procedures to modification of metal surfaces and interfaces by silanes and plasma techniques. They discuss the new, sophisticated analytical tools, such as Time-of-Flight SIMS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and all materials -- metals, pretreatments, and paint systems. The contents include: (1) Corrosion under organic coatings; (2) Mechanisms of corrosion control by organic coatings; (3) Metal pretreatments; (4) Techniques to study organic coating-metal interfaces; (5) Modification of metal surfaces and interfaces; (6) corrosion testing; (7) Adhesion testing; (8) Paint systems; (9) Conclusions and prospects references.

  17. Elastomeric organic material for switching application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiju, K., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com; Praveen, T., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com; Preedep, P., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com [Laboratory for Molecular Photonics and Electronics (LAMP), Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala, 673601 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Organic Electronic devices like OLED, Organic Solar Cells etc are promising as, cost effective alternatives to their inorganic counterparts due to various reasons. However the organic semiconductors currently available are not attractive with respect to their high cost and intricate synthesis protocols. Here we demonstrate that Natural Rubber has the potential to become a cost effective solution to this. Here an attempt has been made to fabricate iodine doped poly isoprene based switching device. In this work Poly methyl methacrylate is used as dielectric layer and Aluminium are employed as electrodes.

  18. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ); Rand, Barry P. (Somers, NY)

    2011-09-06

    A photosensitive device includes a plurality of organic photoconductive materials disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode, including a first continuous layer of donor host material, a second continuous layer of acceptor host material, and at least one other organic photoconductive material disposed as a plurality of discontinuous islands between the first continuous layer and the second continuous layer. Each of these other photoconductive materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor host material and the acceptor host material. Preferably, each of the discontinuous islands consists essentially of a crystallite of the respective organic photoconductive material, and more preferably, the crystallites are nanocrystals.

  19. Exfoliation of self-assembled 2D organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Wendy Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Eiden, Anna; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2014-04-28

    Ultra-thin flakes of 2D organic-inorganic perovskite (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbI{sub 4} are produced using micromechanical exfoliation. Mono- and few-layer areas are identified using optical and atomic force microscopy, with an interlayer spacing of 1.6?nm. Refractive indices extracted from the optical spectra reveal a sample thickness dependence due to the charge transfer between organic and inorganic layers. These measurements demonstrate a clear difference in the exciton properties between “bulk” (>15 layers) and very thin (<8 layer) regions as a result of the structural rearrangement of organic molecules around the inorganic sheets.

  20. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    78-85. F. Dimroth, “ High-efficiency solar cells from III-Vand E. D. Dunlop, ?Solar cell efficiency tables (versionOptimizing the organic solar cell efficiency: Role of the

  1. Organizational images : towards a model of organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Neel

    2012-01-01

    This study develops a general theoretical framework for the analysis of organizational behavior by focusing on the notion that organizations develop unique information-processing frameworks, which it labels "organizational ...

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    MA. Third generation photovoltaics: solar cells for 2020 andSolar cell efficiency tables (Version 27). Prog Photovoltaics.Solar Cells Among other application areas, using graphene in organic photovoltaics

  3. Power, status, and learning in organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunderson, J. Stuart

    This paper reviews the scholarly literature on the effects of social hierarchy—differences in power and status among organizational actors—on collective learning in organizations and groups. We begin with the observation ...

  4. Reducing instability in a transforming organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salter, Thelton Raymond

    2007-01-01

    It is obvious from many studies that an alignment and understanding around vision, strategy and goals must occur within a corporation across all organizations before the corporation can operate at its highest efficiency. ...

  5. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    and G. Li, ?Polymer solar cells with enhanced open-circuittandem and triple-junction solar cells,? Materials, 2012, 5(for tandem organic solar cells,? Journal of Applied Physics,

  6. Applications of nanoimprinted structures to organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Eletha J

    2013-01-01

    Small-molecule organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) have the potential to be a low-cost, flexible power conversion solution to many energy problems. These OPVs take advantage of an extremely thin active layer which enables ...

  7. Microporoelastic modeling of organic-rich shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khosh Sokhan Monfared, Siavash

    2015-01-01

    Due to their abundance, organic-rich shales are playing a critical role in re-defining the world's energy landscape leading to shifts in global geopolitics. However, technical challenges and environmental concerns continue ...

  8. Creating and Organizing an Energy Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T.

    2007-01-01

    Many details are available describing technical feasibility, third party financing, performance contracts, or the savings potential of various energy conservation opportunities. The organization and implementation of a do-it-yourself program is what...

  9. Organization of Chinese Americans Federal Leadership Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Organization of Chinese Americans (OCA) will hold its Federal Leadership Training (FLT) on July 18-19, 2013, during its National Convention in Washington, D.C.  The theme of this year’s...

  10. Organizing Your 4-H Project Group 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    Project work allows 4-H volunteer leaders to teach and young people to learn new skills and gain new knowledge. Each project group should be organized in cooperation with the club's organizational leader. Use this guide when planning your first...

