Sample records for organic matter cpom

  1. Contingency in the Direction and Mechanics of Soil Organic Matter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contingency in the Direction and Mechanics of Soil Organic Matter Responses to Increased Rainfall. Contingency in the Direction and Mechanics of Soil Organic Matter Responses to...

  2. Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional landform positions. Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional landform positions....

  3. aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic matter; CPOM 1. Introduction Retention of particulate Horvath, Thomas G. 7 Impacts of grass carp and hybrid carp on aquatic macrophytes and endemic fish populations...

  4. affect organic matter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Steam treatment of surface soil: how does it affect water-soluble organic matter, C mineralization, and bacterial community composition? University of California...

  5. atmospheric organic matter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) and heavy metals are ubiquitous in aqueous and terrestrial systems. Adsorption processes involving...

  6. Microbial production and consumption of marine dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Jamie William

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine phytoplankton are the principal producers of oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM), the organic substrate responsible for secondary production by heterotrophic microbes in the sea. Despite the importance of DOM in ...

  7. Adsorption of Natural Organic Matter to Air-Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenhart, John J.

    Adsorption of Natural Organic Matter to Air-Water Interfaces during Transport through Unsaturated. A mathematical model incorporating irreversible, second-order rate laws to simulate adsorption at air theories for SHA adsorption. Introduction Natural organic matter (NOM) consists of a mixture

  8. Interactions between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic matter: Further

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Interactions between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic October 2008. [1] Correlations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral fluxes into sediment traps in the deep sea have previously suggested that interactions between organic matter and minerals play a key

  9. Mineral mesopore effects on nitrogenous organic matter Andrew R. Zimmermana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    as sequestration of pollutants in soils and sediments (Luthy et al., 1997), turnover of natural soil organic carbon that organic matter (OM) may be protected from enzymatic degradation by sequestration within mineral mesopores observations. These results provide a potential mechanism for the selective sequestration and preservation

  10. Chromatographic separations of soil organic matter for purposes of investigating the physico-chemical role of organic matter in soil aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard, C. J.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................50 CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATIONS OP SOIL ORGANIC MATTER FOR PURPOSES OP INVESTIGATING THE PHYSICOCHEMICAL ROLE OP ORGANIC MATTER IN SOIL AGGREGATION INTRODUCTION In recent years soil scientists have observed that many fertile soils fail to produce yields...CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATIONS OP SOIL ORGANIC MATTER POR PURPOSES OP INVESTIGATING THE PHYSICOCHEMICAL ROLE OP ORGANIC MATTER IN SOIL AGGREGATION A Dissertation *>y Cleveland Joseph Gerard May 1955 L IB R AR Y A&M COLLEGE OF TEXAS...

  11. Nature and Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assimilated and produced; however, little is known about the chemical nature and fate of DOM in treatment degradation of specific components of the DOM (6). Free water surface treatment wetlands consist of semiNature and Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in Treatment Wetlands L A R R Y B . B A R B E

  12. UrbanSolutionsCenter Soil Organic Matter and Compost Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UrbanSolutionsCenter Soil Organic Matter and Compost Utilization Background High clay content soils is yard waste compost, and composting is becoming increasingly common in urban areas due to municipal yard waste collection and composting programs such as the one in Plano, Texas. Wastewater biosolids

  13. Organic matter of anoxic and oxygenated marine waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershey, Robert Michael

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the water column of the Trench indicated that no enrich- ment of organic matter has occurred with respect to the oxygenated water. The organic carbon content of the first 10 cm of a gravity core taken in the Trench was 3. 4%, as compared to a value of 1... Distributions of Sulfide Sulfur and Dis- solved Oxygen as a Function of Depth for Station 4 (10'38' N; 65'24' W) October, 1972 34 6 Distribution of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) as a Function of Depth for Sta- tion 4 (10'38'N; 65'24'W) and Station 6 (11...

  14. Methods to radiolabel natural organic matter by reduction with hydrogen labeled reducing agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to radiolabel natural organic matter by reduction with a hydrogen labeled reducing agent, and compositions, are provided.

  15. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  16. Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, M.W.; Torn, M. S.; Abiven, S.; Dittmar, T.; Guggenberger, G.; Janssens, I.A.; Kleber, M.; Kögel-Knabner, I.; Lehmann, J.; Manning, D.A.C.; Nannipieri, P.; Rasse, D.P.; Weiner, S.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains more than three times as much carbon as either the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. Yet it remains largely unknown why some SOM persists for millennia whereas other SOM decomposes readily—and this limits our ability to predict how soils will respond to climate change. Recent analytical and experimental advances have demonstrated that molecular structure alone does not control SOM stability: in fact, environmental and biological controls predominate. Here we propose ways to include this understanding in a new generation of experiments and soil carbon models, thereby improving predictions of the SOM response to global warming.

  17. Dissolved Organic Matter Cycling on the Louisiana Shelf: Implications for the Formation of Hypoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Li

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Moreover, even less is known about the importance of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), a critical component of DOM (along with DOC) in supporting hypoxia in this region. Most nitrogen in marine organisms exists...

  18. DETOXIFICATION OF OUTFALL WATER USING NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, N.; Looney, B.; Millings, M.; Nichols, R.; Noonkester, J.; Payne, B.

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To protect stream organisms in an ephemeral stream at the Savannah River Site, a proposed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit reduced the copper limit from 25 {micro}g/l to 6 {micro}g/l at Outfall H-12. Efforts to reduce copper in the wastewater and stormwater draining to this outfall did not succeed in bringing copper levels below this limit. Numerous treatment methods were considered, including traditional methods such as ion exchange and natural treatment alternatives such as constructed wetlands and peat beds, all of which act to remove copper. However, the very low target metal concentration and highly variable outfall conditions presented a significant challenge for these treatment technologies. In addition, costs and energy use for most of these alternatives were high and secondary wastes would be generated. The Savannah River National Laboratory developed an entirely new 'detoxification' approach to treat the outfall water. This simple, lower-cost detoxification system amends outfall water with natural organic matter to bind up to 25 {micro}g/l copper rather than remove it, thereby mitigating its toxicity and protecting the sensitive species in the ecosystem. The amendments are OMRI (Organic Materials Review Institute) certified commercial products that are naturally rich in humic acids and are commonly used in organic farming.

  19. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect decomposition pathways and stabilization. These factors influence the stability of SOM in part by shaping its molecular characteristics, which play a fundamental role in nearly all processes governing SOM stability but are not the focus of this chapter. We review here the most important controls on the distribution and dynamics of SOM at plot to global scales, and methods used to study them. We also explore the concepts of controls, processes, and mechanisms, and how they operate across scales. The concept of SOM turnover, or mean residence time, is central to this chapter and so it is described in some detail. The Appendix details the use of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), a powerful isotopic tool for studying SOM dynamics. Much of the material here was originally presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on 'Soils and Global Change: Carbon Cycle, Trace Gas Exchange and Hydrology', held June 16-27, 1997, at the Chateau de Bonas, France.

  20. Treatment program of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) (Quebec, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Program for processing of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) provides financial assistance to municipalities and the private sector for the installation of...

  1. A Lipid Biomarker Investigation of Organic Matter Sources and Methane Cycling in Alaskan Thaw Lake Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the most recalcitrant. The diagenesis of organic matter isorganisms and, during diagenesis, are reduced in chemicalskeleton to survive through diagenesis and catagenesis while

  2. Direct and indirect photoreactions of chromophoric dissolved organic matter : roles of reactive oxygen species and iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstone, Jared Verrill, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photochemical transformations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are one of the principal processes controlling its fate in coastal waters. The photochemical decomposition of CDOM leads to the formation of a ...

  3. The Role of Mineralogy in Organic Matter Stabilization in Tropical Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Role of Mineralogy in Organic Matter Stabilization in Tropical Soils Wipawan Thaymuang,1 Irb) and mineralogy. This study investigated the mineral properties and OM stabilization in 12 surface tropical soil

  4. Radiocarbon and stable isotope geochemistry of organic matter in the Amazon headwaters, Peruvian Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Michael

    (such as resuspension or photosynthesis) may control riverine POM composition as opposed to terrestrial consistency in the geochemical composition of organic matter (OM) in the Amazon, leading to the conclusion

  5. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater : structure, cycling, and the role of biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan, Tracy M. (Tracy Michelle), 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate three different areas relating to the characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): further determination of the chemical compounds present in high molecular weight DOM ...

  6. anthropic organic matter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Dark Matter and The Anthropic Principle HEP - Theory (arXiv) Summary: We evaluate the problem of...

  7. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects on Mineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitman, Thea L.; Zhu, Zihua; Lehmann, Johannes C.

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a critical and active pool in the global C cycle, and the addition of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has been shown to change SOC cycling, increasing or decreasing mineralization rates (often referred to as priming). We adjusted the amount of easily mineralizable C in the soil, through 1-day and 6-month pre-incubations, and in PyOM made from maple wood at 350°C, through extraction. We investigated the impact of these adjustments on C mineralization interactions, excluding pH and nutrient effects and minimizing physical effects. We found short-term increases (+20-30%) in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions in the soil pre-incubated for 6 months. Over the longer term, both the 6-month and 1-day pre-incubated soils experienced net ~10% decreases in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions. This was possibly due to stabilization of SOC on PyOM surfaces, suggested by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry. Additionally, the duration of pre-incubation affected priming interactions, indicating that there may be no optimal pre-incubation time for SOC mineralization studies. We show conclusively that relative mineralizability of SOC in relation to PyOM-24 C is an important determinant of the effect of PyOM additions on SOC mineralization.

  8. Leadership in Academic Matters Faculty at all levels of an academic organization face discrete leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Leadership in Academic Matters Faculty at all levels of an academic organization face discrete leadership challenges. The very structure of our institution, the obligations and the privileges of shared name just the most obvious). Leadership in Academic Matters (LAM) is a faculty development opportunity

  9. Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Organic matter characteristics of Cenomanian­Turonian source rocks: implications for petroleum from the Senegal margin basin, believed to be the main source rocks in the area, have been matter sources; Depositional environment; Petroleum source rock #12;1. Introduction Fig. 1. (a) Map

  10. The distribution and composition of organic matter in recent deltaic and submarine fan sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeFreitas, Debra Ann

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DISTRIBUTION AND COMPOSITION OF ORGANIC MATTER IN RECFNT DELTAIC AND SUBMARINE FAN SEDIMENTS A Thesis by DEBRA ANN DEFREITAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Oceanography THE DISTRIBUTION AND COMPOSITION OF ORGANIC MATTER IN RECENT DELTAIC AND SUBMARINE FAN SEDIMENTS A Thesis by DEBRA ANN DEFREITAS Approved as to style and content by: James M. Bro...

  11. Temperature-driven decoupling of key phases of organic matter degradation in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Nathaniel B.

    organic matter is further hydrolyzed and fermented to LMW-DOC, such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs) (2 (9­12). The organic carbon consumed by sulfate- reducing bacteria is often VFAs, such as acetic acid is recycled or buried. A diverse consor- tium of microorganisms that hydrolyze, ferment, and terminally

  12. Origins and accumulation of organic matter in expanded Albian to Santonian black shale sequences on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Origins and accumulation of organic matter in expanded Albian to Santonian black shale sequences laminated, Cenoma- nian­Santonian black shale sequences contain between 2% and 15% organic carbon about the depositional conditions leading to the black shale accumulations. The low d13 Corg values

  13. Influence of compost on soil organic matter quality under tropical conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Influence of compost on soil organic matter quality under tropical conditions Carmen Riveroa , T was conducted in Puerto Rico to evaluate the impact of compost on soil quality and crop production in an ultisol. In particular, the effect of compost on the quality of soil organic mater (SOM) was investigated. Compost

  14. Correlation of Soil and Sediment Organic Matter Polarity to Aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and compared with published partition coefficients (Koc) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) from aqueous solution of the measured partition coefficients (Koc) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) vs. percent polar organic carbon (POC to their organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (Koc) for carbon tetrachloride (CT) and 1

  15. Protection of Mesopore-Adsorbed Organic Matter from Enzymatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    ). Direct correlations between organic carbon and specific surface area in many soils and sediments (3, 4 are not well understood. Cycling of organic carbon in sediments and soils has been characterized by complex in the sequestration and preservation of sedimentary OM (19, 21). This may occur by physical occlusion of OM within

  16. Elemental imaging of organic matter and associated metals in ore deposits using micro PIXE and micro-EBS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elemental imaging of organic matter and associated metals in ore deposits using micro PIXE matter Gold Uranium Witwatersrand a b s t r a c t Micro-PIXE and micro-EBS analyses were carried out the role of organic matter in the formation of this deposit. Micro-PIXE and Micro-EBS shows a very complex

  17. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torn, M.S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of organic carbon from peat soils. Nature 412 , 785. Fried,Plant Litter. Standard Soil Methods for Long-Term Ecological2007). Role of proteins in soil carbon and nitrogen storage:

  18. EAOG Sville The fate of organic matter in mangrove sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    during early diagenesis (Marchand et al., 2003; 2004; 2005; in press). Here, we propose to present an integrated conceptual model for organic sedimentation and diagenesis in French Guiana mangroves, taking

  19. Lattice Boltzmann prediction of transport properties in reconstructed nanostructures of organic matters in shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Tao, Wenquan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Size, morphology and distributions of pores in organic matters of shale matrix are discussed based on high resolution images from experiments in the literature. 150 nanoscale structures of the organic matters are then reconstructed by randomly placing pore spheres with different diameters and overlap tolerances. Effects of porosity, the mean diameter and the overlap tolerance on void space connectivity and pore size distribution are studied. Further, a pore-scale model based on the Lattice Boltzmann method is developed to predict the Knudsen diffusivity and permeability of the reconstructed organic matters. The simulation results show that the mean pore diameter and overlap tolerance significantly affect the transport properties. The predicted Knudsen effective diffusivity is compared with Bruggeman equation and it is found that this equation underestimate the tortuosity. A modified Bruggeman equation is proposed based on the simulation results. The predicted intrinsic permeability is in acceptable agreement ...

  20. Organic Matter Analysis of Sediments from Simpson Bay, Alaska using Elemental, Stable Isotopic, and Molecular Signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pondell, Christina

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    profiles for lignin-derived biomarkers and stable carbon isotopes imply that the earthquake events did not disrupt the drainage basin of Simpson Bay enough to change the signatures of the organic matter deposited shortly after these occurrences. The OC, C...

  1. Impacts of Natural Organic Matter on Perchlorate Removal by an Advanced Reduction Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Yuhang

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments were conducted to obtain data on the impacts of natural organic matter and light intensity on destruction of perchlorate by the ARPs that use sulfite activated by ultraviolet light produced by low-pressure mercury lamps or KrCl excimer lamps...

  2. Rumen disappearance of organic matter, crude protein, crude fibre, ADF and NDF from grasses, white clover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rumen disappearance of organic matter, crude protein, crude fibre, ADF and NDF from grasses, white observed in crude fiber, ADF and NDF degradation among forages. For 24 h incubation, the lowest values of crude fiber, ADF and NDF degradations were obtained for Poa pratensis (50, 41, 51 %) and the highest

  3. Impact of organic matter and speciation on the behaviour of uranium in submerged ultrafiltration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semião, Andrea J.C.; Rossiter, Helfrid M.A.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Influence of organic matter (OM) on uranium removal mechanisms by ultrafiltration (UF) over a pH range of 3–11 was investigated. Humic, alginic and tannic acid were used as OM. It was found that uranium adsorbed strongly to the membrane while...

  4. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292­2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza´ c ova´ a,b,Ã, Hana Hrs elova´ a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  5. Meiofauna and sedimentary organic matter off Central Chile: response to changes caused

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    and lipids) and chloroplastic pigments were also assessed. Total meiofauna abundance and biomass increased. A decrease of organic matter quantity and quality, related to low primary productivity conditions in 1998 (El and the meiofauna biomass was observed in May 1997, whereas in May 1998 no relationship was found. © 2001 Ifremer

  6. Removal of boron, fluoride and nitrate by electrodialysis in the presence of organic matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banasiak, Laura J.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -exchange membranes was evaluated in relation to hydrated ionic radius, whereby a positive correlation was found in absence of organic matter. NO3?, with the smaller hydrated ionic radius and weaker hydration shell, was removed more effectively than F?, which has a...

  7. Elemental imaging of organic matter and associated metals in ore deposits using micro PIXE and micro-EBS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devernal, Anne

    Elemental imaging of organic matter and associated metals in ore deposits using micro PIXE Uranium Witwatersrand a b s t r a c t Micro-PIXE and micro-EBS analyses were carried out on samples from of organic matter in the formation of this deposit. Micro-PIXE and Micro-EBS shows a very complex metal

  8. Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (7001100 m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen increased animal activity associated with increasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. We examined faunal community responses to oxygen and organic matter gradients across the lower oxygen minimum zone (OMZ

  9. PAPER www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Alteration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    the lagoon that were incubated in the pre-exposed water for 5 h in the dark. Cell abundance, activity dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation causes rapid changes in bacterial community composition We evaluated the effect of photochemical alterations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM

  10. Role of minerals in thermal alteration of organic matter. II. A material balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis experiments were performed on Green River and Monterey Formation kerogens (Types I and II, respectively) with and without calcite, illite, or montmorillonite at 300/sup 0/C for 2 to 1000 hours under dry and hydrous conditions. Pyrolysis products were identified and quantified, and a material balance of product and reactants resulted. Applying the results to maturation of organic matter in natural environments, they suggest that a given type of organic matter associated with different minerals in source rocks will yield different products. Furthermore, the different adsorption capacities of minerals exert a significant influence on the migration of polar and high molecular weight compounds generated from the breakdown of kerogen. Therefore, the overall accumulated products from carbonate source rocks are mainly heavy oils with some gas, whereas light oils and gases are the main products from source rocks that contain expandable clays with catalytic and adsorptive properties. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Aeolian Delivery of Organic Matter to a Middle Permian Deepwater Ramp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artan, Sinem

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chairs of Committee, Bruce Herbert Mike Tice Committee Member, Thomas McDonald Head of Department, Andreas Kronenberg May 2011 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Aeolian Delivery of Organic Matter to a Middle Permian Deepwater Ramp. (May 2011..., Semra Artan, and my father, Mehmet Ali Artan vi ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my deepest gratitude to my co-advisors, Dr. Bruce Herbert and Dr. Mike Tice, for their time, guidance and advice throughout the course of this research. I...

  12. Radiation Sensitivity of Natural Organic Matter: Clay Mineral Association Effects in the Callovo-Oxfordian Argillite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schäfer, T.; Michel, P; Claret, F; Beetz, T; Wirick, S; Jacobsen, C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay-rich low-organic carbon formations (e.g., Callovo-Oxfordian argillite in France and Opalinus Clay in Switzerland) are considered as host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The clay-organic carbon has a strong impact on the chemical stability of the clays. For this reason, the nature of the clay-organic carbon, the release of hydrophilic organic compounds, namely, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) and the radiation sensitivity of the undisturbed host rock organics was investigated. The clay sample originates from Oxfordian argillite (447 m depth, borehole EST 104). HA and FA were extracted following the standard International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) isolation procedure. Synchrotron based (C-, K-, Ca-, O- and Fe-edge XANES) scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and FT-IR microspectroscopy was used to identify under high spatial resolution the distribution of clay-organic matter with different functionality using principal component and cluster analysis. The results show that in this old (Jurassic) geological formation, small parts of the organic inventory (1-5%) keeps the structure/functionality and can be mobilized as hydrophilic humic substance type material (HA and FA). Target spectra analysis shows best correlation for isolated humic acids with organics found in smectite-rich regions, whereas the extractable FA has better spectral similarities with the illite mixed layer minerals (MLM) regions. After radiation of 1.7 GGy under helium atmosphere the same rock sample area was investigated for radiation damage. Radiation damage in the smectite and illite-MLM associated organic matter is comparably low with 20-30% total oxygen mass loss and 13-18% total carbon mass loss. A critical dose dc of 2.5 GGy and a optical density after infinite radiation (OD?) of 54% was calculated under room temperature conditions. C(1s) XANES show a clear increase in Cdouble bond; length as m-dashC bonds especially in the illite-MLM associated organics. This results suggests a combination of the formation of Cdouble bond; length as m-dashC bond due to crosslinking via polymerization and mass loss due to bond breaking (scissioning) in the main chain or in side groups of the organic macromolecules upon irradiation.

  13. Evaluating the origins and transformations of organic matter and dissolved inorganic nitrogen in two contrasting North Sea estuaries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahad, Jason Michael Elias

    In order to delineate the potential sources and to understand the main controls on the biogeochemical cycling of dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM, POM) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) during estuarine ...

  14. The effect of various cropping systems upon organic matter, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable cations, conductivity and reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannan, Mohammad Abdul

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &IBRARY A 4 N COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS CROPPING SYSTEMS UPON ORGANIC MATTER, TOTAL NITROGEN, CATION EXCHANGE CAPACITY, EXCHANGEABLE CATIONS, CONDUCTIVITY AND REACTION. A Thesis By MOHAMMAD ABDUL MANNAN Submitted...

  15. Microbial community transcriptomes reveal microbes and metabolic pathways associated with dissolved organic matter turnover in the sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarren, Jay

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains as much carbon as the Earth's atmosphere, and represents a critical component of the global carbon cycle. To better define microbial processes and activities associated with ...

  16. Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electrically doped microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzeo, M., E-mail: marco.mazzeo@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Genco, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gambino, S. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy); Ballarini, D.; Mangione, F.; Sanvitto, D. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Di Stefano, O.; Patanè, S.; Savasta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d'Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Gigli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling of the electromagnetic field with an electronic transition gives rise, for strong enough light-matter interactions, to hybrid states called exciton-polaritons. When the energy exchanged between light and matter becomes a significant fraction of the material transition energy an extreme optical regime called ultrastrong coupling (USC) is achieved. We report a microcavity embedded p-i-n monolithic organic light emitting diode working in USC, employing a thin film of squaraine dye as active layer. A normalized coupling ratio of 30% has been achieved at room temperature. These USC devices exhibit a dispersion-less angle-resolved electroluminescence that can be exploited for the realization of innovative optoelectronic devices. Our results may open the way towards electrically pumped polariton lasers.

  17. Structure, composition, and location of organic matter in the enstatite chondrite Sahara 97096 (EH3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piani, Laurette; Beyssac, Olivier; Binet, Laurent; Bourot-Denise, Michèle; Derenne, Sylvie; Guillou, Corentin Le; Marrocchi, Yves; Mostefaoui, Smail; Rouzaud, Jean-Noel; Thomen, Aurelien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The insoluble organic matter (IOM) of an unequilibrated enstatite chondrite Sahara (SAH) 97096 has been investigated using a battery of analytical techniques. As the enstatite chondrites are thought to have formed in a reduced environment at higher temperatures than carbonaceous chondrites, they constitute an interesting comparative material to test the heterogeneities of the IOM in the solar system and to constrain the processes that could affect IOM during solar system evolution. The SAH 97096 IOM is found in situ: as submicrometer grains in the network of fine-grained matrix occurring mostly around chondrules and as inclusions in metallic nodules, where the carbonaceous matter appears to be more graphitized. IOM in these two settings has very similar $\\delta^{15}N$ and $\\delta^{13}C$; this supports the idea that graphitized inclusions in metal could be formed by metal catalytic graphitization of matrix IOM. A detailed comparison between the IOM extracted from a fresh part and a terrestrially weathered part...

  18. PAHs and organic matter partitioning and mass transfer from coal tar particles to water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karim Benhabib; Marie-Odile Simonnot; Michel Sardin [LSGC - Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Science, Nancy (France)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coal tar found in contaminated soils of former manufactured gas plants and coking plants acts as a long-term source of PAHs. Organic carbon and PAH transfer from coal tar particles to water was investigated with closed-looped laboratory column experiments run at various particle sizes and temperatures. Two models were derived. The first one represented the extraction process at equilibrium and was based on a linear partitioning of TOC and PAHs between coal tar and water. The partition coefficient was derived as well as the mass of extractable organic matter in the particles. The second model dealt with mass transfer. Particle diffusion was the limiting step; organic matter diffusivity in the coal tar was then computed in the different conditions. A good consistency was obtained between experimental and computed results. Hence, the modeling of PAH migration in contaminated soils at the field scale requires taking into account coal tar as the source-term for PAH release. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour; Kühn, Oliver

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil soil soil+3 HWE soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  20. Metal Speciation in Landfill Leachates with a Focus on the Influence of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F Claret; C Tournassat; C Crouzet; E Gaucher; T Schäfer; G Braibant; D Guyonnet

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

  1. Competitive ligand exchange reveals mercury reactivity change with dissolved organic matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Complexation of mercury (Hg) with naturally dissolved organic matter (DOM) is important in freshwater environments but the kinetics of Hg binding to DOM and the repartitioning of Hg within the DOM remain poorly understood. We examined changes in Hg-DOM complexes using glutathione (GSH) titrations, coupled with stannous chloride reducible Hg measurements during Hg equilibration with DOM. In laboratory prepared DOM solutions and in water from a Hg-contaminated creek, a fraction of the Hg that was present in Hg-DOM complexes was not reactive to GSH. This unreactive fraction increased with the reaction time between Hg and DOM. In reactions between Hg and Suwannee River natural organic matter, the unreactive Hg increased from 13% at 1 hour to 74% after 48 hours of equilibration. This time-dependent increase in unreactive Hg suggests that either Hg forms strong complexes with DOM that are unreactive to GSH or the DOM complexed Hg becomes more sterically protected as the binding environment changes within the DOM over time. In the contaminated creek water, 58% of the Hg was present as complexes that were unreactive with GSH, demonstrating that the strength of the Hg-DOM complexes evolves with time. The extent of Hg sequestration inside DOM may provide insight to understanding transformations of Hg in natural aquatic systems.

  2. Final technical report; Mercury Release from Organic matter (OM) and OM-Coated Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aiken, George

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final technical report for a project designed to address fundamental processes controlling the release of mercury from flood plain soils associated with East Fork Poplar Creek, Tennessee near the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge facility. The report summarizes the activities, findings, presentations, and publications resulting from an award to the U.S. Geological that were part of a larger overall effort including Kathy Nagy (University of Illinois, Chicago, Ill) and Joseph Ryan (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO). The specific charge for the U.S.G.S. portion of the study was to provide analytical support for the larger group effort (Nagy and Ryan), especially with regard to analyses of Hg and dissolved organic matter, and to provide information about the release of mercury from the floodplain soils.

  3. A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) and first applications with a GC/MS-FID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohaus, T.

    In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to ...

