National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for organic nonfossil material

  1. Role of non-fossil energy in meeting China's energy and climate target for 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Tong, Qing; Yu, Sha; Wang, Yu; Chai, Qimin; Zhang, Xiliang

    2012-12-01

    China is the largest energy consumer and CO2 emitter in the world. The Chinese government faces growing challenges of ensuring energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To address these two issues, the Chinese government has announced two ambitious domestic indicative autonomous mitigation targets for 2020: increasing the ratio of non-fossil energy to 15% and reducing carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP by 40-45% from 2005 levels. To explore the role of non-fossil energy in achieving these two targets, this paper first provides an overview of current status of non-fossil energy development in China; then gives a brief review of GDP and primary energy consumption; next assesses in detail the role of the non fossil energy in 2020, including the installed capacity and electricity generation of non-fossil energy sources, the share and role of non-fossil energy in the electricity structure, emissions reduction resulting from the shift to non-fossil energy, and challenges for accomplishing the mitigation targets in 2020 ; finally, conclusions and policy measures for non-fossil energy development are proposed.

  2. Can 3-D models explain the observed fractions of fossil and non-fossil carbon in and near Mexico City?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodzic, Alma; Jimenez, Jose L.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Szidat, S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Madronich, Sasha

    2010-11-25

    Abstract. A 3-D chemistry-transport model has been applied to the Mexico City metropolitan area to investigate the origin of elevated levels of non-fossil (NF) carbonaceous aerosols observed in this highly urbanized region. High time resolution measurements of the fine aerosol concentration and composition, and 12 or 24 h integrated 14C measurements of aerosol modern carbon have been performed in and near Mexico City during the March 2006 MILAGRO field experiment. The non-fossil carbon fraction (fNF), which is lower than the measured modern fraction (fM) due to the elevated 14C in the atmosphere caused by nuclear bomb testing, is estimated from the measured fM and the source-dependent information on modern carbon enrichment. The fNF contained in PM1 total carbon analyzed by a US team (f TC NF ) ranged from 0.37 to 0.67 at the downtown location, and from 0.50 to 0.86 at the suburban site. Substantially lower values (i.e. 0.24–0.49) were found for PM10 filters downtown by an independent set of measurements (Swiss team), which are inconsistent with the modeled and known differences between the size ranges, suggesting higher than expected uncertainties in the measurement techniques of 14C. An increase in the non-fossil organic carbon (OC) fraction (f OC NF ) by 0.10–0.15 was observed for both sets of filters during periods with enhanced wildfire activity in comparison to periods when fires were suppressed by rain, which is consistent with the wildfire impacts estimated with other methods. Model results show that the relatively high fraction of nonfossil carbon found in Mexico City seems to arise from the combination in about equal proportions of regional biogenic SOA, biomass burning POA and SOA, as well as non-fossil urban POA and SOA. Predicted spatial and temporal variations for f OC NF are similar to those in the measurements between the urban vs. suburban sites, and high-fire vs. low-fire periods. The absolute modeled values of f OC NF are consistent with the Swiss dataset but lower than the US dataset. Resolving the 14C measurement discrepancies is necessary for further progress in model evaluation. The model simulations that included secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from semi-volatile and intermediate volatility (S/IVOC) vapors showed improved closure for the total OA mass compared to simulations which only included SOA from VOCs, providing a more realistic basis to evaluate the fNF predictions. f OC NF urban sources of modern carbon are important in reducing or removing the difference in fNF between model and measurements, even though they are often neglected on the interpretation of 14C datasets. An underprediction of biomass burning POA by the model during some mornings also explains a part of the model-measurement differences. The fNF of urban POA and SOA precursors is an important parameter that needs to be better constrained by measurements. Performing faster ( 3 h) 14C measurements in future campaigns is critical to further progress in this area. To our knowledge this is the first time that radiocarbon measurements are used together with aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) organic components to assess the performance of a regional model for organic aerosols.

  3. Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sealock, Jr., L. John (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250.degree. C. to 500.degree. C. and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials.

  4. Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1997-05-20

    A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250 to 500 C and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials. 7 figs.

  5. Supporting Organizations | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL. ORNL is home to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), and our materials program works with the Neutron Sciences staff at these...

  6. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    . Example of a flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) (from the Center-inch OLED television coming on the market this fall (from LG) !" + 0-vibration couplings Luminescent materials Basic concepts of light absorption

  7. Hopping charge transport in organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novikov, S V

    2013-01-01

    General properties of the transport of charge carriers (electrons and holes) in disordered organic materials are discussed. It was demonstrated that the dominant part of the total energetic disorder in organic material is usually provided by the electrostatic disorder, generated by randomly located and oriented dipoles and quadrupoles. For this reason this disorder is strongly spatially correlated. Spatial correlation directly governs the field dependence of the carrier drift mobility. Shape of the current transients, which is of primary importance for a correct determination of the carrier mobility, is considered. A notable feature of the electrostatic disorder is its modification in the vicinity of the electrode, and this modification takes place without modification of the structure of the material. It is shown how this phenomenon affects characteristics of the charge injection. We consider also effect of inter-charge interaction on charge transport.

  8. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

    1995-05-02

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

  9. Bridged polygermsesquioxanes. Organically modified germanium oxide materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, G.M.; Loy, D.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Shea, K.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Sol-gel processed polysilsesquioxanes are hybrid organic-inorganic materials with potential applications as photoresists, membranes, or catalytic supports. Hydrolytic conversion of trichloro- or trialkoxysilanes often leads to amorphous or crystalline oligosilsesquioxanes instead of high polymers. In light of the intimate dependence of polysilsesquioxane properties of tightly controlled reaction conditions and processing, recent emphasis has been placed on control of polymer microarchitecture via the introduction of arylene-, acetylene-, and alkylene-bridging groups. Another strategy for modifying the properties of hybrid organic-inorganic polymers is to substitute a group IVA metal, such as germanium, for silicon. The authors report the synthesis and characterization of bifunctional hexylene-bridged organogermanium monomers X[sub 3]Ge-(CH[sub 2])[sub 6]GeX[sub 3] (X = Cl; OEt) and the formation of polymeric materials through sol-gel hydrolysis-condensation of the monomers. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Metal-organic framework materials with ultrahigh surface areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Wilmer, Christopher E.; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Snurr, Randall Q.; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Borah, Bhaskarjyoti

    2015-12-22

    A metal organic framework (MOF) material including a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area greater than 7,010 m.sup.2/g. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bond. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including three types of cuboctahedron cages fused to provide continuous channels. Also a method of making a metal organic framework (MOF) material including saponifying hexaester precursors having alkyne bonds to form a plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bonds and performing a solvothermal reaction with the plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers and one or more metal containing compounds to form the MOF material.

  11. Porous Materials -Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    the composition, assembly, properties, and reactivity of matter (atoms, molecules, materials) · Chemistry? · Chemists make compounds and materials ­ Synthetic chemistry · Measure properties of materials ­ Analytical domestic resources Renewable (biomass, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) Fossil fuels (coal ,natural gas

  12. Dynamics of excitons and charges in organic materials and semiconducto...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The seminar will report studies on excitons and charge carriers in conjugated polymers, covalent organic frameworks and semiconductor nanocrystals. These materials have...

  13. X-ray characterization of solid small molecule organic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billinge, Simon; Shankland, Kenneth; Shankland, Norman; Florence, Alastair

    2014-06-10

    The present invention provides, inter alia, methods of characterizing a small molecule organic material, e.g., a drug or a drug product. This method includes subjecting the solid small molecule organic material to x-ray total scattering analysis at a short wavelength, collecting data generated thereby, and mathematically transforming the data to provide a refined set of data.

  14. Bridged polysilsesquioxanes. Highly porous hybrid organic-inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Properties of Organic Materials Dept.; Shea, K.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-07-01

    This contribution reviews a new family of inorganic-organic hybrid materials that are assembled by sol-gel polymerization of polyfunctional molecular building blocks. These bridged polysilsesquioxanes are three-dimensional network materials that are distinguished by incorporation of an organic fragment as an integral component of the network. The intimate association of the organic and inorganic phase, a true molecular composite, coupled with the variability of the organic component, permits engineering of both chemical and physical properties of the material. The paper reviews bridged polysilsesquioxanes, arylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes, alkylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes; and their applications.

  15. Phase of atmospheric secondary organic material affects its reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the reactivity of atmospheric SOM particles. atmospheric chemistry chemical aging organic aerosol collectionPhase of atmospheric secondary organic material affects its reactivity Mikinori Kuwata and Scot T of atmospheric organic particles among solid, semisolid, and liquid phases is of keen current scientific interest

  16. Elastomeric organic material for switching application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiju, K., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com; Praveen, T., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com; Preedep, P., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com [Laboratory for Molecular Photonics and Electronics (LAMP), Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala, 673601 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Organic Electronic devices like OLED, Organic Solar Cells etc are promising as, cost effective alternatives to their inorganic counterparts due to various reasons. However the organic semiconductors currently available are not attractive with respect to their high cost and intricate synthesis protocols. Here we demonstrate that Natural Rubber has the potential to become a cost effective solution to this. Here an attempt has been made to fabricate iodine doped poly isoprene based switching device. In this work Poly methyl methacrylate is used as dielectric layer and Aluminium are employed as electrodes.

  17. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, P.F.; Pinching Maness.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer. 3 figures.

  18. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO); Maness, Pin-Ching (Golden, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer.

  19. 1. Lignocellulosic materials Lignocellulose is a renewable organic material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Wensheng

    aromatic biopolymer on Earth, is extremely recalcitrant to degradation. By linking to both hemicellulose to degrade lignin efficiently using a combination of extracellular ligninolytic enzymes, organic acids. These enzymes include phenol oxidase (laccase) and heme peroxidases [lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese

  20. Lithium-based inorganic-organic framework materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeung, Hamish Hei-Man

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation describes research into lithium-based inorganic-organic frameworks, which has led to an increased understanding of the structural diversity and properties of these materials. The crystal structures of 11 new forms of lithium...

  1. High mobility high efficiency organic films based on pure organic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Rhonda F. (Ann Arbor, MI); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2009-01-27

    A method of purifying small molecule organic material, performed as a series of operations beginning with a first sample of the organic small molecule material. The first step is to purify the organic small molecule material by thermal gradient sublimation. The second step is to test the purity of at least one sample from the purified organic small molecule material by spectroscopy. The third step is to repeat the first through third steps on the purified small molecule material if the spectroscopic testing reveals any peaks exceeding a threshold percentage of a magnitude of a characteristic peak of a target organic small molecule. The steps are performed at least twice. The threshold percentage is at most 10%. Preferably the threshold percentage is 5% and more preferably 2%. The threshold percentage may be selected based on the spectra of past samples that achieved target performance characteristics in finished devices.

  2. Organic light emitting device architecture for reducing the number of organic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Andrade, Brian (Westampton, NJ); Esler, James (Levittown, PA)

    2011-10-18

    An organic light emitting device is provided. The device includes an anode and a cathode. A first emissive layer is disposed between the anode and the cathode. The first emissive layer includes a first non-emitting organic material, which is an organometallic material present in the first emissive layer in a concentration of at least 50 wt %. The first emissive layer also includes a first emitting organic material. A second emissive layer is disposed between the first emissive layer and the cathode, preferably, in direct contact with the first emissive layer. The second emissive material includes a second non-emitting organic material and a second emitting organic material. The first and second non-emitting materials, and the first and second emitting materials, are all different materials. A first non-emissive layer is disposed between the first emissive layer and the anode, and in direct contact with the first emissive layer. The first non- emissive layer comprises the first non-emissive organic material.

  3. Center Organization | Center for Energy Efficient Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1,Center Organization People People Scientific

  4. Photoconversion of organic materials into single-cell protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Paul F. (13130 W. 66th Pl., Golden, CO 80401)

    2001-01-01

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into sterile, high-grade bacterial protein suitable for use an animal feed or human food supplements. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide, hydrogen and nitrogen products, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material, which can be as high as 65% protein. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for food production under zero-gravity or extra-terrestrial conditions.

  5. Organic materials and devices for detecting ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, F. Patrick (Livermore, CA); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-03-06

    A .pi.-conjugated organic material for detecting ionizing radiation, and particularly for detecting low energy fission neutrons. The .pi.-conjugated materials comprise a class of organic materials whose members are intrinsic semiconducting materials. Included in this class are .pi.-conjugated polymers, polyaromatic hydrocarbon molecules, and quinolates. Because of their high resistivities (.gtoreq.10.sup.9 ohmcm), these .pi.-conjugated organic materials exhibit very low leakage currents. A device for detecting and measuring ionizing radiation can be made by applying an electric field to a layer of the .pi.-conjugated polymer material to measure electron/hole pair formation. A layer of the .pi.-conjugated polymer material can be made by conventional polymer fabrication methods and can be cast into sheets capable of covering large areas. These sheets of polymer radiation detector material can be deposited between flexible electrodes and rolled up to form a radiation detector occupying a small volume but having a large surface area. The semiconducting polymer material can be easily fabricated in layers about 10 .mu.m to 100 .mu.m thick. These thin polymer layers and their associated electrodes can be stacked to form unique multi-layer detector arrangements that occupy small volume.

  6. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Next Generation Technologies in Stimulus-Responsive Materials and Organic Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unruh, Jr, David Allen

    2011-01-01

    Building Blocks in Organic Electronics Abstract The donor-performing organic electronics. Inspired by the desirableMaterials and Organic Electronics by David Allen Unruh, Jr.

  7. Supplementary material1 Water-Soluble Organic Aerosol Material and the Light-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Supplementary material1 2 3 4 Water-Soluble Organic Aerosol Material and the Light-5 Absorption., (2010) Fig. 1S.36 37 Reference38 Zhang, X., A. Hecobian, M. Zheng, N. Frank, and R. J. Weber, Biomass measurements,40 MODIS fire counts and PMF analysis, Atm. Chem. Phys. Disc., 10, 7037-7077, 2010.41 42 #12;2 1 2

  8. Supplementary Material1 Characterization of Organic Aerosol Produced during2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    mass spectra of a dominant type (coal) of ambient aerosol in Shanghai using2 ATOFMS (m/z from 1501 Supplementary Material1 Characterization of Organic Aerosol Produced during2 Pulverized Coal diagram of combustion process of a single coal particle5 6 #12;3 10 100 10 3 10 4 10 5 Oxygen/coal ratio

  9. Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.A.; Miron, Y.

    1994-01-01

    To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

  10. Induced patterning of organic and inorganic materials by spatially discrete surface energy Walter Hu,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wenchuang "Walter"

    Induced patterning of organic and inorganic materials by spatially discrete surface energy Walter surface energies on the substrate induce microfluidic self-patterning of materials that are deposited but spatially organized nanostructures both in organic and inorganic materials. Available methods are mainly

  11. The Development of Semiconducting Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Jessica D.

    2013-01-01

    the heterojunction. Organic solar cells operate through thisprocess in excitonic, organic solar cells occurs within thepolymer for use in BHJ organic solar cells. We demonstrated

  12. The Development of Semiconducting Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Jessica D.

    2013-01-01

    F. C. ; Norrman, K. Prog. Photovoltaics 2007, 15, 697–712.Processed Organic Photovoltaics that Generate Chargepolymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have attracted

  13. Society for American Archaeology Raw-Material Availability and the Organization of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Society for American Archaeology Raw-Material Availability and the Organization of Technology to American Antiquity. http://www.jstor.org #12;RAW-MATERIAL AVAILABILITY AND THE ORGANIZATION OF TECHNOLOGY such as abundance and quality oflithic raw materials condition the production offormal- vs. informal-tool types

  14. High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coburn, Thomas T. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

  15. A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coburn, T.T.

    1988-07-26

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

  16. Structured organic materials and devices using low-energy particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vardeny, Z. Valy; Li, Sergey; Delong, Matthew C.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2005-09-13

    Organic materials exposed to an electron beam for patterning a substrate (1) to make an optoelectronic organic device which includes a source, a drain, gate dielectric layer (4), and a substrate for emitting light.

  17. Polymer and carbon nanotube materials for chemical sensors and organic electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    This thesis details the development of new materials for high-performance chemical sensing as well as organic electronic applications. In Chapter 2, we develop a chemiresistive material based on single-walled carbon nanotubes ...

  18. Mexico city aerosol analysis during MILAGRO using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry at the urban supersite (T0) - Part 2: Analysis of the biomass burning contribution and the non-fossil carbon fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aiken, A.C.; Wang, J.; de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Wehrli, M. N.; Szidat, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Noda, J.; Wacker, L.; Volkamer, R.; Fortner, E.; Laskin, A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.; Querol, X.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-16

    Submicron aerosol was analyzed during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City with a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and complementary instrumentation. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) of high resolution AMS spectra identified a biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) component, which includes several large plumes that appear to be from forest fires within the region. Here, we show that the AMS BBOA concentration at T0 correlates with fire counts in the vicinity of Mexico City and that most of the BBOA variability is captured when the FLEXPART model is used for the dispersion of fire emissions as estimated from satellite fire counts. The resulting FLEXPART fire impact factor (FIF) correlates well with the observed BBOA, acetonitrile (CH3CN), levoglucosan, and potassium, indicating that wildfires in the region surrounding Mexico City are the dominant source of BBOA at T0 during MILAGRO. The impact of distant BB sources such as the Yucatan is small during this period. All fire tracers are correlated, with BBOA and levoglucosan showing little background, acetonitrile having a well-known tropospheric background of {approx}100-150 pptv, and PM2.5 potassium having a background of {approx}160 ng m3 (two-thirds of its average concentration), which does not appear to be related to BB sources. We define two high fire periods based on satellite fire counts and FLEXPART-predicted FIFs. We then compare these periods with a low fire period when the impact of regional fires is about a factor of 5 smaller. Fire tracers are very elevated in the high fire periods whereas tracers of urban pollution do not change between these periods. Dust is also elevated during the high BB period but this appears to be coincidental due to the drier conditions and not driven by direct dust emission from the fires. The AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) factor (OOA, mostly secondary OA or SOA) does not show an increase during the fire periods or a correlation with fire counts, FLEXPART-predicted FIFs or fire tracers, indicating that it is dominated by urban and/or regional sources and not by the fires near the MCMA. A new 14C aerosol dataset is presented. Both this new and a previously published dataset of 14C analysis suggest a similar BBOA contribution as the AMS and chemical mass balance (CMB), resulting in 13% higher non-fossil carbon during the high vs. low regional fire periods. The new dataset has {approx}15% more fossil carbon on average than the previously published one, and possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. During the low regional fire period, 38% of organic carbon (OC) and 28% total carbon (TC) are from non-fossil sources, suggesting the importance of urban and regional non-fossil carbon sources other than the fires, such as food cooking and regional biogenic SOA. The ambient BBOA/CH3CN ratio is much higher in the afternoon when the wildfires are most intense than during the rest of the day. Also, there are large differences in the contributions of the different OA components to the surface concentrations vs. the integrated column amounts. Both facts may explain some apparent disagreements between BB impacts estimated from afternoon aircraft flights vs. those from 24-h ground measurements. We show that by properly accounting for the non-BB sources of K, all of the BB PM estimates from MILAGRO can be reconciled. Overall, the fires from the region near the MCMA are estimated to contribute 15-23% of the OA and 7-9% of the fine PM at T0 during MILAGRO, and 2-3% of the fine PM as an annual average. The 2006 MCMA emissions inventory contains a substantially lower impact of the forest fire emissions, although a fraction of these emissions occur just outside of the MCMA inventory area.

  19. Synthesis and Hydrogen Sorption Properties of Carborane Based Metal-Organic Framework Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synthesis and Hydrogen Sorption Properties of Carborane Based Metal-Organic Framework Materials@northwestern.edu Tailorable inorganic coordination polymers,1-7 in particular, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)2-7 comprise an important emerging class of materials. They are noteworthy for their structural and chemical diversity, high

  20. Mn-Substituted Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials Based on ZnSe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Mn-Substituted Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials Based on ZnSe: Nanostructures That May Lead research that deals with synthesis, characterization, and modification of organic-inorganic hybrid to integrate functional materials that utilize both electron charge and spin.1 Thus, the introduction

  1. Micromachined printheads for the direct evaporative patterning of organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leblanc, Valérie, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    Organic optoelectronic devices are appealing for low-performance applications on very low cost and flexible substrates, due to their low-temperature processing. However, it still remains a challenge to develop suitable ...

  2. Programming reality: From Transitive Materials to organic user interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coelho, Marcelo

    Over the past few years, a quiet revolution has been redefining our fundamental computing technologies. Flexible E-Ink, OLED displays, shape-changing materials, parametric design, e-textiles, sensor networks, and intelligent ...

  3. Methods for associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework, systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks, thermal energy transfer assemblies, and methods for transferring thermal energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrail, B. Peter; Brown, Daryl R.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-08-05

    Methods for releasing associated guest materials from a metal organic framework are provided. Methods for associating guest materials with a metal organic framework are also provided. Methods are provided for selectively associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework. Systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks are provided. Thermal energy transfer assemblies are provided. Methods for transferring thermal energy are also provided.

  4. Microporous Materials Strategies for Hydrogen Storage in MetalOrganic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    efficiency fuel-cell power sources. The vehicles should have a similar range (480 km or 300 miles), operate times the gravimetric energy density of petrol, and fuel cells are expected to perform at least twice at improving hydrogen uptake in these materials is presented. These strategies include the optimization of pore

  5. Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories annual report, fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, D.R.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1993. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

  6. Physical properties and design of light-emitting devices based on organic materials and nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anikeeva, Polina Olegovna

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the detailed experimental and theoretical characterization of light-emitting devices (LEDs) based on organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots (QDs). This hybrid material system has several ...

  7. Bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels: A molecular based approach for the preparation of porous hybrid organic-inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small, J.H.; Shea, K.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Bridged polysilsesquioxanes represent an interesting family of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials. It has been shown that manipulation of the organic bridging component offers the potential for the synthesis of a variety of materials with a range of surface areas and porosities. In addition, incorporation of a heteroatom within the bridging organic component allows for further chemical transformation of the polysilsesquioxane material.

  8. Pattern Replication in Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nedelcu, Mihaela

    2014-05-27

    solar cells discovered in 1927 gave less than 1 % e?ciency. R. Ohl developed solar cells with 6 % energy-conversion e?ciency when used under sun light. GaAs solar cells developed in the United States have 17 % e?ciency. Since the photovoltaic effect... have been used as semiconductors in solar cell devices. They initially looked very promising, but the complexity of the material has been found to lead to complications in thin- film devices [33]. The p-n junction of thin-film solar cells based on Cd...

  9. Hybrid metal organic scintillator materials system and particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauer, Christina A.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Doty, F. Patrick; Simmons, Blake A.

    2011-07-26

    We describe the preparation and characterization of two zinc hybrid luminescent structures based on the flexible and emissive linker molecule, trans-(4-R,4'-R') stilbene, where R and R' are mono- or poly-coordinating groups, which retain their luminescence within these solid materials. For example, reaction of trans-4,4'-stilbenedicarboxylic acid and zinc nitrate in the solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) yielded a dense 2-D network featuring zinc in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination environments connected by trans-stilbene links. Similar reaction in diethylformamide (DEF) at higher temperatures resulted in a porous, 3-D framework structure consisting of two interpenetrating cubic lattices, each featuring basic to zinc carboxylate vertices joined by trans-stilbene, analogous to the isoreticular MOF (IRMOF) series. We demonstrate that the optical properties of both embodiments correlate directly with the local ligand environments observed in the crystal structures. We further demonstrate that these materials produce high luminescent response to proton radiation and high radiation tolerance relative to prior scintillators. These features can be used to create sophisticated scintillating detection sensors.

  10. Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage Long Pan coordination structures represent a promising new entry to the field of hydrogen storage materials.2 To fully that effectively store hydrogen are needed for use in fuel cell powered vehicles. Among the various candidate

  11. High Efficiency White Organic Light Emission Device Based On New Orange Phosphorescence Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Efficiency White Organic Light Emission Device Based On New Orange Phosphorescence Material University, Kowloon, Hong Kong ABSTRACT White light emitting device based on a new orange phosphorescent fabricated. The white OLED consists of it and a blue phosphorescent material FIrPic (iridum-bis(4

  12. Method for the catalytic conversion of organic materials into a product gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Sealock, Jr., L. John (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    A method for converting organic material into a product gas includes: a) providing a liquid reactant mixture containing liquid water and liquid organic material within a pressure reactor; b) providing an effective amount of a reduced metal catalyst selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, osmium and iridium or mixtures thereof within the pressure reactor; and c) maintaining the liquid reactant mixture and effective amount of reduced metal catalyst in the pressure reactor at temperature and pressure conditions of from about 300.degree. C. to about 450.degree. C.; and at least 130 atmospheres for a period of time, the temperature and pressure conditions being effective to maintain the reactant mixture substantially as liquid, the effective amount of reduced metal catalyst and the period of time being sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the liquid organic material to produce a product gas composed primarily of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

  13. Method for the catalytic conversion of organic materials into a product gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.

    1997-04-01

    A method for converting organic material into a product gas includes: (a) providing a liquid reactant mixture containing liquid water and liquid organic material within a pressure reactor; (b) providing an effective amount of a reduced metal catalyst selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, osmium and iridium or mixtures thereof within the pressure reactor; and (c) maintaining the liquid reactant mixture and effective amount of reduced metal catalyst in the pressure reactor at temperature and pressure conditions of from about 300 C to about 450 C; and at least 130 atmospheres for a period of time, the temperature and pressure conditions being effective to maintain the reactant mixture substantially as liquid, the effective amount of reduced metal catalyst and the period of time being sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the liquid organic material to produce a product gas composed primarily of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. 5 figs.

  14. Diffraction Studies from Minerals to Organics - Lessons Learned from Materials Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, Pamela S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In many regards the study of materials and minerals by powder diffraction techniques are complimentary, with techniques honed in one field equally applicable to the other. As a long-time materials researcher many of the examples are of techniques developed for materials analysis applied to minerals. However in a couple of cases the study of new minerals was the initiation into techniques later used in materials-based studies. Hopefully they will show that the study of new minerals structures can provide opportunities to add new methodologies and approaches to future problems. In keeping with the AXAA many of the examples have an Australian connection, the materials ranging from organics to battery materials.

  15. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Min

    2011-11-30

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to other OLEDs' attributes such as mechanical flexibility and potential low cost), the OLED technology is promising to successfully compete with current technologies, such as LCDs and inorganic LEDs.

  16. What is compost? Composting refers to biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    What is compost? Composting refers to biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under aerobic conditions (in the presence of oxygen). During the composting is production of good-quality compost that is biologically stable, relatively uniform in appearance, free

  17. SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL Fossil versus contemporary sources of fine elemental and organic carbonaceous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL Fossil versus contemporary sources of fine elemental and organic/OC ratios for biomass burning emissions. SW: softwood; HW hardwood. Reference Notes (EC/OC)bbe unc (EC., 2010 forest fire 0.043 Chow et al., 2010 wild

  18. Materials Science and Engineering A 384 (2004) 3546 Self organization of shear bands in stainless steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Marc A.

    2004-01-01

    12 May 2004 Abstract The spatial distribution of shear bands was investigated in 304L stainless steelMaterials Science and Engineering A 384 (2004) 35­46 Self organization of shear bands in stainless steel Q. Xue, M.A. Meyers, V.F. Nesterenko Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  19. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  20. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

  1. Development and Utilization of Host Materials for White Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Ching; Chen, Shaw

    2013-05-31

    Our project was primarily focused on the MYPP 2015 goal for white phosphorescent organic devices (PhOLEDs or phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes) for solid-state lighting with long lifetimes and high efficiencies. Our central activity was to synthesize and evaluate a new class of host materials for blue phosphors in the PhOLEDs, known to be a weak link in the device operating lifetime. The work was a collaborative effort between three groups, one primarily responsible for chemical design and characterization (Chen), one primarily responsible for device development (Tang) and one primarily responsible for mechanistic studies and degradation analysis (Rothberg). The host materials were designed with a novel architecture that chemically links groups with good ability to move electrons with those having good ability to move “holes” (positive charges), the main premise being that we could suppress the instability associated with physical separation and crystallization of the electron conducting and hole conducting materials that might cause the devices to fail. We found that these materials do prevent crystallization and that this will increase device lifetimes but that efficiencies were reduced substantially due to interactions between the materials creating new low energy “charge transfer” states that are non-luminescent. Therefore, while our proposed strategy could in principle improve device lifetimes, we were unable to find a materials combination where the efficiency was not substantially compromised. In the course of our project, we made several important contributions that are peripherally related to the main project goal. First, we were able to prepare the proposed new family of materials and develop synthetic routes to make them efficiently. These types of materials that can transport both electrons and holes may yet have important roles to play in organic device technology. Second we developed an important new method for controlling the deposition profile of material so that arbitrary concentration gradients can be implemented in layers with mixed composition. These concentration profiles are known to increase device efficiency and longevity and we confirmed that experimentally. Third, we investigated a new method for analyzing degradation in devices using mass spectrometry to look for degradation products. We showed that these methods are not simple to interpret unambiguously and need to be used with caution.

  2. Neural network system and methods for analysis of organic materials and structures using spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, B.J.; Sellers, J.P.; Thomsen, J.U.

    1993-06-08

    Apparatus and processes are described for recognizing and identifying materials. Characteristic spectra are obtained for the materials via spectroscopy techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared absorption analysis, x-ray analysis, mass spectroscopy and gas chromatography. Desired portions of the spectra may be selected and then placed in proper form and format for presentation to a number of input layer neurons in an offline neural network. The network is first trained according to a predetermined training process; it may then be employed to identify particular materials. Such apparatus and processes are particularly useful for recognizing and identifying organic compounds such as complex carbohydrates, whose spectra conventionally require a high level of training and many hours of hard work to identify, and are frequently indistinguishable from one another by human interpretation.

  3. Neural network system and methods for analysis of organic materials and structures using spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Bernd J. (Athens, GA); Sellers, Jeffrey P. (Suwanee, GA); Thomsen, Jan U. (Fredricksberg, DK)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and processes for recognizing and identifying materials. Characteristic spectra are obtained for the materials via spectroscopy techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared absorption analysis, x-ray analysis, mass spectroscopy and gas chromatography. Desired portions of the spectra may be selected and then placed in proper form and format for presentation to a number of input layer neurons in an offline neural network. The network is first trained according to a predetermined training process; it may then be employed to identify particular materials. Such apparatus and processes are particularly useful for recognizing and identifying organic compounds such as complex carbohydrates, whose spectra conventionally require a high level of training and many hours of hard work to identify, and are frequently indistinguishable from one another by human interpretation.

  4. Creating a Discovery Platform for Confined-Space Chemistry and Materials: Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Greathouse, Jeffery A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Simmons, Blake

    2008-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) are a recently discovered class of nanoporous, defect-free crystalline materials that enable rational design and exploration of porous materials at the molecular level. MOFs have tunable monolithic pore sizes and cavity environments due to their crystalline nature, yielding properties exceeding those of most other porous materials. These include: the lowest known density (91% free space); highest surface area; tunable photoluminescence; selective molecular adsorption; and methane sorption rivaling gas cylinders. These properties are achieved by coupling inorganic metal complexes such as ZnO4 with tunable organic ligands that serve as struts, allowing facile manipulation of pore size and surface area through reactant selection. MOFs thus provide a discovery platform for generating both new understanding of chemistry in confined spaces and novel sensors and devices based on their unique properties. At the outset of this project in FY06, virtually nothing was known about how to couple MOFs to substrates and the science of MOF properties and how to tune them was in its infancy. An integrated approach was needed to establish the required knowledge base for nanoscale design and develop methodologies integrate MOFs with other materials. This report summarizes the key accomplishments of this project, which include creation of a new class of radiation detection materials based on MOFs, luminescent MOFs for chemical detection, use of MOFs as templates to create nanoparticles of hydrogen storage materials, MOF coatings for stress-based chemical detection using microcantilevers, and %22flexible%22 force fields that account for structural changes in MOFs that occur upon molecular adsorption/desorption. Eight journal articles, twenty presentations at scientific conferences, and two patent applications resulted from the work. The project created a basis for continuing development of MOFs for many Sandia applications and succeeded in securing %242.75 M in funding from outside agencies to continue the research. 3

  5. Water Adsorption in Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furukawa, H; Gandara, F; Zhang, YB; Jiang, JC; Queen, WL; Hudson, MR; Yaghi, OM

    2014-03-19

    Water adsorption in porous materials is important for many applications such as dehumidification, thermal batteries, and delivery of drinking water in remote areas. In this study, we have identified three criteria for achieving high performing porous materials for water adsorption. These criteria deal with condensation pressure of water in the pores, uptake capacity, and recyclability and water stability of the material. In search of an excellently performing porous material, we have studied and compared the water adsorption properties of 23 materials, 20 of which are metal organic frameworks (MOFs). Among the MOFs are 10 zirconium(IV) MOFs with a subset of these, MOF-801-SC (single crystal form), -802, -805, -806, -808, -812, and -841 reported for the first time. MOF-801-P (microcrystalline powder form) was reported earlier and studied here for its water adsorption properties. MOF-812 was only made and structurally characterized but not examined for water adsorption because it is a byproduct of MOF-841 synthesis. All the new zirconium MOFs are made from the Zr6O4(OH)(4)(-CO2)(n) secondary building units (n = 6, 8, 10, or 12) and variously shaped carboxyl organic linkers to make extended porous frameworks. The permanent porosity of all 23 materials was confirmed and their water adsorption measured to reveal that MOF-801-P and MOF-841 are the highest performers based on the three criteria stated above; they are water stable, do not lose capacity after five adsorption/desorption cycles, and are easily regenerated at room temperature. An X-ray single-crystal study and a powder neutron diffraction study reveal the position of the water adsorption sites in MOF-801 and highlight the importance of the intermolecular interaction between adsorbed water molecules within the pores.

  6. Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, Robert A. (Aiken, SC); Smith, James R. (Corrales, NM); Ramsey, William G. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Bickford, Dennis F. (Folly Beach, SC)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

  7. Separation of C2 Hydrocarbons by Porous Materials: Metal Organic Frameworks as Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Debasis; Liu, Jun; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-12-22

    The effective separation of small hydrocarbon molecules (C1 – C4) is an important process for petroleum industry, determining the end price of many essential commodities in our daily lives. Current technologies for separation of these molecules rely on energy intensive fractional distillation processes at cryogenic temperature, which is particularly difficult because of their similar volatility. In retrospect, adsorptive separation using solid state adsorbents might be a cost effective alternative. Several types of solid state adsorbents (e.g. zeolite molecular sieves) were tested for separation of small hydrocarbon molecules as a function of pressure, temperature or vacuum. Among different types of plausible adsorbents, metal organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of porous, crystalline, inorganic-organic hybrid materials, is particularly promising. In this brief comment article, we discuss the separation properties of different types of solid state adsorbents, with a particular emphasis on MOF based adsorbents for separation of C2 hydrocarbon molecules.

  8. Highly efficient organic multi-junction solar cells with a thiophene based donor material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meerheim, Rico Körner, Christian; Leo, Karl

    2014-08-11

    The efficiency of organic solar cells can be increased by serial stacked subcells even upon using the same absorber material. For the multi-junction devices presented here, we use the small molecule donor material DCV5T-Me. The subcell currents were matched by optical transfer matrix simulation, allowing an efficiency increase from 8.3% for a single junction up to 9.7% for a triple junction cell. The external quantum efficiency of the subcells, measured under appropriate light bias illumination, is spectrally shifted due to the microcavity of the complete stack, resulting in a broadband response and an increased cell current. The increase of the power conversion efficiency upon device stacking is even stronger for large area cells due to higher influence of the resistance of the indium tin oxide anode, emphasizing the advantage of multi-junction devices for large-area applications.

  9. Sol-gel synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Hexylene- and phenylene-bridged polysiloxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Baugher, B.M.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Shea, K.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    New highly cross-linked polysiloxanes were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of 1,6-bis(diethoxymethylsilyl)hexane (1) and 1,4-bis(diethoxymethylsilyl)benzene (2). Hydrolysis and condensation of 1 and 2 under acidic and basic conditions with 4 equiv of water led to the rapid formation of hexylene- and phenylene-bridged polysiloxane gels. The dry gels (xerogels) were intractable, insoluble materials that were noticeably hydrophobic, exhibiting no swelling in organic solvents or water. Most of the xerogels were high surface area, mesoporous materials. Hexylene-bridged polysiloxanes prepared under acidic conditions were always nonporous regardless of whether they were processed to afford xerogels or supercritically dried as aerogels. Hexylene-bridged polysiloxanes prepared under basic conditions and all of the phenylene-bridged polysiloxanes were mesoporous with surface areas as high as 1025 m{sup 2}/g. 35 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 21, 2002, 251 255 Organic-inorganic sol-gel coating for corrosion protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 21, 2002, 251­ 255 Organic-inorganic sol-gel coating or coatings. Through the modification of chemical composition of the coatings, such protec- tive coatings can strength and hydrophobicity. Various organic coatings have been studied for corrosion protection [4

  11. Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaeh, R.A.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

  12. Adsorption and desorption of atrazine and deethylatrazine by low organic carbon geologic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The adsorption and desorption of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6- isopropylamino-s-triazine) and a primary metabolite, deethylatrazine (2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine; DEA), by low organic C ({le} 3.3 g kg{sup -1}) materials were measured by batch-equilibrium techniques. The adsorbents were samples of glacial outwash sand, till, and stream sediments. The adsorption of both atrazine and DEA conformed to linear isotherms. The adsorption of atrazine by most of the absorbents yielded apparent K, values that were in excess of those based on surface agricultural soils. Adsorption correlated with only the pH of the sand-water suspensions. The desorption of atrazine was hysteretic under the conditions of the measurement. DEA had a lower affinity for the same adsorbents; the mean ratio of Kd values of DEA to those of atrazine was 0.37 {+-} 0.20. DEA adsorption did not correlate with organic C, surface area, clay content of the adsorbents, or with the pH of the suspensions. DEA adsorption, unlike atrazine, tended to be reversible. There was a linear relationship between the adsorption constants of atrazine and those of DEA. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Catalysts for the hydrodenitrogenation of organic materials and process for the preparation of the catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, R.M.; Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B. Jr.

    1987-12-29

    A process is described for the preparation of a multimetallic catalyst for the hydrodenitrogenation of an organic feedstock, which process comprises: (a) forming a precatalyst itself comprising: (1) a first metal compound selected from compounds of nickel, cobalt or mixtures thereof; (2) a second metal compound selected from compounds of chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, or mixtures thereof; and (3) an inorganic support; (b) heating the precatalyst of step (a) with a source of sulfide in a first non-oxidizing gas at a temperature and for a time effective to presulfide the precatalyst; (c) adding in a second non-oxidizing gas to the sulfided precatalyst of step (b) an organometallic transition metal moiety selected from compounds of iridium, rhodium, iron, ruthenium, tungsten or mixtures thereof for a time and at a temperature effective to chemically combine the metal components; and (d) optionally heating the chemically combined catalyst of step (b) in vacuum at a temperature and for a time effective to remove residual volatile organic materials. 12 figs.

  14. Viscosity of ?-pinene secondary organic material and implications for particle growth and reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Grayson, James W.; Bateman, Adam P.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Sellier, Mathieu; Murray, Benjamin J.; Shilling, John E.; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2013-05-14

    Particles composed of secondary organic material (SOM) are abundant in the lower troposphere and play important roles in climate, air quality, and health. The viscosity of these particles is a fundamental property that is presently poorly quantified for conditions relevant to the lower troposphere. Using two new techniques, namely a bead-mobility technique and a poke-flow technique, in conjunction with simulations of fluid flow, we measure the viscosity of the watersoluble component of SOM produced by ?-pinene ozonolysis. The viscosity is comparable to that of honey at 90% relative humidity (RH), comparable to that of peanut butter at 70% RH and greater than or comparable to that of bitumen for ? 30% RH, implying that the studied SOM ranges from liquid to semisolid/solid at ambient relative humidities. With the Stokes-Einstein relation, the measured viscosities further imply that the growth and evaporation of SOM by the exchange of organic molecules between the gas and condensed phases may be confined to the surface region when RH ? 30%, suggesting the importance of an adsorption-type mechanism for partitioning in this regime. By comparison, for RH ? 70% partitioning of organic molecules may effectively occur by an absorption mechanism throughout the bulk of the particle. Finally, the net uptake rates of semi-reactive atmospheric oxidants such as O3 are expected to decrease by two to five orders of magnitude for a change in RH from 90% to ? 30% RH, with possible implications for the rates of chemical aging of SOM particles in the atmosphere.

  15. Panoramic view of electrochemical pseudocapacitor and organic solar cell research in molecularly engineered energy materials (MEEM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    al. The State of Organic Solar Cells?A Meta Analysis. Sol.Annealing Effect in Organic Solar Cells with Blends ofProcessed “Bilayer” Organic Solar Cells. Adv. Mater. 2011,

  16. A highly stable zirconium-based metal-organic framework material with high surface area and gas storage capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutov, Oleksii V.; Bury, Wojciech; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Yildirim, Taner; Farha, Omar K.

    2014-08-14

    : 10.1002/chem.201xxxxxx ? Metal-organic frameworks A highly stable zirconium-based metal-organic framework material with high surface area and gas storage capacities Oleksii V. Gutov,†[a] Wojciech Bury,†[a,b] Diego A. Gomez-Gualdron,[c] Vaiva... these parameters is crucial for constructing materials with high-capacity gas uptake, as well as stability. However, most known MOFs are not sufficiently stable to allow their application for gas storage in the presence of water or acid.10 To overcome...

  17. Application of admittance spectroscopy to evaluate carrier mobility in organic charge transport materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Shu K.

    of high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes OLEDs in 1980s has triggered extensive research on organic semiconductors and devices.1 The OLED is now a recognized contender for flat-panel displays. Besides OLEDs, organic field-effect transistors, and organic photo- voltaic cells are showing very

  18. Panoramic view of electrochemical pseudocapacitor and organic solar cell research in molecularly engineered energy materials (MEEM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    material and as a lithium-ion battery elec- trode. 16,17known high-rate lithium ion battery material. A crossover

  19. organic material in any unit below unit 1, and (v) the lack of evidence of vegetation growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    organic material in any unit below unit 1, and (v) the lack of evidence of vegetation growth except locally within units 2 and 3. Because intense precipitation along the arid Peruvian coast is typically deposits at Quebrada Tacahuay. Radiocarbon dating of units 1, 2, 3, 4, 4c3, and 8 (Table 1 and Fig. 2

  20. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  1. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L. (8448 Allison Ct., Arvada, CO 80005); Black, Stuart K. (4976 Raleigh St., Denver, CO 80212); Diebold, James P. (57 N. Yank Way, Lakewood, CO 80228); Kreibich, Roland E. (4201 S. 344th, Auburn, WA 98001)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  2. WHAT IS COMPOST? Composting refers to the biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    WHAT IS COMPOST? Composting refers to the biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under aerobic (in the presence of oxygen) conditions. During the composting, good quality compost is produced that is biologically stable, relatively uniform in appearance, free

  3. PROJECT PROFILE: Utilizing Emergent Material Properties and Novel Device Architectures for Advancing Organic Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will design and develop efficient, stable, and inexpensive organic photovoltaics (PV). It will also make the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s organic photovoltaic database available to the public and add contributions to simulation and stability of organic PV compounds.

  4. Studies of solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes and their materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellerich, Emily

    2013-05-15

    A hitherto unexplored approach is presented in which a small molecule is used as a host to polymer guests in solution-processed OLEDs. We find that the small molecule host results in much more efficient devices than the often-used alternative polymer host when used for the guests presented. It is likely that nano- and microstructural differences between the hosts contribute to the improvements, which highlights some interesting characteristics that can help to better understand the nature of these mixtures. A number of the guests used in this study were newly synthesized benzobisoxazole-based copolymers. New organic copolymers are presented that are based on the chemical structure of benzobisoxazoles, which have been shown in the past to have good electron transporting properties. The novel concept in this publication pertains to a change in the direction of polymerization, also known as the conjugation pathway, which we show increases the emission efficiency. This work highlights a unique and useful property of organic semiconducting materials in that they can be synthesized to create the desired characteristics. Earlier work is described that kick-started in our research group the use of small molecules in solution-processed OLEDs. Originally these devices were to be used in magnetoresistance studies, but the project took a different path when the devices were more efficient than expected. The efficient use of small molecules in solution-processed OLEDs is highlighted, which at the time was not often the case. Also, the important observation of the effect of solvent choice on the resultant film is emphasized, with discussion of the likely cause of these effects. Microcavity OLEDs are introduced in which the transparent anode ITO is replaced with semi-transparent thin silver, which creates an optical cavity within the devices. The goal was to expand a previous work that created an on-chip spectrometer covering wavelengths 493 to 639 nm. In this case, a spin-coated mixed emitting layer (EML) is used, consisting of a polymer and a small molecule that both emit in the near UV and blue. The resulting combined spectra gives a wide band that can be used to create narrow microcavity emission peaks of 373 to 469 nm, depending on the device thickness (i.e. the cavity’s optical length). In the process of this effort, the mixed EML presented interesting complexities that we attempt to explain via simulation and morphology study.

  5. The Effects of Organic Material and Mycorrhizal Inoculation On Horticultural Seedling Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortas, Ibrahim; Demirbas, Ahmet; Akpinar, Ça?da?; ?im?ek, Murat; Kaya, Zülküf

    2009-01-01

    plant material (used worm) 11. Compost : Sewage sludge 12.Compost : Sewage sludge mixed with plant and worm 13.Compost : Sewage sludge (horse manure) 1.25 14. Compost:

  6. Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-09-11

    Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

  7. Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-06-25

    Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

  8. Panoramic view of electrochemical pseudocapacitor and organic solar cell research in molecularly engineered energy materials (MEEM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency in Polymer Solar Cells. Adv. Funct. Mater. 2009,al. The State of Organic Solar Cells?A Meta Analysis. Sol.in Low-Bandgap Polymer Solar Cells by Processing with Alkane

  9. Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Rondall James

    1994-01-01

    The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

  10. Heavy atom induced phosphorescence of organic materials using mono- and trifunctional organomercury derivatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burress, Charlotte Nicole

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation focuses on the phosphorescence of organic chromophores using perfluoro-ortho-phenylene mercury (1) and bis(pentafluorophenyl)mercury (2) as external heavy atom effect inducers. To ascertain the suitability of these luminescent...

  11. Terahertz and infrared transmission of an organic/inorganic hybrid thermoelectric material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyman, J. N. Alebachew, B. A.; Kaminski, Z. S.; Nguyen, M. D.; Coates, N. E.; Urban, J. J.

    2014-04-07

    We report terahertz and infrared transmission measurements of a high-performance thermoelectric material containing tellurium nanowires in a conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) matrix. The DC electrical conductivity of the hybrid material (41?S/cm) is approximately one hundred times that of pure PEDOT:PSS and more than 400 times that of a film of pure tellurium nanowires, while the terahertz-frequency (THz) conductivity of PEDOT:PSS and the hybrid material are comparable at f???2THz. A frequency-dependent conductivity model indicates that the increased DC conductivity of the hybrid material results from an increase in the DC charge mobility rather than in the free charge density. We suggest that the increased DC conductivity of the hybrid material results from an increase in linkage between PEDOT domains by the tellurium nanowires.

  12. The Constitution of Highly Reliable Practices: Materializing Communication as Constitutive of Organizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spradley, Robert Tyler

    2012-10-19

    on collective mind, this study uses a practice-based communication approach to examine the material interplay of bodies, objects, and sites using ethnography and grounded theory. In-depth interviews, participant observations, and organizational documents were...

  13. Computational Chemistry as a Tool for Understanding Non-Covalent Interactions in Organic Reactions and Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sepulveda Camarena, Diana

    2014-12-12

    Non-covalent interactions (NCIs) play vital roles in many areas of chemistry and materials science. Although there has been a great deal of progress understanding the nature of non-covalent interactions in recent years, ...

  14. Reactive Aging of Films of Secondary Organic Material Studied by Infrared Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    composition. In the case that particle composition is significantly hygroscopic, the particles take up water surface area, coupled to the moist surface properties, also increases rates of gas-particle reactions anthropogenic and natural sources.7,13,14 The presence of organic species in the particle phase tends

  15. Development and Applications Of Photosensitive Device Systems To Studies Of Biological And Organic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruner, Sol

    2012-01-20

    The primary focus of the grant is the development of new x-ray detectors for biological and materials work at synchrotron sources, especially Pixel Array Detectors (PADs), and the training of students via research applications to problems in biophysics and materials science using novel x-ray methods. This Final Progress Report provides a high-level overview of the most important accomplishments. These major areas of accomplishment include: (1) Development and application of x-ray Pixel Array Detectors; (2) Development and application of methods of high pressure x-ray crystallography as applied to proteins; (3) Studies on the synthesis and structure of novel mesophase materials derived from block co-polymers.

  16. Alkylene-bridged polygerm- and polygermsilsesqui-oxanes: New hybrid organic-inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, G.M.; Loy, D.A.; Zender, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shea, K.J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    Alkylene-bridge polygerm- and polygermsilsequioxanes have been formed by hydrolysis-condensation of their corresponding (EtO){sub 3}M(CH{sub 2}){sub n}Ge(OEt){sub 3} monomers under HCl- and NEt{sub 3}-catalyzed conditions in ethanol. Solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR indicate the retention of the alkylene bridging moiety during polymerization. The resulting aerogels are mesoporous materials with high surface areas. Incorporation of the short ethylene bridging unit results in higher surface areas than when heylene bridges are present. The porous nature of hexylene-bridged hybrid network [Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}GeO{sub 3}]{sub n} appears insensitive to the acidic or basic nature of the catalyst employed in it formation, in contrast to its polysilsesquioxane counterpart. Work is underway to determine the origin of porosity in these materials, and to characterize xerogel materials generated from these monomers.

  17. Controlling charge transport in blue organic light-emitting devices by chemical functionalization of host materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Rainbolt, James E.; Von Ruden, Amber L.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2011-01-18

    Generation of white light from OLEDs for general lighting applications requires a highly efficient blue component. However, a stable and power efficient blue OLED component with simple device architecture remains a significant challenge partly due to lack of appropriate host materials. Here we report the photophysical and device properties of ambipolar host phosphine oxide based materials. In this work, we studied the effect of the structural modification made to phosphine oxide-based hosts on the charge balance. We observed significant changes in charge transport within the host occurred upon small modifications to their chemical structure. As a result, an alteration of the chemical design of these materials allows for the control of charge balance of the OLED.

  18. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterialMaterials Materials Access to

  19. Experimental Evidence Supported by Simulations of a Very High H{sub 2} Diffusion in Metal Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salles, F.; Maurin, G.; Jobic, H.; Koza, M. M.; Llewellyn, P. L.; Devic, T.; Serre, C.; Ferey, G.

    2008-06-20

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to extract the self-diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the metal organic frameworks MIL-47(V) and MIL-53(Cr). We find that the diffusivity of hydrogen at low loading is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than in zeolites. Such a high mobility has never been experimentally observed before in any nanoporous materials, although it was predicted in carbon nanotubes. Either 1D or 3D diffusion mechanisms are elucidated depending on the chemical features of the MIL framework.

  20. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering datamore »and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.« less

  1. Supplementary Material Cover Sheet1 Temporal Variations of Organic Composition in the Tropical and Marine Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Supplementary Material Cover Sheet1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Temporal@nus.edu.sg Submitted to: Number of tables: 1 S1 #12;1. Background on forest and peat fires in Indonesia21 22 23 24 conditions of 1997-98 and 2006, thousands of fires raged in the peat swamps of Indonesia. Fires in peat

  2. Method for destroying hazardous organics and other combustible materials in a subcritical/supercritical reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janikowski, Stuart K. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A waste destruction method using a reactor vessel to combust and destroy organic and combustible waste, including the steps of introducing a supply of waste into the reactor vessel, introducing a supply of an oxidant into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste forming a waste and oxidant mixture, introducing a supply of water into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste and oxidant mixture forming a waste, water and oxidant mixture, reciprocatingly compressing the waste, water and oxidant mixture forming a compressed mixture, igniting the compressed mixture forming a exhaust gas, and venting the exhaust gas into the surrounding atmosphere.

  3. Shear Zones in granular materials: Optimization in a self-organized random potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J Torok; T. Unger; J. Kertesz; D. E. Wolf

    2006-07-06

    We introduce a model to describe the wide shear zones observed in modified Couette cell experiments with granular material. The model is a generalization of the recently proposed approach based on a variational principle. The instantaneous shear band is identified with the surface that minimizes the dissipation in a random potential that is biased by the local velocity difference and pressure. The apparent shear zone is the ensemble average of the instantaneous shear bands. The numerical simulation of this model matches excellently with experiments and has measurable predictions.

  4. Catalysts for the hydrodenitrogenation of organic materials and process for the preparation of the catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Richard M. (Palo Alto, CA); Hirschon, Albert S. (Menlo Park, CA); Wilson, Jr., Robert B. (Mountain View, CA)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for forming a catalyst for the hydrodenitrogenation of an organic feedstock, which includes (a) obtaining a precatalyst comprising cobalt and molybdenum or nickel and molybdenum; (b) adding in a non-oxidizing an atmosphere selected from hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, neon, argon, carbon monoxide or mixtures thereof to the precatalyst of step (a), a transition met ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of research partially sponsored by the Department of Energy through grants DE-FG22-83P C60781 and DE-FG-85-PC80906, and partially supported by grant CHE82-19541 of the National Science Foundation. The invention is subject to Public Law 96-517 (and amendments), and the United States Government has rights in the present invention.

  5. Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 628 2000 Materials Research Society Hybrid Inorganic/Organic Diblock Copolymers. Nanostructure in Polyhedral Oligomeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Our main approach to the synthesis and study of hybrid organic/inorganic materials involvesMat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 628 © 2000 Materials Research Society CC2.6.1 Hybrid Inorganic the synthesis of melt processable, linear hybrid polymers containing pendent inorganic clusters, and allows us

  6. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterial

  7. Cesium-137 inventories in Alaskan Tundra, lake and marine sediments: An indicator of recent organic material transport?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebmeier, J.M.; Cooper, L.W. |; Larsen, I.L.; Solis, C.; Olsen, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Tundra sampling was accomplished in 1989--1990 at Imnavait Creek, Alaska (68{degree}37` N, 149{degree}17` W). Inventories of {sup 137}Cs (102--162 mBq/cm{sup 2}) are close to expectations, based upon measured atmospheric deposition for this latitude. Accumulated inventories of {sup 137}Cs in tundra decrease by up to 50% along a transect to Prudhoe Bay (70{degree}13` N, 148{degree}30` W). Atmospheric deposition of {sup 137}Cs decreased with latitude in the Arctic, but declines in deposition would have been relatively small over this distance (200 km). This suggests a recent loss of {sup 137}Cs and possibly associated organic matter from tundra over the northern portions of the transect between Imnavait Creek and Prudhoe Bay. Sediments from Toolik Lake (68{degree}38` N, 149{degree}38` W) showed widely varying {sup 137}Cs inventories, from a low of 22 mBq/cm{sup 2} away from the lake inlet, to a high between 140 to >200 mBq/cm{sup 2} near the main stream inflow. This was indicative of recent accumulation of cesium and possibly organic material associated with it in arctic lakes, although additional sampling is needed.

  8. Stability improvement of organic light emitting diodes by the insertion of hole injection materials on the indium tin oxide substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jung-Hung; Liu, Shang-Yi; Wu, I-Wen; Chen, Tsung-Chin; Liu, Chia-Wei [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-I, E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-28

    The degradation of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is a very complex issue, which might include interfacial charge accumulation, material diffusion, and electrical-induced chemical reaction during the operation. In this study, the origins of improvement in device stability from inserting a hole injection layer (HIL) at the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode are investigated. The results from aging single-layer devices show that leakage current increases in the case of ITO/hole transport layer contact, but this phenomenon can be prevented by inserting molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) or 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN{sub 6}) as an HIL. Moreover, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy suggests that the diffusion of indium atoms and active oxygen species can be impeded by introducing MoO{sub 3} or HAT-CN{sub 6} as an HIL. These results reveal that the degradation of OLEDs is related to indium and oxygen out-diffusion from the ITO substrates, and that the stability of OLEDs can be improved by impeding this diffusion with HILs.

  9. 2. Teaching Problem Solving This chapter includes some of the materials we use to teach an organized, logical problem-solving strategy to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Page 17 2. Teaching Problem Solving This chapter includes some of the materials we use to teach an organized, logical problem-solving strategy to students in our calculus-based physics course. Page A Logical Problem-Solving Strategy This is an excerpt from the first chapter of The Competent Problem Solver

  10. Design and implementation of a continuous improvement framework, focusing on material and information flow, for the manufacturing of organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, Susheel Teja

    2011-01-01

    Konarka Technologies is an organic photo voltaic solar panel manufacturing startup and is currently in the process of ramping up their production volumes. The MIT team has worked on numerous improvement activities that ...

  11. Broadband terahertz characterization of the refractive index and absorption of some important polymeric and organic electro-optic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, L. Michael

    technolog- ically important polymers from 0.1­10 THz. These materials include polyimide (Kapton), poly[bisphenol A carbonate- co-4,40 -(3,3,5-trimethyl cyclohexylidene) diphenol carbonate] (APC), poly [bisphenol A carbonate

  12. Adsorption and Diffusion of Hydrogen in a New Metal-Organic Framework Material: [Zn(bdc)(ted)0.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    as materials for gas sorption, gas separation and catalysis.1-9 MOFs consist of metal vertices held together of MOFs is important for developing applications involving membrane and pressure swing separa- tions

  13. First-principles investigation of organic photovoltaic materials C[subscript 60], C[subscript 70], [C[subscript 60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Xiaofeng

    We present a first-principles investigation of the excited-state properties of electron acceptors in organic photovoltaics including C[subscript 60], C[subscript 70], [6,6]-phenyl-C[subscript 61]-butyric-acid-methyl-ester ...

  14. Journal of ELECTRONIC MATERIALS, Vol. 33, No. 4, 2004 Regular Issue Paper Transparent Flexible Plastic Substrates for Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanicki, Jerzy

    light- emitting devices (OLEDs). Specifically, we have evaluated the TCE electrical resistivity, surface Plastic Substrates for Organic Light-Emitting Devices YONGTAEK HONG,1 ZHIQI HE,1,4 NANCY S. LENNHOFF,2. These properties are adequate for OLED applications based on United States Display Consortium specifications

  15. Development of New Absorber Materials to Achieve Organic Photovoltaic Commercial Modules with 15% Efficiency and 20 Years Lifetime: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-498

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, D.

    2014-08-01

    Under this CRADA the parties will develop intermediates or materials that can be employed as the active layer in dye sensitized solar cells printed polymer systems, or small molecule organic photovoltaics.

  16. Organic salts as super-high rate capability materials for lithium-ion batteries Y. Y. Zhang, Y. Y. Sun, S. X. Du, H.-J. Gao, and S. B. Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Organic salts as super-high rate capability materials for lithium-ion batteries Y. Y. Zhang, Y. Y of electrode nanomaterials in lithium-ion battery: The effects of surface stress J. Appl. Phys. 112, 103507://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Organic salts as super-high rate capability materials for lithium-ion batteries Y. Y. Zhang,1,2 Y

  17. A method and apparatus for destroying hazardous organics and other combustible materials in a subcritical/supercritical reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janikowski, Stuart K.

    1997-12-01

    A waste destruction method is described using a reactor vessel to combust and destroy organic and combustible waste, including the steps of introducing a supply of waste into the reactor vessel, introducing a supply of an oxidant into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste forming a waste and oxidant mixture, introducing a supply of water into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste and oxidant mixture forming a waste, water and oxidant mixture, reciprocatingly compressing the waste, water and oxidant mixture forming a compressed mixture, igniting the compressed mixture forming a exhaust gas, and venting the exhaust gas into the surrounding atmosphere.

  18. VOLUME 81, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 16 NOVEMBER 1998 Essential Role of Correlations in Governing Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenkre, V.M.

    of Correlations in Governing Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Materials S. V. Novikov,1,2 D. H. Dunlap,2 V (Received 26 May 1998) The transport of photoinjected charges in disordered organic films is often interpreted using a formula based on a Gaussian disorder model (GDM) that neglects spatial correlations due

  19. Pressure-assisted fabrication of organic light emitting diodes with MoO{sub 3} hole-injection layer materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, J. [The Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Anye, V. C.; Vodah, E. O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Tong, T. [The Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Zebaze Kana, M. G. [Physics Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Kwara State (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [The Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2014-06-21

    In this study, pressures of ?5 to ?8?MPa were applied to organic light emitting diodes containing either evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) or spin-coated poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulphonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hole-injection layers (HILs). The threshold voltages for both devices were reduced by about half, after the application of pressure. Furthermore, in an effort to understand the effects of pressure treatment, finite element simulations were used to study the evolution of surface contact between the HIL and emissive layer (EML) under pressure. The blister area due to interfacial impurities was also calculated. This was shown to reduce by about half, when the applied pressures were between ?5 and 8?MPa. The finite element simulations used Young's modulus measurements of MoO{sub 3} that were measured using the nanoindentation technique. They also incorporated measurements of the adhesion energy between the HIL and EML (measured by force microscopy during atomic force microscopy). Within a fracture mechanics framework, the implications of the results are then discussed for the pressure-assisted fabrication of robust organic electronic devices.

  20. A two-fold interpenetrating 3D metal-organic framework material constructed from helical chains linked via 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Yiming; Zhao Zhenguo; Wu Xiaoyuan; Zhang Qisheng; Chen Lijuan; Wang Fei; Chen Shanci; Lu Canzhong

    2008-12-15

    A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound {l_brace}[Ag(L){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (1) has been synthesized by self-assembly of 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz (L=4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz=3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole) and Ag{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} under hydrothermal conditions. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/acd with a=21.406(4) A, b=21.406(4) A, c=36.298(8) A, Z=32. X-ray single-crystal diffraction reveals that 1 has a three-dimensional framework with an unprecedented alternate left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net. Photoluminescent investigation reveals that the title compound displays interesting emissions in a wide region, which shows that the title compound may be a good potential candidate as a photoelectric material. - Graphical abstract: A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound [Ag(4,4'-bpz){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}] shows unprecedented alternating left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net.

  1. Acute toxicity of smoke screen materials to aquatic organisms, white phosphorus-felt, red phosphorus-butyl rubber and SGF No. 2 fog oil. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M.; McFadden, K.M.; Bean, R.M.; Clark, M.L.; Thomas, B.L.; Killand, B.W.; Prohammer, L.A.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The acute toxicity of three obscurants was determined for nine freshwater organisms. The materials tested were white phosphorus-felt smoke, red phosphorus-butyl rubber (RP-BR) smoke, and smoke generator fuel (SGF) No. 2 fog oil (bulk and vaporized). The chemistry of WP-F and RP-BR smoke in water and the resulting effects on aquatic organisms are similar. Combustion of these two obscurants and their deposition in water leads to the formation of many complex oxy-phosphoric acids. Rates of hydrolysis of these complex products to ortho-phosphate were inconsistent and unpredictable over time. These products acidify water and produce toxic effects after exhausting the buffering capacity of the water. Acute 96 hr tests using Daphnia magna with neutralized and nonneutralized exposure solutions indicated that the presence of unidentified toxic component(s) acted independently of pH. At pH levels of 6.0 to 7.0, phosphorus combustion products precipitated out of solution leading to a bimodal toxic response in extended 96-hr tests with Daphnia magna. Most components of fog oil had low solubility in water. Saturation was apparent at approximately 0.1 to 0.3 mg/L total oil. Vaporization had no demonstrable effect on the chemistry or toxicity of the fog oil. Neither the bulk fog oil nor the vaporized fog oil was acutely toxic to freshwater animals at concentrations less than 10 mg/L total oil. In oil-water mixes in excess of 1.0 mg/L total oil, fog oil quickly separated and floated to the surface. The primary hazard associated with vaporized and bulk fog oil was the physical effect of oil fouling the organisms. Photolysis increased the concentration of water-soluble components of the fog oil. Acute toxicity was demonstrated in oil-water mixes (approx.10 mg/L total oil) of photolyzed bulk and vaporized fog oil. No difference in toxicity was observed between photolyzed and non-photolyzed dilutions of OWM at comparable levels of total oil.

  2. Supporting Organizations | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Engineering Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Supporting Organizations SHARE Supporting...

  3. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  4. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  5. A New Charge Transporting Host Material for Short Wavelength Organic Electrophosphorescence: 2,7–Bis(diphenylphosphine oxide)–9,9–dimethylfluorene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Sapochak, Linda S.; Burrows, Paul E.

    2006-05-01

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure, photophysical and electroluminescent properties of a new charge transporting host material for short wavelength phosphor-doped organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) based on 2,7-bis(diphenylphosphine oxide)-9,9-dimethylfluorene (PO6). The P=O moiety is used as a point of saturation between the fluorene bridge and outer phenyl groups so that the triplet exciton energy of PO6 is 2.72 eV, similar to that of a dibromo substituted fluorene, but it is more amenable to vacuum sublimation and has good film forming properties. Computational analysis (B3LYP/6-31G*) predicts the HOMO and LUMO energies of PO6 to be lower by 1.5 eV and 0.59 eV, respectively, compared to a similar diphenylamino substituted derivative. In a simple bilayer OLED device, PO6 exhibits structured UV electroluminescence (EL) at a peak wavelength of 335 nm and structured lower energy emission with peaks at 380 nm and 397 nm, similar to the solid film and crystalline solid photoluminescence spectra. The longer wavelength peaks are attributed to aggregate formation via strong intermolecular interactions (P-O---H-C and edge-to-face C-H---??contacts?) and longer range electrostatic interactions between P=O moieties leading to ordered regions in the film. Devices incorporating PO6 as the host material doped with iridium(III)bis(4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2.)picolinate (FIrpic) exhibited sky blue emission with peak external quantum efficiency (?ext,max) of 8.1 % and luminous power efficiency (?p,max) of 25.3 lm/W. At a brightness of 800 cd/m2, generally considered to be sufficient for lighting applications, the ?ext and ?p are 6.7 % and 11.8 lm/W and the operating voltage is 5.6 V, which is significantly lower than has been demonstrated previously using this dopant.

  6. Probing the localization length of photo-generated charges in organic materials. A.D. Chepelianskii, J. Wang and R.H. Friend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    of these materials is crucial to the improvement of their power conversion efficien- cies. Research in this direction

  7. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guvenc, Ali Bilge

    2012-01-01

    characterization of organic solar cells, Advanced Functionaland D. Meissner, Organic Solar-Cells, Advanced Materials 3 (devices based on organic solar cells became a very hot topic

  8. Esselen Linguistic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaul, David L.; Turner, Katherine; Collins, James D.

    1984-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to make a complete list of materials known on the Esselen language available in a single place. The existing lexical material has been organized into a lexicon which is followed by phrasal and sentence materials...

  9. Rational design of hybrid organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lentz, Levi (Levi Carl)

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we will present a novel design for a nano-structured organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic material that will address current challenges in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic-based solar cell materials. ...

  10. Nonlinear organic plasmonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainberg, B D

    2015-01-01

    Purely organic materials with negative and near-zero dielectric permittivity can be easily fabricated. Here we develop a theory of nonlinear non-steady-state organic plasmonics with strong laser pulses. The bistability response of the electron-vibrational model of organic materials in the condensed phase has been demonstrated. Non-steady-state organic plasmonics enable us to obtain near-zero dielectric permittivity during a short time. We have proposed to use non-steady-state organic plasmonics for the enhancement of intersite dipolar energy-transfer interaction in the quantum dot wire that influences on electron transport through nanojunctions. Such interactions can compensate Coulomb repulsions for particular conditions. We propose the exciton control of Coulomb blocking in the quantum dot wire based on the non-steady-state near-zero dielectric permittivity of the organic host medium.

  11. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01

    4.2.1 Organic solar cellOrganic Solar Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3.1 Organic solar cell materials . . . . .

  12. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ); Rand, Barry P. (Somers, NY)

    2011-09-06

    A photosensitive device includes a plurality of organic photoconductive materials disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode, including a first continuous layer of donor host material, a second continuous layer of acceptor host material, and at least one other organic photoconductive material disposed as a plurality of discontinuous islands between the first continuous layer and the second continuous layer. Each of these other photoconductive materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor host material and the acceptor host material. Preferably, each of the discontinuous islands consists essentially of a crystallite of the respective organic photoconductive material, and more preferably, the crystallites are nanocrystals.

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01

    W-function. Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. 2005;86(materials and structures to this energy harvesting problem using organic solarsolar cells - Towards 10 % energy-conversion efficiency. Advanced Materials.

  14. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2011, 95(5), 1339-heterojunction organic solar cells,? Solar Energy MaterialsSolar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2013, 113, 85-89. [

  15. MC-CAM Research Topics Organic LEDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    materials with highly- controlled microstructures Next generation optical storage media Products based applications Novel conjugated polymers and high-conductivity organics Nanostructured materials with unique electronic, magnetic, and optical properties Chemically modified fullerenes and fullerene devices Materials

  16. Organic electronic devices with multiple solution-processed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.

    2015-08-04

    A method of fabricating a tandem organic photosensitive device involves depositing a first layer of an organic electron donor type material film by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a first solvent; depositing a first layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the first layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process; depositing a conductive layer over the interim stack by a dry deposition process; depositing a second layer of the organic electron donor type material over the conductive layer by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a second solvent, wherein the organic electron acceptor type material and the conductive layer are insoluble in the second solvent; depositing a second layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the second layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process, resulting in a stack.

  17. Organic optoelectronic devices have remained a research topic of great interest over the past two decades, particularly in the development of efficient organic photovoltaics (OPV) and organic light emitting diodes (OLED). In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    emitting diodes (OLED). In order to improve the efficiency, stability, and materials variety for organic decades, particularly in the development of efficient organic photovoltaics (OPV) and organic light

  18. Synthesis and structural characterization of a new chiral porous hybrid organic–inorganic material based on ?-zirconium phosphates and L-(+)-phosphoserine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alhendawi, Hussein M.H., E-mail: hussein.alhendawi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University of Gaza, 1277 Gaza, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2013-05-01

    In the present work, a chiral layered derivative of ?-zirconium phosphate (?-ZrP) containing L-(+)-phosphoserine (?-ZrP-PS*) covalently attached to inorganic layers has been prepared by means of topotactic exchange reaction. This organic–inorganic derivative is characterized by X-ray diffractometry, Solid {sup 13}C–NMR and FT-IR spectrophotometries and thermal analyses. A maximum level of topotactic replacement of 20% is achieved. Under both the acidic environment of the interlayer region of ?-ZrP and the acidic synthesis conditions, the hydrolysis of the ester bond of PS* is expected to take place to some extent. For this reason, it was impossible to exceed the recent percentage, which in turn reflects the relative moderate stability of the above mentioned bond under these conditions. In order to be more certain with regard to an expected further hydrolysis for this bond after separation, a sample of ?-ZrP-PS* was stored in a desiccator over a saturated solution of BaCl{sub 2} (90% relative humidity) for three months, and then the sample re-analyzed once again. Surprisingly, the results show that the sample still keeps almost the same level of exchange (i.e., 20%). Second, it is revealed that the sample almost gives the same spectroscopic and thermal behavior. This could be attributed to the less acidic character of the partially exchanged inorganic layers of the sample in comparison with that of the precursor ?-ZrP. Therefore, the PS* molecules persist and stay there into the interlayer gallery without further hydrolysis. - Graphical abstract: • Red: oxygen • White: zirconium • Cyan: carbon • Yellow: phosphorus • Blue: nitrogen. Highlights: • L-(+)-Phosphoserine (PS*) is exchanged with ?-ZrP by means of topotactic exchange. • The maximum exchange level is 20%. • ?-ZrP is functionalized with chiral amino acid group. • ?-ZrP-PS* has large chiral space for huge guest molecules to be intercalated.

  19. Material Misfits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues submit Material Misfits How well nanocomposite materials align at their interfaces determines what properties they have, opening broad new avenues of materials-science...

  20. New Morphological Paradigm Uncovered in Organic Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Morphological Paradigm Uncovered in Organic Solar Cells Print Organic solar cells are made of light, flexible, renewable materials; they require simple and inexpensive...

  1. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-02-12

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  2. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  3. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  4. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    1999-12-21

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  5. Combinatorial sythesis of organometallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-07-16

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  6. High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami UNREL DoDDLA Project) (presentation) High...

  7. Organic materials with acenoid and iptycene structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhihua, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    Chapter 1. The synthesis of a group of alkoxy-substituted para-acenequinones and their photophysical properties in solution and liquid crystal are reported. Polarized absorption and fluorescence measurements demonstrate ...

  8. Evaluation of Radiation Resistance for Organic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of air pollutants Novel DNA-repair protein #12;Quantum Beam Science Directorate Advanced Ceramics Group) 0 10 20 30 40 50 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 Vacuum Air Tensilestrength(MPa) Dose (MGy) #12;Reference : "Radiation irradiated in air X-ray Micro Analyzer 100 200

  9. Organic Photovoltaics | Center for Energy Efficient Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser WorkEPVisitingOilOpportunities for

  10. Reducing recombination in organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Jason M. (Jason Michael)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I consider two methods to improve organic photovoltaic efficiency: energy level cascades and promotion of triplet state excitons. The former relies on a thin layer of material placed between the active ...

  11. White organic light-emitting diodes: Status and perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reineke, Sebastian

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are ultrathin, large-area light sources made from organic semiconductor materials. Over the past decades, much research has been spent on finding suitable materials to realize ...

  12. Novel Materials for HIgh Efficiency White Phosphorescent OLED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Thompson

    2008-03-31

    Our program was a materials intensive one, based on preparing new materials for phosphorescent based white organic LEDs (WOLEDs). Each of the principal projects are summarized.

  13. Covetic Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Can re-melt, dilute, alloy... Fabrication of Covetic Materials - Nanocarbon Infusion 3 4 Technical Approach Unusual Characteristics of Covetic Materials ("covalent" &...

  14. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  15. Fermilab | About | Organization | Fermilab Organization | Explanation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Symbols Line Organization: sectors, divisions, sections Line Organization Matrix Organization: centers, projects and programs utilizing resources spanning the entire...

  16. Multifunctional Nanostructured Materials for Processing of Biomass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical commodities. The nanostructured materials will be composed of organic and inorganic species that will work cooperatively to effectively promote chemical conversions...

  17. Cybersecurity Awareness Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    campaigns or as needed to address an emerging cyber threat or hot topic. These materials are available to other DOE organizations or public and private institutions to...

  18. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  19. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Extraction Separation Processes for Critical Materials in 30- 21 Stage Test Facility (Bruce Moyer) ......

  20. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  1. Page 1 of 3 MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CENTER FOR ADVANCED MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    and hybrid organic-inorganic materials for electronic and optical device applications and has put into place involve the design, synthesis, characterization, and/or fabrication of new functional materials or devices, especially those based on organic or hybrid organic-inorganic materials, which could have application

  2. Structure-Function Relationships in Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavulak, David Fredric Joel

    2010-01-01

    C. J. Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 2004, 83, 273-Cyras, V. Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 2007, 91,solar technologies are starting to become a competitive component in the energy industry, organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials

  3. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04

    This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Supersedes DOE M 460.2-1.

  4. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizingOrganizing

  5. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  6. Mesoporous Carbon-based Materials for Alternative Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Kimberly Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of Periodic Surfactant/Inorganic Composite Materials."materials, have been used as inorganic templates for the synthesissynthesis of periodic mesoporous organosilicas (Scott, Many types of organic-inorganic molecular composites or hybrid materials

  7. Nuclear material operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

  8. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys...

  9. Hybrid organicinorganic materials for photonic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Hybrid organic­inorganic materials for photonic applications Partha P. Banerjee,1,* Dean R. Evans,2 18015, USA *pbanerjee1@udayton.edu Abstract: This novel joint feature issue on "Hybrid organic that this feature issue encourages and stimulates further research to into hybrid materials with enhanced linear

  10. Hybrid organicinorganic materials for novel photonic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Hybrid organic­inorganic materials for novel photonic applications Partha P. Banerjee,1, * Dean R. ID 192915); published 31 July 2013 This novel joint feature issue on "Hybrid organic that this feature issue encourages and stim- ulates further research into hybrid materials with enhanced linear

  11. Carbon-Based Materials, High-Surface-Area Sorbents, and New Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies includes a range of carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, aerogels, nanofibers (including metal-doped hybrids), as well as metal-organic frameworks,...

  12. Energy 2050: Bio-inspired Renewable Non-Fossil Liquid Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    We propose an intelligent Energy Transparency model and a bio-inspired hypothetical mechanical mitochondria to optimize energy efficiency. iET seeks learning algorithms to build intelligence in order to pursue carbon-based ...

  13. Terrestrial Analysis of the Organic Component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they formed, these large bodies cannot provide many insights into the nature of the raw starting materials organics is of great interest, both because these materials are thought to represent a reservoir of the original carbon-containing materials from which everything else in our solar system was made and because

  14. Organic electrophosphorescence device having interfacial layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choulis, Stelios A. (San Jose, CA); Mathai, Mathew (Santa Clara, CA); Choong, Vi-En (San Jose, CA); So, Franky (Gainesville, FL)

    2010-08-10

    Techniques are described for forming an organic light emitting diode device with improved device efficiency. Materials having at least one energy level that is similar to those of a phosphorescent light emitting material in the diode are incorporated into the device to directly inject holes or electrons to the light emitting material.

  15. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P. (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ)

    2011-05-24

    A photosensitive device includes a series of organic photoactive layers disposed between two electrodes. Each layer in the series is in direct contact with a next layer in the series. The series is arranged to form at least one donor-acceptor heterojunction, and includes a first organic photoactive layer comprising a first host material serving as a donor, a thin second organic photoactive layer comprising a second host material disposed between the first and a third organic photoactive layer, and the third organic photoactive layer comprising a third host material serving as an acceptor. The first, second, and third host materials are different. The thin second layer serves as an acceptor relative to the first layer or as a donor relative to the third layer.

  16. Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganization Chart Organization Charts

  17. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout EventsOrganizing

  18. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing Committee

  19. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing

  20. Study of Phase Selectivity of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    observation of the phase selection for these hybrid materials. Introduction Hybrid organic_Youn_Moon@nrel.gov. Present address: University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712. (1) Handbook of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid MaterialsArticles Study of Phase Selectivity of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Semiconductors Chang-Youn Moon

  1. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  2. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  3. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  4. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  5. Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Ross, Debra A. (Mountain Ranch, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Danville, CA); Briceno, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xian-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

    2010-08-03

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  6. material recovery

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise.

  7. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

  8. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-12-23

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  9. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  10. Combinatorial screening of inorganic and organometallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  11. Preparation and screening of crystalline inorganic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Danville, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Brice{hacek over (n)}o, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xiao-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

    2008-10-28

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  12. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI); Dourado, Sunil K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dulebohn, Joel I. (Lansing, MI); Hanchar, Robert J. (Charlotte, MI)

    2007-04-17

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  13. Faculty and Instructional Staff in the UW-Madison Department of Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    , Engineering Physics and Materials Science & Engineering Materials for nuclear energy system, fission reactors: photovoltaic solar cells, organic light emitting diodes; materials for alternative energy and energy storage synthesis and characterization, electronic and semiconductor materials, solar energy and photovoltaics

  14. Adhesion in flexible organic and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting device and solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, D.; Kwabi, D.; Akogwu, O.; Du, J. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Oyewole, O. K. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete, Kwara State (Nigeria); Tong, T. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Anye, V. C.; Rwenyagila, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Asare, J.; Fashina, A. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2014-08-21

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the adhesion between bi-material pairs that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells on flexible substrates. Adhesion between the possible bi-material pairs is measured using force microscopy (AFM) techniques. These include: interfaces that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid combinations of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results of AFM measurements are incorporated into the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model for the determination of adhesion energies. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust organic and hybrid organic/inorganic electronic devices.

  15. Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-04-17

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  16. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  17. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Pag...

  18. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  19. Ligand Design for Novel Metal-Organic Polyhedra and Metal-Organic Frameworks for Alternative Energy Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuppler, Ryan John

    2011-10-21

    The primary goal of this research concerns the synthesis of organic ligands in an effort to create metal-organic porous materials for the storage of gas molecules for alternative energy applications as well as other ...

  20. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    and G. Li, ?Polymer solar cells with enhanced open-circuittandem and triple-junction solar cells,? Materials, 2012, 5(for tandem organic solar cells,? Journal of Applied Physics,

  1. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    organic tandem and triple-junction solar cells,? Materials,Current-matched triple-junction solar cell reaching 41.1%demonstrations of triple-junction solar cells outperforming

  2. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  3. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout Events

  4. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout

  5. Megahertz organic/polymer diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Howard Edan; Sun, Jia; Pal, Nath Bhola

    2012-12-11

    Featured is an organic/polymer diode having a first layer composed essentially of one of an organic semiconductor material or a polymeric semiconductor material and a second layer formed on the first layer and being electrically coupled to the first layer such that current flows through the layers in one direction when a voltage is applied in one direction. The second layer is essentially composed of a material whose characteristics and properties are such that when formed on the first layer, the diode is capable of high frequency rectifications on the order of megahertz rectifications such as for example rectifications at one of above 100KHz, 500KhZ, IMHz, or 10 MHz. In further embodiments, the layers are arranged so as to be exposed to atmosphere.

  6. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guvenc, Ali Bilge

    2012-01-01

    Third generation photovoltaics: solar cells for 2020 andfor use in organic photovoltaics, Solar Energy Materials andSolar cell efficiency tables (Version 27), Progress in Photovoltaics

  7. Method for removing organic liquids from aqueous solutions and mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Coronado, Paul R.; Dow, Jerome P.

    2004-03-23

    A method for removing organic liquids from aqueous solutions and mixtures. The method employs any porous material preferably in granular form and having small pores and a large specific surface area, that is hydrophobic so that liquid water does not readily wet its surface. In this method, organics, especially organic solvents that mix with and are more volatile than water, are separated from aqueous solution by preferentially evaporating across the liquid/solid boundary formed at the surfaces of the hydrophobic porous materials. Also, organic solvents that are immiscible with water, preferentially wet the surfaces of the hydrophobic material and are drawn within the porous materials by capillary action.

  8. Thio-,amine-,nitro-,and macrocyclic containing organic aerogels & xerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Glenn A.; Tillotson, Thomas M.

    2005-08-02

    An organic aerogel or xerogel formed by a sol-gel reaction using starting materials that exhibit similar reactivity to the most commonly used resorcinol starting material. The new starting materials, including thio-, amine- and nitro-containing molecules and functionalized macrocyclic molecules will produce organic xerogels and aerogels that have improved performance in the areas of detection and sensor technology, as well as water stream remediation. Also, further functionalization of these new organic aerogels or xerogels will yield material that can be extracted with greater facility than current organic aerogels.

  9. Two Los Alamos National Laboratory organizations receive Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory organizations receive Performance Excellence recognition from Quality New Mexico Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Group and the Quality and Performance...

  10. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  11. Novel patterning techniques for manufacturing organic and nanostructured electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jianglong, 1976-

    2007-01-01

    Molecular organic semiconductors and nanometer size particles are two new classes of functional materials allowing fabrication of electronic devices on low-cost and large area substrates. Patterning these electronic materials ...

  12. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  13. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  14. Porosity in hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, D.W.; Beaucage, G.; Loy, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Multicomponent, or hybrid composites are emerging as precursors to porous materials. Sacrifice of an ephemeral phase can be used to generate porosity, the nature of which depends on precursor structure. Retention of an organic constituent, on the other hand, can add desirable toughness to an otherwise brittle ceramic. We use small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering to examine porosity in both simple and hybrid materials. We find that microphase separation controls porosity in almost all systems studied. Pore distributions are controlled by the detailed bonding within and between phases as well as the flexibility of polymeric constituents. Thus hybridization opens new regions of pore distributions not available in simple systems. We look at several sacrificial concepts and show that it is possible to generate multimodal pore size distributions due to the complicated phase structure in the precursor.

  15. Pricing of Departmental Materials and Services

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-12-18

    The order establishes DOE requirements for prices and charges for materials and services sold or provided to external organizations, other Federal agencies, or the private sector either directly or through a Departmental site/facility management contract.

  16. 3.044 Materials Processing, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchain, Randolph

    The goal of 3.044 is to teach cost-effective and sustainable production of solid material with a desired geometry, structure or distribution of structures, and production volume. Toward this end, it is organized around ...

  17. Materials compatibility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-04-01

    Objectives are to enable development and implementation of codes and standards for H{sub 2} containment components: (1) Evaluate data on mechanical properties of materials in H{sub 2} gas - Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials; (2) Generate new benchmark data on high-priority materials - Pressure vessel steels, stainless steels; and (3) Establish procedures for reliable materials testing - Sustained-load cracking, fatigue crack propagation. Summary of this presentation are: (1) Completed measurement of cracking thresholds (K{sub TH}) for Ni-Cr-Mo pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - K{sub TH} measurements required in ASME Article KD-10 (2) Crack arrest test methods appear to yield non-conservative results compared to crack initiation test methods - (a) Proposal to insert crack initiation test methods in Article KD-10 will be presented to ASME Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks, and (b) Crack initiation methods require test apparatus designed for dynamic loading of specimens in H{sub 2} gas; and (3) Demonstrated ability to measure fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - (a) Fatigue crack growth data in H{sub 2} required in ASME Article KD-10, and (b) Test apparatus is one of few in U.S. or abroad for measuring fatigue crack growth in >100 MPa H{sub 2} gas.

  18. Materials with supramolecular chirality : liqid crystals and polymers for catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Karen Villazor

    2005-01-01

    Mesomorphic organizations provide a powerful and efficient method for the preorganization of molecules to create synthetic materials with controlled supramolecular architectures. Incorporation of polymerizable groups within ...

  19. Optical Spectroscopy for Materials Applications | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optical Spectroscopy for Materials Applications The two main objectives of the Smith research group are: (1) to measure the organization and dynamics of biological structures, and...

  20. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  1. Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xudong, 1966-

    1999-01-01

    Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

  2. Supercapacitors specialities - Materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreja, Vasile V. N.

    2014-06-16

    The electrode material is a key component for supercapacitor cell performance. As it is known, performance comparison of commercial available batteries and supercapacitors reveals significantly lower energy storage capability for supercapacitor devices. The energy density of commercial supercapacitor cells is limited to 10 Wh/kg whereas that of common lead acid batteries reaches 35-40 Wh/kg. For lithium ion batteries a value higher than 100 Wh/kg is easily available. Nevertheless, supercapacitors also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors have other advantages in comparison with batteries. As a consequence, many efforts have been made in the last years to increase the storage energy density of electrochemical capacitors. A lot of results from published work (research and review papers, patents and reports) are available at this time. The purpose of this review is a presentation of the progress to date for the use of new materials and approaches for supercapacitor electrodes, with focus on the energy storage capability for practical applications. Many reported results refer to nanostructured carbon based materials and the related composites, used for the manufacture of experimental electrodes. A specific capacitance and a specific energy are seldom revealed as the main result of the performed investigation. Thus for nanoprous (activated) carbon based electrodes a specific capacitance up to 200-220 F/g is mentioned for organic electrolyte, whereas for aqueous electrolyte, the value is limited to 400-500 F/g. Significant contribution to specific capacitance is possible from fast faradaic reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface in addition to the electric double layer effect. The corresponding energy density is limited to 30-50 Wh/kg for organic electrolyte and to 12-17 Wh/kg for aqueous electrolyte. However such performance indicators are given only for the carbon material used in electrodes. For a supercapacitor cell, where two electrodes and also other materials for cell assembling and packaging are used, the above mentioned values have to be divided by a factor higher than four. As a consequence, the specific energy of a prototype cell, hardly could exceed 10 Wh/kg because of difficulties with the existing manufacturing technology. Graphene based materials and carbon nanotubes and different composites have been used in many experiments reported in the last years. Nevertheless in spite of the outstanding properties of these materials, significant increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy in comparison with activated or nanoporous carbon is not achieved. Use of redox materials as metal oxides or conducting polymers in combination with different nanostructured carbon materials (nanocomposite electrodes) has been found to contribute to further increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy. Nevertheless, few results are reported for practical cells with such materials. Many results are reported only for a three electrode system and significant difference is possible when the electrode is used in a practical supercapacitor cell. Further improvement in the electrode manufacture and more experiments with supercapacitor cells with the known electrochemical storage materials are required. Device prototypes and commercial products with an energy density towards 15-20 Wh/kg could be realized. These may be a milestone for further supercapacitor device research and development, to narrow the storage energy gap between batteries and supercapacitors.

  3. RESEARCH RESEARCH VALIDATION COMMERCIAL MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multifunctional Nanocomposites Florescent Imaging of Graphene Based Materials Sealants for Fetal Membrane Repair Gas Phase Deposition in Metal Organic Frameworks Nanocomposites for Energy Storage Adhesive Hydrogels-SurfaceTexturing System Separation of Olefin/Paraffin Metal Organic Frameworks Silole-Containing Polymers Conductive

  4. Conjugated Materials DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310290

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Peter

    Conjugated Materials DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310290 Dithiolodithiole as a Building Block for Conjugated Materials** Derek J. Schipper, Lionel C. H. Moh, Peter Müller, and Timothy M. Swager* Abstract as a conjugated building block for organic materials is described. The resulting materials exhibit complimentary

  5. Blackbody material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hamby, Jr., Clyde (Harriman, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN); Trivelpiece, Alvin W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A light emitting article comprises a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light emitting composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  6. Method of photocatalytic conversion of C-H organics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Camaioni, D.M.; Lilga, M.A.

    1998-01-13

    The present invention is the addition of a semiconductor material and energy to the reaction mixture of organic, acid (for example, trifluoroacetate), and oxygen. A transition metal ion may be added to the reaction mixture. The semiconductor material converts energy to oxidants thereby promoting oxidation of the organic. Alternatively, using metal in combination with exposure to light may be used.

  7. Method of photocatalytic conversion of C-H organics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Camaioni, Donald M. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is the addition of a semiconductor material and energy to the reaction mixture of organic, acid (for example, trifluoroacetate), and oxygen. A transition metal ion may be added to the reaction mixture. The semiconductor material converts energy to oxidants thereby promoting oxidation of the organic. Alternatively, using metal in combination with exposure to light may be used.

  8. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  9. Casting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  10. Construction material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  11. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference Materials Reference

  12. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference Materials

  13. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

  14. White light-emitting organic electroluminescent devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John; Duggal, Anil Raj; Parthasarathy, Gautam

    2006-06-20

    A light-emitting device comprises a light-emitting member, which comprises two electrodes, at least two organic electroluminescent ("EL") materials disposed between the electrodes, a charge blocking material disposed between the electrodes, and at least one photoluminescent ("PL") material. The light-emitting member emits electromagnetic ("EM") radiation having a first spectrum in response to a voltage applied across the two electrodes. The PL material absorbs a portion of the EM radiation emitted by the light-emitting member and emits EM radiation having second spectrum different than the first spectrum. Each of the organic EL materials emits EM radiation having a wavelength range selected from the group consisting of blue and red wavelength ranges.

  15. Method of monitoring photoactive organic molecules in-situ during gas-phase deposition of the photoactive organic molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Vartanian, Garen; Rolin, Cedric

    2015-06-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring of gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in real time while depositing a film of the photoactive organic molecules on a substrate in a processing chamber for depositing the film includes irradiating the gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in the processing chamber with a radiation from a radiation source in-situ while depositing the film of the one or more organic materials and measuring the intensity of the resulting photoluminescence emission from the organic material. One or more processing parameters associated with the deposition process can be determined from the photoluminescence intensity data in real time providing useful feedback on the deposition process.

  16. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering The development of new high-performance materials for energy Use of Advanced Characterization Techniques for Materials Development in Energy and Transportation and composition of materials at higher spatial resolution, with greater efficiency, and on real materials

  17. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  18. Scratch resistance of different silica filled resins for obturation materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    for better obturation materials persists. Since teeth are constantly subjected to scratch- ing by hard food is a composite of organic (collagen, etc.) and mineral [hydroxyapatite (HAp)] phases. The outer enamel layer together the HAp crystals. A synthetic counterpart to the natural tooth materials is a hybrid organic

  19. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  20. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  1. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  2. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  3. Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

    2011-07-05

    An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

  4. Materials for solid state lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.G.; Simmons, J.A.

    2002-03-26

    Dramatic improvement in the efficiency of inorganic and organic light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs) within the last decade has made these devices viable future energy efficient replacements for current light sources. However, both technologies must overcome major technical barriers, requiring significant advances in material science, before this goal can be achieved. Attention will be given to each technology associated with the following major areas of material research: (1) material synthesis, (2) process development, (3) device and defect physics, and (4) packaging. The discussion on material synthesis will emphasize the need for further development of component materials, including substrates and electrodes, necessary for improving device performance. The process technology associated with the LEDs and OLEDs is very different, but in both cases it is one factor limiting device performance. Improvements in process control and methodology are expected to lead to additional benefits of higher yield, greater reliability and lower costs. Since reliability and performance are critical to these devices, an understanding of the basic physics of the devices and device failure mechanisms is necessary to effectively improve the product. The discussion will highlight some of the more basic material science problems remaining to be solved. In addition, consideration will be given to packaging technology and the need for the development of novel materials and geometries to increase the efficiencies and reliability of the devices. The discussion will emphasize the performance criteria necessary to meet lighting applications, in order to illustrate the gap between current status and market expectations for future product.

  5. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  6. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  7. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  8. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  9. Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applied materials science and technology. One key component of the division is a strong Basic Energy Sciences (BES) portfolio that pushes the frontiers of materials theory,...

  10. Stable blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark; Giebink, Noel

    2014-08-26

    Novel combination of materials and device architectures for organic light emitting devices is provided. An organic light emitting device, is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer includes a host and a phosphorescent emissive dopant having a peak emissive wavelength less than 500 nm, and a radiative phosphorescent lifetime less than 1 microsecond. Preferably, the phosphorescent emissive dopant includes a ligand having a carbazole group.

  11. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Manufacturing New materials drive the development of innovative products. Building upon a rich history in materials science, ORNL is discovering and developing...

  12. Photochemical deterioration of the organic/metal contacts in organic optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Qi; Williams, Graeme; Aziz, Hany; Tsui Ting

    2012-09-15

    We study the effect of exposure to light on a wide range of organic/metal contacts that are commonly used in organic optoelectronic devices and found that irradiation by light in the visible and UV range results in a gradual deterioration in their electrical properties. This photo-induced contact degradation reduces both charge injection (i.e., from the metal to the organic layer) and charge extraction (i.e., from the organic layer to the metal). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements reveal detectable changes in the interface characteristics after irradiation, indicating that the photo-degradation is chemical in nature. Changes in XPS characteristics after irradiation suggests a possible reduction in bonds associated with organic-metal complexes. Measurements of interfacial adhesion strength using the four-point flexure technique reveal a decrease in organic/metal adhesion in irradiated samples, consistent with a decrease in metal-organic bond density. The results shed the light on a new material degradation mechanism that appears to have a wide presence in organic/metal interfaces in general, and which likely plays a key role in limiting the stability of various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic light emitting devices, organic solar cells, and organic photo-detectors.

  13. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  14. TFB:TPDSi2 interfacial layer usable in organic photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Iobin J. (Evanston, IL); Hains, Alexander W. (Evanston, IL)

    2011-02-15

    The present invention, in one aspect, relates to a solar cell. In one embodiment, the solar cell includes an anode; an active organic layer comprising an electron-donating organic material and an electron-accepting organic material; and an interfacial layer formed between the anode and active organic layer, where the interfacial layer comprises a hole-transporting polymer characterized with a hole-mobility higher than that of the electron-donating organic material in the active organic layer, and a small molecule that has a high hole-mobility and is capable of crosslinking on contact with air.

  15. Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickford, D.F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

  16. Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickford, D.F.

    1997-09-02

    A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig.

  17. Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

  18. Departmental Organization and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-06-10

    Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

  19. Protective coatings for sensitive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Egert, C.M.

    1997-08-05

    An enhanced protective coating is disclosed to prevent interaction between constituents of the environment and devices that can be damaged by those constituents. This coating is provided by applying a synergistic combination of diffusion barrier and physical barrier materials. These materials can be, for example, in the form of a plurality of layers of a diffusion barrier and a physical barrier, with these barrier layers being alternated. Further protection in certain instances is provided by including at least one layer of a getter material to actually react with one or more of the deleterious constituents. The coating is illustrated by using alternating layers of an organic coating (such as Parylene-C{trademark}) as the diffusion barrier, and a metal coating (such as aluminum) as the physical barrier. For best results there needs to be more than one of at least one of the constituent layers. 4 figs.

  20. Protective coatings for sensitive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01

    An enhanced protective coating to prevent interaction between constituents of the environment and devices that can be damaged by those constituents. This coating is provided by applying a synergistic combination of diffusion barrier and physical barrier materials. These materials can be, for example, in the form of a plurality of layers of a diffusion barrier and a physical barrier, with these barrier layers being alternated. Further protection in certain instances is provided by including at least one layer of a getter material to actually react with one or more of the deleterious constituents. The coating is illustrated by using alternating layers of an organic coating (such as Parylene-C.TM.) as the diffusion barrier, and a metal coating (such as aluminum) as the physical barrier. For best results there needs to be more than one of at least one of the constituent layers.

  1. Corrosion control of metals by organic coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooij, W.J. van; Bierwagen, G.P.; Skerry, B.S.; Mills, D.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a comprehensive treatment of the entire field of corrosion control of metals, from mechanisms and testing procedures to modification of metal surfaces and interfaces by silanes and plasma techniques. They discuss the new, sophisticated analytical tools, such as Time-of-Flight SIMS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and all materials -- metals, pretreatments, and paint systems. The contents include: (1) Corrosion under organic coatings; (2) Mechanisms of corrosion control by organic coatings; (3) Metal pretreatments; (4) Techniques to study organic coating-metal interfaces; (5) Modification of metal surfaces and interfaces; (6) corrosion testing; (7) Adhesion testing; (8) Paint systems; (9) Conclusions and prospects references.

  2. Nanoscale Synthesis and Functional Assembly Center for Nanophase Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Kai Xiao R&D Staff Nanoscale Synthesis and Functional Assembly Center for Nanophase Materials Oak materials; #12;3. Inorganic/organic nanoscale electronics. Fabrication 1D and 2D nanoscale electronic of Technology, China Chemistry B.A., 1998 Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Acad. of Sci., China Material

  3. Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Binding ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials |...

  4. Screening combinatorial arrays of inorganic materials with spectroscopy or microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy

    2004-02-03

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  5. Polymer arrays from the combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Goldwasser, Isy; Briceno, Gabriel; Sun, Xiao-Dong

    2004-09-21

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  6. Composite material dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  7. Method for forming materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  8. Current trends in chemistry of materials S NATARAJAN and J GOPALAKRISHNAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    materials (synthesis and the role of chemistry) and understanding materials (the role of theory). Possible] inorganic-organic hybrid materials [8] and materials for other related properties. In this context, one, (figure 1) for being the Keywords. Solid materials; dense; porous; energy; synthesis; theory. 21 #12

  9. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    Waves in Magnetoelectric Materials . . . Need forApplication of Multiferroic Materials to Receive AntennaMaterials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  10. Method for making an energetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-03-18

    A method for making trinitrotoluene is described, and which includes the steps of providing a source of aqueous nitric acid having a concentration of less than about 95% by weight; mixing a surfactant with the source of aqueous nitric acid so as to dehydrate the aqueous nitric acid to produce a source of nitronium ions; providing a supercritical carbon dioxide environment; providing a source of an organic material to be nitrated to the supercritical carbon dioxide environment; and controllably mixing the source or nitronium ions with the supercritical carbon dioxide environment to nitrate the organic material and produce trinitrotoluene.

  11. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  12. Direct synthesis of ordered mesoporous materials constructed with polymersilica hybrid frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Man

    to obtain the organic­inorganic hybrid mesoporous materials. The post-synthesis procedure via graftingDirect synthesis of ordered mesoporous materials constructed with polymer­silica hybrid frameworks for pore surface modification.5 Second is the one-pot synthesis of mesoporous materials with an organically

  13. The Development of Semiconducting Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Jessica D.

    2013-01-01

    40 min before adding zinc bromide (6.89 g, 30.6 mmol) and30 min before adding zinc bromide (6.89 g, 30.6 mmol) and

  14. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Porous Metal-Organic Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jinhee

    2013-04-19

    of conformation of the azobenzene groups inside the pores. The adsorbent returned to its original state when allowed to stay with gentle heating. In addition, solubility of srMOPs was optically controlled by trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene moieties...

  15. Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

  16. Exploring Structure-Property Relationships in Conjugated Organic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Blanton Neil

    2016-01-01

    develop clean and renewable energy sources that can supportclean and affordable renewable energy sources are urgentlyfor clean, renewable energy. Current commercialized solar

  17. Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

    2012-04-01

    This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

  18. Simulation of Neutron Backscattering applied to organic material detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forero, N. C.; Cruz, A. H.; Cristancho, F.

    2007-10-26

    The Neutron Backscattering technique is tested when performing the task of localizing hydrogenated explosives hidden in soil. Detector system, landmine, soil and neutron source are simulated with Geant4 in order to obtain the number of neutrons detected when several parameters like mine composition, relative position mine-source and soil moisture are varied.0.

  19. The Development of Semiconducting Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Jessica D.

    2013-01-01

    a clear light yellow oil (98%). The crude product was used2.57 g of an orange oil (77 %). The crude product was used647 mg of a yellow oil (74 %). The crude product was used

  20. Computational investigations of new bioorthogonal cycloadditions and organic semiconducting materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Steven Alexander

    2015-01-01

    the activation free energy in water with tetrazine (viaactivation free energies in water (G water ), relative ratefree energies in the gas phase and in water (G gas and G

  1. Alternative methods and materials for patterning organic thin film electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahlke, Matthias Erhard

    2014-01-01

    Photolithography's accuracy and scalability have made it the method for sub-micronscale definition of single-crystal semiconductor devices for over half a century. The ultimate goal for OLED manufacturing, however, is to ...

  2. Computational investigations of new bioorthogonal cycloadditions and organic semiconducting materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Steven Alexander

    2015-01-01

    4 shows the lowest energy transition structures and theresults from the lowest energy transition state, TS(1a?3a).11 (See SI for higher energy transition structures). Table 6

  3. Chemistry and Applications of Metal-Organic Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Dan

    2012-02-14

    . 5 Albeit not a primary energy source, hydrogen is an ideal energy carrier. It almost triples the gravimetric heat of combustion of gasoline (120 MJ kg-1 vs. 44.5 MJ kg-1).22 More importantly, the energy-releasing procedure of hydrogen oxidation... combustion heat than that of gasoline (8960 MJ m-3 vs. 31170 MJ m-3). In the gas phase, 4 kg of hydrogen occupy 45 m3 of space at room temperature and 1 atm.23 In order to facilitate the research and application of hydrogen as an energy carrier, the U...

  4. Directed Organization of Functional Materials at Inorganic-Macromolecular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileep

  5. Biomimicry in metal-organic materials | Center for Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools toBadging,

  6. High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡High HIGHofWasteDepartmentfor

  7. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes in organic media for polymer:fullerene photovoltaic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes in organic media for polymer:fullerene photovoltaic devices Gwang photovoltaic device are fabricated using homogeneously dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a polymer. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials promise the production

  8. Computational Evaluation of Metal-Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jiamei

    2013-03-20

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new class of porous solids comprised of metal-containing nodes linked by organic ligands, have become promising materials for gas separations. In particular, their flexible chemistry makes them attractive for CO2...

  9. Effects of PMMA-transfer residues on the growth of organic semiconductor molecules on CVD graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratzer, Markus; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Matkovi?, Aleksandar; Gaji?, Radoš; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Weatherup, Robert S.; Hofmann, Stephan; Teichert, Christian

    2015-03-09

    Scalably grown and transferred graphene is a highly promising material for organic electronic applications, but controlled interfacing of graphene thereby remains a key challenge. Here, we study the growth characteristics of the important organic...

  10. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2006-03-30

    An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

  11. Technology Planning in Smaller Organizations or Nonprofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    in expenditures. - Each statement may be true or false. Major cost of writing a plan is staff time. A technology1 Technology Planning in Smaller Organizations or Nonprofits (This is quite practical material...) Before we begin: See http://www.nten.org/ Why Undertake Technology Planning? Source: Podolsky, 2003 Wired

  12. Organic photovoltaics and concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapel, Jonathan King

    2008-01-01

    The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

  13. ORGANIZATION CHART UNIVERSITY SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Materials Mgmt Safety & Health Training Industrial Hygiene Medical Surveillance Fire & Life Safety Workers

  14. Aerogels derived from multifunctional organic monomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.

    1991-09-01

    Traditional inorganic aerogels are mad via the hydrolysis and condensation of metal alkoxides. Recently, we reported the synthesis of organic aerogels based upon the aqueous polycondensation of (1) resorcinol with formaldehyde and (2) melamine with formaldehyde. The former materials can also be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form vitreous carbon aerogels. In both the inorganic and organic systems, the structure and properties of the dried aerogel are dictated by polymerization conditions. Factors such as pH, reactant ratio, and temperature influence the crosslinking chemistry and growth processes taking place prior to gelation. The ability to tailor the structure and properties of aerogels at the nanometer scale opens up exciting possibilities for these novel materials. This paper addresses the chemistry-structure-property relationships of organic aerogels. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Evaluation of the commercial potential of novel organic photovoltaic technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Jonathan (Jonathan Allan)

    2005-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells based on organic semiconducting materials have the potential to compete with the more mature crystalline and thin film based photovoltaic technologies in the future primarily due to the expectation of ...

  16. Overcoming the Exciton Diffusion Bottleneck in Organic Photovoltaic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overcoming the Exciton Diffusion Bottleneck in Organic Photovoltaic Cells May 20, 2009 at 3pm36-428 Russell J.Holmes Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science,...

  17. Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskite Solar Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SunShot Initiative supports research and development projects aimed at increasing the efficiency and lifetime as well as evaluating new materials for hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar...

  18. Inorganic Metal Oxide/Organic Polymer Nanocomposites And Method Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Simpson, Randy (Livermore, CA)

    2004-11-16

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal in organic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophilic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  19. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  20. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  1. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Richard W. (Hinsdale, IL); Nieman, G. William (Evanston, IL); Weertman, Julia R. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  2. Method of making organic light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Janora, Kevin Henry (Schenectady, NY); Parthasarathy, Gautam (Saratoga Springs, NY); Cella, James Anthony (Clifton Park, NY); Chichak, Kelly Scott (Clifton Park, NY)

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides a method for the preparation of organic light-emitting devices comprising a bilayer structure made by forming a first film layer comprising an electroactive material and an INP precursor material, and exposing the first film layer to a radiation source under an inert atmosphere to generate an interpenetrating network polymer composition comprising the electroactive material. At least one additional layer is disposed on the reacted first film layer to complete the bilayer structure. The bilayer structure is comprised within an organic light-emitting device comprising standard features such as electrodes and optionally one or more additional layers serving as a bipolar emission layer, a hole injection layer, an electron injection layer, an electron transport layer, a hole transport layer, exciton-hole transporting layer, exciton-electron transporting layer, a hole transporting emission layer, or an electron transporting emission layer.

  3. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  4. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2012-10-23

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  5. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-03-19

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  6. Study of organic molecules and nano-particle/polymer composites for flash memory and switch applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paydavosi, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Organic materials exhibit fascinating optical and electronic properties which motivate their hybridization with traditional silicon-based electronics in order to achieve novel functionalities and address scaling challenges ...

  7. Elucidating the organic-OMS interface and its implications for heterogeneous catalysts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingqing

    2012-07-16

    Organic – ordered mesoporous silica (OMS) hybrid materials have attracted great interest due to their potential applications for gas separations, and heterogeneous catalysis. Amine-functionalized OMS materials are active in a variety of base...

  8. Nanostructured magnetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

  9. Department of Materials Science &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Materials Science & Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, students in materials science, engineering physics and engineering science choose to tackle compelling issues in materials science and engineering or engineering science

  10. Sandia Energy - Materials Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Chemistry Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Clean FuelsPower Materials Chemistry Materials ChemistryAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:42:21+00:00...

  11. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-06

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  12. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  13. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  14. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Education Center About Us Conferences and Workshops Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop Quantum and Dirac Materials for Energy...

  15. Materials Physics and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPA Materials Physics and Applications We develop new technologies that solve pressing national energy and security challenges by exploring and exploiting materials and their...

  16. Vibrational Thermodynamics of Materials Brent Fultz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fultz, Brent

    Vibrational Thermodynamics of Materials Brent Fultz California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena CA 91125 USA July 6, 2009 Abstract. The literature on vibrational thermodynamics of harmonic phonons in alloys are organized into thermodynamic models for unmixing and ordering

  17. Pricing of Departmental Materials and Services

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-11-03

    To set forth requirements for establishing prices and charges for materials and services sold or provided to external organizations, other Federal agencies, and the private sector either directly or through the Department's site/facility management contracts. Supersedes DOE O 2110.1A.

  18. LANL organic analysis detection capabilities for chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansell, G.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.; Hollis, K.W.; Monagle, M.

    1996-12-31

    Organic analysis is the analytical arm for several Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) research programs and nuclear materials processes, including characterization and certification of nuclear and nonnuclear materials used in weapons, radioactive waste treatment and waste certification programs. Organic Analysis has an extensive repertoire of analytical technique within the group including headspace gas, PCBs/pesticides, volatile organics and semivolatile organic analysis. In addition organic analysis has mobile labs with analytic capabilities that include volatile organics, total petroleum hydrocarbon, PCBs, pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and high explosive screening. A natural extension of these capabilities can be applied to the detection of chemical and biological agents,

  19. Finding renewable energy materials using one screensaver at a...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Finding renewable energy materials using one screensaver at a time: Combinatorial quantum chemistry for organic photovoltaics April 24, 2012 at 3pm36-428 Alan Aspuru-Guzik...

  20. New functional polymers for sensors, smart materials and solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobez Comeras, Jose Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Organic polymers can be used as the active component of sensors, smart materials, chemical-delivery systems and the active layer of solar cells. The rational design and modification of the chemical structure of polymers ...

  1. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsuk Kang; Young-Gui Yoon; D. Thirumalai; Changbong Hyeon

    2015-06-03

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yeast ($N\\approx 1.2\\times 10^7$, $\\phi<\\phi_c^{\\infty}$) are equilibrated with no clear signature of such organization.

  2. Fossil Energy Materials Program conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy has recognized the need for materials research and development to assure the adequacy of materials of construction for advanced fossil energy systems. The principal responsibility for identifying needed materials research and for establishing a program to address these needs resides within the Office of Technical Coordination. That office has established the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Fossil Energy Materials Program to fulfill that responsibility. In addition to the AR and TD Materials Program, which is designed to address in a generic way the materials needs of fossil energy systems, specific materials support activities are also sponsored by the various line organizations such as the Office of Coal Gasification. A conference was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee on May 19-21, 1987, to present and discuss the results of program activities during the past year. The conference program was organized in accordance with the research thrust areas we have established. These research thrust areas include structural ceramics (particularly fiber-reinforced ceramic composites), corrosion and erosion, and alloy development and mechanical properties. Eighty-six people attended the conference. Papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  3. Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

  4. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Organic Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells Based on Silole-Fluorene Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and to stop the well known spectral shift degradation occurring in fluorene based materials. In this paper we1 Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Organic Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells Based on Silole-Fluorene, copolymerization of siloles with fluorene was aimed at improving electron injection into the polymer layer and so

  5. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newkirk, L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

  6. A Case for Safer Building Materials: Lifecycle Concerns, Data Gaps, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    ;Conventional Building Materials · Wood · Stone · Cement · Metal · Glass · Straw · Ceramics #12;Synthetic;Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) · Aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons

  7. Density Functional Theory for High-Throughput Screening of Chemicals and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    organic compounds and gas storage capabilities in nanoporousof materials for gas storage has been rather limited becausefree energy and gas storage and transport properties in

  8. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, B.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Prater, J.T.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed. 11 figs.

  9. Synthesis of Novel Polypeptide-Silica Hybrid Materials through Surface-Initiated N-carboxyanhydride Polymerization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunn, Jonathan D.

    2011-08-08

    There is an increasing demand for materials that are physically robust, easily recovered, and able to perform a wide variety of chemical functions. By combining hard and soft matter synergistically, organic-inorganic hybrid materials are potentially...

  10. Conferences and Seminars Organized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiscale Analysis and Modeling of Dislocation Motions, (Minisymposium for the Sixth SIAM Conference on Mathematics of Materials Science, May 2010)

  11. Engineering Organic/inorganic hybrids comprise a mixture of oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science and Director of Energy Materials Forum at the College of Polymer Science and Engineering and polymers, forming specific structures with unique functionalities. These materials have a wide range of potential applications in coatings, fuel cells, solar cells, and sensors. Organic amino (-NH2) silane

  12. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  13. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peumans, Peter; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-01-22

    A photoactive device is provided. The device includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between and electrically connected to the first and second electrodes. The photoactive region further includes an organic donor layer and an organic acceptor layer that form a donor-acceptor heterojunction. The mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region are different by a factor of at least 100, and more preferably a factor of at least 1000. At least one of the mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region is greater than 0.001 cm.sup.2/V-sec, and more preferably greater than 1 cm.sup.2/V-sec. The heterojunction may be of various types, including a planar heterojunction, a bulk heterojunction, a mixed heterojunction, and a hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction.

  14. Low resistance thin film organic solar cell electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen (Princeton, NJ); Xue, Jiangeng (Piscataway, NJ)

    2008-01-01

    A method which lower the series resistance of photosensitive devices includes providing a transparent film of a first electrically conductive material arranged on a transparent substrate; depositing and patterning a mask over the first electrically conductive material, such that openings in the mask have sloping sides which narrow approaching the substrate; depositing a second electrically conductive material directly onto the first electrically conductive material exposed in the openings of the mask, at least partially filling the openings; stripping the mask, leaving behind reentrant structures of the second electrically conductive material which were formed by the deposits in the openings of the mask; after stripping the mask, depositing a first organic material onto the first electrically conductive material in between the reentrant structures; and directionally depositing a third electrically conductive material over the first organic material deposited in between the reentrant structures, edges of the reentrant structures aligning deposition so that the third electrically conductive material does not directly contact the first electrically conductive material, and does not directly contact the second electrically conductive material.

  15. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  16. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering In this presentation the role of materials in power generation sector is about 20%, opportunities for materials-based technologies to improve energy efficiency (e Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He is also the Director of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

  17. Tritium breeding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.

    1984-03-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved.

  18. Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heller, Christian Maria Anton (Albany, NY)

    2008-05-06

    A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

  19. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  20. Evaporative printing of organic materials and metals and development of organic memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Sung Hoon, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    The advantages of directed printing make it the ideal fabrication tool for the ubiquitous electronic technologies of the future. However, direct printing techniques such as ink-jet technology, are currently limited to ...

  1. Organization and Functions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organization and Functions Mission Unit EM-30 Deputy Assistant SecretaryADAS Waste Management Director Office of Packaging and Transportation EM-33 Regulations & Standards...

  2. Astatinated organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milius, R.A.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1989-05-02

    Methods and kits for incorporating a radioactive astatine isotope (particularly [sup 211]At) into an organic compound by electrophilic astatodestannylation of organostannanes. 3 figs.

  3. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2012-10-23

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  4. Prebiotic materials from on and off the early Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prebiotic materials from on and off the early Earth Max Bernstein* NASA Ames Research Center, Mail of organics to the Earth every day, therefore this flux of reduced carbon from space probably also played a role in making the Earth habitable. We will compare and contrast the types and abundances of organics

  5. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  6. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, David R. (Bothel, WA); Stampfer, Joseph F. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  7. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, R.W.; Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R.

    1994-06-14

    A method is disclosed for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material. 19 figs.

  8. High efficiency organic photovoltaic cells employing hybridized mixed-planar heterojunctions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xue, Jiangeng; Uchida, Soichi; Rand, Barry P.; Forrest, Stephen

    2015-08-18

    A device is provided, having a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode. The photoactive region includes a first photoactive organic layer that is a mixture of an organic acceptor material and an organic donor material, wherein the first photoactive organic layer has a thickness not greater than 0.8 characteristic charge transport lengths; a second photoactive organic layer in direct contact with the first organic layer, wherein the second photoactive organic layer is an unmixed layer of the organic acceptor material of the first photoactive organic layer, and the second photoactive organic layer has a thickness not less than about 0.1 optical absorption lengths; and a third photoactive organic layer disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode and in direct contact with the first photoactive organic layer. The third photoactive organic layer is an unmixed layer of the organic donor layer of the first photoactive organic layer and has a thickness not less than about 0.1 optical absorption lengths.

  9. ENGINEERED ELECTRODES AND ELECTRODE-ORGANIC INTERFACES FOR HIGH-EFFICIENCY ORGANIC PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin J. Marks; R.P.H. Chang; Tom Mason; Ken Poeppelmeier; Arthur J. Freeman

    2008-11-13

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells offer the ultimate promise of low cost, readily manufacturable, and durable solar power. While recent advances have led to cells with impressive performance levels, OPV cells have yet to break the double-digit efficiency barrier. Further gains in efficiency and durability, to that competitive with high-performance inorganic photovoltaics will require breakthroughs in transparent electrode and interfacial materials science and engineering. This project involved an integrated basic research effort carried out by an experienced and highly collaborative interdisciplinary team to address in unconventional ways, critical electrode-interfacial issues underlying OPV performance--controlling band offsets between transparent electrodes and organics, addressing current loss/leakage problems at interfaces, enhancing adhesion, interfacial stability, and device durability while minimizing cost. It synergistically combined materials and interfacial reagent synthesis, nanostructural and photovoltaic characterization, and high level quantum theory. The research foci were: 1) understanding of/development of superior transparent electrode materials and materials morphologies--i.e., better matched electronically and chemically to organic active layers, 2) understanding-based development of inorganic interfacial current-collecting/charge-blocking layers, and 3) understanding-based development of self-assembled adhesion/current-collecting/charge-blocking/cross-linking layers for high-efficiency OPV interfaces. Pursing the goal of developing the fundamental scientific understanding needed to design, fabricate, prototype and ultimately test high-efficiency OPV cells incorporating these new concepts, we achieved a record power conversion efficiency of 5.2% for an organic bulk-heterjunction solar cell.

  10. Inorganic metal oxide/organic polymer nanocomposites and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-03-30

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal inorganic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophillic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the composite material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  11. High efficiency organic photovoltaic cells employing hybridized mixed-planar heterojunctions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xue, Jiangeng; Uchida, Soichi; Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen

    2013-11-19

    A device is provided, having a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode. The photoactive region includes a first organic layer comprising a mixture of an organic acceptor material and an organic donor material, wherein the first organic layer has a thickness not greater than 0.8 characteristic charge transport lengths, and a second organic layer in direct contact with the first organic layer, wherein: the second organic layer comprises an unmixed layer of the organic acceptor material or the organic donor material of the first organic layer, and the second organic layer has a thickness not less than about 0.1 optical absorption lengths. Preferably, the first organic layer has a thickness not greater than 0.3 characteristic charge transport lengths. Preferably, the second organic layer has a thickness of not less than about 0.2 optical absorption lengths. Embodiments of the invention can be capable of power efficiencies of 2% or greater, and preferably 5% or greater.

  12. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  13. Importance of the Donor:Fullerene Intermolecular Arrangement for High-Efficiency Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Photovoltaics Kenneth R. Graham,, Clement Cabanetos, Justin P. Jahnke,§ Matthew N. Idso,§ Abdulrahman El Labban *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) material systems the performance of OPV material systems. INTRODUCTION Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are a promising PV technology

  14. Plasmachemical surface functionalised beads: versatile tailored supports for polymer assisted organic synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    materials. Solid supported synthesis has become a widely used technique in organic chemistry. Whilst a range of inorganic materials such as clays, silicas and controlled pore glass are used, the vast majority of supports organic synthesis Jas Pal Badyal,a Audrey M. Cameron,a Neil R. Cameron,a Diane M. Coe,c Richard Cox

  15. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  16. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  17. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  18. Zeolitic Materials, Vol. 3, No. 1, December 2002, 20-28 20 Copyright 2002 Korean Zeolite Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Man

    studies report the synthesis of inorganic-organic hybrid mesoporous materials MCM-41 functionalized mesoporous organosilicas (PMO) are hybrid organic-inorganic materials containing siloxane moieties bridged. / Synthesis and Alkylation of Phenol over PMO-SO3H Zeolitic Materials, Vol. 3, No. 1, December 2002 21

  19. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  20. UWM-CBU Concrete Materials Technology Series Program No. 71 Workshop on GREEN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    : Classification (Class F, Class C, Class N, and SDA & Clean-Coal Ash); Chemical Composition; PhysicalUWM-CBU Concrete Materials Technology Series Program No. 71 Workshop on GREEN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Center for By-Products Utilization NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION 3200

  1. Editorial: Photovoltaic Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Rupnowski, P.

    2012-01-01

    As the global energy needs grow, there is increasing interest in the generation of electricity by photovoltaics (PVs) devices or solar cells - devices that convert sunlight to electricity. Solar industry has seen an enormous growth during the last decade. The sale of PV modules has exceeded 27 GW in 2011, with significant contributions to the market share from all technologies. While the silicon technology continues to have the dominant share, the other thin film technologies (CdTe, CIGS, a-Si, and organic PV) are experiencing fast growth. Increased production of silicon modules has led to a very rapid reduction in their price and remains as benchmark for other technologies. The PV industry is in full gear to commercialize new automated equipment for solar cell and module production, instrumentation for process monitoring technologies, and for implementation of other cost-reduction approaches, and extensive research continues to be carried out in many laboratories to improve the efficiency of solar cells and modules without increasing the production costs. A large variety of solar cells, which differ in the material systems used, design, PV structure, and even the principle of PV conversion, are designed to date. This special issue contains peer-reviewed papers in the recent developments in research related to broad spectrum of photovoltaic materials and devices. It contains papers on many aspects of solar cells-the growth and deposition, characterization, and new material development.

  2. Summary Report for the Development of Materials for Volatile Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Henager, Charles H.; Matyas, Josef; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2010-11-22

    The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2010, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogenides. For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated.

  3. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  4. Earth-Abundant Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The sections below...

  5. Factors of material consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

  6. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Forensics team in the Polymers and Coatings Group, MST-7. He graduated from the University of Toledo, aerogels, carbon fiber composites, damaged materials, and low density materials examining defects

  7. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Turchi, Patrice LLNL Materials...

  8. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  9. Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

  10. Karankawa linguistic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Anthony P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper I present the available materials on the diverse dialectal forms of the extinct Karankawa language of coastal Texas in the form of an English-Karankawa vocabulary, together with the attested sentence and text material, a transcription...

  11. Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship ABackground Report for the National Dialogue...................................................................................................26 Low Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Regulations on Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship Prepared by the: Product Stewardship Institute University

  12. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

  13. Approaching 10% Conversion Efficiency Using Tandem Organic Photovoltaic Cells with Enhanced Optical Coupling: Final Report, October 2004 - December 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, S.

    2008-08-01

    To find routes to achieving nearly 10% power conversion efficiency based on a new generation of organic photovoltaic cells using vapor-deposited, small-molecular-weight organic materials.

  14. Departmental Organization Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-27

    Public Law 95-91, 42 United States Code 7101, Department of Energy Organization Act, Section 642 gives to the Secretary of the Department of Energy the responsibility to approve organization changes affecting the number, designation, or mission of Departmental Elements and to approve the addition, deletion, or transfer of missions and/or functions of or between Departmental Elements. In order to streamline the organizational change process, the Secretary has delegate to the Heads of Departmental Headquarters and Field Elements the authority to approve organization changes. No cancellations.

  15. On Pictorial Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wollheim, Richard

    2002-01-01

    , 2001 © Copyright 200~ by Department of Philosophy University of Kansas On Pictorial Organization Richard Wollhcim U nivcrsity of California, Berkeley 1. Paintings arc organized objects. That much we know, and, in an area where not much is secure... painting works or doesn't work has something to do with its organization, and this idea gains support from the fact that it is only at a late stage in the creative process that the painter will start to think about the painting's working. No serious...

  16. VHTR Materials Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-07-30

    The PowerPoint presentation was given at the DOE-NE Materials Crosscut Coordination Meeting, Tuesday, 30 July 2013.

  17. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Garritt Tucker Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Atomistic Methods to Quantify Nanoscale Strain and Deformation Mechanisms in Nanostructured Materials Thursday, August...

  18. HIGH PERFORMANCE MACROMOLECULAR MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gregory Forest. Department of Mathematics. Institute for Advanced Materials, Nanoscience & Technology. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  19. Instructions and Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following are 2012 Program Peer Review Meeting instructions, materials and resource links for presenters and reviewers.

  20. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering New paradigms in the R&D of novel multifunctional oxide and nanocarbon thin films are providing the bases for new physics, new materials science and chemistry Laboratory (ANL) during the past fifteen years. Also, the applications of these materials for a new

  1. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  2. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Materials Science & Engineering The University of Utah 2014-15 Undergraduate Handbook #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines, including chemistry, physics and engineering. It is the one discipline within the College of Engineering

  3. FIRE SYSTEMS Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    FIRE SYSTEMS Professional Organizations: American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) Society for Fire Protection Engineers (SFPE) National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) Events & Training: UVa Center for Leadership Excellence classes SkillSoft classes American Fire Sprinkler Association events American Fire

  4. Allies in Sport Organizations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Elizabeth

    2012-10-19

    Employee support is a key factor in creating more welcoming and accepting work environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals in sport. As such, organizations need to understand what factors ...

  5. Organic Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funds research and development projects related to organic photovoltaics (OPV) due to the unique benefits of the technology. Below is a list of the projects, summary of the benefits, and...

  6. ENGINEERING Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    ENGINEERING Professional Organizations: National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) Virginia Society of Professional Engineers (VSPE) American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) American Institute

  7. PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations: Association of Collegiate Computing Services) Project Management Institute (PMI) Events & Training: UVA Local Support Partners (LSP) program training Project Management Institute webinars Project Management Institute events Scrum Alliance events Learning

  8. RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION Professional Organizations: Society of Research Administrators (SRA) International National Council of University Research Administrators (NCURA) National Council of University Research Administrators (NCURA) Region III Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA) Central Virginia

  9. PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations: Project Management Institute International Association of Project and Program Management (IAPPM) Events & Training: UVa Center for Leadership Excellence classes SkillSoft classes PMO Symposium through PMI Project Management Institute (PMI) webinars American

  10. ORGANIZATIONS Wisconsin Foundation &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS Wisconsin Foundation & Alumni Association UW Medical Foundation The Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Organizational Chart Vice Management Division Faculty and Staff Programs General Library System HIPAA Quality Improvement, Office

  11. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014DepartmentCouncilOffice of theOpenOrganizationOrganization

  12. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014DepartmentCouncilOffice ofOrganization Organization

  13. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServices »About Us » Organization Organization

  14. Tailored Porous Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

    1999-11-09

    Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

  15. Organic contaminant separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Mar, P.

    1993-12-28

    A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

  16. Food Exemption Request Organization Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Exemption Request Organization Information Organization Received ______ Organizations are permitted one food exemption per semester. Requests must be submitted and Regulations Your group has requested a food exemption for an event. The rules and regulations for use

  17. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willem, Henry

    2010-01-01

    organic aerosols from ozone-initiated reactions with emissions from wood-based materials and a "green" paint.organic compounds (VOCs) and other air pollutants from the indoor application of water - based paints.Paints and coatings Wall finish and surfaces Acrylic urethane Glass fiber, resin, polystyrene, polyurethane, polyethylene foam, organic

  18. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction...

  19. Water purification using organic salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  20. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  1. The necessity for a practical approach to address organic emissions from cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonley, C.; Schreiber, B.; Kellerman, S.; Kellett, C.

    1998-12-31

    There is an inherent difficulty in monitoring organic emissions from hazardous waste combustion in the cement process. Data gathered by the EPA and the industry indicate that organic emissions at the main stack of cement kilns are principally from process characteristics and/or the desorption of organic constituents contained in the raw materials. Organic emissions are primarily based on the facility design and origin of the raw materials. One would generally conclude that organic emissions from fuels are essentially non-existent. To understand alternatives for monitoring organic emissions, this paper reviews some of the historical background behind the issue and reviews trends of characteristic organic emissions data. Based on this discussion and review, some approaches are presented to address organic emissions testing and monitoring when utilizing hazardous waste fuel in a cement kiln.

  2. Electrifying inks with 2D materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrisi, Felice; Coleman, Jonathan N.

    2014-10-06

    beyond conventional silicon-based technologies. Electronic devices including radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, light emitting diodes, batteries, and transistors can be built by printing liquid-dispersed functional materials such as organic... , conducting-polymer-based inks are not stable enough for many applications, whereas most nanotube inks contain both semiconducting and metallic tubes. Graphene fulfils most requirements for use in conducting inks thanks to its high carrier mobility...

  3. Assessment tool for nuclear material acquisition pathways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, David Grant

    2009-05-15

    . An organization interested in a smaller required infrastructure may choose to simply obtain material that can be enriched directly, most of these pathways begin in Figure 7 with the exceptions of the EMIS path in Figure 6 and the AVLIS path in Figure 8... Produce 1 SQ of Uranium Metal Produce 1 SQ of Highly Enriched Uranium Metal Develop Basic Heavy Machinery Manufacturing Skills Develop Basic Understanding of Lasers and Optics Construct AVLIS Pilot Plant Master AVLIS Method Construct Full Scale...

  4. Surface Analysis Leader If we are to understand how reliable materials are, and how well they can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    of quality accreditation · Certified to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9001 that produce metallic and plastic components analyse and evaluate the surfaces of their materials

  5. Polychlorinated biphenyls in water, sediment and selected organisms of Galveston Bay, Texas: environmental levels and bioaccumulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahl, Ralph Garner

    1980-01-01

    of PCBs and CHCPs Routes and Mechanisms of Transfer to the Environment Bioaccumulation by Organisms Toxicity to Organisms MATERIALS AND METHODS 6 11 23 28 33 Description of the Study Area Concentrations of Organic Pollutants Microbiological...-10%) 1268 (1. 5-40'4) 1262 (5-50%) 1260 (254 of oil) 1242 (5%) Environmental Levels of PCBs and CHCPs In 1965, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPW) began analyses of water, sediment anc organisms for chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides (CHCP...

  6. Chronology Organization/Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    Supporting Facilities 88 Kashiwa Campus Map 57 Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 62 Materials Design stage of non-destructive long-pulse magnets. As for the synchrotron radiation facility, the construction

  7. Deformation Mechanisms in Nanocrystalline Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Farghalli A.; Yang, Heather

    2010-01-01

    2010 METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A 47. F.A.12. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A VOLUME 41A,of Slip: Progress in Materials Science, Pergamon Press,

  8. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01

    Smart Structures and Materials, 3989:531- 538. Biggerstaff,2002. “Electroviscoelastic Materials As Active Dampers”,Smart Structures and Materials, 4695:345-350. Biggerstaff,

  9. Sandia Energy - Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wavelength Conversion Materials Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Wavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion MaterialsAlyssa...

  10. ANS materials databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchbanks, M.F.

    1995-08-01

    Technical development in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project is dynamic, and a continuously updated information source is necessary to provide readily usable materials data to the designer, analyst, and materials engineer. The Advanced Neutron Source Materials Databook (AMBK) is being developed as a part of the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Information System (AMIS). Its purpose is to provide urgently needed data on a quick-turnaround support basis for those design applications whose schedules demand immediate estimates of material properties. In addition to the need for quick materials information, there is a need for consistent application of data throughout the ANS Program, especially where only limited data exist. The AMBK is being developed to fill this need as well. It is the forerunner to the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Handbook (AMHB). The AMHB, as reviewed and approved by the ANS review process, will serve as a common authoritative source of materials data in support of the ANS Project. It will furnish documented evidence of the materials data used in the design and construction of the ANS system and will serve as a quality record during any review process whose objective is to establish the safety level of the ANS complex. The information in the AMBK and AMHB is also provided in electronic form in a dial-up computer database known as the ANS Materials Database (AMDB). A single consensus source of materials information prepared and used by all national program participants has several advantages. Overlapping requirements and data needs of various sub-projects and subcontractors can be met by a single document which is continuously revised. Preliminary and final safety analysis reports, stress analysis reports, equipment specifications, materials service reports, and many other project-related documents can be substantially reduced in size and scope by appropriate reference to a single data source.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Process for impregnating a concrete or cement body with a polymeric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, A.J.; Spence, R.D.

    1988-05-04

    A process for impregnating cementitious solids with polymeric materials by blending polymeric materials in a grout, allowing the grout to cure, and contacting the resulting solidified grout containing the polymeric materials with an organic mixture containing a monomer, a cross-linking agent and a catalyst. The mixture dissolves the polymerized particles and forms a channel for distributing the monomer throughout the network formed by the polymeric particles. The organic components are then cured to form a substantially water-impermeable mass.

  14. Process for impregnating a concrete or cement body with a polymeric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, Alfred J. (Kingston, TN); Spence, Roger D. (Clinton, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A process for impregnating cementitious solids with polymeric materials by blending polymeric materials in a grout, allowing the grout to cure, and contacting the resulting solidified grout containing the polymeric materials with an organic mixture containing a monomer, a cross-linking agent and a catalyst. The mixture dissolves the polymerized particles and forms a channel for distributing the monomer throughout the network formed by the polymeric particles. The organic components are then cured to form a substantially water-impermeable mass.

  15. EPOK Centre for Organic Food & Farming ORGANIC FOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPOK ­ Centre for Organic Food & Farming ORGANIC FOOD ­ food quality and potential health effects.slu.se/epok/english #12;ORGANIC FOOD ­ food quality and potential health effects Publishing year: 2015, Uppsala Publisher: SLU, EPOK ­ Centre for Organic Food & Farming Lay-out: Pelle Fredriksson, SLU, EPOK Photo, cover: i

  16. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  17. Organic aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  18. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    comprises the core actinide materials science and metallurgical capability within the nuclear weapons production and surveillance communities. Contact Us Group Leader David...

  19. Nanoscale Materials in Medicine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Technology for Drug Delivery. Gao, X., et al. 2002. Journal of Biomedical Optics 7: 532-537. Ferromagnetic materials become superparamagnetic below 20 nm Size...

  20. Webinar: Materials Genome Initative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

  1. Computational Chemical Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Thermodynamic and micromechanical analysis #12;Home Polyimide-nanotube composites for electro-active materials · (ß ­ CN)APB/ODPA Polyimide · Piezoelectric polyimide · Exceptional thermal, mechanical

  2. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain, Austin, TX 78731); Dumitru, Earl T. (10116 Aspen St., Austin, TX 78758)

    1986-11-04

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  3. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain, Austin, TX 78731); Dumitru, Earl T. (10116 Aspen St., Austin, TX 78758)

    1990-02-13

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  4. Radiation Safety Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

  5. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  6. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  7. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop U.S. Department of Energy April 3, 2012 eere.energy.gov Dr. Leo Christodoulou Program Manager Advanced Manufacturing Office Energy Efficiency and...

  8. Next Generation Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    databases for ICME Surface treatments User facility for remanufactured parts testing; lower-cost coating materials Low-cost laser processing; high accuracy non-planar surface...

  9. Phase Change Material Tower

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    transfer of pulverized coal Assortment of available fabrication methods (shrink fit, adhesive, casting) & liner materials (i.e. alumina, SiC, etc.) Pyrotek molten metal transfer...

  10. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  11. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  12. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  13. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  14. Electrolyte materials - Issues and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balbuena, Perla B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas, 77843 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    Electrolytes are vital components of an electrochemical energy storage device. They are usually composed of a solvent or mixture of solvents and a salt or a mixture of salts which provide the appropriate environment for ionic conduction. One of the main issues associated with the selection of a proper electrolyte is that its electronic properties have to be such that allow a wide electrochemical window - defined as the voltage range in which the electrolyte is not oxidized or reduced - suitable to the battery operating voltage. In addition, electrolytes must have high ionic conductivity and negligible electronic conductivity, be chemically stable with respect to the other battery components, have low flammability, and low cost. Weak stability of the electrolyte against oxidation or reduction leads to the formation of a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer at the surface of the cathode and anode respectively. Depending on the materials of the electrolyte and those of the electrode, the SEI layer may be composed by combinations of organic and inorganic species, and it may exert a passivating role. In this paper we discuss the current status of knowledge about electrolyte materials, including non-aqueous liquids, ionic liquids, solid ceramic and polymer electrolytes. We also review the basic knowledge about the SEI layer formation, and challenges for a rational design of stable electrolytes.

  15. Washington and Lee University STUDENT ORGANIZATION APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Washington and Lee University STUDENT ORGANIZATION APPLICATION Organization Name mission statement of your organization. How will your organization be beneficial to Washington and Lee

  16. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  17. Ionic liquid polyoxometalates as light emitting materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz-acosta, Denisse [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bennett, Bryan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Purdy, Geraldine M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Kigney, Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The low melting point, negligible vapor pressure, good solubility, and thermal and chemical stability make ionic liquids useful materials for a wide variety of applications. Polyoxometalates are early transition metal oxygen clusters that can be synthesized in many different sizes and with a variety of heterometals. The most attractive feature of POMs is that their physical properties, in particular electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, can be easily modified following known procedures. It has been shown that POMs can exhibit cooperative properties, as superconductivity and energy transfer. POM ionic liquids can be obtained by selecting the appropliate cation. Different alkyl ammonium and alkyl phosphonium salts are being used to produce new POM ionic liquids together with organic or inorganic luminescent centers to design light emitting materials. Ammonium and phosphonium cations with activated, polymerizable groups are being used to further polymerize the ionic liquid into transparent, solid materials with high metal density.

  18. Thermal properties of organic and inorganic aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Material Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-9900 (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Aerogels are open-cell foams that have already been shown to be among the best thermal insulating solid materials known. This paper examines the three major contributions to thermal transport through porous materials; solid, gaseous, and radiative, to identify how to reduce the thermal conductivity of air-filled aerogels. We find that significant improvements in the thermal insulation property of aerogels are possible by; (i) employing materials with a low intrinsic solid conductivity, (ii) reducing the average pore size within aerogels, and (iii) affecting an increase of the infrared extinction in aerogels. Theoretically, polystyrene is the best of the organic materials and zirconia is the best inorganic material to use for the lowest achievable conductivity. Significant reduction of the thermal conductivity for all aerogel varieties is predicted with only a modest decrease of the average pore size. This might be achieved by modifying the sol-gel chemistry leading to aerogels. For example, a thermal resistance value of [ital R]=20 per inch would be possible for an air-filled resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogel at a density of 156 kg/m[sup 3], if the average pore size was less than 35 nm. An equation is included which facilitates the calculation of the optimum density for the minimum total thermal conductivity, for all varieties of aerogels.

  19. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    -twines numerous disciplines, including chemistry, physics and engineering. It is the one discipline within an engineering degree. Materials Scientists apply the principles of physics and chemistry to engineering problemsMaterials Science & Engineering 2015-2016 Undergraduate Handbook The University of Utah #12

  20. Hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brecher, Lee E.; Mones, Charles G.; Guffey, Frank D.

    2015-06-02

    A hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method may involve a novel combination of heating, vaporizing and chemically reacting hydrocarbonaceous feedstock that is substantially unpumpable at pipeline conditions, and condensation of vapors yielded thereby, in order to upgrade that feedstock to a hydrocarbonaceous material condensate that meets crude oil pipeline specification.

  1. Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2004-02-03

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  2. Measurements and material accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, G.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The DOE role for the NBL in safeguarding nuclear material into the 21st century is discussed. Development of measurement technology and reference materials supporting requirements of SDI, SIS, AVLIS, pyrochemical reprocessing, fusion, waste storage, plant modernization program, and improved tritium accounting are some of the suggested examples.

  3. Registered Student Organization Officer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    website: gradorg.syr.edu #12;Important Information Registered Graduate Student Organization Handbook Fiscal Policy document provides additional fiscal guidelines and procedures ­ The Fiscal Policy can with Office of Student Activities If any of the required information changes, contact Internal VP

  4. Project organizations and schedules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1990-07-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) faces the challenge of simultaneously carrying out a large-scale construction project with demanding cost, schedule, and performance goals; and creating a scientific laboratory capable of exploiting this unique scientific instrument. This paper describes the status of the laboratory organization developed to achieve these goals, and the major near-term schedule objectives of the project.

  5. FOOD SERVICE Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    FOOD SERVICE Professional Organizations: National Association of College and University Food National Association of College and University Food Services (NACUFS) conference NACUFS Mid-Atlantic Region of Colleges and University Food Services e-newsletter Social Media: National Association of College

  6. Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

  7. Non-thermal calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    Non-thermal calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials Atul N-directing agents in the synthesis of microporous materials. The method relies on the exposure of the sample. This method is applicable in making new materials from organic­inorganic pre- cursors and holds promise

  8. Investigation of the Impact of Magnetic Permeability and Loss of Magnetic Composite Materials on RFID and RF Passives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    magnetic materials. One of the most significant challenges for applying new magnetic materials is understanding the interrelationships of the new materials, design, and performance. In previous studies, it can and organic matrix has been demonstrated [4]. The implication ofthese new magnetic materials has not been

  9. Materials of Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-15

    The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

  10. Preparation and screening of crystalline zeolite and hydrothermally-synthesized materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy; Briceno, Gabriel; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Kai-An

    2005-03-08

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  11. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K; Joseph Murphy, J

    2008-07-18

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding that was induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species used in the construction of the packaging, followed by polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. Fiberboard material, also used in the construction of the packaging induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV sealant, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water. In light of these corrosion mechanisms, the lead shielding was sheathed in a stainless steel liner to mitigate against corrosion.

  12. Metabolic evolution of Escherichia coli strains that produce organic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabar, Tammy; Gong, Wei; Yocum, R Rogers

    2014-10-28

    This invention relates to the metabolic evolution of a microbial organism previously optimized for producing an organic acid in commercially significant quantities under fermentative conditions using a hexose sugar as sole source of carbon in a minimal mineral medium. As a result of this metabolic evolution, the microbial organism acquires the ability to use pentose sugars derived from cellulosic materials for its growth while retaining the original growth kinetics, the rate of organic acid production and the ability to use hexose sugars as a source of carbon. This invention also discloses the genetic change in the microorganism that confers the ability to use both the hexose and pentose sugars simultaneously in the production of commercially significant quantities of organic acids.

  13. Mechanically flexible organic electroluminescent device with directional light emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Schaepkens, Marc

    2005-05-10

    A mechanically flexible and environmentally stable organic electroluminescent ("EL") device with directional light emission comprises an organic EL member disposed on a flexible substrate, a surface of which is coated with a multilayer barrier coating which includes at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent organic polymer and at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent inorganic material. The device includes a reflective metal layer disposed on the organic EL member opposite to the substrate. The reflective metal layer provides an increased external quantum efficiency of the device. The reflective metal layer and the multilayer barrier coating form a seal around the organic EL member to reduce the degradation of the device due to environmental elements.

  14. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01

    xi Material CharacterizationThermoelectric Materials . . . . . . . . Graphene-Like5 Nanostructured Materials for Electrochemical Energy

  15. Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

  16. Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; and others

    1997-06-26

    This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106.

  17. Electrically conductive composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  18. Nuclear materials management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiallonardo, D.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The true goal of Nuclear Materials MANAGEMENT (NMM) is the strategical and economical management of all nuclear materials. Nuclear Materials Management's role involves near-term and long-term planning, reporting, forecasting, and reviewing of inventories. This function is administrative in nature. it is a growing area in need of future definition, direction, and development. Improvements are required in program structure, the way residues and wastes are determined, how ''what is and what if'' questions are handled, and in overall decision-making methods.

  19. Nuclear materials management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiallonardo, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The true goal of Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) is the strategical and economical management of all nuclear materials. Nuclear Materials Management's role involves near-term and long-term planning, reporting, forecasting, and reviewing of inventories. This function is administrative in nature. It is a growing area in need of future definition, direction, and development. Improvements are required in program structure, the way residues and wastes are determined, how /open quotes/What is and what if/close quotes/ questions are handled, and in overall decision-making methods. 2 refs.

  20. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  1. Fissile material detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  2. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  3. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  4. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  5. Materials Physics and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterialMaterials Materials

  6. Materials Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterialMaterialsMST Materials

  7. MMMaaattteeerrriiiaaalllsss SSSeeemmmiiinnnaaarrr There have been great interests in recent years in exploring the use of organic-inorganic hybrid electronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation and a Solar Energy of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL, as an Assistant Professor applications of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic electronic materials including nanostructures and energy

  8. High Electrical Conductivity in Ni3(2,3,6,7,10,11-hexaiminotriphenylene)2, a Semiconducting Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    not allow in-plane conjugation.17,18 Bridging the divide between 2D inorganic and organic materials currently dominated by purely inorganic compounds.24 Clearly, the synthesis and characterization of new s-organic framework (MOF). The new material can be isolated as a highly conductive black powder or dark blue

  9. Chronology Organization/Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    ) took the initiative in renovating the joint-use research institute scheme in Japan. ISSP was duly, and act as the core institute to lead the research in the Strategic Field 2, "New Materials and Energy 1980s has extended the energy range attainable by laser to VUV or even soft X-ray region. On the other

  10. Status Organizing Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Joseph; Rosenholtz, Susan J; Zelditch, Morris Jr

    2015-08-15

    STATUS ORGANIZING PROCESSES Joseph Berger Susan J. Rosenholtz Morris Zelditch, Jr. Technical Report #77 Stanford University January 1980 To appear in the Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 6, 1980. This paper was prepared while Or. Rosenholtz was a... to take place--in such a way that the expectation-states are confirmed, hence maintained, by the very interaction that depends on them (Berger, 1958; Berger & Snell, 1961; Berger, Conner & McKeown, 1969; Berger & Conner, 1969, 1974; Fisek, 1968, 1974...

  11. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014DepartmentCouncilOffice of theOpenOrganization

  12. Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServices »About Us » Organization

  13. Architectures and criteria for the design of high efficiency organic photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry; Forrest, Stephen R; Burk, Diana Pendergrast

    2015-03-24

    An organic photovoltaic cell includes an anode and a cathode, and a plurality of organic semiconductor layers between the anode and the cathode. At least one of the anode and the cathode is transparent. Each two adjacent layers of the plurality of organic semiconductor layers are in direct contact. The plurality of organic semiconductor layers includes an intermediate layer consisting essentially of a photoconductive material, and two sets of at least three layers. A first set of at least three layers is between the intermediate layer and the anode. Each layer of the first set consists essentially of a different organic semiconductor material having a higher LUMO and a higher HOMO, relative to the material of an adjacent layer of the plurality of organic semiconductor layers closer to the cathode. A second set of at least three layers is between the intermediate layer and the cathode. Each layer of the second set consists essentially of a different organic semiconductor material having a lower LUMO and a lower HOMO, relative to the material of an adjacent layer of the plurality of organic semiconductor layers closer to the anode.

  14. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  15. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  16. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  17. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop Sheraton Crystal City 1800 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA April 3, 2012, 8 am - 5 pm Time (EDT) Activity Speaker 8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration...

  18. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, supersedes DOE O 410.2.

  19. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  20. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  1. Nuclear Material Packaging Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-03-07

    The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. Does not cancel/supersede other directives. Certified 11-18-10.

  2. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-05-26

    To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

  3. Engineering Materials and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furui, Sadaoki

    Science Engineering Materials and Chemical Technology Computing Life Science and Technology Environment and Society Mathematics Physics Chemistry Earth and Planetary Sciences Mechanical Engineering Systems and Control Engineering Electrical and Electronic Engineering Information and Communications

  4. Cookoff of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.; Schmitt, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    An overview of cookoff modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented aimed at assessing the violence of reaction following cookoff of confined energetic materials. During cookoff, the response of energetic materials is known to involve coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical processes which induce thermal damage to the energetic material prior to the onset of ignition. These damaged states enhance shock sensitivity and lead to conditions favoring self-supported accelerated combustion. Thus, the level of violence depends on the competition between pressure buildup and stress release due to the loss of confinement. To model these complex processes, finite element-based analysis capabilities are being developed which can resolve coupled heat transfer with chemistry, quasi-static structural mechanics and dynamic response. Numerical simulations that assess the level of violence demonstrate the importance of determining material damage in pre- and post-ignition cookoff events.

  5. Small Building Material Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Applicants may borrow up to $100,000 for projects that improve the livability of a home, improve energy efficiency or expand space. The loan can be applied toward building materials, freight or...

  6. Physical Education ! Teaching Materials!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    Physical Education ! Teaching Materials! !!! ! 1. PROGRAMS OF STUDY ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !P.E. Program Physical Activity (DPA) Initiative: Mandatory program introduced in 2005. Schools are required to create opportunities for students to engage in Physical activity. Administrators and all teachers are responsible

  7. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  8. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  9. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  10. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Jitendra P. (Bollingbrook, IL); Bosak, Andrea L. (Burnam, IL); McPheeters, Charles C. (Woodridge, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Woodridge, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  11. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  12. Controlled growth of larger heterojunction interface area for organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Fan (Somerset, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2009-12-29

    An optoelectronic device and a method of fabricating a photosensitive optoelectronic device includes depositing a first organic semiconductor material on a first electrode to form a continuous first layer having protrusions, a side of the first layer opposite the first electrode having a surface area at least three times greater than an underlying lateral cross-sectional area; depositing a second organic semiconductor material directly on the first layer to form a discontinuous second layer, portions of the first layer remaining exposed; depositing a third organic semiconductor material directly on the second layer to form a discontinuous third layer, portions of at least the second layer remaining exposed; depositing a fourth organic semiconductor material on the third layer to form a continuous fourth layer, filling any exposed gaps and recesses in the first, second, and third layers; and depositing a second electrode on the fourth layer, wherein at least one of the first electrode and the second electrode is transparent, and the first and third organic semiconductor materials are both of a donor-type or an acceptor-type relative to second and fourth organic semiconductor materials, which are of the other material type.

  13. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  14. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  15. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2003-04-22

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  16. Materials in design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perata, Alfredo Ferando

    1970-01-01

    gears so the alloy content has to be higher. Gear shape -17- $11 these considerations can be summarized in three reasons for selecting a terial. 1) The mechanical properties of the material selected had to satisfy the service requirements 2... of materials at the various temperatures encountered in service and during the process of manufacturing. He must know other properties such as resistance to corrosion in the expected environment and their rate of change in mechanical properties with time...

  17. Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarineLaboratory:Materials Materials 2011 DOE

  18. Materials Research Institute 199 Materials Research Institute Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    promise to transform the field of materials research in areas such as energy, health, and the environment of Materials Research A New Building for the 21st Century he Materials Research Institute promotes interdisciMaterials Research Institute 199 Materials Research Institute Building The Pennsylvania State

  19. Smart Material Interfaces: "A Material Step to the Future"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    of smart materials in designing and building interfaces of everyday life. Inter- faces that communicateSmart Material Interfaces: "A Material Step to the Future" Anton Nijholt Human Media Interaction on the mar- ket many new smart materials. Smart Material Interfaces (SMIs) want to take advantage

  20. Method of making nanopatterns and nanostructures and nanopatterned functional oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dravid, Vinayak P; Donthu, Suresh K; Pan, Zixiao

    2014-02-11

    Method for nanopatterning of inorganic materials, such as ceramic (e.g. metal oxide) materials, and organic materials, such as polymer materials, on a variety of substrates to form nanopatterns and/or nanostructures with control of dimensions and location, all without the need for etching the materials and without the need for re-alignment between multiple patterning steps in forming nanostructures, such as heterostructures comprising multiple materials. The method involves patterning a resist-coated substrate using electron beam lithography, removing a portion of the resist to provide a patterned resist-coated substrate, and spin coating the patterned resist-coated substrate with a liquid precursor, such as a sol precursor, of the inorganic or organic material. The remaining resist is removed and the spin coated substrate is heated at an elevated temperature to crystallize the deposited precursor material.