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    in bipolar graphene p-n-p junctions. Phys Rev Lett. 2007;99(GL. A New Silicon P-N Junction Photocell for Convertingmechanisms in organic p/n-junction solar cells. Sol Energ

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    W-function. Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. 2005;86(materials and structures to this energy harvesting problem using organic solarsolar cells - Towards 10 % energy-conversion efficiency. Advanced Materials.

  13. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2011, 95(5), 1339-heterojunction organic solar cells,? Solar Energy MaterialsSolar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2013, 113, 85-89. [

  14. Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells Master of Engineering Final Report Shanel C. Miller................................................................................................................... 12 2.1 How do Solar Cells Work?.................................................................................................. 12 2.2 Types of Solar Cells that Exist Today

  15. Nanomechanical properties of hydrated organic thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jae Hyeok

    2007-01-01

    Hydrated organic thin films are biological or synthetic molecularly thin coatings which impart a particular functionality to an underlying substrate and which have discrete water molecules associated with them. Such films ...

  16. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    organic tandem and triple-junction solar cells,? Materials,Current-matched triple-junction solar cell reaching 41.1%demonstrations of triple-junction solar cells outperforming

  17. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Improvement: Multi-Junction Solar Cells .2 Design improvement: Multi-Junction Solar Cells 2.1 LossImprovement of transparent metal top electrodes for organic solar cells

  18. Novel Isotope Effects and Organic Reaction Mechanisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Kelmara K.

    2010-07-14

    A variety of organic reactions provide experimental observations that are not explained by current models of reactivity and selectivity. This dissertation describes a combination of experimental and theoretical studies of such reactions. In the ene...

  19. Gas adsorption on metal-organic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willis, Richard R. (Cary, IL); Low, John J. (Schaumburg, IL), Faheem, Syed A. (Huntley, IL); Benin, Annabelle I. (Oak Forest, IL); Snurr, Randall Q. (Evanston, IL); Yazaydin, Ahmet Ozgur (Evanston, IL)

    2012-07-24

    The present invention involves the use of certain metal organic frameworks that have been treated with water or another metal titrant in the storage of carbon dioxide. The capacity of these frameworks is significantly increased through this treatment.

  20. Patterning Organic Electronics Based on Nanoimprint Lithography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Yi-Chen

    2014-04-25

    transferring straight-line sidewalls into the substrate. Other than straight-line sidewall patterns, this method also fabricated ring-shaped patterns including circles, squares, and concentric squares. Finally, a new structure of organic solar cells (OSCs...

  1. Whither Physical Organic Chemistry? Wither? Or Wider?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrin, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Mechanism in Organic Chemistry, Cornell University Press,Sommer, A. Molnar, Superacid Chemistry 2 ed, John Wiley, NewYork,, . C. L. Perrin, Chemistry in Britain 1972, 8, 163-

  2. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  3. DOE Organization Chart- August 7, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  4. AOML Employee Memberships in Science Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society of Agronomy Xiaolan Huang, Member Crop Science Society of America Xiaolan HuangAOML Employee Memberships in Science Organizations Cooperative Institute for Climate and Ocean) Mark Powell, Fellow Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science Silvia Garzoli

  5. Cross-domain self organizing maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fidelholtz, Estanislao L

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, I present a method for organizing and relating events represented in two domains: the transition-space domain, which focuses on change and the trajectory-space domain, which focuses on movement along paths. ...

  6. MC-CAM Research Topics Organic LEDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    materials with highly- controlled microstructures Next generation optical storage media Products based applications Novel conjugated polymers and high-conductivity organics Nanostructured materials with unique electronic, magnetic, and optical properties Chemically modified fullerenes and fullerene devices Materials

  7. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    . Example of a flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) (from the Center-inch OLED television coming on the market this fall (from LG) !" + 0-vibration couplings Luminescent materials Basic concepts of light absorption

  8. Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This analysis is an update to the Energy Efficiency Potential report completed by KEMA for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) and identifies potential energy efficiency opportunities in the residential sector on Kaua‘i (KEMA 2005).

  9. Identifying and quantifying nonconservative energy production/destruction terms in hydrostatic Boussinesq primitive equation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tailleux, Remi

    Identifying and quantifying nonconservative energy production/destruction terms in hydrostatic that physical inconsistencies between thermodynamics and dynamics usually introduce nonconservative production/destruction terms in the local total energy balance equation in numerical ocean general circulation models (OGCMs

  10. CourseDiff : a system for identifying and reporting changes to course websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopylov, Igor, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    CourseDiff is a prototype system that periodically samples course websites and notifies users via email when it identifies changes to those sites. The system was developed after conducting a study of 120 web pages from 50 ...

  11. Identifying Predictors of Instrumental and Reactive Aggression Among Low-Income Minority Adolescent Girls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williford, Anne; DePaolis, Kathryn J.