  4. Metal speciation in landfill leachates with a focus on the influence of organic matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claret, Francis, E-mail: f.claret@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Tournassat, Christophe; Crouzet, Catherine; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Schaefer, Thorsten [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Hydrogeology Group, D-12249 Berlin (Germany); Braibant, Gilles; Guyonnet, Dominique [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. > Most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while Pb, Cu and Cd are associated with larger particles. > Metal complexation with OM is not sufficient to explain apparent supersaturation of metals with sulphide minerals. - Abstract: This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

  5. Hydrocarbon potential, organic matter diagenesis, sedimentology, and paleoenvironment of upper Mesozoic dark shales, northern Himalayas and Argo abyssal plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurow, J.; Gibling, M.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Late Jurassic was a time favorable for the deposition of black shale-type sediments in shallow environments as known from circum-North Atlantic basins, North Sea, and Himalayan Tethys regions. Locally these shales have excellent hydrocarbon source potential. The site of the Spiti shales in the Thakkola region of north-central Nepal provides the opportunity to study a long-term (Oxfordian-Tithonian) stable, shallow, and oxygen-depleted environment. Strata with calcareous benthic communities show that the environment was not anoxic. Organic geochemical and sedimentological analyses on the Spiti shales (Oxfordian-Valanginian) were done to understand the hydrocarbon potential, organic matter diagenesis, sedimentology, and paleoenvironment of this sequence. The depositional environment changed, driven by tectono-eustatic and climatic events, from an open shelf (approximately 250 m) with low amounts of detrital input and rich macrofossil communities to an extremely shallow, partly continental environment with intercalations of quartzose channel fill, silty shales, rare lumachelle layers, and coal seams. Paleocurrents suggest a north-facing continental margin bordering the Tethys Sea. The organic matter changed from marine (Jurassic) to terrestrial in the Cretaceous. Analysis of coeval strata, deposited in the deep-marine environment off the northern Indian shelf (contiguous with the present-day Argo abyssal plain), demonstrates the changing shallow to deep-water hydrocarbon potential. It reflects the more advanced organic matter maturation of the onshore material due to Himalayan tectonics and allows tracing the transport of the organic matter.

  6. Using finished compost is a way of returning organic matter to the soil in a usable form. Soil organic matter benefits plant growth by improving the moisture and nutrient-holding capacity of sandy soils, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Using finished compost is a way of returning organic matter to the soil in a usable form. Soil and by helping prevent soil erosion. Think of compost primarily as a soil conditioner rather than a fertilizer will be necessary for adequate plant growth. A soil test will determine if compost-amended garden soil requires

  7. Quantification of loss of calcite, pyrite, and organic matter due to weathering of Toarcian black shales and effects on kerogen and bitumen characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littke, R.; Klussmann, U.; Krooss, B.; Leythaeuser, D. (Inst. fuer Erdoel und organische Geochemie, Juelich (West Germany))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of geochemical data on Posidonia Shale (Early Toarcian) from a shallow unweathered core and from adjacent weathered exposures of the same facies was performed. Results revealed that quantitatively the most affected petrographic constituent is pyrite and that organic matter and carbonate were also altered by weathering. Due to this process of weathering, the bulk composition of organic matter, especially the molecular composition of soluble organic matter and the fluorescence color of organic particles, are changed. Estimates of weathering rates reveal that the annual release of sulfur and organic carbon from black shales may significantly add to anthropogenic pollution.

  8. Determination of thiol functional groups on bacteria and natural organic matter in environmental systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anandha Rao, Balaji [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic thiols (R-SH) are known to react and form complexes with some toxic soft metals such as mercury (Hg) in both biotic and abiotic systems. However, a clear understanding of these interactions is currently limited because quantifying thiols in environmental matrices is difficult due to their low abundance, susceptibility to oxidation, and measurement interference by non-thiol compounds in samples. Here, we report a fluorescence-labeling method using a maleimide containing probe, ThioGlo-1 (TG-1), to determine total thiols directly on bacterial cells and natural organic matter (NOM). We systematically evaluated the optimal thiol labeling conditions and interference from organic compounds such as disulfide, methionine, thiourea, and amine, and inorganic ions such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, and SCN-, and found that the method is highly sensitive and selective. Only relatively high levels of sulfide (S2-) and sulfite (SO32-) significantly interfere with the thiol analysis. The method was successful in determining thiols in a bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and its mutants in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The measured value of ~2.1 104 thiols cell-1 (or ~0.07 mol g-1 wet cells) is in good agreement with that observed during reactions between Hg and PCA cells. Using the standard addition, we determined the total thiols of two reference NOM samples, the reduced Elliot soil humic acid and Suwanee River NOM, to be 3.6 and 0.7 mol g-1, respectively, consistent with those obtained based on their reactions with Hg.

  9. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    restoration plans for the Columbia Basin. The enhancement of nutrient availability and food web productivity and a revised project narrative. Our review follows below, organized by our six concerns. ISRP Recommendation inform treatment methodology? b) The coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) transport determination

  10. Clay minerals in the Meuse -Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Clay minerals in the Meuse - Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution Francis Claret1,2,* , Boris A. Sakharov3 , Victor A. Drits3 words: Callovo-Oxfordian, Clay minerals, Clay diagenesis, Illite-smectite, Mixed- layering

  11. The Relationships of Particulate Matter and Particulate Organic Carbon with Hypoxic Conditions Along the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuck, Nicole A

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    an onboard surface-water flow-through system, CTD casts, and by an undulating towed vehicle. Total particulate matter and particulate organic carbon samples were obtained from Niskin bottles on CTD casts. Samples were also taken to measure dissolved oxygen...

  12. Effects of Soil Organic Matter on the Kinetics and Mechanisms of Pb(II) Sorption and Desorption in Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Effects of Soil Organic Matter on the Kinetics and Mechanisms of Pb(II) Sorption and Desorption in Soil Daniel G. Strawn* and Donald L. Sparks ABSTRACT make better predictions about the mobility and threat from Pb contami- and desorption behavior on soil be understood, as wellnated soil, it is critical

  13. Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in Aquatic Systems: Interactions with Radionuclides (234Th (IV), 129 I) and Biofilms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Saijin

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory and field investigations were carried out to elucidate the importance of natural organic matter in aquatic systems, i.e., trace element scavenging (e.g., 234Th) by exopolymeric substances (EPS), formation of biofilms, as well...

  14. Metal binding to dissolved organic matter and adsorption to ferrihydrite in shallow peat groundwaters: Application to diamond exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metal binding to dissolved organic matter and adsorption to ferrihydrite in shallow peat t The speciation and solubility of kimberlite pathfinder metals (Ni, Nd, Ba and K) in shallow peat ground- waters with kimberlite pathfinder metals and determine the spatial distribution of those metals in shallow peat

  15. Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le Russey, Jura Mountains, France.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le. In order to moniter peat reaccumulation and hence long-term carbon sequestration in peatlands which have ([1]). Among these indicators, it has previously been shown that physico-chemical properties of peat

  16. PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite and smectite surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite carbon (DOC) concentrations (0­140 g C m 3 ) for reaction with goethite ( -FeOOH), birnessite ( -MnO2 different NOM adsorption, fractionation and transformation patterns. Goethite exhibited a steep initial

  17. Start | View At a Glance | Author Index 151-2 Soil Organic Matter-Mineral Interactions Along Hillslope Transects: Importance of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of organic matter (OM) with minerals has been increasingly recognized as a major process for protecting processes with soil C cycling. Selective chemical extractions, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and microShare | Start | View At a Glance | Author Index 151-2 Soil Organic Matter-Mineral Interactions

  18. Organic Matter Transformation in the Peat Column at Marcell Experimental Forest: Humification and Vertical Stratification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tfaily, Malak [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Cooper, Bill [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Chanton, Patrick R [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Chanton, Jeff P [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale ecosystem manipulation (Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change, SPRUCE) is being constructed in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA, to determine the effects of climatic forcing on ecosystem processes in northern peatlands. Prior to the initiation of the manipulation, we characterized the solid-phase peat to a depth of 2 meters using a variety of techniques, including peat C:N ratios, 13C and 15N isotopic composition, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT IR), and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR). FT IR determined peat humification-levels increased rapidly between and 75 cm, indicating a highly reactive zone. We observed a rapid drop in the abundance of O-alkyl-C, carboxyl-C, and other oxygenated functionalities within this zone and a concomitant increase in the abundance of alkyl- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Below 75-cm, minimal change was observed except that aromatic functionalities accumulated with depth. Incubation studies revealed the highest methane production rates and greatest CH4:CO2 ratios within this and 75 cm zone. Hydrology and surface vegetation played a role in belowground carbon cycling. Radiocarbon signatures of microbial respiration products in deeper porewaters resembled the signatures of dissolved organic carbon rather than solid phase peat, indicating that more recently photosynthesized organic matter fueled the bulk of subsurface microbial respiration. Oxygen-containing functionalities, especially O-alkyl-C, appear to serve as an excellent proxy for soil decomposition rate, and in addition should be a sensitive indicator of the response of the solid phase peat to the climatic manipulation.

  19. by the ratio of biogas production to organic matter input : 0.20 to 0.3 M3/kg organic When considering the period of steady operation, i.e. without technical problems such

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the ratio of biogas production to organic matter input : 0.20 to 0.3 M3/kg organic matter. When of digestible amino acids. The definition of availability is recalled and the methods used to estimate it briefly examined ; that based on measurements of the apparent digestibility being apparently the most

  20. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic Wetlands by Natural Organic Matter and Plant Roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ?2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore »the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  1. Soil organic matter factions of no-tilled and tilled soils and their reactivity with herbicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearman, G.K.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of soil humic fractions were determined on surface and 7.5-15.0 cm soil samples of continuously (7-year) no-tilled and tilled cotton, corn, and soybean plots in West Tennessee. Soil humic and fulvic acid were extracted by standard methods and the humic acid was characterized by /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy, titration of total acidity and carboxyl groups, and infrared and elemental analysis. Humic acid composition differed by depth and crop. Small differences were observed between tillage systems. Humic acid aliphatic and aromatic carbons ranged from 48 to 65% and 25 to 40% of total peak area, respectively. The humic acids extracted from soils with larger amounts of carbon had larger aliphatic to aromatic ratios, indicating less decomposed organic matter. Carboxyl groups of the humic acids ranged from 9 to 13% and samples from tilled soil had slightly greater amounts of carboxyl and aromatic groups. Carboxyl group determinations by /sup 13/C-NMR, compared more closely with total acidity determinations by titration than with carboxyl determinations by titration. All infrared spectra were similar. Elemental composition of humic acid averaged C, 52.7%, 5.6%; N, 4.8%, and 36.9%.

  2. The thermal maturation degree of organic matter from source rocks revealed by wells logs including examples from Murzuk Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negoita, V.; Gheorghe, A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The customary technique used to know the organic matter quantity per rock volume it as well as the organic matter maturation stage is based on geochemical analyses accomplished on a preselected number of samples and cuttings drawn from boreholes during the drilling period. But the same objectives can be approached without any extra cost using the continuous measurements of well logs recorded in each well from the ground surface to the total depth. During the diagenetic stage, the identification of potential source rocks out of which no hydrocarbon have been generated may be carried out using a well logging suite including Gamma Ray Spectrometry, the Compensated Neutron/Litho Density combination and a Dual Induction/Sonic Log. During the catagenetic stage the onset of oil generation brings some important changes in the organic matter structure as well as in the fluid distribution throughout the pore space of source rocks. The replacement of electric conductive water by electric non-conductive hydrocarbons, together with water and oil being expelled from source rocks represent a process of different intensities dependent of time/temperature geohistory and kerogen type. The different generation and expulsion scenarios of hydrocarbons taking place during the catagenetic and metagenetic stages of source rocks are very well revealed by Induction and Laterolog investigations. Several crossplots relating vitrinite reflectance, total organic carbon and log-derived physical parameters are illustrated and discussed. The field applications are coming from Murzuk Basin, where Rompetrol of Libya is operating.

  3. Small reductions in forest cover weaken terrestrial-aquatic linkages in headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    assessed the impacts of deforestation on the energy base of headwater food webs in seven headwater streams. Standing crop of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) declined with deforestation at large scales (i.e. catchment deforestation and riparian deforestation at the entire stream network scale). Terrestrial plant

  4. Genome-Based Models to Optimize In Situ Bioremediation of Uranium and Harvesting Electrical Energy from Waste Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, Derek R

    2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to provide computational tools to predictively model the behavior of two microbial communities of direct relevance to Department of Energy interests: 1) the microbial community responsible for in situ bioremediation of uranium in contaminated subsurface environments; and 2) the microbial community capable of harvesting electricity from waste organic matter and renewable biomass. During this project the concept of microbial electrosynthesis, a novel form of artificial photosynthesis for the direct production of fuels and other organic commodities from carbon dioxide and water was also developed and research was expanded into this area as well.

  5. The Use of Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes as a Method for Delineating Sources of Organic Matter in Anchialine Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neisch, Julie A

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    in the sediments of anchialine caves, activity 5 within redox gradients of the water column halocline is suspected to be of greater ecological importance (Pohlman 2011). Organic matter can be trapped in the halocline due to the density change between..., and in order to survive this harsh environment, stygobites have evolved complex sensory appendages, slowed their metabolism, and even have reduced (or completely lost) pigment and eyes (Iliffe and Bishop 2007). While most crustaceans living outside of caves...

  6. The Use of Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes as a Method for Delineating Sources of Organic Matter in Anchialine Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neisch, Julie A

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    -reduction potential (ORP) is a measure of the tendency of a chemical species to acquire electrons (becoming reduced). As surface waters are in contact with atmospheric oxygen, they are 8 in an oxidizing state and maintain positive ORP values. As with other... water quality parameters, a shift in ORP values often occurs at the halocline (due to bacterial degradation of organic matter), and waters enter a reducing state with negative ORP values (Pohlman 2011). This shift is important in anchialine systems...

  7. increased in the case of dry matter or organic matter (apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) 87.3 and 89.o for groups i and 6). The digestibility of nitrogen increased in the same propor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    increased in the case of dry matter or organic matter (apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) = 87.3 and 89.o for groups i and 6). The digestibility of nitrogen increased in the same propor- tions p. ioo MPC). The maize protein concentrate studied has the advantage of being remarkably digestible

  8. The Effects of Moisture and Organic Matter Lability on Carbon Dioxide and Methane Production in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    amounts of carbon in the form of peat and other undecomposed plant matter. Global climate change al. 2003). The carbon stored in wetlands is in the form of undecayed plant matter, or peat. Peat carbon are very useful for agricultural purposes. Their peat and preserved timber has been mined

  9. Trace metal behaviour in riverine sediments: role of organic matter and sulphides Adeline Charriaua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    matter during early diagenesis leads to major changes in the redox conditions between the overlying oxic; Canavan et al., 2007, Miller and Orbock Miller, 2007). Moreover, resuspension events from natural

  10. Organic Matter Composition, Recycling Susceptibility, and the Effectiveness of the Biological Pump – An Evaluation Using NMR Spectra of Marine Plankton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paytan, Adina [UCSC] [UCSC

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon (C) sequestration through fertilization of phytoplankton with micronutrients and enhancement of the absorption and retention of atmospheric C by ocean biota heavily depends on the efficiency of the “biological pump”. The long-term effectiveness of this strategy depends on a net transfer of C from the upper ocean-atmosphere system to the deep ocean where the C is removed from contact with the atmosphere for an extended period of time. This C removal can be equated to the amount of C fixation by phytoplankton minus the C cycling and regeneration in the euphotic zone. If the regeneration efficiency is increased, then despite increased C fixation, no net loss (sequestration) of C will result. A reduction in cycling efficiency in the euphotic zone, on the other hand, will increase the effectiveness of the “biological pump” and thus C sequestration. The degree of organic matter biodegradation and recycling depends on the “reactivity” of compounds synthesized by the biota, which in turn, is controlled by the structural characteristic of these compounds. There is considerable evidence that different phytoplankton taxa differ substantially in their biogeochemical characteristics and it is likely that the relative abundance of different compounds synthesized by these distinct taxa, and even within each group at different growth conditions, will differ too. This variability in biosynthesis and thus abundance of a wide range of organic compounds in the water column would lend itself to different susceptibility for biodegradation and regeneration. Knowledge of the distribution of various organic matter structural groups synthesized by distinct taxa, the dependence of the organic matter compound classes on different growth conditions (temperature, light, nutrients) and the selective susceptibility of these compound to regeneration is crucial for estimating the potential for rapid regeneration in the euphotic zone, and thus the effectiveness of the “biological pump”.

  11. Interaction of Polar and Nonpolar Organic Pollutants with Soil Organic Matter: Sorption Experiments and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour A; Aziz, Saadullah G; Hilal, Rifaat H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Leinweber, Peter; Kühn, Oliver

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of organic pollutants in the environment is influenced by several factors including the type and strength of their interactions with soil components especially SOM. However, a molecular level answer to the question How organic pollutants interact with SOM? is lacking. In order to explore mechanisms of this interaction, we have developed a new SOM model followed by carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in parallel with sorption experiments. The new SOM model comprises free SOM functional groups (carboxylic acid and naphthalene) as well as SOM cavities (with two different sizes), representing the soil voids, containing the same SOM functional groups. To examine the effect of the hydrophobicity on the interaction, the organic pollutants hexachlorobenzene (HCB, non-polar) and sulfanilamide (SAA, polar) were considered. The experimental and the theoretical outcomes explored four major points regarding sorption of SAA and HCB on soil. 1. The interaction depends on the SOM chemical composition mo...

  12. APPLICATION OF CARBOHYDRATES AND PHENOLS AS BIOMARKERS TO STUDY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER RESERVOIRS IN ARCTIC RIVERS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Rachel

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic rivers are the dominant pathways for the transport of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, but knowledge of sources, transformations and transfer of organic carbon and nitrogen in Arctic river watersheds is extremely...

  13. The temporal dynamics of terrestrial organic matter transfer to the oceans : initial assessment and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drenzek, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis employs compound-specific stable carbon and radiocarbon isotopic analysis of organic biomarkers to (a) resolve petrogenic from pre-aged vascular plant organic carbon (OC) in continental margin sediments, (b) ...

  14. Identification of Location and Nature of Organic Matter and Contaminants on Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    importance of these different forms of organic carbon in the sequestration of PAHs in sediments. Our to identify organic carbon location in sediment particles. Scanning electron microscopy with wavelength silica particles. It has been suggested previously that PAHs partition into organic carbon on soils

  15. Production and turnover of suspended organic matter in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1992-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixteen years of work on the microbial food web of the southeastern shelf and its relation to the production, movement, and fate of organic materials, have helped us understand the roles of microorganisms in that ecosystem. We found that microbial metabolism dominates the flow of energy and materials on the continental shelf, utilizing nearly all available organic matter, except in mid-winter. Bacteria strongly influence the cycle of carbon in continental shelf waters, both by rapidly utilizing organic materials and by promoting aggregation of particulate material. We demonstrated a strong interaction between microorganisms in the water and those in the nearshore bottom sediments. We showed that chelation of copper by dissolved organic ligands in the coastal water protects phytoplankton not only from existing amounts but from much larger amounts. Simulation modeling predicted that there is usually little transfer of energy from the microbial food web to macroorganisms (fishes), an observation that has since been validated by investigators. A complete list of publications, theses and dissertations resulting from this project is provided.

  16. Biomass combustion as a source of terrigenous organic matter to the coastal ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Kayce

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural and anthropogenic combustion processes are major sources of organic carbon into the environment. Biomarkers of biomass combustion can be used to monitor the impact of combustion on carbon cycling at multiple scales, particularly in natural...

  17. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER The effect of hydraulic lift on organic matter decomposition, soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    for both, suggesting dif- ferential mineralization of organic N among treatments. Aboveground biomass, leaf, The University of Western Australia (M084), 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia 123 Oecologia (2012

  18. 22th International Meeting on org. geochem. The fate of organic matter in mangrove sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the behaviour of carbohydrates and lignin during early diagenesis (Marchand et al., 2003; 2004; 2005; in press). Here, we propose to present an integrated conceptual model for organic sedimentation and diagenesis

  19. FIA-12-0054- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 14, 2012, California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) filed an appeal from a final determination issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of...

  20. Release of dissolved organic matter by coastal diatoms Michael S. Wetz1 and Patricia A. Wheeler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    are capable of relatively rapid sinking rates, both as individual cells and in aggregates, and are responsible beginning in late exponential growth as a result of increased cell density. For Cylindrotheca closterium. This coincided with continued particulate organic carbon (POC) production and a threefold increase in the per-cell

  1. Role of natural organic matter in governing the bioavailability of toxic metals to american oysters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haye, Jennifer Marcelle

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ) organic biopolymers, tagged with gamma-emitting radioactive metal ions (110mAg, 109Cd, 57Co, 51Cr, 59Fe, 203Hg and 65Zn) or 14C (to sugar OH groups). Natural COM was obtained from Galveston Bay water by 0.5µm filtration, followed by cross...

  2. Biogeochemical and hydrographic controls on chromophoric dissolved organic matter distribution in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    in the Pacific Ocean Chantal M. Swan a,Ã, David A. Siegel a,b , Norman B. Nelson a , Craig A. Carlson c , Elora Available online 19 September 2009 Keywords: CDOM AOU Pacific Water masses Hydrography Bio-optical a b s t r a c t Recent in situ observations of chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) in the Pacific

  3. FTIR spectroscopy can predict organic matter quality in2 regenerating cutover peatlands3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    emissions51 Soil Biology and Biochemistry #12;3 show a return to net carbon sequestration (Tuittila et al sequestration potential. Increased losses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC)55 have been observed from many area. Peat46 extraction for fuel and horticultural use has steadily diminished this carbon stock,47

  4. FIA-12-0020- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals granted a Motion for Reconsideration of part of a Decision we issued on March 23, 2012, relating to appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  5. Controlled Synthesis of Organic/Inorganic van de Waals Solid for Tunable Light-matter Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Lin; Cong, Chunxiao; Wu, Chunyang; Wu, Di; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wang, Hong; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jiadong; Wang, Xingli; Fu, Wei; Yu, Peng; Fu, Qundong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Yakobson, Boris I; Tay, Beng Kang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Sum, Tze Chien; Jin, Chuanhong; He, Haiyong; Yu, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Van de Waals (vdW) solids, as a new type of artificial materials that consisting of alternative layers bonded by weak interactions, have shed light on fantastic optoelectronic devices. As a result, a large variety of shining vdW devices have been engineered via layer-by-layer stacking of two-dimensional materials, although shadowed by the difficulties of fabrication. Alternatively, direct growth of vdW solids have been proved a scalable and swift way towards vdW solids, reflected by the successful synthesis of graphene/h-BN and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) vertical heterostructures from controlled vapor deposition. Enlightened by it, with a three-step deposition and reaction, we realize high-quality organic and inorganic vdW solids, using methylammonium lead halide as the organic part (organic perovskite) and 2D monolayers inorganic as counterpart. Being a perfect light absorbent, the electrons and holes generated in organic perovskite couple with its inorganic 2D companions, and behave dramaticall...

  6. FIA-12-0004- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals issued one Decision relating to two appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) from two determination letters issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  7. FIA-12-0005- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals issued one Decision relating to two appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) from two determination letters issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  8. Soil compaction and organic matter affect conifer seedling nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance and diversity. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaranthus, M.P.; Page-Dumroese, D.; Harvey, A.; Cazares, E.; Bednar, L.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three levels of organic matter removal (bole only; bole and crowns; and bole, crowns, and forest floor) and three levels of mechanical soil compaction (no compaction, moderate compaction, and severe soil compaction) were studied as they influence Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings following outplanting. Moderate and severe soil compaction significantly reduced nonmycorrhizal root tip abundance on both Douglas-fir and western white pine seedlings (p less than or equal to 0.05). Ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in severely compacted areas with bole and crowns and bole, crowns, and forest floor removed. Ectomycorrhizal diversity also was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in all severely compacted areas.

  9. Role of natural organic matter in governing the bioavailability of toxic metals to american oysters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haye, Jennifer Marcelle

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ligand properties related to their A- or B-type (hard or soft) character, influencing their interactions with other particles. For instance, Cd, Hg, Zn, and Ag are B-type or transition metals preferring sulfur-containing ligands to N- or O... in these experiments: Alginic Acid (AA), Carrageenan (C) -Type 1 or kappa and natural colloidal organic carbon (COC). While alginic acid has coagulant properties, and carrageenans have anticoagulant and antiviral properties (Libes, 1992), both are used as emulsifiers...

  10. Burial and decomposition of particulate organic matter in a temperate, siliciclastic, seasonal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welsh, Lisa Williamson

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the net primary productivity (NPP) of terrestrial ecosystems depends on nutrients recycled through the decomposition of plant detritus (Swift et al. 1979, Vargo et al. 1998). Thus, a better understanding of organic decomposition in wetland sediments... was then transported to the site in an anaerobic chamber constructed of PVC and maintained 12 under deoxygenated conditions until insertion into the slough sediments. The peeper was positioned in the slough for 2 weeks to allow equilibration and diffusion...

  11. Sources and Fate of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in the Arctic Ocean and Surrounding Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Sally Annette

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    the time to share, Dr. Louchouarn and Dr. Duan Shwang for lignin analysis, Amanda Rinehart for her help collecting samples, Stephanie Smith for her work on DOM fractionation during sea ice formation, and Kerestin Goodman for her help with sample analysis...-mass spectrometry HTC High temperature combustion HWL Halocline water layer viii IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change LHW Lower halocline water layer LOP Lignin oxidation products OC Organic carbon PARAFAC Parallel Factor...

  12. Towards the EDGE: Early diagenetic global explanation. A model depicting the early diagenesis of organic matter, O sub 2 , NO sub 3 , Mn, and PO sub 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabouille, C.; Gaillard, J.F. (Univ. Paris 7 (France) Inst. de Physique du Globe de Paris (France))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate fate of particles in aquatic environments is their burial and transformation in surficial sediments. There is an increasing need to relate quantitatively particle fluxes in the water column to the material recycled or preserved in the sediment. For this purpose, a transport-reaction model (EDGE) that represents the early diagenetic processes occurring in surficial sediments has been designed. This model uses the incoming flux of particulate matter and the overlying water composition in order to obtain simulated concentration profiles of chemical species in the bulk sediment and interstitial waters. It consists of a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations representing the oxidation of Particulate Organic Matter (POM) by a continuous sequence of electron acceptors (i.e., O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, MnO{sub 2}; in its preset state). The distribution of the concentrations of six components: POM, O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, MnO{sub 2}, Mn{sup 2+}, and {Sigma}PO{sub 4} are currently calculated. The Monod rate law has been used for representing the mineralization of POM coupled with the consumption of oxidants, and the sequence of oxidation of organic matter is represented using an inhibition function. The distributions with depth of the concentrations of the six chemical compounds are presented for different fluxes of POM at steady-state. These calculations show that the preservation of organic carbon and the extent of the mineralization processes are very sensitive to the organic carbon rain rate. For constant fluxes of POM and MnO{sub 2} arriving at the sediment water interface, the effect of an increasing sedimentation rate, as it might be produced by an augmentation of the detrital flux, is assessed on carbon preservation.

  13. Steam treatment of surface soil: how does it affect water-soluble organic matter, C mineralization, and bacterial community composition?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roux-Michollet, Dad; Dudal, Yves; Jocteur-Monrozier, Lucile; Czarnes, Sonia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    organic components Water extraction was performed by shakingresulting from hot water extraction, as measured by Sparlingboiling soil in water resulted in the extraction of both

  14. Changes in soil organic matter driven by shifts in co-dominant plant species in a grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of carbon sequestration. The quality and quantity of soil organic carbon is probably influenced. It is suggested that, in conservation projects based on higher carbon sequestration, the plant species with more sequestration, Plant species, Soil organic carbon, Vegetation type, Prangus uloptera stands. hal-00875310

  15. 1 Protection of Organic Carbon in Soil Microaggregates Occurs via Restructuring of Aggregate Porosity and Filling of Pores with Accumulating Organic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, John F.

    , and insights relevant to strategies for enhancing 44 carbon-sequestration in soil through changes 53 sequestration as a strategy to help mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions (Post et al., 20041 Protection of Organic Carbon in Soil Microaggregates Occurs via Restructuring of Aggregate

  16. The effect of various cropping systems upon the stability of aggregates: the rate of water infiltration, and the organic matter content of three soil conditions in the Texas Blacklands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quintero, Angel H

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the soil snd its relation to water oonserxation and to crop production has been recognised for a long tixm by uorkmrs e~ in agricultural research Soil fertility and plant growth are affected by a nuaber of faotarsx among which structurex organic matter.... . . , ?, ~ . ~ ~ ~ 31 ~ ~ ~ 32 ~ ~ ~ 33 Average pex'oentages of organic carbon in tbe surface layer of three land classes in 6 different cropping systelwl ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 34 Analysis of varianoe of organic oarbon in tbs...

  17. Development of infaunal populations and below-ground organic matter from three created Spartina alterniflora marshes in Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Alisha Renee

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 5-cm cores taken at the created salt marshes on Pelican Spit before and after the creation of the 92Marsh . . . 51 Fig. 19. Trophic relationships within the polychaetes at the 83Marsh, 87Marsh, and natural marshes during 1990/1991 (before creation... of the 92Marsh) and at the 83Marsh, 87Marsh, and 92Marsh during 1992/1994 (the two years following creaticn Of the 92Marsh) 53 Fig. 20. Plot of the relationship between the results of the two procedures for measuring sediment organic content...

  18. Longitudinal and seasonal variation of stream N uptake in an urbanizing watershed: effect of organic matter, stream size, transient storage and debris dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claessens, Luc; Tague, Christina L.; Groffman, Peter M.; Melack, John M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    streams, organic debris dams can play an important role inin ?ow velocity when debris dams are hydraulically activecontact time. Therefore, debris dams can have an important

  19. Dark Matters

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Joseph Silk

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  20. Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of Particulate Matter on DPF Soot Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of...

  1. Calculation of the thermodynamic properties at elevated temperatures and pressures of saturated and aromatic high molecular weight solid and liquid hydrocarbons in kerogen, bitumen, petroleum, and other organic matter of biogeochemical interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, L.; Helgeson, H.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To supplement the relatively sparse set of calorimetric data available for the multitude of high molecular weight organic compounds of biogeochemical interest, group additivity algorithms have been developed to estimate heat capacity power function coefficients and the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 C and 1 bar of high molecular weight compounds in hydrocarbon source rocks and reservoirs, including crystalline and liquid isoprenoids, steroids, tricyclic diterpenoids, hopanoids, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A total of ninety-six group contributions for each coefficient and property were generated from the thermodynamic properties of lower molecular weight reference species for which calorimetric data are available in the literature. These group contributions were then used to compute corresponding coefficients and properties for {approximately}360 representative solid and liquid high molecular weight compounds in kerogen, bitumen, and petroleum for which few or no experimental data are available. The coefficients and properties of these high molecular weight compounds are summarized in tables, together with those of the groups and reference species from which they were generated. The tabulated heat capacity power function coefficients and standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 C and 1 bar include selected crystalline and liquid regular, irregular and highly branched isoprenoids, tricyclic diterpanes, 17{alpha}(H)- and 17{beta}(H)-hopanes, 5{alpha}(H),14{alpha}(H)-, 5{beta}(H),14{alpha}(H)-, 5{alpha}(H),14{beta}(H)-, and 5{beta}(H),14{beta}(H)-steranes, double ether- and ester-bonded n-alkanes, and various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including methylated biphenyls, naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, anthracenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes. However, corresponding coefficients and properties for many more saturated and unsaturated high molecular weight hydrocarbons can be estimated from the equations of state group additivity algorithms. Calculations of this kind permit comprehensive thermodynamic description of the chemical evolution of organic matter with increasing depth in sedimentary basins.

  2. Matter Field, Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masayasu Tsuge

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A model concerning particle theory and cosmology is proposed. Matter field, dark matter and dark energy are created by an energy flow from space to primordial matter fields at the phase transition in the early universe.

  3. Isotope study on organic nitrogen of Westphalian anthracites from the Western Middle field of Pennsylvania (U.S.A.) and from the Bramsche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that nitrogen is released by sedimentary organic matter during diagenesis and metamorphism. Improvements of our

  4. Matter Wave Radiation Leading to Matter Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Yi Huang

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of matter wave radiation is put forward, and its equation is established for the first time. The formalism solution shows that the probability density is a function of displacement and time. A free particle and a two-level system are reinvestigated considering the effect of matter wave radiation. Three feasible experimental designs, especially a modified Stern-Gerlach setup, are proposed to verify the existence of matter wave radiation. Matter wave radiation effect in relativity has been formulated in only a raw formulae, which offers another explanation of Lamb shift. A possible mechanics of matter teleportation is predicted due to the effect of matter wave radiation.

  5. Baryonic matter and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize recent developments in identifying the ground state of dense baryonic matter and beyond. The topics include deconfinement from baryonic matter to quark matter, a diquark mixture, topological effect coupled with chirality and density, and inhomogeneous chiral condensates.

  6. Dark Matter Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dark Matter Theory Dark Matter Theory Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505)...

  7. Changes in microbial community characteristics and soil organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microbial responses to N deposition and shifts in soil organic matter (SOM) quality and quantity. We used phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and microbial enzyme assays in...

  8. aquatic organisms caused: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and sedimentary organic matter off Central Chile: response to changes caused by the 1997. GALLARDOc,d a Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM),...

  9. Management effects on labile organic carbon pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodziej, Scott Michael

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well documented that increases in soil organic matter (SOM) improve soil physical properties and increase the overall fertility and sustainability of the soil. Research in SOM storage has recently amplified following ...

  10. Management effects on labile organic carbon pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodziej, Scott Michael

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well documented that increases in soil organic matter (SOM) improve soil physical properties and increase the overall fertility and sustainability of the soil. Research in SOM storage has recently amplified following the proposal...

  11. Design of programmable matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knaian, Ara N. (Ara Nerses), 1977-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programmable matter is a proposed digital material having computation, sensing, actuation, and display as continuous properties active over its whole extent. Programmable matter would have many exciting applications, like ...

  12. Asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jason [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the theoretical framework underlying models of asymmetric dark matter, describe astrophysical constraints which arise from observations of neutron stars, and discuss the prospects for detecting asymmetric dark matter.

  13. Exothermic dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Peter W.

    We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, ...

  14. Hot-dark matter, cold dark matter and accelerating universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbas Farmany; Amin Farmany; Mohammad Mahmoodi

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Friedman equation is solved for a universe contains hotdark matter and cold dark matter. In this scenario, hot-dark matter drives an accelerating universe no cold dark matter.

  15. in Condensed Matter Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Master in Condensed Matter Physics ­ Master académique #12;2 #12;3 Students at the University. Condensed matter physics is about explaining and predicting the relationship between the atomic, and broad education in the field of condensed matter physics · introduce you to current research topics

  16. Of Matters Condensed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shulman, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Physical Society (APS) March Meeting of condensed matter physics has grown to nearly 10,000 participants, comprises 23 individual APS groups, and even warrants its own hashtag (#apsmarch). Here we analyze the text and data from March Meeting abstracts of the past nine years and discuss trends in condensed matter physics over this time period. We find that in comparison to atomic, molecular, and optical physics, condensed matter changes rapidly, and that condensed matter appears to be moving increasingly toward subject matter that is traditionally in materials science and engineering.

  17. Incompressibility of strange matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monika Sinha; Manjari Bagchi; Jishnu Dey; Mira Dey; Subharthi Ray; Siddhartha Bhowmick

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strange stars calculated from a realistic equation of state (EOS), that incorporate chiral symmetry restoration as well as deconfinement at high density show compact objects in the mass radius curve. We compare our calculations of incompressibility for this EOS with that of nuclear matter. One of the nuclear matter EOS has a continuous transition to ud-matter at about five times normal density. Another nuclear matter EOS incorporates density dependent coupling constants. From a look at the consequent velocity of sound, it is found that the transition to ud-matter seems necessary.

  18. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  19. Matter: Space without Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  20. Energy Matters Mailbag

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This edition of the mailbag tackles follow-up questions from our Energy Matters discussion on breaking our reliance on foreign oil.

  1. Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oxidized to nitrates. The direct study of the changes in organic matter or carbon in the soil is more satisfactory than any assumption. A considerable amount of work upon the oxidation of organic matter in the soil has been clone hy Wollny... cflpo8city, so the re1ati~-e power of the soil to support oxidizing organisms ma!r he termed its oxidafion cnpaciiy. The nitrif-ing capac- it" the oxidatioa capacity 'and the capacit~ of the soil to convert am- monia into nitrates and ammonia are to a...

  2. The significance of organic carbon and sediment surface area to the benthic biogeochemistry of the slope and deep water environments of the northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beazley, Melanie J.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The bioavailability of metabolizable organic matter within marine sediments is one of the more important driving mechanisms controlling benthic pelagic communities. Interactions between organic material and mineral surfaces ...

  3. Organic Geochemistry of the CenomanianTuronian Bahloul Formation Petroleum Source Rock, Central and Northern Tunisia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Organic Geochemistry of the Cenomanian­Turonian Bahloul Formation Petroleum Source Rock, Central and around diapirs of the Triassic salt. Key words: Organic matter, Petroleum Source Rock, Cenomanian (TOC) determination, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, extractable organic matter content (EOM) fractionation

  4. Dipolar Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchet, Luc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because the two types of dark matter interact through the vector field, a ghostly degree of fre...

  5. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  6. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  7. Ice particle size matters | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice particle size matters Ice particle size matters Released: May 04, 2014 Fine-tuning cloud models for improved climate predictions The Science Arctic clouds are widespread and...

  8. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 1 - Skills and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual and decomposed organic matter held in the soil Infiltration The absorption of waterresidual rain moisture is typically lost from the root zone as water

  9. Molecular fossils and other organic markers as palaeoenvironmental indicators of the Messinian Calcare di Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    matter shows low maturity, and preserves the original signatures of the source organisms. Rock petrography and geochemical analyses (palynofacies, Rock-Eval pyrolysis and gas chromatography

  10. Leadership, Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmeri, Thomas

    Leadership, Policy & Organizations #12;2 At Peabody students have the opportunity to develop new College, in the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations (LPO). The faculty believes Patricia and Rodes Hart Chair, and Professor of Education Policy and Leadership, Ellen Goldring also serves

  11. Hot and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Eramo, Francesco

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we build new Effective Field Theory tools to describe the propagation of energetic partons in hot and dense media, and we propose two new reactions for dark matter in the early universe. In the first part, ...

  12. Programmable matter by folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, R. J.

    Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to ...

  13. The Heart of Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohini M. Godbole

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article I trace the development of the human understanding of the "Heart of Matter" from early concepts of "elements" (or alternatively "Panchmahabhootas") to the current status of "quarks" and "leptons" as the fundamental constituents of matter, interacting together via exchange of the various force carrier particles called "gauge bosons" such as the photon, W/Z-boson etc. I would like to show how our understanding of the fundamental constituents of matter has gone hand in hand with our understanding of the fundamental forces in nature. I will also outline how the knowledge of particle physics at the "micro" scale of less than a Fermi(one millionth of a nanometer), enables us to offer explanations of Cosmological observations at the "macro" scale. Consequently these observations, may in turn, help us address some very fundamental questions of the Physics at the "Heart of the Matter".

  14. Matter & Energy Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    See also: Matter & Energy Electronics· Detectors· Technology· Construction· Sports Science Electronic Tongue Tastes Wine Variety, Vintage (Aug. 12, 2008) -- You don't need a wine expert to Advance

  15. Gaseous dark matter detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martoff, C. J.

    Dark matter (DM) detectors with directional sensitivity have the potential of yielding an unambiguous positive observation of WIMPs as well as discriminating between galactic DM halo models. In this paper, we introduce the ...

  16. High density matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Stone

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been the subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has lead to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. However, there remains great uncertainty in these models, which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfil basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics. In this review the latest developments in construction of the Equation of State (EoS) of high-density matter at zero and finite temperature assuming different composition of the matter are surveyed. Critical comparison of model EoS with available observational data on neutron stars, including gravitational masses, radii and cooling patterns is presented. The effect of changing rotational frequency on the composition of neutron stars during their lifetime is demonstrated. Compatibility of EoS of high-density, low temperature compact objects and low density, high temperature matter created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  17. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches: Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Abercrombie; Nural Akchurin; Ece Akilli; Juan Alcaraz Maestre; Brandon Allen; Barbara Alvarez Gonzalez; Jeremy Andrea; Alexandre Arbey; Georges Azuelos; Patrizia Azzi; Mihailo Backovi?; Yang Bai; Swagato Banerjee; James Beacham; Alexander Belyaev; Antonio Boveia; Amelia Jean Brennan; Oliver Buchmueller; Matthew R. Buckley; Giorgio Busoni; Michael Buttignol; Giacomo Cacciapaglia; Regina Caputo; Linda Carpenter; Nuno Filipe Castro; Guillelmo Gomez Ceballos; Yangyang Cheng; John Paul Chou; Arely Cortes Gonzalez; Chris Cowden; Francesco D'Eramo; Annapaola De Cosa; Michele De Gruttola; Albert De Roeck; Andrea De Simone; Aldo Deandrea; Zeynep Demiragli; Anthony DiFranzo; Caterina Doglioni; Tristan du Pree; Robin Erbacher; Johannes Erdmann; Cora Fischer; Henning Flaecher; Patrick J. Fox; Benjamin Fuks; Marie-Helene Genest; Bhawna Gomber; Andreas Goudelis; Johanna Gramling; John Gunion; Kristian Hahn; Ulrich Haisch; Roni Harnik; Philip C. Harris; Kerstin Hoepfner; Siew Yan Hoh; Dylan George Hsu; Shih-Chieh Hsu; Yutaro Iiyama; Valerio Ippolito; Thomas Jacques; Xiangyang Ju; Felix Kahlhoefer; Alexis Kalogeropoulos; Laser Seymour Kaplan; Lashkar Kashif; Valentin V. Khoze; Raman Khurana; Khristian Kotov; Dmytro Kovalskyi; Suchita Kulkarni; Shuichi Kunori; Viktor Kutzner; Hyun Min Lee; Sung-Won Lee; Seng Pei Liew; Tongyan Lin; Steven Lowette; Romain Madar; Sarah Malik; Fabio Maltoni; Mario Martinez Perez; Olivier Mattelaer; Kentarou Mawatari; Christopher McCabe; Théo Megy; Enrico Morgante; Stephen Mrenna; Siddharth M. Narayanan; Andy Nelson; Sérgio F. Novaes; Klaas Ole Padeken; Priscilla Pani; Michele Papucci; Manfred Paulini; Christoph Paus; Jacopo Pazzini; Björn Penning; Michael E. Peskin; Deborah Pinna; Massimiliano Procura; Shamona F. Qazi; Davide Racco; Emanuele Re; Antonio Riotto; Thomas G. Rizzo; Rainer Roehrig; David Salek; Arturo Sanchez Pineda; Subir Sarkar; Alexander Schmidt; Steven Randolph Schramm; William Shepherd; Gurpreet Singh; Livia Soffi; Norraphat Srimanobhas; Kevin Sung; Tim M. P. Tait; Timothee Theveneaux-Pelzer; Marc Thomas; Mia Tosi; Daniele Trocino; Sonaina Undleeb; Alessandro Vichi; Fuquan Wang; Lian-Tao Wang; Ren-Jie Wang; Nikola Whallon; Steven Worm; Mengqing Wu; Sau Lan Wu; Hongtao Yang; Yong Yang; Shin-Shan Yu; Bryan Zaldivar; Marco Zanetti; Zhiqing Zhang; Alberto Zucchetta

    2015-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report of the ATLAS-CMS Dark Matter Forum, a forum organized by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations with the participation of experts on theories of Dark Matter, to select a minimal basis set of dark matter simplified models that should support the design of the early LHC Run-2 searches. A prioritized, compact set of benchmark models is proposed, accompanied by studies of the parameter space of these models and a repository of generator implementations. This report also addresses how to apply the Effective Field Theory formalism for collider searches and present the results of such interpretations.

  18. The aging of organic aerosol in the atmosphere : chemical transformations by heterogeneous oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Sean Herbert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The immense chemical complexity of atmospheric organic particulate matter ("aerosol") has left the general field of condensed-phase atmospheric organic chemistry relatively under-developed when compared with either gas-phase ...

  19. Isotopic constraints on the sources and associations of organic compounds in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Helen K

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To provide a new perspective on the fate of both natural organic matter and hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in marine sediments, we have investigated the relationship between radiocarbon (14C) age and the different ...

  20. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  1. Phase transition from hadronic matter to quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Wang; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase transition from nuclear matter to quark matter within the SU(3) quark mean field model and NJL model. The SU(3) quark mean field model is used to give the equation of state for nuclear matter, while the equation of state for color superconducting quark matter is calculated within the NJL model. It is found that at low temperature, the phase transition from nuclear to color superconducting quark matter will take place when the density is of order 2.5$\\rho_0$ - 5$\\rho_0$. At zero density, the quark phase will appear when the temperature is larger than about 148 MeV. The phase transition from nuclear matter to quark matter is always first order, whereas the transition between color superconducting quark matter and normal quark matter is second order.

  2. Thermodynamics of clusterized matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad. R. Raduta; F. Gulminelli

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamics of clusterized matter is studied in the framework of statistical models with non-interacting cluster degrees of freedom. At variance with the analytical Fisher model, exact Metropolis simulation results indicate that the transition from homogeneous to clusterized matter lies along the $\\rho=\\rho_0$ axis at all temperatures and the limiting point of the phase diagram is not a critical point even if the surface energy vanishes at this point. Sensitivity of the inferred phase diagram to the employed statistical framework in the case of finite systems is discussed by considering the grand-canonical and constant-pressure canonical ensembles. A Wigner-Seitz formalism in which the fragment charge is neutralized by an uniform electron distribution allows to build the phase diagram of neutron star matter.

  3. Axion Dark Matter Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Stern

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a $\\mu$eV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 $\\mu$eV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  4. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Ian P. [Department of Physics, Univerisity of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Collaboration: ADMX Collaboration; ADMX-HF Collaboration

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a ?eV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 ?eV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  5. Dark matter axions `96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikivie, P.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses why axions have been postulated to exist, what cosmology implies about their presence as cold dark matter in the galactic halo, how axions might be detected in cavities wherein strong magnetic fields stimulate their conversion into photons, and relations between axions` energy spectra and galactic halos` properties.

  6. Matter & Energy Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    See Also: Matter & Energy Solar Energy· Electronics· Materials Science· Earth & Climate Energy at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got brighter. Although silicon is the industry Electronics Over 1.2 Million Electronics Parts, Components and Equipment. www.AlliedElec.com solar energy

  7. Matter & Energy Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    .com/products/seahawk/ Maryland Solar Panels-- Solar Installations from BGE HOME $0 Down For Big Energy Savings! www.bgehome.com/SolarLike 6 0 | More APA MLA See Also: Matter & Energy Petroleum Engineering Fossil Fuels Earth believe may be contributing to global warming. The UK government has just announced it is investing £1

  8. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Anthony

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate can be very light, $10^{-22}\\,{\\rm eV} \\lesssim m \\lesssim 10^2\\,{\\rm eV}$; the lower limit arises from constraints on small-scale structure formation, while the upper bound ensures that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of deco...

  9. Energy Matters in Washington State Page 1 Energy Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 1 Energy Matters in Washington State June 2008 Updated November 2009 Updated and Revised October 2013 Grand Coulee Dam #12;Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 2 Copyright © 2013 Washington State University Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, P.O. Box 43169

  10. Self assembly in soft matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term “soft matter” applies to a variety of physical systems, such as liquids, colloids, polymers, foams, gels, and granular materials. The most fascinating aspect of soft matter lies in the fact that they are not ...

  11. Self Assembly in Soft Matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term “soft matter” applies to a variety of physical systems, such as liquids, colloids, polymers, foams, gels, and granular materials. The most fascinating aspect of soft matter lies in the fact that they are not ...

  12. The Search for Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Orrell, John

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

  13. The Search for Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, John

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

  14. Dating Carbonaceous Matter in Archean Cherts by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rocks. This is particularly the case for Archean siliceous sedimentary rocks (cherts), which record. As thermal treatments impact organic matter maturity, the effect of temperature on this syngeneity proxy samples (from Mars for example). Key Words: Kero- gen--Sedimentary rocks

  15. Effect of Natural Organic Matter on Zinc Inhibition of Hematite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    study, we showed that amendments known to stimulate hematite reduction [anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate

  16. Impacts of engineering nanoparticles on dissolved organic matter assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chi-Shuo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the marine food web in the deep ocean, the possibilityfor the marine food web in the deep ocean, the possibility

  17. Enhancing the soil organic matter pool through biomass incorporation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felipe G. Sanchez; Emily A. Carter; John F. Klepac

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was installed in the upper Coastal Plains of South Carolina, USA that sought to examine the impact of incorporating downed slash materials into subsoil layers on soil chemical and physical properties as compared with the effect of slash materials left on the soil surface. Two sites were examined which differed in soil textural composition: sandy vs. clay.

  18. Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular...

  19. Microbial responses and coral reef resilience to organic matter inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garren, Melissa Sara

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antagonistic interactions among coral-associated bacteria.environmental drivers of coral communities at Palmyra Atoll:growth rates, and primary production made in coral reef

  20. Decomposition and Organic Matter Quality in Continental Peatlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    deglaciation and represent a long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Soil temperatures incubations to quantify carbon dioxide (CO2) pro- duction in peat formed under different permafrost regimes (Alberta, Sas- katchewan) or within depth intervals (surface, deep). Internal lawn peat produces more CO2

  1. Impacts of engineering nanoparticles on dissolved organic matter assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chi-Shuo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QDs, e.g. , CdSe/ZnS and InGaP/ZnS), 4) zero-valent metalQDs, e.g. , CdSe/ZnS and InGaP/ZnS), 4) zero-valent metal

  2. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

  3. dark matter dark energy inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wayne

    theory dark matter dark energy inflation The National Science Foundation The Kavli Foundation NSF Site Review November 28-29, 2005 #12;dark matter dark energy inflation NSF Site Visit ­ November 28 Gravitation initial conditions beyond single-field slow roll #12;dark matter dark energy inflation NSF Site

  4. Dark Energy and Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith A. Olive

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief overview of our current understanding of abundance and properties of dark energy and dark matter is presented. A more focused discussion of supersymmetric dark matter follows. Included is a frequentist approach to the supersymmetric parameter space and consequences for the direct detection of dark matter.

  5. Particulate matter dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cionco, Rodolfo G; Caligaris, Marta G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantial fraction of the particulate matter released into the atmosphere by industrial or natural processes corresponds to particles whose aerodynamic diameters are greater than 50 mm. It has been shown that, for these particles, the classical description of Gaussian plume diffusion processes, is inadequate to describe the transport and deposition. In this paper we present new results concerning the dispersion of coarse particulate matter. The simulations are done with our own code that uses the Bulirsch Stoer numerical integrator to calculate threedimensional trajectories of particles released into the environment under very general conditions. Turbulent processes are simulated by the Langevin equation and weather conditions are modeled after stable (Monin-Obukhov length L> 0) and unstable conditions (L <0). We present several case studies based on Monte Carlo simulations and discusses the effect of weather on the final deposition of these particles.

  6. Constraining Decaying Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Huo

    2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisited the decaying dark matter (DDM) model, in which one collisionless particle decays early into two collisionless particles, that are potentially dark matter particles today. The effect of DDM will be manifested in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and structure formation. With a systematic modification of CMB calculation tool \\texttt{camb}, we can numerically calculated this effect, and compare it to observations. Further Markov Chain Monte Carlo \\texttt{cosmomc} runnings update the constraints in that model: the free streaming length $\\lambda_{FS}\\lesssim0.5$Mpc for nonrelativistic decay, and $((M_{DDM}/keV) Y)^2 (T_d/yr)\\lesssim5\\times10^{-5}$ for relativistic decay.

  7. Dark matter particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryonic and cold dark matter are reviewed in the context of cosmological models. The theoretical search for the particle candidates is limited by supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. Generically in such models there are just two candidates associated with each other: generalized neutralino, which components are usual neutralino and axino, and axion which is a partner of axino in supermultiplet. The status of these particles as DM candidates is described.

  8. Luminous Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Feldstein; Peter W. Graham; Surjeet Rajendran

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a dark matter model in which the signal in direct detection experiments arises from electromagnetic, not nuclear, energy deposition. This can provide a novel explanation for DAMA while avoiding many direct detection constraints. The dark matter state is taken nearly degenerate with another state. These states are naturally connected by a dipole moment operator, which can give both the dominant scattering and decay modes between the two states. The signal at DAMA then arises from dark matter scattering in the Earth into the excited state and decaying back to the ground state through emission of a single photon in the detector. This model has unique signatures in direct detection experiments. The density and chemical composition of the detector is irrelevant, only the total volume affects the event rate. In addition, the spectrum is a monoenergetic line, which can fit the DAMA signal well. This model is readily testable at experiments such as CDMS and XENON100 if they analyze their low-energy, electronic recoil events.

  9. Dark matter axions revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 (United States)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae, and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. We also upgrade the treatment of anharmonicities in the axion potential, which we find important in certain cases. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass m{sub a}=(85{+-}3) {mu}eV makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for m{sub a}<15 meV provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle {theta}{sub i} is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass m{sub a}. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle {theta}{sub i}.

  10. Hidden vector dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Hambye

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that dark matter could be made of massive gauge bosons whose stability doesn't require to impose by hand any discrete or global symmetry. Stability of gauge bosons can be guaranteed by the custodial symmetry associated to the gauge symmetry and particle content of the model. The particle content we consider to this end is based on a hidden sector made of a vector multiplet associated to a non-abelian gauge group and of a scalar multiplet charged under this gauge group. The hidden sector interacts with the Standard Model particles through the Higgs portal quartic scalar interaction in such a way that the gauge bosons behave as thermal WIMPS. This can lead easily to the observed dark matter relic density in agreement with the other various constraints, and can be tested experimentally in a large fraction of the parameter space. In this model the dark matter direct detection rate and the annihilation cross section can decouple if the Higgs portal interaction is weak.

  11. High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coburn, Thomas T. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

  12. A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coburn, T.T.

    1988-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

  13. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize carbon AboutOrganizing Committee

  14. Superconnections and Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roepstorff, G

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous paper, the superconnection formalism was used to naturally fit the Higgs field into a U(n) gauge theory where we aimed at the reconstruction of the standard model. The approach provides an alternative to non-commutative geometry. This work is now continued by including matter field (leptons). The essentially new ingredient is the right-handed neutrino field and a new kind of interaction that goes with it. All interactions follow from one Dirac operator associated to a superconnection.

  15. Superconnections and Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Roepstorff

    2000-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous paper (hep-th/9801040), the superconnection formalism was used to fit the Higgs field into a U(n) gauge theory with particular emphasis on the n=2 case, aiming at the reconstruction of certain parts of the Standard Model. The approach provides an alternative to the one bases on non-commutative geometry. This work is continued by including matter fields (leptons only). We extend the Standard Model by including the right-handed neutrino field. The possibility of a finite neutrino mass is thus accounted for.

  16. Thermodynamics of electroweak matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gynther

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a slightly modified version of the introductory part of a PhD thesis, also containing the articles hep-ph/0303019, hep-ph/0510375 and hep-ph/0512177. We provide a short history of the research of electroweak thermodynamics and a brief introduction to the theory as well as to the necessary theoretical tools needed to work at finite temperatures. We then review computations regarding the pressure of electroweak matter at high temperatures (the full expression of the perturbative expansion of the pressure is given in the appendix) and the electroweak phase diagram at finite chemical potentials. Finally, we compare electroweak and QCD thermodynamics.

  17. Discrete dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, M.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apartado 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new motivation for the stability of dark matter (DM). We suggest that the same non-Abelian discrete flavor symmetry which accounts for the observed pattern of neutrino oscillations, spontaneously breaks to a Z{sub 2} subgroup which renders DM stable. The simplest scheme leads to a scalar doublet DM potentially detectable in nuclear recoil experiments, inverse neutrino mass hierarchy, hence a neutrinoless double beta decay rate accessible to upcoming searches, while {theta}{sub 13}=0 gives no CP violation in neutrino oscillations.

  18. Particulate Matter Aerosols

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics OneOutreach EffortsSearchParticulate Matter

  19. Dark Matter Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OFSupplemental TechnologySummaryDariuszDark Matter Theory

  20. Thermodynamics of strong-interaction matter from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heng-Tong Ding; Frithjof Karsch; Swagato Mukherjee

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We review results from lattice QCD calculations on the thermodynamics of strong-interaction matter with emphasis on input these calculations can provide to the exploration of the phase diagram and properties of hot and dense matter created in heavy ion experiments. This review is organized as follows: 1) Introduction, 2) QCD thermodynamics on the lattice, 3) QCD phase diagram at high temperature, 4) Bulk thermodynamics, 5) Fluctuations of conserved charges, 6) Transport properties, 7) Open heavy flavors and heavy quarkonia, 8) QCD in external magnetic fields, 9) Summary.

  1. Thermodynamics of strong-interaction matter from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Heng-Tong; Mukherjee, Swagato

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review results from lattice QCD calculations on the thermodynamics of strong-interaction matter with emphasis on input these calculations can provide to the exploration of the phase diagram and properties of hot and dense matter created in heavy ion experiments. This review is organized as follows: 1) Introduction, 2) QCD thermodynamics on the lattice, 3) QCD phase diagram at high temperature, 4) Bulk thermodynamics, 5) Fluctuations of conserved charges, 6) Transport properties, 7) Open heavy flavors and heavy quarkonia, 8) QCD in external magnetic fields, 9) Summary.

  2. From association to organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandler, George

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S.M. (1978). Organization theory and memory for prose: Aand summarize organization theory and relevant empiricalexplained in terms of organization theory. The hierarchical

  3. Organization Chart - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LSD Logo About Us People & Organization Research News & Events Safety Internal Resources Organization Chart Departments Scientific Staff Directory Committees Organization Chart...

  4. Nitrogen isotopic evolution of carbonaceous matter during metamorphism: Methodology and preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartigny, Pierre

    their extraction from the rock. In view of that, a preliminary sealed-tube investigation of the organic nitrogen). However, with kerogen maturation and following carbonaceous matter (CM) metamorphism, a significant; Sucha et al., 1994). 15 N of this neo-formed mineral nitrogen can be different from its organic source

  5. Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Colonna

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

  6. Charmonium mass in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. H.; Ko, Che Ming.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass shift of charmonium states in nuclear matter is studied in the perturbative QCD approach. The leading-order effect due to the change of gluon condensate in nuclear matter is evaluated using the leading-order QCD formula, while the higher...

  7. Astronomical Evidence for Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golwala, Sunil

    weapon in "Quake 4" is the Dark Matter Gun. In Futurama they use dark matter fuel, where "one pound is 10 and neutrons, can compute relative ratio. Using nuclear reaction rates, can compute relative abundances oscillations). Peak is from maximal compression of photon-baryon fluid. Peak sensitive to curvature

  8. Energy Matters in Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Energy Matters in Washington State Energy Matters in Washington State www.energy.wsu.edu/library/ November 2009 #12;905 Plum Street SE, Building 3 P.O. Box 43169 Olympia, Washington 98504-3169 Energy University Extension Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, Building 3, P.O. Box 43169, Olympia, Washington

  9. Quantum vacuum and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum was proposed as alternative to the dark matter paradigm. In the present paper we consider four benchmark measurements: the universality of the central surface density of galaxy dark matter haloes, the cored dark matter haloes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the non-existence of dark disks in spiral galaxies and distribution of dark matter after collision of clusters of galaxies (the Bullet cluster is a famous example). Only some of these phenomena (but not all of them) can (in principle) be explained by the dark matter and the theories of modified gravity. However, we argue that the framework of the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum allows the understanding of the totality of these phenomena.

  10. Mesoscopic Fractional Quantum in Soft Matter Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Division Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    matter such as polymers, colloids, emulsions, foams, living organisms, rock layers, sediments, plastics, glass, rubber, oil, soil, DNA, etc, µ ranges from 0 to 2 and is from 0 to 1. It is worth pointing out

  11. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Advanced diagnostics of experiments covering many orders of magnitude in strain...

  12. The Energy of Charged Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Philip Solovej

    2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I will discuss some of the techniques that have been developed over the past 35 years to estimate the energy of charged matter. These techniques have been used to solve stability of (fermionic) matter in different contexts, and to control the instability of charged bosonic matter. The final goal will be to indicate how these techniques with certain improvements can be used to prove Dyson's 1967 conjecture for the energy of a charged Bose gas--the sharp $N^{7/5}$ law.

  13. Sources and production of organic aerosol in Mexico City: insights from the combination of a chemical transport model (PMCAMx-2008) and measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsimpidi, A. P.

    Urban areas are large sources of organic aerosols and their precursors. Nevertheless, the contributions of primary (POA) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the observed particulate matter levels have been difficult to ...

  14. The Unification and Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Barr

    2011-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In grand unified theories with gauge groups larger than SU(5), the multiplets that contain the known quarks and leptons also contain fermions that are singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Some of these could be the dark matter of the universe. Grand unified theories can also have accidental U(1) global symmetries (analogous to B-L in minimal SU(5)) that can stabilize dark matter. These ideas are illustrated in an SU(6) model.

  15. The Unification and Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, S M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In grand unified theories with gauge groups larger than SU(5), the multiplets that contain the known quarks and leptons also contain fermions that are singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Some of these could be the dark matter of the universe. Grand unified theories can also have accidental U(1) global symmetries (analogous to B-L in minimal SU(5)) that can stabilize dark matter. These ideas are illustrated in an SU(6) model.

  16. Quantification of soil organic carbon using mid- and near- DRIFT spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Misun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New, rapid techniques to quantify the different pools of soil organic matter (SOM) are needed to improve our understanding of the dynamics and spatio-temporal variability of SOM in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, ...

  17. Terrorist Safe Havens: Towards an Understanding of What They Accomplish for Terrorist Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Baptiste, Ari

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    How do safe havens help facilitate a militant terrorist organization's activities and operations? This study expects to find that safe havens do matter, that they provide safety, training, rest, etc. The researcher presumes ...

  18. Investigation of the correlation between odd oxygen and secondary organic aerosol in Mexico City and Houston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, E. C.

    Many recent models underpredict secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particulate matter (PM) concentrations in polluted regions, indicating serious deficiencies in the models' chemical mechanisms and/or missing SOA precursors. ...

  19. Physical Protection of Classified Matter

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes policy and objectives for physical protection of classified matter. This directive does not cancel another directive. Chg 1, 7-30-93. Canceled by 5632.1C.

  20. Cosmology, Thermodynamics and Matter Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; M. O. Calvao; I. Waga

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Several approaches to the matter creation problem in the context of cosmological models are summarily reviewed. A covariant formulation of the general relativistic imperfect simple fluid endowed with a process of matter creation is presented. By considering the standard big bang model, it is shown how the recent results of Prigogine et alii \\cite{1} can be recovered and, at the same time their limits of validity are explicited.

  1. ?CDM cosmology from matter only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman Telkamp

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a matter-only interpretation of {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, based on conservation of energy and assuming a Machian definition of inertia. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology can be linked to a Newtonian cosmic potential, subject to a propagating gravitational horizon. In a matter-only universe where total energy is conserved, Machian inertia related to the evolving potential may cause both deceleration and acceleration of recession.

  2. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Xu

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I report my recent study on the shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. An isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction is used in the study. Effects of density, temperature, and isospin asymmetry of nuclear matter on its shear viscosity have been discussed. Similar to the symmetry energy, the symmetry shear viscosity is defined and its density and temperature dependence are studied.

  3. Dark Matter Triggers of Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter W. Graham; Surjeet Rajendran; Jaime Varela

    2015-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ rules out primordial black holes with masses $\\sim 10^{19}$ gm - $10^{20}$ gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as $10^{24}$ gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range $10^{20}$ gm - $10^{22}$ gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism proposed in this paper can constrain a variety of other dark matter scenarios such as Q balls, annihilation/collision of large composite states of dark matter and models of dark matter where the accretion of dark matter leads to the formation of compact cores within the star. White dwarfs, with their astronomical lifetimes and sizes, can thus act as large space-time volume detectors enabling a unique probe of the properties of dark matter, especially of dark matter candidates that have low number density. This mechanism also raises the intriguing possibility that a class of supernova may be triggered through rare events induced by dark matter rather than the conventional mechanism of accreting white dwarfs that explode upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass.

  4. Two field matter bounce cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; McDonough, Evan; Duplessis, Francis; Brandenberger, Robert H., E-mail: yifucai@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: evanmc@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: francis.duplessis@mail.mcgill.ca, E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montréal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the non-singular Matter Bounce scenario first developed in [20], which starts with a matter-dominated period of contraction and transitions into an Ekpyrotic phase of contraction. We consider both matter fields, the first of which plays the role of regular matter, and the second of which is responsible for the non-singular bounce. Since the dominant matter field is massive, the induced curvature fluctuations are initially not scale-invariant, whereas the fluctuations of the second scalar field (which are initially entropy fluctuations) are scale-invariant. We study the transfer of the initial entropy perturbations into curvature fluctuations in the matter-dominated phase of contraction and show that the latter become nearly scale invariant on large scales but are blue tilted on small scales. We study the evolution of both curvature and entropy fluctuations through the bounce, and show that both have a scale-invariant spectrum which is blue-tilted on small scales. However, we find that the entropy fluctuations have an amplitude that is much smaller than that of the curvature perturbations, due to gravitational amplification of curvature perturbations during the bounce phase.

  5. Quantifying the Effect of Kerogen on Electrical Resistivity Measurements on Organic-rich Source Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kethireddy, Nikhil Reddy

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    conductivity measurements (Rajeshwar et al., 1980) carried out on oil shale samples from the Green River oil shales illustrate the correlation between electrical behavior of organic matter and temperature. Researchers (Meng et al., 2012; Rajeshwar et al...., 1980) observed a pronounced effect of thermal maturity of organic matter and temperature on magnitude of measured electrical conductivity of the oil shale samples. The changes in kerogen network and structure, with increasing temperature and maturity...

  6. The Cosmic Organism Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding-Yu Chung; Volodymyr Krasnoholovets

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the cosmic organism theory in which all visible and invisible matter has different cosmic genetic expressions. The cosmic gene includes codes for the object structure and the space structure. The cosmic digital code for the object structure consists of full object (1, 2, and 3 for particle, string, and membrane, respectively) and empty object (0) as anti de Sitter space (AdS). The tessellation lattice of empty objects is tessellattice. The decomposition of a full object in tessellattice results in the AdS/CFT (conformal field theory) duality. The digital code for the object structure accounts for the AdS/CFT duality, the dS/bulk duality, and gravity. The digital code for the space structure consists of 1 and 0 for attachment space and detachment space, respectively. Attachment space attaches to object permanently at zero speed or reversibly at the speed of light. Detachment space detaches from the object irreversibly at the speed of light. The combination of attachment space and detachment space results in miscible space, binary lattice space or binary partition space. Miscible space represents special relativity. Binary lattice space consists of multiple quantized units of attachment space separated from one another by detachment space. Binary lattice space corresponds to the nilpotent universal computational rewrite system (NUCRS) by Diaz and Rowlands. The gauge force fields and wavefunction are in binary lattice space. With tessellattice and binary lattice space, 11D brane is reducing to 4D particle surrounded by gravity and the gauge force fields. The cosmic dimension varies due to different speeds of light in different dimensional space-times and the increase of mass.

  7. Matter-antimatter asymmetry and dark matter from torsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplawski, Nikodem J. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Swain Hall West, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple scenario which explains the observed matter-antimatter imbalance and the origin of dark matter in the Universe. We use the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity which naturally extends general relativity to include the intrinsic spin of matter. Spacetime torsion produced by spin generates, in the classical Dirac equation, the Hehl-Datta term which is cubic in spinor fields. We show that under a charge-conjugation transformation this term changes sign relative to the mass term. A classical Dirac spinor and its charge conjugate therefore satisfy different field equations. Fermions in the presence of torsion have higher energy levels than antifermions, which leads to their decay asymmetry. Such a difference is significant only at extremely high densities that existed in the very early Universe. We propose that this difference caused a mechanism, according to which heavy fermions existing in such a Universe and carrying the baryon number decayed mostly to normal matter, whereas their antiparticles decayed mostly to hidden antimatter which forms dark matter. The conserved total baryon number of the Universe remained zero.

  8. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of ?-Pinene. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic...

  9. Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Pe-Der

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina... to human health if they exist in the water supply at relatively high concentrations. A wide variety of treatment processes are available to remove organic matter from wastewater. Biological treatment is the most cost effective method for removing oxygen...

  10. Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

  11. Departmental Organization and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

  12. Fluid Mechanics Explains Cosmology, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the interstellar medium by the Herschel, Planck etc. infrared satellites throw doubt on standard {\\Lambda}CDMHC cosmological processes to form gravitational structures. According to the Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics (HGD) cosmology of Gibson (1996), and the quasar microlensing observations of Schild (1996), the dark matter of galaxies consists of Proto-Globular-star-Cluster (PGC) clumps of Earth-mass primordial gas planets in metastable equilibrium since PGCs began star production at 0.3 Myr by planet mergers. Dark energy and the accelerating expansion of the universe inferred from SuperNovae Ia are systematic dimming errors produced as frozen gas dark matter planets evaporate to form stars. Collisionless cold dark matter that clumps and hierarchically clusters does not exist. Clumps of PGCs began diffusion from the Milky Way Proto-Galaxy upon freezing at 14 Myr to give the Magellanic Clouds and the faint dwarf galaxies of the 10^22 m diameter baryonic dark matter Galaxy halo. The first stars persist as old globular star clusters (OGCs). Water oceans and the biological big bang occurred at 2-8 Myr. Life inevitably formed and evolved in the cosmological primordial organic soup provided by 10^80 big bang planets and their hot oceans as they gently merged to form larger binary planets and small binary stars.

  13. Dynamical dark matter. II. An explicit model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Thomas, Brooks

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent paper [K. R. Dienes and B. Thomas, Phys. Rev. D 85, 083523 (2012).], we introduced “dynamical dark matter,” a new framework for dark-matter physics, and outlined its underlying theoretical principles and phenomenological possibilities. Unlike most traditional approaches to the dark-matter problem which hypothesize the existence of one or more stable dark-matter particles, our dynamical dark-matter framework is characterized by the fact that the requirement of stability is replaced by a delicate balancing between cosmological abundances and lifetimes across a vast ensemble of individual dark-matter components. This setup therefore collectively produces a time-varying cosmological dark-matter abundance, and the different dark-matter components can interact and decay throughout the current epoch. While the goal of our previous paper was to introduce the broad theoretical aspects of this framework, the purpose of the current paper is to provide an explicit model of dynamical dark matter and demonstrate that this model satisfies all collider, astrophysical, and cosmological constraints. The results of this paper therefore constitute an “existence proof” of the phenomenological viability of our overall dynamical dark-matter framework, and demonstrate that dynamical dark matter is indeed a viable alternative to the traditional paradigm of dark-matter physics. Dynamical dark matter must therefore be considered alongside other approaches to the dark-matter problem, particularly in scenarios involving large extra dimensions or string theory in which there exist large numbers of particles which are neutral under standard-model symmetries.

  14. Phi Meson in Dense Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.; Qiu, X. J.; Li, C. T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 45, NUMBER 3 MARCH 1992 Phi meson in dense matter C. M. Ko, P. Levai, * and X. J. Qiu Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas A &M University, College Station, Texas 77843 C. T. Li Physics Department, National... Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10764, China {Received 3 September 1991) The effect of the kaon loop correction to the property of a phi meson in dense matter is studied in the vector dominance model. Using the density-dependent kaon effective mass...

  15. Organe und Gremien Organe der Stiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Batavia IL (USA) Prof. Dr. F. Krausz BESSY GmbH, Berlin Prof. Dr. B. Naroska Universität Hamburg Prof. Dr. F. Pauss European Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Geneva (CH) Dr. N. Roe Lawrence Berkeley Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Geneva (CH) Dr. A. Wrulich Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (CH) 14 #12

  16. Organe und Gremien Organe der Stiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medizinische Forschung, Heidelberg Prof. Dr. E. Jaeschke BESSY GmbH, Berlin Prof. Dr. W. Jentschke Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg (Ehrenmitglied) Dr. K.-H. Kissler European Organization for Particle Physics Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Geneva (CH) Prof. Dr. W. Sandner Max-Born-Institut, Berlin Dr. M

  17. Organe und Gremien Organe der Stiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassel Prof. Dr. S. Großmann Fachbereich Physik, Universität Marburg Prof. Dr. E. Jaeschke BESSY Gmb Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Genf (CH) Prof. Dr. V. Metag Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung GSI, Darmstadt Dr. D. Möhl European Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Genf (CH) Prof. Dr. J. Stachel

  18. Organe und Gremien Organe der Stiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BESSY GmbH, Berlin Prof. Dr. W. Jentschke II. Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg (Ehrenmitglied) Dr. K.-H. Kissler European Organization for Particle Physics CERN, Geneva (CH) Prof. Dr. K. Königsmann Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg Dr. J. May European Organization for Particle Physics CERN

  19. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  20. Neutrino oscillations and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zuber

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance of light massive neutrinos as hot dark matter is outlined. The power of neutrino oscillation experiments with respect to detect such neutrinos in the eV-region is discussed. Present hints for neutrino oscillations in solar, atmospheric and LSND data are reviewed as well as future experiments and their potential.

  1. Laser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    - velopment of techniques that have allowed the ion motion to be cooled into the ground state of the confiningLaser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION Laser cooling of neutral atoms in the past decades has been a breakthrough in the understanding of their dy- namics and led to the seminal proposals of laser cooling

  2. Magnets & Magnet Condensed Matter Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials Pressure 9 Metal to Insulator Transition on the N=0 Landau Level in Graphene 10 Evidence for Fractional Quantum Hall States in Suspended Bilayer and Trilayer Graphene 11 Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

  3. Solar Neutrino Matter Effects Redux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin; A. Malkus

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Following recent low-threshold analysis of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and asymmetry measurements of the BOREXINO Collaboration of the solar neutrino flux, we revisit the analysis of the matter effects in the Sun. We show that solar neutrino data constrains the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ poorly and that subdominant Standard Model effects can mimic the effects of the physics beyond the Standard Model.

  4. States of Matter Deepak Dhar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    - logical classification of different animal species) or some mixture of these (e.g. books in a library answer in this case is that states of matter is a classification scheme, like filing cabinets classification schemes could be alphabetical (e.g. in a dictionary), or based on some common properties ( zoo

  5. Apparatus for particulate matter analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara A.; Apte, Michael G.; Hansen, Anthony D.; Black, Douglas R.

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus described herein is a miniaturized system for particle exposure assessment (MSPEA) for the quantitative measurement and qualitative identification of particulate content in gases. The present invention utilizes a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) or other mass-sensitive temperature compensated acoustic wave resonator for mass measurement. Detectors and probes and light sources are used in combination for the qualitative determination of particulate matter.

  6. Mineralization pathways in lake sediments with different oxygen and organic carbon supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Mineralization pathways in lake sediments with different oxygen and organic carbon supply Martin Abstract The intensity and pathways of mineralization of sedimentary organic matter were investigated equipped with both oxygen and ion-selective electrodes. Anaerobic sedimentary mineralization ranged from 13

  7. "The disintegration of organic compounds by microorganisms is accompanied by the liberation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    comple- ment of enzymes necessary to completely oxidize organic fuels to carbon dioxide is not yet they are `carbon-neutral'; the oxidation of the organic matter only releases recently fixed carbon back and sediments. The ubiquitous and innocuous properties of fuels for microbial fuel cells alleviates the need

  8. Energy Matters: Our Energy Independence | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Matters: Our Energy Independence Energy Matters: Our Energy Independence Addthis Description In this installment of the livechat series "Energy Matters," Dr. Arun Majumdar takes...

  9. Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, AnticipatingUSA Macdougall, Doug. Why Geology Matters: Decoding theE-book available. Why Geology Matters pursues two goals: to

  10. Exotic Matter and Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terazawa, Hidezumi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exotic forms of matter such as carbon nanofoams, hexalambdas and strange stars, pentaquarks, color-balls, etc. and their relations to current problems in cosmo-particle physics such as dark matter and energy are discussed in some details.

  11. Dark matter axions and caustic rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikivie, P.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: the strong CP problem; dark matter axions; the cavity detector of galactic halo axions; and caustic rings in the density distribution of cold dark matter halos.

  12. Organic photovoltaics and concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapel, Jonathan King

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

  13. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  14. Statistical mechanics of hot dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    More, R.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on properties of hot dense matter produced with high intensity laser radiation is described in a brief informal review.

  15. Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Front Matter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes the front matter of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: a Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

  16. Organizing and Personalizing Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Ah-Hwee

    Vista). More sophis- ticated ones, such as Northern Light, BullsEye and Copernic go a step further organize

  17. Nuclear matter to strange matter transition in holographic QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngman Kim; Yunseok Seo; Sang-Jin Sin

    2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a simple holographic QCD model to study nuclear matter to strange matter transition. The interaction of dense medium and hadrons is taken care of by imposing the force balancing condition for stable D4/D6/D6 configuration. By considering the intermediate and light flavor branes interacting with baryon vertex homogeneously distributed along R^3 space and requesting the energy minimization, we find that there is a well defined transition density as a function of current quark mass. We also find that as density goes up very high, intermediate (or heavy) and light quarks populate equally as expected from the Pauli principle. In this sense, the effect of the Pauli principle is realized as dynamics of D-branes.

  18. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  19. CCPPolicyBriefing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    . METHODOLOGY · The author incorporates the economic theory of organizations into the framework of public law to establish the theory of cartel organization, and calls for further studies to disclose the sophisticatedCCPPolicyBriefing September 2008 Cartel Organization and Antitrust Enforcement W: www

  20. Personal Finance Make Your Money Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Mark

    Personal Finance Make Your Money Matter Name: Registration number: Department: Year of study of your portfolio. #12;Personal Finance Make Your Money Matter2 Contents Timetable Page 3 Introduction 16 #12;Personal Finance Make Your Money Matter3 Timetable Friday 6.00 pm Introduction

  1. WOGOGOB-2004 CONFERENCE MATERIALS. Edited by O. Hints & L. Ainsaar During Kukruse (Caradoc) time, light-brown organ-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    ic matter forming oil shale interlayers in calcareous sediments accumulated in the Baltoscandian Basin (Nestor & Einasto 1997). The oil shale is composed of almost equal portions of carbonate, and clayey siliciclastic and organic matter. The existence of a rich and diverse normal marine bottom

  2. Phase transition towards strange matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; Ad. R. Raduta; M. Oertel

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase diagram of a system constituted of neutrons and $\\Lambda$-hyperons in thermal equilibrium is evaluated in the mean-field approximation. It is shown that this simple system exhibits a complex phase diagram with first and second order phase transitions. Due to the generic presence of attractive and repulsive couplings, the existence of phase transitions involving strangeness appears independent of the specific interaction model. In addition we will show under which conditions a phase transition towards strange matter at high density exists, which is expected to persist even within a complete treatment including all the different strange and non- strange baryon states. The impact of this transition on the composition of matter in the inner core of neutron stars is discussed.

  3. Superconducting Detectors for Super Light Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonit Hochberg; Yue Zhao; Kathryn M. Zurek

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and study a new class of of superconducting detectors which are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark matter limit, mX > keV. We compute the rate of dark matter scattering off free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with all astrophysical and terrestrial constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  4. Superconducting Detectors for Super Light Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Yonit; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and study a new class of of superconducting detectors which are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark matter limit, mX > keV. We compute the rate of dark matter scattering off free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with all astrophysical and terrestrial constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  5. On Math, Matter and Mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piet Hut; Mark Alford; Max Tegmark

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the nature of reality in the ontological context of Penrose's math-matter-mind triangle. The triangle suggests the circularity of the widespread view that math arises from the mind, the mind arises out of matter, and that matter can be explained in terms of math. Non-physicists should be wary of any claim that modern physics leads us to any particular resolution of this circularity, since even the sample of three theoretical physicists writing this paper hold three divergent views. Some physicists believe that current physics has already found the basic framework for a complete description of reality, and only has to fill in the details. Others suspect that no single framework, from physics or other sources, will ever capture reality. Yet others guess that reality might be approached arbitrarily closely by some form of future physics, but probably based on completely different frameworks. We will designate these three approaches as the fundamentalist, secular and mystic views of the world, as seen by practicing physicists. We present and contrast each of these views, which arguably form broad categories capturing most if not all interpretations of physics. We argue that this diversity in the physics community is more useful than an ontological monoculture, since it motivates physicists to tackle unsolved problems with a wide variety of approaches.

  6. Effects of Advanced Combustion Technologies on Particulate Matter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Combustion Technologies on Particulate Matter Emissions Characteristics Effects of Advanced Combustion Technologies on Particulate Matter Emissions Characteristics...

  7. Strange Quark Matter and Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysicists distinguish between three different types of compact stars. These are white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. The former contain matter in one of the densest forms found in the Universe which, together with the unprecedented progress in observational astronomy, make such stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a broad range of most striking physical phenomena. These range from nuclear processes on the stellar surface to processes in electron degenerate matter at subnuclear densities to boson condensates and the existence of new states of baryonic matter--like color superconducting quark matter--at supernuclear densities. More than that, according to the strange matter hypothesis strange quark matter could be more stable than nuclear matter, in which case neutron stars should be largely composed of pure quark matter possibly enveloped in thin nuclear crusts. Another remarkable implication of the hypothesis is the possible existence of a new class of white dwarfs. This article aims at giving an overview of all these striking physical possibilities, with an emphasis on the astrophysical phenomenology of strange quark matter. Possible observational signatures associated with the theoretically proposed states of matter inside compact stars are discussed as well. They will provide most valuable information about the phase diagram of superdense nuclear matter at high baryon number density but low temperature, which is not accessible to relativistic heavy ion collision experiments.

  8. From Population to Organization Thinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, David; Maxfield, Robert; Read, Dwight W; van der Leeuw, Sander E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herbert Simon developed a theory of organization for complexin need of a theory of organization. As we have alreadya deeper theory of organization: complex networks,

  9. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsuk Kang; Young-Gui Yoon; D. Thirumalai; Changbong Hyeon

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yeast ($N\\approx 1.2\\times 10^7$, $\\phi<\\phi_c^{\\infty}$) are equilibrated with no clear signature of such organization.

  10. Sociology: Computational Organization Theory Sociology: Computational Organization Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Sociology: Computational Organization Theory Sociology: Computational Organization Theory Kathleen; organization theory; organizational learning; social networks; expert systems Citation: Kathleen Carley, 1994, "Sociology: Computational Organization Theory." Social Science Computer Review, 12(4): 611-624. #12;Sociology

  11. Theory of Organic Magnetoresistance in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    Theory of Organic Magnetoresistance in Disordered Organic Semiconductors Nicholas J. Harmon semiconductors, disordered semiconductors, organic magnetoresistance, percolation theory, spin transport organic semiconductors. The theory proposed here maps the complex phenomena of spin-dependent hopping onto

  12. Dark matter, a new proof of the predictive power of general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stéphane Le Corre

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Without observational or theoretical modifications, Newtonian and general relativity seem to be unable to explain gravitational behavior of large structure of the universe. The assumption of dark matter solves this problem without modifying theories. But it implies that most of the matter in the universe must be unobserved matter. Another solution is to modify gravitation laws. In this article, we study a third way that does not modify gravitation of general relativity and not modify the matter's distribution, by using gravitomagnetism in a new physical context. Compare with Newtonian gravitation, it leads to add a new component without changing the gravity field. As already known, we retrieve that this new component is generally small enough to be undetectable. But we will see that the galaxies clusters can generate a significant component and embed large structure of universe. We show that the magnitude of this embedding component is once again small enough to be in agreement with current experimental results, undetectable at the scale of our solar system, but detectable at the scale of the galaxies and explain dark matter. Mainly, it explains six unexplained phenomena, the rotation speed of galaxies, the rotation speed of dwarf satellite galaxies, the movement in a plane of dwarf satellite galaxies, the decreasing quantity of dark matter with the distance to the center of galaxies' cluster, the expected quantity of dark matter inside galaxies and the expected experimental values of parameters of dark matter measured in CMB. This solution implies consequences on the dwarf galaxies (distribution in planes) that just have been observed and differentiate it from dark matter solution. It could explain some others facts (galaxies with two portions of their disk that rotate in opposite directions, galaxies with a truly declining rotation curve, narrowness of galaxy's jets, precocity of organization of galaxies, ...).

  13. Feasibility of Organizations -A Refinement of Chemical Organization Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    Feasibility of Organizations - A Refinement of Chemical Organization Theory with Application to P a theorem providing a criteria for an unfeasible organization. This is a refinement of organization theory organization. Key words: reaction networks, constructive dynamical systems, chem- ical organization theory

  14. The Evolution of Galaxies by the Incompatibility between Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding-Yu Chung

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the evolution of galaxies is by the incompatibility between dark matter and baryonic matter. Due to the structural difference, baryonic matter and dark matter are incompatible to each other as oil droplet and water in emulsion. In the interfacial zone between dark matter and baryonic matter, this incompatibility generates the modification of Newtonian dynamics to keep dark matter and baryonic matter apart. The five periods of baryonic structure development in the order of increasing incompatibility are the free baryonic matter, the baryonic droplet, the galaxy, the cluster, and the supercluster periods. The transition to the baryonic droplet generates density perturbation in the CMB. In the galaxy period, the first-generation galaxies include elliptical, normal spiral, barred spiral, irregular, and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In the cluster period, the second-generation galaxies include modified giant ellipticals, cD, evolved S0, dwarf elliptical, BCD, and tidal dwarf galaxies. The whole observable expanding universe behaves as one unit of emulsion with increasing incompatibility between dark matter and baryonic matter. The properties of dark matter and baryonic matter are based on cosmology derived from the two physical structures: the space structure and the object structure. Baryonic matter can be described by the periodic table of elementary particles.

  15. Food Exemption Request Organization Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Exemption Request Organization Information Organization Received ______ Organizations are permitted one food exemption per semester. Requests must be submitted): ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Only homemade food may be provided by your organization. Initial ______ No prepared food may

  16. EXTRAGALACTIC DARK MATTER AND DIRECT DETECTION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baushev, A. N., E-mail: baushev@gmail.com [DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent astronomical data strongly suggest that a significant part of the dark matter content of the Local Group and Virgo Supercluster is not incorporated into the galaxy halos and forms diffuse components of these galaxy clusters. A portion of the particles from these components may penetrate the Milky Way and make an extragalactic contribution to the total dark matter containment of our Galaxy. We find that the particles of the diffuse component of the Local Group are apt to contribute {approx}12% to the total dark matter density near Earth. The particles of the extragalactic dark matter stand out because of their high speed ({approx}600 km s{sup -1}), i.e., they are much faster than the galactic dark matter. In addition, their speed distribution is very narrow ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). The particles have an isotropic velocity distribution (perhaps, in contrast to the galactic dark matter). The extragalactic dark matter should provide a significant contribution to the direct detection signal. If the detector is sensitive only to the fast particles (v > 450 km s{sup -1}), then the signal may even dominate. The density of other possible types of the extragalactic dark matter (for instance, of the diffuse component of the Virgo Supercluster) should be relatively small and comparable with the average dark matter density of the universe. However, these particles can generate anomaly high-energy collisions in direct dark matter detectors.

  17. Astatinated organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milius, R.A.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and kits for incorporating a radioactive astatine isotope (particularly [sup 211]At) into an organic compound by electrophilic astatodestannylation of organostannanes. 3 figs.

  18. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  19. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Hongsuk; Thirumalai, D; Hyeon, Changbong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yea...

  20. The CRESST Dark Matter Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Majorovits; G. Angloher; C. Bucci; P. Christ; C. Cozzini; F. von Feilitzsch; D. Hauff; S. Henry; Th. Jagemann; J. Jochum; H. Kraus; V. Mikhailik; J. Ninkovic; F. Petricca; W. Potzel; F. Proebst; Y. Ramachers; M. Razeti; W. Rau; W. Seidel; M. Stark; L. Stodolsky; A. J. B. Tolhurst; D. Wahl; W. Westphal; H. Wulandari

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first competitive results on WIMP dark matter using the phonon-light-detection technique. A particularly strong limit for WIMPs with coherent scattering results from selecting a region of the phonon-light plane corresponding to tungsten recoils. The observed count rate in the neutron band is compatible with the rate expected from neutron background. CRESST is presently being upgraded with a 66 channel SQUID readout system, a neutron shield and a muon veto system. This results in a significant improvement in sensitivity.

  1. Axion hot dark matter bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Raffelt; S. Hannestad; A. Mirizzi; Y. Y. Y. Wong

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive cosmological limits on two-component hot dark matter consisting of neutrinos and axions. We restrict the large-scale structure data to the safely linear regime, excluding the Lyman-alpha forest. We derive Bayesian credible regions in the two-parameter space consisting of m_a and sum(m_nu). Marginalizing over sum(m_nu) provides m_aaxions the same data and methods give sum(m_nu)< 0.63 eV (95% CL).

  2. Holographic Viscosity of Fundamental Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Mateos; Robert C. Myers; Rowan M. Thomson

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A holographic dual of a finite-temperature SU(N_c) gauge theory with a small number of flavours N_f viscosity to entropy ratio in these theories saturates the conjectured universal bound eta/s >= 1/4\\pi. The contribution of the fundamental matter eta_fund is therefore enhanced at strong 't Hooft coupling lambda; for example, eta_fund ~ lambda N_c N_f T^3 in four dimensions. Other transport coefficients are analogously enhanced. These results hold with or without a baryon number chemical potential.

  3. Effective Presentations Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, David H.

    1 Pericles Effective Presentations · Content · Organization · Delivery · Visual aids and graphics Be brave Graphics · KISS · Powerpoint: ­ Font · Bigger than you'd expect · San serif ­ Lines · Thicker than · Organization · Energy · Clarity · Poise Key: Practice Web Resources · http

  4. Axion Dark Matter Detection using Atomic Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sikivie

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter axions may cause transitions between atomic states that differ in energy by an amount equal to the axion mass. Such energy differences are conveniently tuned using the Zeeman effect. It is proposed to search for dark matter axions by cooling a kilogram-sized sample to milliKelvin temperatures and count axion induced transitions using laser techniques. This appears an appropriate approach to axion dark matter detection in the $10^{-4}$ eV mass range.

  5. Noble Travails: Noble Liquid Dark Matter Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golwala, Sunil

    , or water, 0.1x flux per 10 cm Cosmic Ray Muons generate high energy neutrons 50 MeV - 3 GeV which are toughGaitskell Noble Travails: Noble Liquid Dark Matter Detectors Rick Gaitskell Particle Astrophysics://particleastro.brown.edu/ http://gaitskell.brown.edu v1 #12;LUX Dark Matter Collaboration 2007 v01_7mm Dark Matter Theory

  6. Maximally incompressible neutron star matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy S. Olson

    2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic kinetic theory, based on the Grad method of moments as developed by Israel and Stewart, is used to model viscous and thermal dissipation in neutron star matter and determine an upper limit on the maximum mass of neutron stars. In the context of kinetic theory, the equation of state must satisfy a set of constraints in order for the equilibrium states of the fluid to be thermodynamically stable and for perturbations from equilibrium to propagate causally via hyperbolic equations. Application of these constraints to neutron star matter restricts the stiffness of the most incompressible equation of state compatible with causality to be softer than the maximally incompressible equation of state that results from requiring the adiabatic sound speed to not exceed the speed of light. Using three equations of state based on experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and properties of light nuclei up to twice normal nuclear energy density, and the kinetic theory maximally incompressible equation of state at higher density, an upper limit on the maximum mass of neutron stars averaging 2.64 solar masses is derived.

  7. A Matter of Quantum Voltages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellner, Bernhard; Kathmann, Shawn M.

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Voltages inside matter are relevant to crystallization, materials science, biology, catalysis, and aqueous chemistry. Electron holography is able to measure the variation of voltages in matter and modern supercomputers allow the calculation of quantum voltages with practically unlimited spatial and temporal resolution of bulk systems. Of particular interest is the Mean Inner Potential (Vo) - the spatial average of these voltages. Voltages are very sensitive to the distribution of electrons and provide metrics to understand interactions in condensed phases. In the present study, we find excellent agreement with measurements of Vo for vitrified water and salt crystals and demonstrate the impact of covalent and ionic bonding as well as intermolecular/atomic interactions. Furthermore, we predict Vo as well as the fluctuations of these voltages in aqueous NaCl electrolytes and characterize the changes in their behavior as the resolution increases below the size of atoms. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Shapes of dark matter halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Bullock

    2001-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an analysis of the density shapes of dark matter halos in LCDM and LWDM cosmologies. The main results are derived from a statistical sample of galaxy-mass halos drawn from a high resolution LCDM N-body simulation. Halo shapes show significant trends with mass and redshift: low-mass halos are rounder than high mass halos, and, for a fixed mass, halos are rounder at low z. Contrary to previous expectations, which were based on cluster-mass halos and non-COBE normalized simulations, LCDM galaxy-mass halos at z=0 are not strongly flattened, with short to long axis ratios of s = 0.70 +/- 0.17. I go on to study how the shapes of individual halos change when going from a LCDM simulation to a simulation with a warm dark matter power spectrum (LWDM). Four halos were compared, and, on average, the WDM halos are more spherical than their CDM counterparts (s =0.77 compared to s = 0.71). A larger sample of objects will be needed to test whether the trend is significant.

  9. PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

  10. Interaction of gravitational waves with matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cetoli; C. J. Pethick

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a unified formalism for describing the interaction of gravitational waves with matter that clearly separates the effects of general relativity from those due to interactions in the matter. Using it, we derive a general expression for the dispersion of gravitational waves in matter in terms of correlation functions for the matter in flat spacetime. The self energy of a gravitational wave is shown to have contributions analogous to the paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions to the self energy of an electromagnetic wave. We apply the formalism to some simple systems - free particles, an interacting scalar field, and a fermionic superfluid.

  11. An attempt to do without dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Kinney; Martina Brisudova

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrepancy between dynamical mass measures of objects such as galaxies and the observed distribution of luminous matter in the universe is typically explained by invoking an unseen ``dark matter'' component. Dark matter must necessarily be non-baryonic. We introduce a simple hypothesis to do away with the necessity for dark matter by introducing an additional non-gravitational force coupled to baryon number as a charge. We compare this hypothesis to Milgrom's Modified Newtonian Dynamics. The model ultimately fails when confronted with observation, but it fails in an interesting way.

  12. Generating Luminous and Dark Matter During Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrie, Neil D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism for generating both luminous and dark matter during cosmic inflation. According to this mechanism, ordinary and dark matter carry common charge which is associated with an anomalous $ U(1)_{X} $ group. Anomaly terms source $ \\mathcal{CP} $ and $ U(1)_{X} $ charge violating processes during inflation, producing corresponding non-zero Chern-Simons numbers which are subsequently reprocessed into baryon and dark matter densities. The general framework developed is then applied to two possible extensions of the Standard Model with anomalous gauged $B$ and $B-L$, each with an additional dark matter candidate.

  13. Generating Luminous and Dark Matter During Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil D. Barrie; Archil Kobakhidze

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism for generating both luminous and dark matter during cosmic inflation. According to this mechanism, ordinary and dark matter carry common charge which is associated with an anomalous $ U(1)_{X} $ group. Anomaly terms source $ \\mathcal{CP} $ and $ U(1)_{X} $ charge violating processes during inflation, producing corresponding non-zero Chern-Simons numbers which are subsequently reprocessed into baryon and dark matter densities. The general framework developed is then applied to two possible extensions of the Standard Model with anomalous gauged $B$ and $B-L$, each with an additional dark matter candidate.

  14. ALS Reveals New State of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    papers and extensive news coverage of their work on a new state of matter embodied by "topological insulators," materials that conduct electricity only on their surfaces. First...

  15. Dark Energy and Dark Matter Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the problems of dark energy and dark matter and several models designed to explain them, in the light of some latest findings.

  16. Jelly Bean Universe (Dark Matter / Dark Energy)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kurt Riesselmann

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab's Kurt Riesselmann explains how to make a jelly bean universe to help explain the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy.

  17. Dissipative dark matter explains rotation curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foot, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particles interact with a massless (or very light) boson, is studied. Such dark matter can arise in simple hidden sector gauge models, including those featuring an unbroken $U(1)'$ gauge symmetry, leading to a dark photon. Previous work has shown that such models can not only explain the LSS and CMB, but potentially also dark matter phenomena on small scales, such as the inferred cored structure of dark matter halos. In this picture, dark matter halos of disk galaxies not only cool via dissipative interactions but are also heated via ordinary supernovae (facilitated by an assumed photon - dark photon kinetic mixing interaction). This interaction between the dark matter halo and ordinary baryons, a very special feature of these types of models, plays a critical role in governing the physical properties of the dark matter halo. Here, we further study the implications of this type of dissipative dark matter for disk galaxies. Building on earlier work, we develop a simpl...

  18. Quantum Condensates in Nuclear Matter: Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ropke; D. Zablocki

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In connection with the contribution "Quantum Condensates in Nuclear Matter" some problems are given to become more familiar with the techniques of many-particle physics.

  19. Graphic values for some organic constituents of beneficiated coal samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohlenberger, L.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first objective of this one-year project is to obtain analytical data on a series of fractions of coal sample IBC-101 of widely varying ash content obtained via a froth flotation physical coal cleaning process. Froth flotation is the fractionation technique to be used rather than float/sink testing as in the Stansfield-Sutherland method because (1) most of the data in our files which were used in the development of these techniques were froth flotation tests and (2) as a way of showing that the fractionating is as effective by one technique as the other, so long as no chemical changes are effected. Analytical values will be obtained in the Coal Analysis Laboratory for moisture, ash, volatile matter, fixed carbon, total carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, total sulfur, sulfate sulfur, organic sulfur, and calorific value. The next objective will be to plot the various values of each of the analyzed species versus its corresponding ash values to obtain x/y plots for each as a function of ash. From the resulting curves, it should be possible to calculate for coal sample IBC-101 a precise measure of its mineral matter content, its dry or moist ,mineral-matter-free calorific value as used in determining the rank of the coal sample, calculate organic sulfur values corresponding to each ash value in cases where the relationship is linear, and possibly find other analyzed values which have a direct correlation with the mineral matter content of the coal.

  20. Scientists Mix Matter and Anti-Matter Results to Resolve Decade...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab's Experimental Hall B was used to measure electrons during the experiment. Fans of science and science fiction have been warned that mixing matter with anti-matter can yield...

  1. ISOTOPICALLY ANOMALOUS ORGANIC GLOBULES FROM COMET 81P/WILD 2. B. T. De Grego-, R. M. Stroud1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    . Organic matter is present in several particles from comet 81P/Wild 2 captured in silica aerogel) were S-embedded, ultramicrotomed, and placed on SiO-coated Cu TEM grids (Track 2 sections prepared by K (CIW). Results: Each organic globule is near aerogel from the Stardust sample collector, and both

  2. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  3. Departmental Organization Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Law 95-91, 42 United States Code 7101, Department of Energy Organization Act, Section 642 gives to the Secretary of the Department of Energy the responsibility to approve organization changes affecting the number, designation, or mission of Departmental Elements and to approve the addition, deletion, or transfer of missions and/or functions of or between Departmental Elements. In order to streamline the organizational change process, the Secretary has delegate to the Heads of Departmental Headquarters and Field Elements the authority to approve organization changes. No cancellations.

  4. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichoski, Ubi [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Collaboration: PICASSO Collaboration

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The PICASSO experiment searches for cold dark matter through the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their spin-dependent interactions with fluorine at SNOLAB, Sudbury--ON, Canada since 2002. The detection principle is based on the superheated droplet technique; the detectors consist of a gel matrix with millions of liquid droplets of superheated fluorocarbon (C4F10) dispersed in it. Recently, a new setup has been built and installed in the Ladder Lab area at SNOLAB. In the present phase of the experiment the Collaboration is running 4.5-litre detector modules with approximately 85 g of active mass per module. Here, we give an overview of the experiment and discuss the progress in background mitigation, in particular background discrimination in the PICASSO detectors.

  5. Lepton-flavored dark matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kile, Jennifer; Kobach, Andrew; Soni, Amarjit

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we address two paradoxes. The first is that the measured dark-matter relic density can be satisfied with new physics at O(100 GeV–1 TeV), while the null results from direct-detection experiments place lower bounds of O(10 TeV) on a new-physics scale. The second puzzle is that the severe suppression of lepton-flavor-violating processes involving electrons, e.g. ? ? 3e, ? ? e??, etc., implies that generic new-physics contributions to lepton interactions cannot exist below O(10–100 TeV), whereas the 3.6? deviation of the muon g – 2 from the standard model can be explained by a new physics scale matter thus interacts appreciably only with particles of ? and ? flavor at tree level and has loop-suppressed couplings to quarks and electrons. Remarkably, if such a gauged flavor interaction exists at a scale O(100 GeV–1 TeV), it allows for a consistent phenomenological framework, compatible with the muon g – 2, the relic density, direct detection, indirect detection, charged-lepton decays, neutrino trident production, and results from hadron and e?e? colliders. We suggest experimental tests for these ideas at colliders and for low-energy observables. (author)

  6. Lepton-flavored dark matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kile, Jennifer; Kobach, Andrew; Soni, Amarjit

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we address two paradoxes. The first is that the measured dark-matter relic density can be satisfied with new physics at O(100 GeV–1 TeV), while the null results from direct-detection experiments place lower bounds of O(10 TeV) on a new-physics scale. The second puzzle is that the severe suppression of lepton-flavor-violating processes involving electrons, e.g. ? ? 3e, ? ? e??, etc., implies that generic new-physics contributions to lepton interactions cannot exist below O(10–100 TeV), whereas the 3.6? deviation of the muon g – 2 from the standard model can be explained by a new physics scale more »TeV). Here, we suggest that it may not be a coincidence that both the muon g – 2 and the relic density can be satisfied by a new-physics scale ?1 TeV. We consider the possibility of a gauged lepton-flavor interaction that couples at tree level only to ?- and ?-flavored leptons and the dark sector. Dark matter thus interacts appreciably only with particles of ? and ? flavor at tree level and has loop-suppressed couplings to quarks and electrons. Remarkably, if such a gauged flavor interaction exists at a scale O(100 GeV–1 TeV), it allows for a consistent phenomenological framework, compatible with the muon g – 2, the relic density, direct detection, indirect detection, charged-lepton decays, neutrino trident production, and results from hadron and e?e? colliders. We suggest experimental tests for these ideas at colliders and for low-energy observables. (author)« less

  7. Strong field physics in condensed matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oka, Takashi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are deep similarities between non-linear QFT studied in high-energy and non-equilibrium physics in condensed matter. Ideas such as the Schwinger mechanism and the Volkov state are deeply related to non-linear transport and photovoltaic Hall effect in condensed matter. Here, we give a review on these relations.

  8. Strong field physics in condensed matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Oka

    2011-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There are deep similarities between non-linear QFT studied in high-energy and non-equilibrium physics in condensed matter. Ideas such as the Schwinger mechanism and the Volkov state are deeply related to non-linear transport and photovoltaic Hall effect in condensed matter. Here, we give a review on these relations.

  9. Probing nuclear matter with jet conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Fries, Rainer J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the flavor of leading jet partons as a valuable probe of nuclear matter. We point out that the coupling of jets to nuclear matter naturally leads to an alteration of jet chemistry even at high transverse momentum PT. In particular...

  10. Public Service "The Minor That Matters"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    degree. Employees in public service have the opportunity to: vdeliver and manage public programs vaddressMinorThatMatters" TAKEYOURCAR EER IN ANENTIRE LY NEW DIRECTION #12;Public Service...The Minor That Matters Purpose of the Minor designed to provide a solid foundation in public administration and non-profit management, including

  11. The status of neutralino dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakya, Bibhushan [Laboratory for Elementary Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The lightest neutralino in supersymmetry is the most studied dark matter candidate. This writeup reviews the status of neutralino dark matter in minimal and nonminimal supersymmetric models in light of recent null results at the XENON100 experiment and the observation of a 130 GeV gamma ray signal from the Galactic Center by the Fermi LAT.

  12. Pressure inequalities for nuclear and neutron matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove several inequalities using lowest-order effective field theory for nucleons which give an upper bound on the pressure of asymmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter. We prove two types of inequalities, one based on convexity and another derived from shifting an auxiliary field.

  13. Advanced particulate matter control apparatus and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, ND); Zhuang, Ye (Grand Forks, ND); Almlie, Jay C. (East Grand Forks, MN)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods for collection and removal of particulate matter, including fine particulate matter, from a gas stream, comprising a unique combination of high collection efficiency and ultralow pressure drop across the filter. The apparatus and method utilize simultaneous electrostatic precipitation and membrane filtration of a particular pore size, wherein electrostatic collection and filtration occur on the same surface.

  14. Measuring the dark matter equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serra, Ana Laura

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the dominant component of galaxies and clusters remains unknown. While the astrophysics comunity supports the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm as a clue factor in the current cosmological model, no direct CDM detections have been performed. Faber and Visser 2006 have suggested a simple method for measuring the dark matter equation of state. By combining kinematical and gravitational lensing data it is possible to test the widely adopted assumption of pressureless dark matter. According to this formalism, we have measured the dark matter equation of state for first time using improved techniques. We have found that the value of the equation of state parameter is consistent with pressureless dark matter within the errors. Nevertheless the measured value is lower than expected. This fact follows from the well known differences between the masses determinated by lensing and kinematical methods. We have tested our techniques using simulations and we have also analyzed possible sources of errors that c...

  15. Dark Matter And The Habitability of Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooper, Dan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many models, dark matter particles can elastically scatter with nuclei in planets, causing those particles to become gravitationally bound. While the energy expected to be released through the subsequent annihilations of dark matter particles in the interior of the Earth is negligibly small (a few megawatts in the most optimistic models), larger planets that reside in regions with higher densities of slow moving dark matter could plausibly capture and annihilate dark matter at a rate high enough to maintain liquid water on their surfaces, even in the absence of additional energy from starlight or other sources. On these rare planets, it may be dark matter rather than light from a host star that makes it possible for life to emerge, evolve, and survive.

  16. Dark Matter And The Habitability of Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Hooper; Jason H. Steffen

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In many models, dark matter particles can elastically scatter with nuclei in planets, causing those particles to become gravitationally bound. While the energy expected to be released through the subsequent annihilations of dark matter particles in the interior of the Earth is negligibly small (a few megawatts in the most optimistic models), larger planets that reside in regions with higher densities of slow moving dark matter could plausibly capture and annihilate dark matter at a rate high enough to maintain liquid water on their surfaces, even in the absence of additional energy from starlight or other sources. On these rare planets, it may be dark matter rather than light from a host star that makes it possible for life to emerge, evolve, and survive.

  17. Organic contaminant separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Mar, P.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

  18. A new relativistic model of hybrid star with interactive quark matter and dense baryonic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Chakraborty; Farook Rahaman; Arkopriya Mallick

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a relativistic model of hybrid star admitting conformal symmetry considering quark matter and baryonic matter as two different fluids. We define interaction equations between the normal baryonic matter and the quark matter and study the physical situations for repulsive, attractive and zero interaction between the constituent matters. From the interaction equations we find out the value of the equation of state (EOS) parameter for normal baryonic matter which is found to be consistent with the value obtained from the Walecka model for nucleonic matter at high density. The measured value of the Bag constant is used to explore the space time geometry inside the star. The theoretical mass-radius values are compared with the available observational data of the compact objects. From the nature of the match with the observational data, we predict the nature of interaction that must be present inside the hybrid stars

  19. Detecting the invisible universe with neutrinos and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaboth, Asher C. (Asher Cunningham)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work in astrophysics has show that most of the matter in the universe is non-luminous. This work investigates two searches for non-luminous matter: hot dark matter formed from cosmic relic neutrinos from the Big ...

  20. Water purification using organic salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  1. The soil organic matter dynamic by using different compost organic manure in a vegetable system in North China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qinping; Li, Jijin; Liu, Bensheng; Zou, Guoyuan; Liu, Baocun

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to cattle manure compost and biogas residue compost. Higherafter crop harvest in biogas residue compost treatment.2) cattle compost, 3) biogas residue, 4) control, no

  2. The soil organic matter dynamic by using different compost organic manure in a vegetable system in North China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qinping; Li, Jijin; Liu, Bensheng; Zou, Guoyuan; Liu, Baocun

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    following the long-term application of manure compost.Chicken manure compost showed the highest soil organicwhen compared to cattle manure compost and biogas residue

  3. Sandia Energy - Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using the Capacitance of Metamaterial Nanocavities Home Highlights - Energy Research Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using the...

  4. Electronic Structure of Warm Dense Matter via Multicenter Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Structure of Warm Dense Matter via Multicenter Green's Function Technique Research Personnel Modeling The proposed research addresses the Warm Dense Matter area...

  5. Recent Progress on Steam Hydrogasification of Carbonaceous Matter...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recent Progress on Steam Hydrogasification of Carbonaceous Matter to Clean Synthetic Diesel Fuel Recent Progress on Steam Hydrogasification of Carbonaceous Matter to Clean...

  6. Dark Matter Triggers of Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Peter W; Varela, Jaime

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ rules out primordial black holes with masses $\\sim 10^{19}$ gm - $10^{20}$ gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as $10^{24}$ gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range $10^{20}$ gm - $10^{22}$ gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism p...

  7. Baryonic pinching of galactic dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafsson, Michael; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper [Cosmology, Particle Astrophysics and String Theory, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91, Stockholm (Sweden); Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution cosmological N-body simulations of four galaxy-scale dark matter halos are compared to corresponding N-body/hydrodynamical simulations containing dark matter, stars and gas. The simulations without baryons share features with others described in the literature in that the dark matter density slope continuously decreases towards the center, with a density {rho}{sub DM}{proportional_to}r{sup -1.3{+-}}{sup 0.2}, at about 1% of the virial radius for our Milky Way sized galaxies. The central cusps in the simulations which also contain baryons steepen significantly, to {rho}{sub DM}{proportional_to}r{sup -1.9{+-}}{sup 0.2}, with an indication of the inner logarithmic slope converging. Models of adiabatic contraction of dark matter halos due to the central buildup of stellar/gaseous galaxies are examined. The simplest and most commonly used model, by Blumenthal et al., is shown to overestimate the central dark matter density considerably. A modified model proposed by Gnedin et al. is tested and it is shown that, while it is a considerable improvement, it is not perfect. Moreover, it is found that the contraction parameters in their model not only depend on the orbital structure of the dark-matter-only halos but also on the stellar feedback prescription which is most relevant for the baryonic distribution. Implications for dark matter annihilation at the galactic center are discussed and it is found that, although our simulations show a considerable reduced dark matter halo contraction as compared to the Blumenthal et al. model, the fluxes from dark matter annihilation are still expected to be enhanced by at least a factor of a hundred, as compared to dark-matter-only halos. Finally, it is shown that, while dark-matter-only halos are typically prolate, the dark matter halos containing baryons are mildly oblate with minor-to-major axis ratios of c/a=0.73{+-}0.11, with their flattening aligned with the central baryonic disks.

  8. Isotropic cosmological singularities: other matter models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Tod

    2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotropic cosmological singularities are singularities which can be removed by rescaling the metric. In some cases already studied (gr-qc/9903008, gr-qc/9903009, gr-qc/9903018) existence and uniqueness of cosmological models with data at the singularity has been established. These were cosmologies with, as source, either perfect fluids with linear equations of state or massless, collisionless particles. In this article we consider how to extend these results to a variety of other matter models. These are scalar fields, massive collisionless matter, the Yang-Mills plasma of Choquet-Bruhat, or matter satisfying the Einstein-Boltzmann equation.

  9. Nonlinear manipulation and control of matter waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Goldstein; M. G. Moore; P. Meystre

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews some of our recent results in nonlinear atom optics. In addition to nonlinear wave-mixing between matter waves, we also discuss the dynamical interplay between optical and matter waves. This new paradigm, which is now within experimental reach, has the potential to impact a number of fields of physics, including the manipulation and applications of atomic coherence, and the preparation of quantum entanglement between microscopic and macroscopic systems. Possible applications include quantum information processing, matter-wave holography, and nanofabrication.

  10. Clusters in nuclear matter and Mott points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Röpke

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Light clusters (mass number $A \\leq 4$) in nuclear matter at subsaturation densities are described using a quantum statistical approach. In addition to self-energy and Pauli-blocking, effects of continuum correlations are taken into account to calculate the quasiparticle properties and abundances of light elements. Medium-modified quasiparticle properties are important ingredients to derive a nuclear matter equation of state applicable in the entire region of warm dense matter below saturation density. The influence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction on the quasiparticle shift is discussed.

  11. Unbound particles in dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: behroozi@stanford.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate unbound dark matter particles in halos by tracing particle trajectories in a simulation run to the far future (a = 100). We find that the traditional sum of kinetic and potential energies is a very poor predictor of which dark matter particles will eventually become unbound from halos. We also study the mass fraction of unbound particles, which increases strongly towards the edges of halos, and decreases significantly at higher redshifts. We discuss implications for dark matter detection experiments, precision calibrations of the halo mass function, the use of baryon fractions to constrain dark energy, and searches for intergalactic supernovae.

  12. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  13. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  14. Manual for Classified Matter Protection and Control

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements for the protection and control of classified matter which supplement DOE O 471.2A. Cancels DOE M 471.2-1 dated 09/26/1995.

  15. Size Matters. Eat Your Heart Out.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    Size Matters. Eat Your Heart Out. Party of One? Does it seem like all students drink? While and couples therapy, group therapy, medication management, 24-hour crisis service, consultation

  16. Antigravitation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter - Alternative Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collisional damping of gravitational waves in the Newtonian matter is investigated. The generalized theory of Landau damping is applied to the gravitational physical systems in the context of the plasma gravitational analogy.

  17. Superheavy sterile neutrinos as dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yongjun

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chung, Kolb, and Riotto have proposed nonthermal mechanisms for the production of superheavy dark matter, consisting of particles with masses which may range up to the GUT scale. Shi and Fuller, on the other hand, have proposed much lighter sterile...

  18. Shocking Signals of Dark Matter Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jonathan H; Boehm, Celine; Kotera, Kumiko; Norman, Colin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine whether charged particles injected by self-annihilating Dark Matter into regions undergoing Diffuse Shock Acceleration (DSA) can be accelerated to high energies. We consider three astrophysical sites where shock acceleration is supposed to occur, namely the Galactic Centre, galaxy clusters and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). For the Milky Way, we find that the acceleration of cosmic rays injected by dark matter could lead to a bump in the cosmic ray spectrum provided that the product of the efficiency of the acceleration mechanism and the concentration of DM particles is high enough. Among the various acceleration sources that we consider (namely supernova remnants (SNRs), Fermi bubbles and AGN jets), we find that the Fermi bubbles are a potentially more efficient accelerator than SNRs. However both could in principle accelerate electrons and protons injected by dark matter to very high energies. At the extragalactic level, the acceleration of dark matter annihilation products could be responsible fo...

  19. Antigravitation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter - Alternative Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris V. Alexeev

    2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Collisional damping of gravitational waves in the Newtonian matter is investigated. The generalized theory of Landau damping is applied to the gravitational physical systems in the context of the plasma gravitational analogy.

  20. Coherent neutrino scattering in dark matter detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Alexander John

    Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus and weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interaction signatures are expected to be quite similar. This paper discusses how a next-generation ton-scale dark matter detector could ...

  1. Can Dark Matter Decay in Dark Energy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Pereira; J. F. Jesus

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the interaction between Dark Energy and Dark Matter from a thermodynamical perspective. By assuming they have different temperatures, we study the possibility of occurring a decay from Dark Matter into Dark Energy, characterized by a negative parameter $Q$. We find that, if at least one of the fluids has non vanishing chemical potential, for instance $\\mu_x0$, the decay is possible, where $\\mu_x$ and $\\mu_{dm}$ are the chemical potentials of Dark Energy and Dark Matter, respectively. Using recent cosmological data, we find that, for a fairly simple interaction, the Dark Matter decay is favored with a probability of $\\sim 93%$ over the Dark Energy decay. This result comes from a likelihood analysis where only background evolution has been considered.

  2. From nuclear matter to Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. K. Jha

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron stars are the most dense objects in the observable Universe and conventionally one uses nuclear theory to obtain the equation of state (EOS) of dense hadronic matter and the global properties of these stars. In this work, we review various aspects of nuclear matter within an effective Chiral model and interlink fundamental quantities both from nuclear saturation as well as vacuum properties and correlate it with the star properties.

  3. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology from matter only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telkamp, Herman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a matter-only interpretation of {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, based on conservation of energy and assuming a Machian definition of inertia. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology can be linked to a Newtonian cosmic potential, subject to a propagating gravitational horizon. In a matter-only universe where total energy is conserved, Machian inertia related to the evolving potential may cause both deceleration and acceleration of recession.

  4. Desorption of hexachlorobiphenyl from selected particulate matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rorschach, Reagan Cartwright

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESORPTION OF HEXACHLOROBIPHENYL FROM SELECTED PARTICULATE MATTER A Thesis by REAGAN CARTWRIGHT RORS CHACH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Civil Engineering DESORPTION OF HEXACHLOROBIPHENYL FROM SELECTED PARTICULATE MATTER A Thesis by REAGAN C. RORSCHACH Approved as to style and content by: Robin L. Autenrieth (Chair of Committee...

  5. Magnetism and superconductivity in quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Tatsumi; E. Nakano; K. Nawa

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic properties of quark matter and its relation to the microscopic origin of the magnetic field observed in compact stars are studied. Spontaneous spin polarization appears in high-density region due to the Fock exchange term, which may provide a scenario for the behaviors of magnetars. On the other hand, quark matter becomes unstable to form spin density wave in the moderate density region, where restoration of chiral symmetry plays an important role. Coexistence of magnetism and color superconductivity is also discussed.

  6. Cosmology with a stiff matter era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henri Chavanis

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple analytical solution of the Friedmann equations for a universe made of stiff matter, dust matter, and dark energy. A stiff matter era is present in the cosmological model of Zel'dovich (1972) where the primordial universe is assumed to be made of a cold gas of baryons. It also occurs in certain cosmological models where dark matter is made of relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When the energy density of the stiff matter is positive, the primordial universe is singular. It starts from a state with a vanishing scale factor and an infinite density. We consider the possibility that the energy density of the stiff matter is negative (anti-stiff matter). This happens, for example, when the BECs have an attractive self-interaction. In that case, the primordial universe is non-singular. It starts from a state in which the scale factor is finite and the energy density is equal to zero. For the sake of generality, we consider a cosmological constant of arbitrary sign. When the cosmological constant is positive, the universe asymptotically reaches a de Sitter phase where the scale factor increases exponentially rapidly. This can account for the accelerating expansion of the universe that we observe at present. When the cosmological constant is negative (anti-de Sitter), the evolution of the universe is cyclic. Therefore, depending on the sign of the energy density of the stiff matter and of the dark energy, we obtain singular and non-singular expanding or cyclic universes.

  7. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  8. Supplementary information for: Insights into the secondary fraction of the organic aerosol in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Contemporary Carbon PCF : Primary Fossil Carbon PM : Particulate Matter POA : Primary Organic Aerosol POC 293 306 163 147 129 73 relativeintensity[%] 219 277 321 117 147129 73 0 100 200 300 400 m/z relativeintensity[%] 219 277 321 117 147 129 73 m/z 0 100 200 300 400 relativeintensity[%] selected fragment: m

  9. 4D imaging of fracturing in organic-rich shales during heating1 Maya Kobchenko1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    across the sample. Thermogravimetry and gas chromatography revealed that the20 fracturing occurring at ~350°C was associated with significant mass loss and release of light21 hydrocarbons generated by the decomposition of immature organic matter. Kerogen22 decomposition is thought to cause an internal pressure build

  10. Dynamical dark matter. I. Theoretical overview

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Thomas, Brooks

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose a new framework for dark-matter physics. Rather than focus on one or more stable dark-matter particles, we instead consider a multicomponent framework in which the dark matter of the universe comprises a vast ensemble of interacting fields with a variety of different masses, mixings, and abundances. Moreover, rather than impose stability for each field individually, we ensure the phenomenological viability of such a scenario by requiring that those states with larger masses and standard-model decay widths have correspondingly smaller relic abundances, and vice versa. In other words, dark-matter stability is not an absolute requirement in such a framework, but is balanced against abundance. This leads to a highly dynamical scenario in which cosmological quantities such as ?CDM experience nontrivial time-dependences beyond those associated with the expansion of the universe. Although it may seem difficult to arrange an ensemble of states which have the required decay widths and relic abundances, we present one particular example in which this balancing act occurs naturally: an infinite tower of Kaluza-Klein (KK) states living in the bulk of large extra spacetime dimensions. Remarkably, this remains true even if the stability of the KK tower itself is entirely unprotected. Thus theories with large extra dimensions—and by extension, certain limits of string theory—naturally give rise to dynamical dark matter. Such scenarios also generically give rise to a rich set of collider and astrophysical phenomena which transcend those usually associated with dark matter.

  11. Light Higgses and Dark Matter Bob McElrath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Light Higgses and Dark Matter Bob McElrath University of California, Davis Santa Cruz, February 26, 2007 #12;Light Low-Mass Dark Matter Bob McElrath University of California, Davis ICHEP, January 2, 2007 and Expectations for Light Dark Matter · Invisible Quarkonium Decays · Light Dark Matter from SUSY · Detection

  12. Search for pseudoscalar cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Bibber, K.; Stoeffl, W.; LLNL Collaborators

    1992-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    AH dynamical evidence points to the conclusion that the predominant form of matter in the universe is in a non-luminous form. Furthermore, large scale deviations from uniform Hubble flow, and the recent COBE reports of inhomogeneities in the cosmic microwave background strongly suggest that we live in an exactly closed universe. If this is true, then ordinary baryonic matter could only be a minority component (10% at most) of the missing mass, and that what constitutes the majority of the dark matter must involve new physics. The axion is one of very few well motivated candidates which may comprise the dark matter. Additionally it is a `cold` dark-matter candidate which is preferred by the COBE data. We propose to construct and operate an experiment to search for axions which may constitute the dark matter of our own galaxy. As proposed by Sikivie, dark-matter axions may be detected by their stimulated conversion into monochromatic microwave photons in a tunable high-Q cavity inside a strong magnetic field. Our ability to mount an experiment quickly and take data within one year is due to a confluence of three factors. The first is the availability of a compact high field superconducting magnet and a local industrial partner, Wang NMR, who can make a very thermally efficient and economical cryostat for it. The second is an ongoing joint venture with the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences to do R&D on metalized precision-formed ceramic microwave cavities for the axion search, and INR has commited to providing all the microwave cavity arrays for this experiment, should this proposal be approved. The third is a commitment of very substantial startup capital monies from MIT for all of the state-of-the-art ultra-low noise microwave electronics, to one of our outstanding young collaborators who is joining their faculty.

  13. Allies in Sport Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Elizabeth

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOSPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, George B. Cunningham Committee Members, Kathi Miner Gregg... Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. George B. Cunningham Employee support is a key factor in creating more welcoming and accepting work environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals in sport. As such, organizations need...

  14. Working Group Report: Dark Matter Complementarity (Dark Matter in the Coming Decade: Complementary Paths to Discovery and Beyond)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arrenberg, Sebastian; et al.,

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Report we discuss the four complementary searches for the identity of dark matter: direct detection experiments that look for dark matter interacting in the lab, indirect detection experiments that connect lab signals to dark matter in our own and other galaxies, collider experiments that elucidate the particle properties of dark matter, and astrophysical probes sensitive to non-gravitational interactions of dark matter. The complementarity among the different dark matter searches is discussed qualitatively and illustrated quantitatively in several theoretical scenarios. Our primary conclusion is that the diversity of possible dark matter candidates requires a balanced program based on all four of those approaches.

  15. Color superconductivity and dense quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Mannarelli

    2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of cold and dense quark matter have been the subject of extensive investigation, especially in the last decade. Unfortunately, we still lack of a complete understanding of the properties of matter in these conditions. One possibility is that quark matter is in a color superconducting phase which is characterized by the formation of a diquark condensate. We review some of the basic concepts of color superconductivity and some of the aspects of this phase of matter which are relevant for compact stars. Since quarks have color, flavor as well as spin degrees of freedom many different color superconducting phases can be realized. At asymptotic densities QCD predicts that the color flavor locked phase is favored. At lower densities where the QCD coupling constant is large, perturbative methods cannot be applied and one has to rely on some effective model, eventually trying to constrain such a model with experimental observations. The picture is complicated by the requirement that matter in the interior of compact stars is in weak equilibrium and neutral. These conditions and the (possible) large value of the strange quark mass conspire to separate the Fermi momenta of quarks with different flavors, rendering homogenous superconducting phases unstable. One of the aims of this presentation is to introduce non-experts in the field to some of the basic ideas of color superconductivity and to some of its open problems.

  16. Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

  17. Isospin dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, P. Roy [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Basu, D. N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Samanta, C. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Physics Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 232840 (United States); Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is determined from a systematic study of the isospin dependent bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter using the isoscalar and isovector components of the density dependent M3Y interaction. The incompressibility K{sub {infinity}} for the symmetric nuclear matter, the isospin dependent part K{sub asy} of the isobaric incompressibility, and the slope L are all in excellent agreement with the constraints recently extracted from measured isotopic dependence of the giant monopole resonances in even-A Sn isotopes, from the neutron skin thickness of nuclei, and from analyses of experimental data on isospin diffusion and isotopic scaling in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. This work provides a fundamental basis for the understanding of nuclear matter under extreme conditions and validates the important empirical constraints obtained from recent experimental data.

  18. Isospin dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Roy Chowdhury; D. N. Basu; C. Samanta

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is determined from a systematic study of the isospin dependent bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter using the isoscalar and the isovector components of density dependent M3Y interaction. The incompressibility $K_\\infty$ for the symmetric nuclear matter, the isospin dependent part $K_{asy}$ of the isobaric incompressibility and the slope $L$ are all in excellent agreement with the constraints recently extracted from measured isotopic dependence of the giant monopole resonances in even-A Sn isotopes, from the neutron skin thickness of nuclei and from analyses of experimental data on isospin diffusion and isotopic scaling in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. This work provides a fundamental basis for the understanding of nuclear matter under extreme conditions, and validates the important empirical constraints obtained from recent experimental data.

  19. Neutrino matter potentials induced by Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Linder

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An instructive method of deriving the matter potentials felt by neutrinos propagating through matter on Earth is presented. This paper thoroughly guides the reader through the calculations involving the effective weak Hamiltonian for lepton and quark scattering. The matter potentials are well-known results since the late 70's, but a detailed and pedagogical calculation of these quantities is hard to find. We derive potentials due to charged and neutral current scattering on electrons, neutrons and protons. Intended readership is for undergraduates/graduates in the fields of relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. In addition to the derivation of the potentials for neutrinos, we explicitely study the origin of the reversed sign for potentials in the case of antineutrino-scattering.

  20. Towards a 'Thermodynamics' of Active Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sho C. Takatori; John F. Brady

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-propulsion allows living systems to display unusual collective behavior. Unlike passive systems in thermal equilibrium, active matter systems are not constrained by conventional thermodynamic laws. A question arises however as to what extent, if any, can concepts from classical thermodynamics be applied to nonequilibrium systems like active matter. Here we use the new swim pressure perspective to develop a simple theory for predicting phase separation in active matter. Using purely mechanical arguments we generate a phase diagram with a spinodal and critical point, and define a nonequilibrium chemical potential to interpret the "binodal." We provide a generalization of thermodynamic concepts like the free energy and temperature for nonequilibrium active systems. Our theory agrees with existing simulation data both qualitatively and quantitatively and may provide a framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of nonequilibrium active systems.

  1. Strong dark matter constraints on GMSB models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Staub; W. Porod; J. Niemeyer

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the dark matter problem in supersymmetric models with gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking, with and without R-parity breaking. In these classes of models, a light gravitino forms the dark matter.Consistency with the experimental data, in particular the dark matter abundance and the small-scale power spectrum, requires additional entropy production after the decoupling of the gravitino from the thermal bath. We demonstrate that the usual mechanism via messenger number violating interactions does not work in models where the messenger belongs to SU (5) representations. This is mainly a consequence of two facts: (i) there are at least two different types of lightest messenger particles and (ii) the lightest messenger particle with SU (2) quantum numbers decays dominantly into vector bosons once messenger number is broken, a feature which has been overlooked so far. In case of SO(10) messenger multiplets we find scenarios which work if the SM gauge singlet component is rather light.

  2. Strong dark matter constraints on GMSB models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staub, F; Niemeyer, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the dark matter problem in supersymmetric models with gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking, with and without R-parity breaking. In these classes of models, a light gravitino forms the dark matter.Consistency with the experimental data, in particular the dark matter abundance and the small-scale power spectrum, requires additional entropy production after the decoupling of the gravitino from the thermal bath. We demonstrate that the usual mechanism via messenger number violating interactions does not work in models where the messenger belongs to SU (5) representations. This is mainly a consequence of two facts: (i) there are at least two different types of lightest messenger particles and (ii) the lightest messenger particle with SU (2) quantum numbers decays dominantly into vector bosons once messenger number is broken, a feature which has been overlooked so far. In case of SO(10) messenger multiplets we find scenarios which work if the SM gauge singlet component is rather light.

  3. Solitonic axion condensates modeling dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castañeda Valle, David, E-mail: casvada@gmail.com; Mielke, Eckehard W., E-mail: ekke@xanum.uam.mx

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Instead of fluid type dark matter (DM), axion-like scalar fields with a periodic self-interaction or some truncations of it are analyzed as a model of galaxy halos. It is probed if such cold Bose–Einstein type condensates could provide a viable soliton type interpretation of the DM ‘bullets’ observed by means of gravitational lensing in merging galaxy clusters. We study solitary waves for two self-interacting potentials in the relativistic Klein–Gordon equation, mainly in lower dimensions, and visualize the approximately shape-invariant collisions of two ‘lump’ type solitons. -- Highlights: •An axion model of dark matter is considered. •Collision of axion type solitons are studied in a two dimensional toy model. •Relations to dark matter collisions in galaxy clusters are proposed.

  4. Bi-metric Gravity and "Dark Matter"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. T. Drummond

    2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a bi-metric theory of gravity containing a length scale of galactic size. For distances less than this scale the theory satisfies the standard tests of General Relativity. For distances greater than this scale the theory yields an effective gravitational constant much larger than the locally observed value of Newton's constant. The transition from one regime to the other through the galactic scale can explain the observed rotation curves of galaxies and hence the effects normally attributed to the presence of dark matter. Phenomena on an extragalactic scale such as galactic clusters and the expansion of the universe are controlled by the enhanced gravitational coupling. This provides an explanation of the missing matter normally invoked to account for the observed value of Hubble's constant in relation to observed matter.

  5. Semiconductor Probes of Light Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter W. Graham; David E. Kaplan; Surjeet Rajendran; Matthew T. Walters

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter with mass below about a GeV is essentially unobservable in conventional direct detection experiments. However, newly proposed technology will allow the detection of single electron events in semiconductor materials with significantly lowered thresholds. This would allow detection of dark matter as light as an MeV in mass. Compared to other detection technologies, semiconductors allow enhanced sensitivity because of their low ionization energy around an eV. Such detectors would be particularly sensitive to dark matter with electric and magnetic dipole moments, with a reach many orders of magnitude beyond current bounds. Observable dipole moment interactions can be generated by new particles with masses as great as 1000 TeV, providing a window to scales beyond the reach of current colliders.

  6. Interferometry with correlated matter-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oksana I. Streltsova; Alexej I. Streltsov

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Matter-wave interferometry of ultra-cold atoms with attractive interactions is studied at the full many-body level. First, we study how a coherent light-pulse applied to an initially-condensed solitonic system splits it into two matter-waves. The split system looses its coherence and develops correlations with time, and inevitably becomes fragmented due to inter-particle attractions. Next, we show that by re-colliding the sub-clouds constituting the split density together, along with a simultaneous application of the same laser-pulse, one creates three matter-waves propagating with different momenta. We demonstrate that the number of atoms in the sub-cloud with zero-momentum is directly proportional to the degree of fragmentation in the system. This interferometric-based protocol to discriminate, probe, and measure the fragmentation is general and can be applied to ultra-cold systems with attractive, repulsive, short- and long-range interactions.

  7. Chemical Addition prior to Membrane Processes for Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Removal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Fane, Anthony G.; Waite, T. D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Membrane processes for surface water treatment include microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF), depending on the target material to be removed and the limiting process economics. MF will remove ...

  8. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA; PRM=Petaluma River Mid, CA; CCM=China Camp Mid, Ca; WTM=SC % SOC CIM TE CSM PRM WTM CCM ML A TE SB ML CSM PK PK BulkCA; PRM=Petaluma River Mid, CA; CCM=China Camp Mid, Ca; WTM=

  9. The Effects of Ozone Deposition and Dissolved Organic Matter on Manganese Speciation in the Surface Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Alison Michelle

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the known reactivity of ozone (O_(3)) in water and ozone’s environmental importance in the atmosphere, there are relatively few studies published examining the chemistry of O_(3) in seawater. This study focused on developing a flow injection...

  10. Fractionation of Dissolved Solutes and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter During Experimental Sea Ice Formation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephanie 1990-

    2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    (TN), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), fluorescence and absorption (optics), water isotopes (?18O and ?D), and lignin phenols. Results showed a clear fractionation effect for all parameters, where the ice samples contained much less of the dissolved...

  11. FIA-12-0060- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 1, 2012, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy...

  12. A Spatial Deconvolution of Molecular Signals in Oceanic Dissolved Organic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,central equatorial Pacific Ocean, 1992: Daily and finescale

  13. A spatial deconvolution of molecular signals in oceanic dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis Blake

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,central equatorial Pacific Ocean, 1992: Daily and finescale

  14. Organic matter added to bareroot nursery beds influences soil properties and morphology of Fraxinus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responses to nursery soil amendments vary with different forms and amounts of OM. Benefits to seedling, including soil properties. Hardwood seedlings are generally more demanding than conifer seedlings in terms). Aggregates formed between OM and the soil help increase filtration and retention of water and increase root

  15. Douglas-fir plantation productivity: effects of organic matter retention, competing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sand silt loamsoils MolallaMatlockFall River Grove soil series near Matlock #12;Precipitation(mm) 20 25 30 35 control compacted Fall River Matlock Molalla Height(cm) 100 120 140 160 Third-year size

  16. FAR AND MIDINFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MATTER OF ASTROCHEMICAL INTEREST: COAL, HEAVY PETROLEUM FRACTIONS, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The best match of the PPNe band pattern is offered by the BQ1 heavy aromatic oil fraction and by its, HEAVY PETROLEUM FRACTIONS, AND ASPHALTENES Franco Cataldo1,2 , D. A. GarcíaHernández3,4 , Arturo of heavy petroleum fractions namely "Distillate Aromatic Extract" (DAE), "Residual Aromatic Extract" (RAE

  17. Molecular Level Characterization and Mobility of Radionuclide-Carrying Natural Organic Matter in Aquatic Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Chen

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclides, 129I and 239,240Pu, are major products or by-products of nuclear fission and among the top risk drivers for waste disposal at the Savannah River Sites (SRS) and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS), respectively, due...

  18. Molecular Level Characterization and Mobility of Radionuclide-Carrying Natural Organic Matter in Aquatic Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Chen

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................. 112 4.5 Conclusions .............................................................................. 129 V COLLOIDAL CUTIN-LIKE SUBSTANCES CROSS-LINKED TO SIDEROPHORE DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS MOBILIZING PLUTONIUM FROM CONTAMINATED SOILS... through 1972, the plutonium-production operation at the Hanford Site in Washington released about 266 kg of 129I into the air while the operation of production reactors in the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina released about 32 kg of 129I...

  19. Composition of the ozonolytic degradation products of the organic matter of Barzasskii sapromyxite coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Semenova; Y.F.Patrakov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation). Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ozonization of Barzasskii sapromyxite coal in chloroform and the composition of ozonolytic degradation products were studied. Water-insoluble high-molecular-weight products were predominant among the ozonization products. A half of water-soluble substances consisted of aliphatic C{sub 5}-C{sub 12} dicarboxylic acids and benzenedicarboxylic acid derivatives. Sapromyxite has been suggested as a substitute for crude petroleum in the manufacture of motor fuels.

  20. Dissolved organic matter properties and their relationship to carbon dioxide efflux from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany c Department of Geography and Centre for Climate and Global Change 2001; accepted 9 December 2002 Abstract The effects of peat bog harvesting and restoration on dissolved- centrations, humification indices derived from synchronous fluorescence spectra (humification index (HIX

  1. Colored dissolved organic matter dynamics across the shelf-basin interface in the western Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    Ocean were examined by three-dimensional excitation/emission matrix (3-D EEM) spectroscopy. CDOM was confined to the upper halocline layer (salinity of $33.1). This layer had distinctive 3-D EEM fingerprints

  2. Characterization of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Baltic Sea by excitation emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durako, Michael J.

    matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra and UV­visible absorption spectra of CDOM are reported as a function. Analysis of CDOM-EEM spectra indicated that a change in composition of CDOM occurred along the salinity intensity of EEM spectra indicated that the fluorescence peaks associated with terrestrial humic components

  3. Dissolved organic matter discharge in the six largest arctic rivers-chemical composition and seasonal variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Amanda J.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . ................................................................................................. 31 3 Relationship of Yukon discharge to DOC (mg L -1 ), spectral slope (?m -1 ), and SUVA (L (mg OC) -1 m -1 )..................................................... 37 4 Fluorescence EEM?s measured in Yukon samples from low flow... .................................................................................................. 46 8 Relationship of Mackenzie discharge to DOC (mg L -1 ), spectral slope (?m -1 ), and SUVA (L (mg OC) -1 m -1 )...................................................... 47 x FIGURE Page 9 Fluorescence EEM?s measured...

  4. Production and preservation of organic matter: The significance of Stephen R. Meyers1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    ratios in diatoms [Hutchins and Bruland, 1998; Hutchins et al., 1998; Firme et al., 2003], and a decrease

  5. Phase partitioning and solubility of iron in natural seawater controlled by dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    in the coastal environments [Hutchins and Bruland, 1998; Bruland et al., 2001; Hutchins et al., 2002]. Knowledge

  6. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of natural and created marsh soils. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol.2007. Freshwater Input Structures Soil Properties, VerticalS.S. , Hoover, K.L. 1996. Soil properties of reference

  7. Soil organic matter stability and the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Nancy Rosalind

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2, with the potential for large positive feedbacks with global warming. The size of these feedbacks will depend on the relative sensitivity to temperature of very ...

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLE Organic matter governs N and P balance in Danube Delta lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    . Doberer · J. Reutimann · A. Pavel · S. Balan · S. Radan · B. Wehrli Received: 7 January 2010 / Accepted: 7 S. Radan National Institute for Marine Geology and Geoecology­GeoEcoMar, 024053 Bucharest, Romania

  9. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    year record of carbon sequestration from a coastal lagoonR.E. , Milarn, C.S. 2012. Carbon sequestration and SedimentJ.C. 2003. Global carbon sequestration in tidal saline

  10. Spatial and temporal distributions of particulate matter and particulate organic carbon, Northeast Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Christina Estefana

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) that becomes trapped in the rings upon separation, and they are an important part of the heat and salt budget of the Gulf basin. Most anticyclones tend to move westward and eventually dissipate along the Gulf* s western boundary, Convective mixing transforms... as well as a significant portion of the Canadian interior. The Mississippi River plume's input of new nutrients has been identified as a potentially important factor in the high level of primary production found in the northern Gulf of Mexico (Lohrenz...

  11. Characterization of organic matter in the Oligocene (Chattian) turbiditic fine grained deposits, offshore Angola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is discontinuous and produces layers of sediment in which OM quantity, type and diagenesis are heterogeneous (Cowie

  12. Role of minerals in formation of hydrocarbons during pyrolysis of organic matter - a material balance approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monterey Formation and Green River Formation kerogens (types II and I, respectively) were isolated, mixed with common sedimentary minerals, and pyrolyzed under dry and hydrous conditions for various times and temperatures. Analysis of all the pyrolyses products were conducted to perform a material balance and to infer reaction kinetics and mechanisms. Material balance of the pyrolyses products, in the presence and absence of minerals, reveals that the kerogen degradation results in the formation of bitumen rich in high molecular weight compounds in the initial stages, followed by additional cracking of kerogen and bitumen. However, amount and type of hydrocarbons in the pyrolyses products of kerogen in the presence of montmorillonite are markedly different from those produced by heating kerogen alone or with other minerals. The initial amounts of products in the presence of montmorillonite, and in particular the quantities of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, are higher than those in the presence of illite, calcite, and kerogen alone. The composition of these low molecular weight compounds is dominated by branched hydrocarbons, indicating catalytic cracking via carbonium ion mechanism, which is initiated on acidic sites of the clay. Composition differences are evident also in the distribution of n-alkanes and in the pristane/phytane ratio. The catalytic effect of montmorillonite, however, disappears in the presence of excess water. These differences may have important implications for the composition and quantities of petroleum generated from source rocks with different mineralogies.

  13. Tracing global biogeochemical cycles and meridional overturning circulation using chromophoric dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    of the ocean, ultraviolet light penetration, and photochemical reactions that influence the cycling) within the top kilometer of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. However, a much weaker correspondence is found encompass all three ocean basins transecting the subtropics where satelliteretrieved surface ocean CDOM

  14. Historical Reconstruction of Terrestrial Organic Matter Inputs to Fiordland, NZ Over the Last ~500 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................ 92 OMfossil ....................................................................................... 96 Source Reconstruction: Marine, Terrestrial, Fossil ................... 99 Conclusion...) demonstrates that in peat and 9 soil-poor environments, the BIT Index does not provide similar estimates of %OMterr in Northern Hemisphere fjords as 8, 13C, and C/N analysis. Additionally, it has been shown that the soil and marine GDGTs may vary...

  15. Temperature effects on decomposition rates of soil organic matter with differing proportions of labile and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    that the carbon dioxide loss from soil declines over time then picks up again after approximately15 years properties will change and thus their role as a carbon sink. This experiment uses forest soils since the microbial physiological properties change over long-term warming and if it is a result of a change in carbon

  16. Dissolved organic matter and persistence of the invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) under low food conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cause substantial reductions in phytoplankton biomass (Caraco et al. 1997). These reductions can). Although the rapid spread of zebra mussels across North America and Europe can be explained by their free), it is their ability to drive down phytoplankton biomass while still persisting at high densities that enable zebra

  17. Mid-infrared study of the molecular structure variability of insoluble organic matter from primitive chondrites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concerning the location and chemical processes of the synthesis of the IOM. In the 1970s, Fischer­Tropsch

  18. Study of dissolved organic matter in peatlands: molecular characterisation of a dynamic carbon reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridley, Luke McDonald

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern peatlands represent a significant carbon reservoir, containing approximately a third of the terrestrial carbon pool. The stability of these carbon stores is poorly understood, and processes of accumulation and ...

  19. Organic Matter Stoichiometry, Flux, and OxygenControlNitrogenLossintheOcean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    %. It is somewhat mysterious then that anam- mox and denitrification often do not appear to be stoichiometrically showed that on a larger (areal) scale, anam- mox was 28% of the total N loss (10), as pre- dicted (4

  20. Author's personal copy Biogeochemistry of particulate organic matter from lakes of different trophic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    profiles of total fatty acids (FAs) and total neutrals. In Lake Brienz, the results reflect the relative contributions of primary productivity and refractory, allochthonous OM to POM, gov- erned by particle load productivity, water column stratification and associated particle load in the upper layers, as well

  1. Structural stability of coprecipitated natural organic matter and ferric iron under reducing conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henneberry, Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. , 1989. Formation of goethite from ferrihydrite atferrihydrite, and goethite. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Actaon the formation of goethite and hematite from ferrihydrite.

  2. FIA-12-0059- In the Matter of California Arizona Nevada District Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 31, 2012, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) denied a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Appeal filed by the California Arizona Nevada District...

  3. FIA-12-0053- In the Matter of Arizona Nevada District Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 11, 2012, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) denied a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Appeal filed by the California Arizona Nevada District...

  4. Studies of the Ammonia-soluble Organic Matter of the Soil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Hamner, N.C.

    1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Remove Clay 15 ........................................ Precipitation of the Humic Acid 17 ................................... Effect of Extended Washing with Acid 18 ................................. Effect of Various Strengths of Ammonia 19 PART... Salts 36 .................................................... Effect of Ammonia 37 .............................. Effect of Carbonates of Lime and Magnesia '37 .............................................. Hydrolysis of Humic Acid 38...

  5. Author's personal copy Modeling the dynamics and export of dissolved organic matter in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fennel, Katja

    & Mary, Route 1208, Greate Road, Gloucester Point, VA 23062-1346, USA c Rutgers University, 71 Dudley), mesotrophic (Anderson and Williams, 1998; Fasham et al., 1999) and oligotro- phic (Anderson and Pondaven, 2003; Raick et al., 2005) regional systems and the global ocean (Popova and Anderson, 2002). Fasham et al

  6. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland (Mugu Lagoon, Carpinteria Salt Marsh, TijuanaB) Tijuana Estuary C) Carpinteria Salt Marsh Figure 2: MeanTijuana Estuary and Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Horizontal bars

  7. The Effects of Ozone Deposition and Dissolved Organic Matter on Manganese Speciation in the Surface Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Alison Michelle

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis (FIA) chemiluminescence system to measure Mn(II) in order to investigate the effect of O_(3) deposition to the sea surface on Mn speciation. Modifications to earlier FIA systems had to be made in order to accommodate the relatively high...

  8. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    df III SS Mean F-Ratio p-value Squares Treatment WetlandDepth Treatment*Wetland Treatment*DepthWetland*Depth Treatment*Wetland*Depth Error Table 2: A. Data

  9. Neighborhood Progress Through Organized Action.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eula; Cox, Bonnie; Martin, E. C.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] ~ei~ h borhood Progress Through Organized Action E. C. MARTIN, Administrative Assistant BONNIE COX, Organization Specialist MRS. EULA NEWMAN, Specialist in Home Management TEXAS A. & M. COLLEGE SYSTEM "The... coord: lent r peo plt 1. mmunity organization is successful when all families erested groups participate. Such an organization may inate interest in the community and provide an excel- neans for channeling most programs. The interest...

  10. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Menlo Park, CA); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  11. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Golden, CO); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  12. Organization | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for #SpaceWeekOMB Policies2.0 OpenOrganization

  13. All Lab Organizations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About BecomeTechnologies | Blandine JeromeOrganizations All

  14. Nuclear Organization and Genome Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corces, Victor G.

    Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

  15. Persistent Organic By Steven Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Persistent Organic Pollutants By Steven Jackson #12;What are POP's? · POP's are organic compounds, rivers and surface ocean water. · Bio accumulation- POPs work their way through the food chain by accumulating in the body fat of living organisms and becoming more concentrated as they move from one creature

  16. DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries.

  17. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  18. Does Management Matter? Evidence from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, Nicholas; Eifert, Benn; Mahajan, Aprajit; McKenzie, David; Roberts, John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a detailed ground- based management survey of every textileoutput markets. A2) Management survey in 2011 In 2011 weUS Census 2011 Management and Organization Survey http://

  19. Classified Matter Protection and Control Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual supplements DOE O 471.2A, Information Security Program, and provides detailed requirements for the protection and control of classified matter. Cancels DOE M 471.2-1B except Chapter III paragraphs 1 and 2, and Chapter IV.

  20. Exploring ? signals in dark matter detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnik, Roni; Kopp, Joachim; Machado, Pedro A.N., E-mail: roni@fnal.gov, E-mail: jkopp@fnal.gov, E-mail: accioly@fma.if.usp.br [Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510-0500 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate standard and non-standard solar neutrino signals in direct dark matter detection experiments. It is well known that even without new physics, scattering of solar neutrinos on nuclei or electrons is an irreducible background for direct dark matter searches, once these experiments reach the ton scale. Here, we entertain the possibility that neutrino interactions are enhanced by new physics, such as new light force carriers (for instance a ''dark photon'') or neutrino magnetic moments. We consider models with only the three standard neutrino flavors, as well as scenarios with extra sterile neutrinos. We find that low-energy neutrino-electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering rates can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude, potentially enough to explain the event excesses observed in CoGeNT and CRESST. We also investigate temporal modulation in these neutrino signals, which can arise from geometric effects, oscillation physics, non-standard neutrino energy loss, and direction-dependent detection efficiencies. We emphasize that, in addition to providing potential explanations for existing signals, models featuring new physics in the neutrino sector can also be very relevant to future dark matter searches, where, on the one hand, they can be probed and constrained, but on the other hand, their signatures could also be confused with dark matter signals.

  1. Photonic dark matter portal and quantum physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Alavi; F. S. Kazemian

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify the nature and properties of dark matter is one of the most serious open problems in modern physics. We study a model of dark matter in which the hidden sector interacts with ordinary matter (standard model particles) via photonic portal(hidden photonic portal). We search for the effects of this new interaction in quantum physics, therefore we study its effects on hydrogen atom because it is a simple and a well-studied quantum system so it can be considered as an outstanding test for dark matter signatures. Using the accuracy of the measurement of energy, we obtain an upper bound for the coupling constant of the model. We also calculate the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of muon due to the hidden photonic portal. At the moment there is a deviation between the standard model prediction for muon anomalous magnetic moment and its experimental value so the anomalous magnetic moment of muon can provide an important test of the standard model and the theories beyond it.

  2. Alternatives to Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip D. Mannheim

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the underpinnings of the standard Newton-Einstein theory of gravity, and identify where it could possibly go wrong. In particular, we discuss the logical independence from each other of the general covariance principle, the equivalence principle and the Einstein equations, and discuss how to constrain the matter energy-momentum tensor which serves as the source of gravity. We identify the a priori assumption of the validity of standard gravity on all distance scales as the root cause of the dark matter and dark energy problems, and discuss how the freedom currently present in gravitational theory can enable us to construct candidate alternatives to the standard theory in which the dark matter and dark energy problems could then be resolved. We identify three generic aspects of these alternate approaches: that it is a universal acceleration scale which determines when a luminous Newtonian expectation is to fail to fit data, that there is a global cosmological effect on local galactic motions which can replace galactic dark matter, and that to solve the cosmological constant problem it is not necessary to quench the cosmological constant itself, but only the amount by which it gravitates.

  3. Particle Dark Matter and its Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angel Morales

    1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The status and prospects of the experimental efforts in the detection of Particle Dark Matter is reviewed. Emphasis is put in the direct searches for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), outlining the various strategies and techniques currently followed and sumarizing the results. A briefing of the indirect methods of WIMP detection is also presented.

  4. An Ultimate Target for Dark Matter Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kfir Blum; Yanou Cui; Marc Kamionkowski

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of S-matrix unitarity and the dynamics of thermal freeze-out for massive relic particles (denoted here simply by WIMPs) implies a lower limit on the density of such particles, that provide a (potentially sub-dominant) contribution to dark matter. This then translates to lower limits to the signal rates for a variety of techniques for direct and indirect detection of dark matter. For illustration, we focus on models where annihilation is s-wave dominated. We derive lower limits to the flux of gamma-rays from WIMP annihilation at the Galactic center; direct detection of WIMPs; energetic neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun; and the effects of WIMPs on the angular power spectrum and frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The results suggest that a variety of dark-matter-search techniques may provide interesting avenues to seek new physics, even if WIMPs do not constitute all the dark matter. While the limits are quantitatively some distance from the reach of current measurements, they may be interesting for long-range planning exercises.

  5. Direct Detection of Galactic Halo Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Ben R.

    inferred because the grav- itational field due to the known distribution of luminous matter, primarily, photographic plates in the R59F and BJ pass- bands from the SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey (12­14). R59F and BJ roughly% of the sky. Because of image blending problems and large halos of scattered light around bright stars

  6. DAE?ALUS and dark matter detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krnjaic, Gordan

    Among laboratory probes of dark matter, fixed-target neutrino experiments are particularly well suited to search for light weakly coupled dark sectors. In this paper, we show that the DAE?ALUS source setup—an 800 MeV proton ...

  7. Dark Matter Related to Axion and Axino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jihn E. Kim

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the essential features of the QCD axion: the strong CP solution and hence its theoretical necessity. I also review the axion and axino effects on astrophysics and cosmology, in particular with emphasis on their role in the dark matter component in the universe.

  8. FRW Cosmologies with Adiabatic Matter Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; A. S. M. Germano; L. R. W. Abramo

    1995-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Some properties of cosmological models with matter creation are investigated in the framework of the Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) line element. For adiabatic matter creation, as developed by Prigogine and coworkers, we derive a simple expression relating the particle number density $n$ and energy density $\\rho$ which holds regardless of the matter creation rate. The conditions to generate inflation are discussed and by considering the natural phenomenological matter creation rate $\\psi =3 \\beta nH$, where $\\beta$ is a pure number of the order of unity and $H$ is the Hubble parameter, a minimally modified hot big-bang model is proposed. The dynamic properties of such models can be deduced from the standard ones simply by replacing the adiabatic index $\\gamma$ of the equation of state by an effective parameter $\\gamma_{*} = \\gamma (1 - \\beta)$. The thermodynamic behavior is determined and it is also shown that ages large enough to agree with observations are obtained even given the high values of $H$ suggested by recent measurements.

  9. Organization Chart and Contacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Organization Chart and Contacts Organization Chart and Contacts Organization Chart and Contacts Contact Information U.S. Department of...

  10. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

  11. The Agenda Setting Powers of Party Organizations /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Andrew Scott

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory of Parties and Party Organizations . . . . . . . . . .1984. “On the Theory of Party Organization. ” The Journal ofand I offer a new theory of party organizations that more

  12. An Alternative to Particle Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Khoury

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an alternative to particle dark matter that borrows ingredients of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) while adding new key components. The first new feature is a dark matter fluid, in the form of a scalar field with small equation of state and sound speed. This component is critical in reproducing the success of cold dark matter for the expansion history and the growth of linear perturbations, but does not cluster significantly on non-linear scales. Instead, the missing mass problem on non-linear scales is addressed by a modification of the gravitational force law. The force law approximates MOND at large and intermediate accelerations, and therefore reproduces the empirical success of MOND at fitting galactic rotation curves. At ultra-low accelerations, the force law reverts to an inverse-square-law, albeit with a larger Newton's constant. This latter regime is important in galaxy clusters and is consistent with their observed isothermal profiles, provided the characteristic acceleration scale of MOND is mildly varying with scale or mass, such that it is ~12 times higher in clusters than in galaxies. We present an explicit relativistic theory in terms of two scalar fields. The first scalar field is governed by a Dirac-Born-Infeld action and behaves as a dark matter fluid on large scales. The second scalar field also has single-derivative interactions and mediates a fifth force that modifies gravity on non-linear scales. Both scalars are coupled to matter via an effective metric that depends locally on the fields. The form of this effective metric implies the equality of the two scalar gravitational potentials, which ensures that lensing and dynamical mass estimates agree. Further work is needed in order to make both the acceleration scale of MOND and the fraction at which gravity reverts to an inverse-square law explicitly dynamical quantities, varying with scale or mass.

  13. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

  14. Veto for the ZEPLIN-III dark matter detector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Emma Jayne

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) is a favoured explanation to the galactic dark matter puzzle and could account for a large proportion of the missing mass of the Universe. ...

  15. Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Matter Emissions from Catalyzed Trap-Equipped Heavy-duty Diesel Vehicles Operating on Ultra-low Sulfur EC-D Fuel Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter...

  16. TSO-01113 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TSO-01113 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing TSO-01113 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing The individual currently is employed by a DOE contractor, and that...

  17. Bulk viscosity in nuclear and quark matter: A short review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui Dong; Nan Su; Qun Wang

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The history and recent progresses in the study of bulk viscosity in nuclear and quark matter are reviewed. The constraints from baryon number conservation and electric neutrality in quark matter on particle densities and fluid velocity divergences are discussed.

  18. Pseudo-Goldstone modes in isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, T.D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Broniowski, W. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyze the chiral limit in dense isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter. It is shown that the pseudo-Goldstone modes in this system are qualitatively different from the case of isospin-symmetric matter.

  19. The Problem of Big Bang Matter vs. AntiMatter Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger Ellman

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    -The favored Big Bang concept is that the original symmetry was skewed, the universe now being all matter, all antimatter having annihilated. -The mechanism of matter/antimatter annihilation is analyzed. A total annihilation of original antimatter could not have occurred; the skewing is unnecessary; and the universe must contain equally both forms of matter. -Current detection of cosmic matter/antimatter annihilations is Gamma Ray Bursts [GRB's]. However, the conviction that the universe is now all matter with no antimatter has left that possibility rejected and uninvestigated and left standing the massive supernovae core collapse hypothesis for GRB's. -It has recently been reported that the rate of GRB's increases with red shift z for z = 0 to 4 as (1 + z)^1.5. The indication is that the rate increases significantly with time into the past at least back to z = 4 [and probably back to the Big Bang]. -That finding is inconsistent with the massive supernovae core collapse hypothesis for GRB's and supports GRB's being cosmic matter/antimatter annihilations.

  20. Anatomy of symmetry energy of dilute nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar; B. K. Agrawal

    2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The symmetry energy coefficients of dilute clusterized nuclear matter are evaluated in the $S$-matrix framework. Employing a few different definitions commonly used in the literature for uniform nuclear matter, it is seen that the different definitions lead to perceptibly different results for the symmetry coefficients for dilute nuclear matter. They are found to be higher compared to those obtained for uniform matter in the low density domain. The calculated results are in reasonable consonance with those extracted recently from experimental data.

  1. Soft matter with soft particles Christos N. Likos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Likos, Christos N.

    properties of concentrated solutions of two novel kinds of soft matter systems: star-shaped polymers of soft matter systems under external influences and promising perspectives for the fabrication of new Perhaps the most fascinating aspect of soft matter science lies in the fact that the physical systems

  2. Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model K nuclear matter produced by heavy-ion reactions is isospin asymmetric. Although the critical exponents. Miyazaki Abstract We have studied the liquid-gas phase transition of warm asymmetric nuclear matter

  3. Method of doping organic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kloc,; Christian Leo (Constance, DE); Ramirez; Arthur Penn (Summit, NJ); So, Woo-Young (New Providence, NJ)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus has a crystalline organic semiconducting region that includes polyaromatic molecules. A source electrode and a drain electrode of a field-effect transistor are both in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. A gate electrode of the field-effect transistor is located to affect the conductivity of the crystalline organic semiconducting region between the source and drain electrodes. A dielectric layer of a first dielectric that is substantially impermeable to oxygen is in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. The crystalline organic semiconducting region is located between the dielectric layer and a substrate. The gate electrode is located on the dielectric layer. A portion of the crystalline organic semiconducting region is in contact with a second dielectric via an opening in the dielectric layer. A physical interface is located between the second dielectric and the first dielectric.

  4. Embedding Sustainability into Manufacturing Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutterow, V.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Sustainability Ratings GISR standard (13) (under development) Accrediting other sustainability ratings, rankings, and indices International Organization for Standardization ISO 14001:2004 – Environmental Management Systems – Requirements with Guidance for Use (22...) Environmental management system criteria International Organization for Standardization ISO 14064:2006 – (parts 1,2,3) (23) Principles and requirements on GHG quantification, reporting, and verification International Organization for Standardization ISO 50001...

  5. Digestive System general organization throughout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houde, Peter

    Digestive System general organization throughout: mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa, serosa digestive glands salivary pancreas liver (lobes: right, left, caudate, quadrate, diaphragmatic surface, bare

  6. Graphic values for some organic constitutents of beneficiated coal samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohlenberger, L.B. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphic techniques exist which can accurately predict values for calorific value, organic sulfur, and possibly other constituents of the organic portion of beneficiated coal sample fractions. These techniques also permit a determination of coal rank to be made without the use of the approximations required in the standard procedure. Fractions of IBC-101 with varying ash contents were produced by froth flotation. The various fractions were analyzed by the coal analysis laboratory and the particular data type was plotted in each case vs. the individual ash content of each fraction, using Lotus 123 and Freelace software packages. Such plots for calorific value and organic sulfur have, so far, been made. These curves and the information they contain are discussed in this report. A comparison of the graphic mineral matter value with the usual one calculated from the Parr approximation has been made. Eventually, the data may lead to an effective way to estimate inorganic carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and other organic constitents of coal. All data will be made available to researchers.

  7. Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessen, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    = Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , S=straw, SN=straw + Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , P=peat, PN=peat + Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , UC=unfertilized control.straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and

  8. Symmetry energy coefficients for asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fábio L. Braghin

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Symmetry energy coefficients of asymmetric nuclear matter are investigated as the inverse of nuclear matter polarizabilities with two different approaches. Firstly a general calculation shows they may depend on the neutron-proton asymmetry itself. The choice of particular prescriptions for the density fluctuations lead to certain isospin (n-p asymmetry) dependences of the polarizabilities. Secondly, with Skyrme type interactions, the static limit of the dynamical polarizability is investigated corresponding to the inverse symmetry energy coefficient which assumes different values at different asymmetries (and densities and temperatures). The symmetry energy coefficient (in the isovector channel) is found to increase as n-p asymmetries increase. The spin symmetry energy coefficient is also briefly investigated.

  9. Axion cold dark matter in nonstandard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the parameter space of cold dark matter axions in two cosmological scenarios with nonstandard thermal histories before big bang nucleosynthesis: the low-temperature reheating (LTR) cosmology and the kination cosmology. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks during inflation, we find more allowed parameter space in the LTR cosmology than in the standard cosmology and less in the kination cosmology. On the contrary, if the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks after inflation, the Peccei-Quinn scale is orders of magnitude higher than standard in the LTR cosmology and lower in the kination cosmology. We show that the axion velocity dispersion may be used to distinguish some of these nonstandard cosmologies. Thus, axion cold dark matter may be a good probe of the history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  10. Dark matter through the axion portal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Thaler, Jesse [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the galactic positron excess seen by PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS, we propose that dark matter is a TeV-scale particle that annihilates into a pseudoscalar 'axion'. The positron excess and the absence of an antiproton or gamma ray excess constrain the axion mass and branching ratios. In the simplest realization, the axion is associated with a Peccei-Quinn symmetry, in which case it has a mass around 360-800 MeV and decays into muons. We present a simple and predictive supersymmetric model implementing this scenario, where both the Higgsino and dark matter obtain masses from the same source of TeV-scale spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  11. Earth Matter Effect on Democratic Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Zhuridov

    2014-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino propagation through the Earth is investigated in the framework of the democratic neutrino theory. In this theory the neutrino mixing angle theta-1-3 is approximately determined, which allows one to make a well defined neutrino oscillogram driven by the 1-3 mixing in the matter of the Earth. Significant differences in this oscillogram from the case of models with relatively small theta-1-3 are discussed.

  12. Energy Matters, September/October 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Matters is a quarterly newsletter to update partners on Motor Challenge progress. This issue includes these topics: small town plastics manufacturer produces big local energy and cost savings; technical advances improve industrial energy efficiency; energy service companies: cost-savings partners for industry; choosing the right energy service company to prove the value of motor upgrades projects; energy assets: tapping the hidden value; steam workshops promote energy efficiency; performance optimization tips.

  13. Radio signals of particle dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Regis

    2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In most of particle dark matter (DM) models, the DM candidate injects sizable fluxes of high-energy electrons and positrons through its annihilations or decays. Emitted in regions with magnetic field, they in turn give raise to a synchrotron radiation, which typically covers radio and infrared bands. We discuss the possibility of detecting signatures of Galactic and extra-galactic DM in the total intensity and small-scale anisotropies of the radio background.

  14. Dark Matter Search with Moderately Superheated Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Hamel; L. Lessard; V. Zacek; Bhaskar Sur

    1996-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest the use of moderately superheated liquids in the form of superheated droplet detectors for a new type of neutralino search experiment. The advantage of this method for Dark Matter detection is, that the detector material is cheap, readily available and that it is easily possible to fabricate a large mass detector. Moreover the detector can be made "background blind", i.e. exclusively sensitive to nuclear recoils.

  15. Shear viscosity of the quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaharu Iwasaki; Hiromasa Ohnishi; Takahiko Fukutome

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss shear viscosity of the quark matter by using Kubo formula. The shear viscosity is calculated in the framework of the quasi-particle RPA for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We obtain a formula that the shear viscosity is expressed by the quadratic form of the quark spectral function in the chiral symmetric phase. The magnitude of the shear viscosity is discussed assuming the Breit-Wigner type for the spectral function.

  16. Quark Nuggets as Baryonic Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan-e Alam; Sibaji Raha; Bikash Sinha

    1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmic first order phase transition from quarks to hadrons, occurring a few microseconds after the Big Bang, would lead to the formation of quark nuggets which would be stable on a cosmological time scale, if the associated baryon number is larger than a critical value. We examine the possibility that these surviving quark nuggets may not only be viable candidates for cold dark matter but even close the universe.

  17. The Surface Tension of Magnetized Quark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Garcia; M. B. Pinto

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface tension of quark matter plays a crucial role for the possibility of quark matter nucleation during the formation of compact stellar objects and also for the existence of a mixed phase within hybrid stars. However, despite its importance, this quantity does not have a well established numerical value. Some early estimates have predicted that, at zero temperature, the value falls within the wide range $\\gamma_0\\approx10-300{\\rm\\ MeV/fm^2}$ but, very recently, different model applications have reduced these numerical values to fall within the range $\\gamma_0\\approx5-30{\\rm\\ MeV/fm^2}$ which would favor the phase conversion process as well as the appearance of a mixed phase in hybrid stars. In magnetars one should also account for the presence of very high magnetic fields which may reach up to about $ eB\\approx 3-30\\, m_\\pi^2$ ($B \\approx 10^{19}-10^{20} \\,G$) at the core of the star so that it may also be important to analyze how the presence of a magnetic field affects the surface tension. With this aim we consider magnetized two flavor quark matter, described by the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. We show that although the surface tension oscillates around its B=0 value, when $0 surface tension value drops by about 30% while for $eB \\gtrsim 10\\, m_\\pi^2$ it quickly raises with the field intensity so that the phase conversion and the presence of a mixed phase should be suppressed if extremely high fields are present. We also investigate how thermal effects influence the surface tension for magnetized quark matter.

  18. Alternatives to Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, P D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the underpinnings of the standard Newton-Einstein theory of gravity, and identify where it could possibly go wrong. In particular, we discuss the logical independence from each other of the general covariance principle, the equivalence principle and the Einstein equations, and discuss how to constrain the matter energy-momentum tensor which serves as the source of gravity. We identify the a priori assumption of the validity of standard gravity on all distance scales as the root cause of the dark matter and dark energy problems, and discuss how the freedom currently present in gravitational theory can enable us to construct candidate alternatives to the standard theory in which the dark matter and dark energy problems could then be resolved. We identify three generic aspects of these alternate approaches: that it is a universal acceleration scale which determines when a luminous Newtonian expectation is to fail to fit data, that there is a global cosmological effect on local galactic motions which ca...

  19. Halo Formation in Warm Dark Matter Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Bode; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Neil Turok

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrepancies have emerged between the predictions of standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory and observations of clustering on sub-galactic scales. Warm dark matter (WDM) is a simple modification of CDM in which the dark matter particles have initial velocities due either to their having decoupled as thermal relics, or having been formed via non-equilibrium decay. We investigate the nonlinear gravitational clustering of WDM with a high resolution N-body code, and identify a number of distinctive observational signatures. Relative to CDM, halo concentrations and core densities are lowered, core radii are increased, and large halos emerge with far fewer low mass satellites. The number of small halos is suppressed, and those present are formed by `top down' fragmentation of caustics, as part of a `cosmic web' connecting massive halos. Few small halos form outside this web. If we identify small halos with dwarf galaxies, their number, spatial distribution, and formation epoch appear in better agreement with the observations for WDM than they are for CDM.

  20. Dark matter ignition of type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SNIa) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SNIa progenitors. We show that $0.1-10$ PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SNIa. We combine data on SNIa masses with data on the ages of SNIa-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a $ 3 \\sigma$ inverse correlation between SNIa masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 versus 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SNIa in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SNI...

  1. Dark matter monopoles, vectors and photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin V. Khoze; Gunnar Ro

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In a secluded dark sector which is coupled to the Standard Model via a Higgs portal interaction we arrange for the existence of 't Hooft-Polyakov magnetic monopoles and study their implications for cosmology. We point out that a dark sector which can accommodate stable monopoles will also contain massless dark photons gamma' as well as charged massive vector bosons W'. The dark matter in this scenario will be a combination of magnetically and electrically charged species under the unbroken U(1) subgroup of the dark sector. We estimate the cosmological production rate of monopoles and the rate of monopole-anti-monopole annihilation and conclude that monopoles with masses of few hundred TeV or greater, can produce sizeable contributions to the observed dark matter relic density. We scan over the parameter space and compute the relic density for monopoles and vector bosons. Turning to the dark photon radiation, we compute their contribution to the measured density of relativistic particles Neff and also apply observational constraints from the Bullet cluster and other large scale galaxies on long-range interactions for the self-interacting dark matter components made out of monopoles and out of dark vector bosons. At scales relevant for dwarf galaxies we identify regions on the parameter space where self-interacting monopole and vector dark mater components can aid solving the core-cusp and the too-big-to-fail problems.

  2. Color superconducting quark matter in compact stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Blaschke; T. Klahn; F. Sandin

    2007-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent indications for high neutron star masses (M \\sim 2 M_sun) and large radii (R > 12 km) could rule out soft equations of state and have provoked a debate whether the occurence of quark matter in compact stars can be excluded as well. We show that modern quantum field theoretical approaches to quark matter including color superconductivity and a vector meanfield allow a microscopic description of hybrid stars which fulfill the new, strong constraints. For these objects color superconductivity turns out to be an essential ingredient for a successful description of the cooling phenomenology in accordance with recently developed tests. We discuss the energy release in the neutrino untrapping transition as a new aspect of the problem that hybrid stars masquerade themselves as neutron stars. Quark matter searches in future generations of low-temperature/high-density nucleus-nucleus collision experiments such as low-energy RHIC and CBM @ FAIR might face the same problem of an almost crossover behavior of the deconfinement transition. Therefore, diagnostic tools shall be derived from effects of color superconductivity.

  3. Dark Matter Balls Help Supernovae to Explode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froggatt, Colin D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat - of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating d...

  4. Phase separation and coarsening in active matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Gonnella; Davide Marenduzzo; Antonio Suma; Adriano Tiribocchi

    2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Active systems, or active matter, are self-driven systems which live, or function, far from equilibrium - a paradigmatic example which we focus on here is provided by a suspension of self-motile particles. Active systems are far from equilibrium because their microscopic constituents constantly consume energy from the environment in order to do work, for instance to propel themselves. The nonequilibrium nature of active matter leads to a variety of non-trivial intriguing phenomena. An important one which has recently been the subject of intense interest among biological and soft matter physicists is that of the so-called "motility-induced phase separation", whereby self-propelled particles accumulate into clusters in the absence of any explicit attractive interactions between them. Here we review the physics of motility-induced phase separation, and discuss this phenomenon within the framework of the classic physics of phase separation and coarsening. We also discuss cases where the coarsening may be arrested, either in theories for bacterial colonies or in experiments. Most of this work will focus on the case of run-and-tumble and active Brownian particles in the absence of solvent-mediated hydrodynamic interactions - we will briefly discuss at the end their role, which is not currently fully understood in this context.

  5. Dissipative dark matter and the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foot, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is ample evidence from rotation curves that dark matter halo's around disk galaxies have nontrivial dynamics. Of particular significance are: a) the cored dark matter profile of disk galaxies, b) correlations of the shape of rotation curves with baryonic properties, and c) the Tully-Fisher relation. Dark matter halo's around disk galaxies may have nontrivial dynamics if dark matter is strongly self interacting and dissipative. Multicomponent hidden sector dark matter featuring a massless `dark photon' (from an unbroken dark $U(1)$ gauge interaction) which kinetically mixes with the ordinary photon provides a concrete example of such dark matter. The kinetic mixing interaction facilitates halo heating by enabling ordinary supernovae to be a source of these `dark photons'. Dark matter halo's can expand and contract in response to the heating and cooling processes, but for a sufficiently isolated halo should have evolved to a steady state or `equilibrium' configuration where heating and cooling rates local...

  6. Dark matter, dark energy and gravitational proprieties of antimatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that the eventual gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter may be a key for understanding of the nature of dark matter and dark energy. If there is gravitational repulsion, virtual particle-antiparticle pairs in the vacuum, may be considered as gravitational dipoles. We use a simple toy model to reveal a first indication that the gravitational polarization of such a vacuum, caused by baryonic matter in a Galaxy, may produce the same effect as supposed existence of dark matter. In addition, we argue that cancellation of gravitational charges in virtual particle-antiparticle pairs, may be a basis for a solution of the cosmological constant problem and identification of dark energy with vacuum energy. Hence, it may be that dark matter and dark energy are not new, unknown forms of matter-energy but an effect of complex interaction between quantum vacuum and known baryonic matter.

  7. Spring 2014 Organization Development & Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Spring 2014 Organization Development & Training Catalog University of Central Florida Office of Organization Development & Training 3280 Progress Drive Orlando, FL 32826-2912 (407) 823-0440 February 7, 2014 Volume 2, Number 3 The current Catalog is published at http://www.hr.ucf.edu/web/training

  8. 4, 719745, 2007 Fluvial organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    changes and targets for carbon sequestration set by the Kyoto Protocol. In the UK the largest componentHESSD 4, 719­745, 2007 Fluvial organic carbon flux from an eroding peatland R. R. Pawson et al System Sciences Fluvial organic carbon flux from an eroding peatland catchment, southern Pennines, UK R

  9. Seebeck coefficient in organic semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this PhD thesis lie in building cost-effective and environmentally friendly waste-heat to useful energy converters based on organic polymers. The efficiency of heat to energy conversion by organic polymers tends to be higher than that for conventional...

  10. Room temperature organic exciton-polariton flow exploiting high-speed, high-Q propagating modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lerario, Giovanni; Cannavale, Alessandro; Mangione, Federica; Gambino, Salvatore; Dominici, Lorenzo; De Giorgi, Milena; Gigli, Giuseppe; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exciton-polaritons, bosonic quasi-particles formed by the interaction of light and matter, have shown a plethora of exciting phenomena that have been chiefly restricted to inorganic semiconductors and low temperature operation. Only recently, polariton condensation and non-linear effects have been demonstrated with polymers and organic molecules, making these systems suited for a realistic new generation of all-optical devices. However, polariton propagation in the plane of the device, essential for on-chip integration, is still limited by the very strong dissipation inherent to present organic microcavities. Here, we demonstrate strong-coupling of organic excitons with a Bloch surface wave (Q $\\approx$ 3000) which sustains polariton propagation for distances longer than 300 $\\mu$m and polariton lifetimes of about 1 ps, a record value in organic devices. The group velocity of the polariton mode is found to be $\\approx$ 50% the speed of light, about two order of magnitude higher than in any planar microcavity.

  11. Charge Transport through Organized Organic Assemblies in Confined Geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuckman, Amanda Eileen

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee: Dr. James D. Batteas Organic molecules such as porphyrins and alkanethiols are currently being investigated for applications such as sensors, light-emitting diodes and single electron transistors. Porphyrins are stable, highly..., molecules have shown their potential for applications such as information storage, charge separation, single electron transistors, current routers and gates and continue to be designed for use in solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, sensors...

  12. Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics Demonstrates...

  13. Classified Matter Protection and Control Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual supplements DOE O 471.2A, Information Security Program, dated 3-27-97, and provides detailed requirements for the protection and control of classified matter. Cancels DOE M 471.2-1B, dated 1-6-99, except Chapter III paragraphs 1 and 2 and Chapter IV. DOE M 471.2-1B Chapter IV was canceled by DOE O 471.4, Incidents of Security Concern, dated 3-17-04. Change 1, dated 7-14-2004, modifies requirements in Chapter II, paragraph 8c. Extended until 5-11-06 by DOE N 251.63, dated 5-11-05.

  14. Topological Matter, Integrable Models and Fusion Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Nemeschansky; N. P. Warner

    1991-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how topological $G_k/G_k$ models can be embedded into the topological matter models that are obtained by perturbing the twisted $N=2$ supersymmetric, hermitian symmetric, coset models. In particular, this leads to an embedding of the fusion ring of $G$ as a sub-ring of the perturbed, chiral primary ring. The perturbation of the twisted $N=2$ model that leads to the fusion ring is also shown to lead to an integrable $N=2$ supersymmetric field theory when the untwisted $N=2$ superconformal field theory is perturbed by the same operator and its hermitian conjugate.

  15. Weak Lensing: Dark Matter, Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh (University of Pennsylvania) [University of Pennsylvania

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The light rays from distant galaxies are deflected by massive structures along the line of sight, causing the galaxy images to be distorted. Measurements of these distortions, known as weak lensing, provide a way of measuring the distribution of dark matter as well as the spatial geometry of the universe. I will describe the ideas underlying this approach to cosmology. With planned large imaging surveys, weak lensing is a powerful probe of dark energy. I will discuss the observational challenges ahead and recent progress in developing multiple, complementary approaches to lensing measurements.

  16. Bulk viscosity in kaon condensed matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debarati Chatterjee; Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of $K^-$ condensed matter on bulk viscosity and r-mode instability in neutron stars. The bulk viscosity coefficient due to the non-leptonic process $n \\rightleftharpoons p + K^-$ is studied here. In this connection, equations of state are constructed within the framework of relativistic field theoretical models where nucleon-nucleon and kaon-nucleon interactions are mediated by the exchange of scalar and vector mesons. We find that the bulk viscosity coefficient due to the non-leptonic weak process in the condensate is suppressed by several orders of magnitude. Consequently, kaon bulk viscosity may not damp the r-mode instability in neutron stars.

  17. Shear viscosity of $?$-stable nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omar Benhar; Arianna Carbone

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscosity plays a critical role in determining the stability of rotating neutron stars. We report the results of a calculation of the shear viscosity of $\\beta$~-~stable matter, carried out using an effective interaction based on a state-of-the-art nucleon-nucleon potential and the formalism of correlated basis functions. Within our approach the equation of state, determining the proton fraction, and the nucleon-nucleon scattering probability are consistently obtained from the same dynamical model. The results show that, while the neutron contribution to the viscosity is always dominant, above nuclear saturation density the electron contribution becomes appreciable.

  18. Neutralino dark matter from heavy axino decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Ki-Young [Departamento de Fisica Teorica C-XI, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Kim, Jihn E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Min [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Seto, Osamu [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider cosmological consequences of a heavy axino, decaying to the neutralino in R-parity conserving models. The importance and influence of the axino decay on the resultant abundance of neutralino dark matter depends on the lifetime and the energy density of axino. For a high reheating temperature after inflation, copiously produced axinos dominate the energy density of the universe, and its decay produces a large amount of entropy. As a bonus, we obtain that the upper bound on the reheating temperature after inflation via gravitino decay can be moderated, because the entropy production by the axino decay more or less dilutes the gravitinos.

  19. Classified Matter Protection and Control Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements for the protection and control of classified matter which supplement DOE O 471.2A. Extended until 5-11-06 by DOE N 251.63, dated 5-11-05. This manual has been canceled by DOE M 471.2-1C except Chapter III paragraphs 1 and 2, and Chapter IV. Chapter IV was canceled by DOE O 471.4, Incidents of Security Concern, dated 3/17/2004. Cancels DOE M 471.2-1A.

  20. Quark and Gluon Condensates in Isospin Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lianyi He; Yin Jiang; Pengfei Zhuang

    2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying the Hellmann-Feynman theorem to a charged pion gas, the quark and gluon condensates at low isospin density are determined by precise pion properties. At intermediate density around $ f_\\pi^2m_\\pi$, from both the estimation for the dilute pion gas and the calculation with Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, the quark condensate is strongly and monotonously suppressed, while the gluon condensate is enhanced and can be larger than its vacuum value. This unusual behavior of the gluon condensate is universal for Bose condensed matter of mesons. Our results can be tested by lattice calculations at finite isospin density.

  1. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

  2. Policy Matters Ohio | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation to Reduce Emissions fromMatters Ohio Jump

  3. Exploring the Nature of Matter | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring the Nature of Matter November 3,

  4. ALS Reveals New State of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals New State of Matter

  5. Quantum Condensed Matter | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL:Quantum Condensed Matter SHARE Quantum

  6. Quantum Condensed Matter | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL:Quantum Condensed Matter SHARE

  7. EPOK Centre for Organic Food and Farming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPOK ­ Centre for Organic Food and Farming Research on Organic Animal Husbandry in Sweden on organic production is coordinated by EPOK (Centre for Organic Food and Farming) at the Swedish University that have the potential to mitigate environmental effects. Publisher: EPOK ­ Centre for organic food

  8. Reducing recombination in organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Jason M. (Jason Michael)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I consider two methods to improve organic photovoltaic efficiency: energy level cascades and promotion of triplet state excitons. The former relies on a thin layer of material placed between the active ...

  9. DOE Organization Chart- February 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  10. Engineering Organization Chart Assistant Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Engineering Organization Chart Fall `12 Assistant Dean Outreach & Recruiting Matthew Cavalli and Geological Engineering Joseph Hartman Chair, Petroleum Engineering Steve Benson Chair, Electrical Engineering Forrest Ames (interim) Chair, Mechanical Engineering Matthew Cavalli Chair, Chemical Engineering Mike Mann

  11. Emergent Leadership Structures in Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slaughter, Andrew

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A social network approach was used to investigate the structural features of various emergent leadership systems in a large financial organization (n = 137), including transactional and transformational-style leadership relations. Results indicate...

  12. Three Essays on Industrial Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yang Seung

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation discusses issues in the field of industrial organization. When the government provides better infrastructure to competing firms for innovation, private firms' R&D expenditures are affected. When the ...

  13. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited. They are expected to anticipate and react quickly to prevent a potential threat while staying accountable to their public stakeholders, many of whom remain unaware of the very threats the organization is trying to address. When budgets are flush, it is easy to believe that money will solve all problems; but during times of economic hardship, managers must rely on creative and cost-effective management approaches to implement their missions. Fortunately, managers of nonproliferation organizations can draw on a wealth of research on organizational design and culture to help them identify the management strategies most appropriate for them. Such research can help nonproliferation managers think about their own organizational structures and cultures and adapt accepted management principles to their unique organizational mission. This analytical process is not straight forward, as some managers may find themselves taking risks that others might not take, such as making ostensibly risky investments for the common good, or supporting creative thinking to help mission accomplishment. Some management principles that are relatively straightforward for other organizations may be difficult to envision and implement in a nonproliferation organization. Therefore, the goal of this study is to help nonproliferation managers identify management principles that can be implemented in a nonproliferation organization and, in the process, help maximize the value of the organization's products and effectiveness of its mission.

  14. DOE Organization Chart- May 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  15. Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-scale synthesis of inorganic and organic nanomaterials (single-crystalline nanowires and functionalized conducting polymer thin films) together with strategies for large-scale assembly are discussed

  16. Absorbing Phase Transitions and Dynamic Freezing in Running Active Matter Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Reichhardt; C. J. Olson Reichhardt

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine a two-dimensional system of sterically repulsive interacting disks where each particle runs in a random direction. This system is equivalent to a run-and-tumble dynamics system in the limit where the run time is infinite. At low densities, we find a strongly fluctuating state composed of transient clusters. Above a critical density that is well below the density at which non-active particles would crystallize, the system can organize into a drifting quiescent or frozen state where the fluctuations are lost and large crystallites form surrounded by a small density of individual particles. Although all the particles are still moving, their paths form closed orbits. The average transient time to organize into the quiescent state diverges as a power law upon approaching the critical density from above. We compare our results to the random organization observed for periodically sheared systems that can undergo an absorbing transition from a fluctuating state to a dynamical non-fluctuating state. In the random organization studies, the system organizes to a state in which the particles no longer interact; in contrast, we find that the randomly running active matter organizes to a strongly interacting dynamically jammed state. We show that the transition to the frozen state is robust against a certain range of stochastic fluctuations. We also examine the effects of adding a small number of pinned particles to the system and find that the transition to the frozen state shifts to significantly lower densities and arises via the nucleation of faceted crystals centered at the obstacles.

  17. Indirect Dark Matter search with large neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermani, Paolo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter is one of the main goals of neutrino astronomy. At present, there are two big neutrino telescopes based on the Cherenkov technique in ice and water: IceCube at the South Pole and ANTARES in the northern hemisphere. Both telescopes are performing an indirect search for Dark Matter by looking for a statistical excess of neutrinos coming from astrophysical massive objects. This excess could be an evidence of the possible annihilation of dark matter particles in the centre of these objects. In one of the most popular scenarios the Dark Matter is composed of WIMP particles. The analysis and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope for the indirect detection of Dark Matter fluxes from the Sun are here presented, as well as the latest IceCube published sensitivity results, for different Dark Matter models.

  18. Ambient-pressure organic superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

  19. Test of the equivalence principle for ordinary matter falling toward dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.; Adelberger, E.G.; Heckel, B.R.; Su, Y. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested the equivalence principle (EP) for Be, Cu, and Al falling toward the galactic center, and found [Delta][ital a](Be,Cu)=[minus](0.1 [plus minus]5.8)[times]10[sup [minus]12] cm/[ital s][sup 2] and [Delta][ital a](Be,Al)=(3.6[plus minus]6.9)[times]10[sup [minus]12] cm/[ital s][sup 2]. As dark matter is thought to account for (25--30)% of our galacticentric acceleration, the EP parameters for Be/Cu, or Be/Al, falling toward dark matter, are [eta](Be,Cu)=(0.0[plus minus]1.2)[times]10[sup [minus]3] and [eta](Be,Al)=(0.7[plus minus]1.4)[times]10[sup [minus]3] (1[sigma] errors). This limits any EP-violating component of our acceleration toward dark matter and provides laboratory evidence that gravitation is the only significant long-range interaction between dark and ordinary matter.

  20. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.