    2012-01-01

    Research on both the forms and functions of aggression has yet to include the experiences of low-income minority adolescent girls, particularly Latinas. The present study addresses this limitation by applying ecological systems theory to identify...

  12. Substrate Profiling of Cysteine Proteases Using a Combinatorial Peptide Library Identifies Functionally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craik, Charles S.

    Substrate Profiling of Cysteine Proteases Using a Combinatorial Peptide Library Identifies studied using a com- pletely diversified positional scanning synthetic combinatorial library. A bifunctional coumarin fluorophore was used that facili- tated synthesis of the library and individual peptide

  13. Identifying and Evaluating Energy Cost Reduction Opportunities for Harvesters - The Community Food Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Aaron M.

    2011-05-20

    The purpose of this project is to identify and evaluate opportunities where energy costs can be reduced for Harvesters - The Community Food Network. This is accomplished by conducting an energy audit, analyzing the data collected during the audit...

  14. Pride-asap: Automatic fragment ion annotation of identified PRIDE spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulstaert, Niels

    We present an open source software application and library written in Java that provides a uniform annotation of identified spectra stored in the PRIDE database. Pride-asap can be ran in a command line mode for automated ...

  15. Guidance for the Implementation and Follow-Up of Identified Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    identified and undertaken per Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) (42 U.S.C. 8253(f)(4) and (5)). Document also provides context for how...

  16. Student identified leadership competencies, skills, behaviors, and training needs: perspectives of college newspaper editors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowlands, Alice J.

    2006-08-16

    This study identified the leadership competencies, skills, behaviors, and training needs most critical to a college newspaper leader's success. A Web-based Delphi technique, supported by the Center for Distance Learning ...

  17. From Connectivity Models to Region Labels: Identifying Foci of a Neurological Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraman, Archana

    We propose a novel approach to identify the foci of a neurological disorder based on anatomical and functional connectivity information. Specifically, we formulate a generative model that characterizes the network of ...

  18. Acquisition LetteJ'S (AL) that remain in effect are identified...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LetteJ'S (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All odJer previously issued ALs have been supersedcd by a formal rule-making. incorporated into other guidance, andor...

  19. A principal target of human immunity to malaria identified by molecular population genetic and immunological analyses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conway, David J; Cavanagh, David R; Tanabe, K; Roper, C; Mikes, Z S; Sakihama, N; Bojang, K A; Oduola, A M J; Kremsner, P G; Arnot, D E; Greenwood, B M; McBride, J S

    New strategies are required to identify the most important targets of protective immunity in complex eukaryotic pathogens. Natural selection maintains allelic variation in some antigens of the malaria parasite Plasmodium ...

  20. The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Banks, Jo Ann; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Bowman, John L.; Gribskov, Michael; dePamphilis, Claude; Albert, Victor A.; Aono, Naoki; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Ambrose, Barbara A.; Ashton, Neil W.; Axtell, Michael J.; Barker, Elizabeth; Barker, Michael S.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Chapple, Clint; Cheng, Chaoyang; Correa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Dacre, Michael; DeBarry, Jeremy; Dreyer, Ingo; Elias, Marek; Engstrom, Eric M.; Estelle, Mark; Feng, Liang; Finet, Cedric; Floyd, Sandra K.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Fujita, Tomomichi; Gramzow, Lydia; Gutensohn, Michael; Harholt, Jesper; Hattori, Mitsuru; Heyl, Alexander; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Iwata, Mineko; Karol, Kenneth G.; Koehler, Barbara; Kolukisaoglu, Uener; Kubo, Minoru; Kurata, Tetsuya; Lalonde, Sylvie; Li, Kejie; Li, Ying; Litt, Amy; Lyons, Eric; Manning, Gerard; Maruyama, Takeshi; Michael, Todd P.; Mikami, Koji; Miyazaki, Saori; Morinaga, Shin-ichi; Murata, Takashi; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Nelson, David R.; Obara, Mari; Oguri, Yasuko; Olmstead, Richard G.; Onodera, Naoko; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Pils, Birgit; Prigge, Michael; Rensing, Stefan A.; Riano-Pachon, Diego Mauricio; Roberts, Alison W.; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Schulz, Burkhard; Schulz, Christian; Shakirov, Eugene V.; Shibagaki, Nakako; Shinohara, Naoki; Shippen, Dorothy E.; Sorensen, Iben; Sotooka, Ryo; Sugimoto, Nagisa; Sugita, Mamoru; Sumikawa, Naomi; Tanurdzic, Milos; Theilsen, Gunter; Ulvskov, Peter; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Weng, Jing-Ke; Willats, William W.G.T.; Wipf, Daniel; Wolf, Paul G.; Yang, Lixing; Zimmer, Andreas D.; Zhu, Qihui; Mitros, Therese; Hellsten, Uffe; Loque, Dominique; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shapiro, Harris; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution