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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Large-scale synthesis of inorganic and organic nanomaterials (single-crystalline nanowires and functionalized conducting polymer thin films) together with strategies for large-scale assembly are discussed

2

Inorganic Chemistry, "01. 13,No. 7, 1974 exchange resin using acetonitrile as eluent. The acetonitrile was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inorganic Chemistry, "01. 13,No. 7, 1974 exchange resin using acetonitrile as eluent. The acetonitrile was removed in vacuo and the residue sublimed at 40-45" to obtain 0.764 g (4.3 5% yield, mp 145

Bodner, George M.

3

NSF/DOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics NSFDOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

4

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics...

5

Organic-Inorganic Hetero Junction White Light Emitting Diode.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The purpose of this thesis work is to design and fabricates organic-inorganic hetero junction White Light Emitting Diode (WLED). In this WLED, inorganic material… (more)

Lubuna Beegum, Shafeek

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Inorganic-organic hybrid aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organically modified silica aerogels were prepared by NH{sub 4}OH-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of RSi(OMe){sub 3} / Si(OMe){sub 4} mixtures, followed by supercritical drying of the alcogels with methanol or CO{sub 2}. Terminal alkyl or aryl groups, bridging groups or functional organic (methacryloxypropyl or glycidoxypropyl) groups were employed for R. By the proper choice of the organic groups, the RSi(OMe){sub 3} / Si(OMe){sub 4} ratio and the drying conditions, hydrophobic aerogels, being insensitive towards moisture, were obtained with no residual SiOH or Si-OMe groups left. The transparency and porosity of the organically modified aerogels was only slightly diminished relative to unmodified silica aerogels. The elastic constant of the aerogels was significantly influenced by the kind of organic groups. By pyrolysis of the phenyl-substituted aerogels, nanometer-sized carbon structures were generated. They partly coat the primary aerogel particles and provide a very high mass specific extinction in the wavelengths interval critical for thermal radiative transport.

Schubert, U.; Schwertfeger, F.; Huesing, N.; Seyfried, E. [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

SciTech Connect: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic Sorbents for Rapid and Efficient Extraction of Heavy Metals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metal-Organic Framework Templated...

8

Thermal properties of organic and inorganic aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogels are open-cell foams that have already been shown to be among the best thermal insulating solid materials known. This paper examines the three major contributions to thermal transport through porous materials; solid, gaseous, and radiative, to identify how to reduce the thermal conductivity of air-filled aerogels. We find that significant improvements in the thermal insulation property of aerogels are possible by; (i) employing materials with a low intrinsic solid conductivity, (ii) reducing the average pore size within aerogels, and (iii) affecting an increase of the infrared extinction in aerogels. Theoretically, polystyrene is the best of the organic materials and zirconia is the best inorganic material to use for the lowest achievable conductivity. Significant reduction of the thermal conductivity for all aerogel varieties is predicted with only a modest decrease of the average pore size. This might be achieved by modifying the sol-gel chemistry leading to aerogels. For example, a thermal resistance value of [ital R]=20 per inch would be possible for an air-filled resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogel at a density of 156 kg/m[sup 3], if the average pore size was less than 35 nm. An equation is included which facilitates the calculation of the optimum density for the minimum total thermal conductivity, for all varieties of aerogels.

Hrubesh, L.W.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Material Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-9900 (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Lithium-based inorganic-organic framework materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation describes research into lithium-based inorganic-organic frameworks, which has led to an increased understanding of the structural diversity and properties of these materials. The crystal structures of 11 new forms of lithium...

Yeung, Hamish Hei-Man

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Heterostructures based on inorganic and organic van der Waals systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-dimensional limit of layered materials has recently been realized through the use of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures composed of weakly interacting layers. In this paper, we describe two different classes of vdW heterostructures: inorganic vdW heterostructures prepared by co-lamination and restacking; and organic-inorganic hetero-epitaxy created by physical vapor deposition of organic molecule crystals on an inorganic vdW substrate. Both types of heterostructures exhibit atomically clean vdW interfaces. Employing such vdW heterostructures, we have demonstrated various novel devices, including graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and MoS{sub 2} heterostructures for memory devices; graphene/MoS{sub 2}/WSe{sub 2}/graphene vertical p-n junctions for photovoltaic devices, and organic crystals on hBN with graphene electrodes for high-performance transistors.

Lee, Gwan-Hyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chul-Ho [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Zande, Arend M. van der [Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Han, Minyong [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cui, Xu; Arefe, Ghidewon; Hone, James [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Nuckolls, Colin [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Heinz, Tony F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Kim, Philip, E-mail: pk2015@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Inorganic metal oxide/organic polymer nanocomposites and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal inorganic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophillic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the composite material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Toward High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells: Bringing Conjugated Polymers and Inorganic Nanocrystals in Close  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to traditional silicon solar cells due to the capacity of producing high- efficiency solar energy in a cost these advantages and progress, organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells still exhibit much lower PCEs (iToward High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells: Bringing Conjugated Polymers

Lin, Zhiqun

13

Inorganic Metal Oxide/Organic Polymer Nanocomposites And Method Thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal in organic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophilic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Simpson, Randy (Livermore, CA)

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process. 4 figs.

Schweighardt, F.K.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S.Indianaof Energy Innovative TechniqueInorganic-Organic

17

Electronic properties of 2D and 3D hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for optoelectronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic properties of 2D and 3D hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for optoelectronic, optoelectronic properties, photovoltaic, exciton 1. Introduction Over the past decade, Hybrid Organic/inorganic Perovskites (HOP) have attracted increasing interest in the field of optoelectronics (Mitzi et al. 1995

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

18

Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization using combusted oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted at the Western Research Institute to evaluate the ability of combusted oil shale to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous wastes. The oil shale used in the research was a western oil shale retorted in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor. Two combustion temperatures were used, 1550{degrees}F and 1620{degrees}F (843{degrees}C and 882{degrees}C). The five wastes selected for experimentation were an API separator sludge, creosote-contaminated soil, mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge, and smelter dust. The API separator sludge and creosote-contaminated soil are US EPA-listed hazardous wastes and contain organic contaminants. The mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge (also an EPA-listed waste), and smelter dust contain high concentrations of heavy metals. The smelter dust and mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste fail the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for cadmium, and the metalplating sludge fails the TCLP for chromium. To evaluate the ability of the combusted oil shales to stabilize the hazardous wastes, mixtures involving varying amounts of each of the shales with each of the hazardous wastes were prepared, allowed to equilibrate, and then leached with deionized, distilled water. The leachates were analyzed for the hazardous constituent(s) of interest.

Sorini, S.S.; Lane, D.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Importance of spin-orbit coupling in hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for photovoltaic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Importance of spin-orbit coupling in hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for photovoltaic, optoelectronics, titanateoxyde, density functional theory Photovoltaic (PV) solar electricity is one of the key

Boyer, Edmond

20

Fundamental Studies on Polymer and Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Nanoparticles Reinforced Silica Aerogels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this research was to reinforce silica aerogels using functional organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles, silane end-capped polyurethane oligomer and chain extended polymer, and self-crosslinkable… (more)

Duan, Yannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Organic-inorganic nanocomposite membranes from highly ordered mesoporous thin films for solubility-based separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties. In this study, we synthesized the organic-inorganic nanocomposite membranes by decorating the surfaces of commercially available mesoporous alumina substrates, and surfactant-templated highly ordered mesoporous silicate thin films placed...

Yoo, Suk Joon

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Photocurable Inorganic-Organic Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................. 4 1.3 Hydrogels as Sensor Membranes ............................................. 6 II PHOTO-CROSSLINKED PDMSstar-PEG HYDROGELS: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND POTENTIAL APPLICATION FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLD........... 9........................................................... 5 1.2 Sequence of events that leads to formation of fibrous capsules around implanted biosesors .................................................................................... 8 2.1 Synthesis of: (top) inorganic PDMS star -MA (A...

Hou, Yaping

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

Organic/inorganic nanocomposites, methods of making, and uses as a permeable reactive barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nanocomposite materials having a composition including an inorganic constituent, a preformed organic polymer constituent, and a metal ion sequestration constituent are disclosed. The nanocomposites are characterized by being single phase, substantially homogeneous materials wherein the preformed polymer constituent and the inorganic constituent form an interpenetrating network with each other. The inorganic constituent may be an inorganic oxide, such as silicon dioxide, formed by the in situ catalyzed condensation of an inorganic precursor in the presence of the solvated polymer and metal ion sequestration constituent. The polymer constituent may be any hydrophilic polymer capable of forming a type I nanocomposite such as, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and combinations thereof. Nanocomposite materials of the present invention may be used as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate contaminated groundwater. Methods for making nanocomposite materials, PRB systems, and methods of treating groundwater are also disclosed.

Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Exfoliation of self-assembled 2D organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exfoliation of self-assembled 2D organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductors Wendy Niu,1,a) Anna-inorganic perovskite (C6H9C2H4NH3)2PbI4 are produced using micromechanical exfoliation. Mono- and few-layer areas microme- chanical exfoliation of 2D PbI perovskites and explore the few-layer behaviour of such systems

Steiner, Ullrich

25

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. W. Yu, Organic photovoltaic devices with a crosslinkablein Nanostructured Photovoltaic Devices, Recent Patents oninterfaces in organic photovoltaic devices, Solar Energy

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Solid state radioluminescent sources: Mixed organic/inorganic hybrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This concept brings a condensed source of tritium into close proximity with an inorganic phosphor. That source may thus become the equivalent of many atmospheres of tritium gas pressure. If both phosphor and tritium source material are optically clear, then a lamp's brightness may be made to scale with optical path length. Proof of principle of this concept has been demonstrated and will be described. A theoretical treatment is presented for the results here and for results from aerogel experiments. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Gill, J.T. (EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (USA)); Renschler, C.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Shepodd, T.J. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Smith, H.M. (Allied-Signal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, Helena L. (8448 Allison Ct., Arvada, CO 80005); Black, Stuart K. (4976 Raleigh St., Denver, CO 80212); Diebold, James P. (57 N. Yank Way, Lakewood, CO 80228); Kreibich, Roland E. (4201 S. 344th, Auburn, WA 98001)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

materials analysis of inorganic, organic, and bioma-terials. See ELECTRON MICROSCOPE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28 Plaster materials analysis of inorganic, organic, and bioma- terials. See ELECTRON MICROSCOPE: The next chip-scale technology, Mater. Today, 9:20­27, 2006. Plaster A plastic mixture of solids and water plaster is also used in the industry to designate plaster of paris. Plaster is usually applied in one

Anderson, Peter M.

30

Engineering Organic/inorganic hybrids comprise a mixture of oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of potential applications in coatings, fuel cells, solar cells, and sensors. Organic amino (-NH2) silane in the CO2 adsorption and desorption temperature as well as the sorbent's heat capacity govern the operating cost of the CO2 capture process. The key challenge in scaling up the process of amino silica is its

31

Determination of organic inorganic associations of trace elements in New Albany shale kerogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic and organic trace element associations in the kerogen isolated from the New Albany shale were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue obtained using density separations. Elemental mass balance data from these fractions indicate a predominantly inorganic association with pyrite and marcasite for several elements (As, Co, Ga, Mn, Ni, Sb and Se). The degree of inorganic association of these elements was determined by treatment of the mineral residue ({approximately}85% FeS{sub 2}) with dilute HNO{sub 3} to remove pyrite and marcasite. The association of several other elements in minerals which are insoluble in dilute HNO{sub 3} (rutile, zircon, etc.) were also determined. The results of these studies indicate an essentially total organic association for V and approximately 95% organic association for Ni in New Albany kerogen. The determination of organically combined elements is very difficult for those elements which are predominantly concentrated in the mineral fraction. Correction methods based on low temperature ashing, chemical removal of pyrite, and physical methods of separation are compared.

Mercer, G.E.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Composite Organic Radical - Inorganic Hybrid Cathode for Lithium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new organic radical inorganic hybrid cathode comprised of PTMA/LiFePO4 composite system is developed and reported for the first time. The hybrid cathodes demonstrate high pulse power capability resulting in a significant improvement over the pure PTMA or LiFePO4 cathode which is very promising for transportation and other high pulse power applications that require long cycle life and lower cost.

Huang, Qian; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip K.; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Inorganic-Organic Molecules and Solids with Nanometer-Sized Pores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are constructing porous inorganic-organic hybrid molecules and solids, many of which contain coordinatively unsaturated metal centers. In this work, we use multifunctional ���²-diketone ligands as �¢����building blocks�¢��� to prepare extended-solid and molecular porous materials that are capable of reacting with a variety of guest molecules.

Maverick, Andrew W.

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

Study of Electron Transport in Organic and Inorganic Atomic Monolayer Based MOS/MOSFET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wide research interest for the potential nanoelectronics applications are attracted by the organic and inorganic monolayer materials. In this work, we have studied the organic monolayer such as trichloro (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)-silane (FOTS), hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and inorganic monolayers such as hexagonal - boron nitride (h-BN) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) based MOS devices. The organic monolayer based configurations are Au/FOTS/p-Si and Au/HMDS/p-Si. The inorganic monolayer based configurations are Au/MoS2/SiO2/p-Si and Au/h-BN/SiO2/p-Si. These configurations were examined and compared with Au/SiO2/p-Si MOS configuration using the Multi-dielectric Energy Band Diagram Program (MEBDP) and MOSFeT simulation software. The C-V and I-V characteristics of MOS and MOSFET of FOTS, HMDS, h-BN, MoS2 and SiO2 were reported. The results show that the above configurations are suitable for designing MOSFETs with smaller drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and reduced threshold voltage. We noted that th...

Azariah, J Cyril Robinson; Devaprakasam, D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Understanding ligand-centred photoluminescence through flexibility and bonding of anthraquinone inorganic?organic frameworks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five novel inorganic-organic framework compounds containing the organic chromophore ligand anthraquinone-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (abbreviated H{sub 2}AQDC) and calcium (CaAQDC), zinc (ZnAQDC), cadmium (CdAQDC), manganese (MnAQDC), and nickel (NiAQDC), respectively, have been synthesized. The photoluminescence of these materials is only visible at low temperatures and this behaviour has been evaluated in terms of ligand rigidity. It is proposed that the 2,3 position bonding sites result in luminescence-quenching ligand motion, as supported by X-ray diffraction and temperature-dependent luminescence studies.

Furman, Joshua D.; Burwood, Ryan P.; Tang, Min; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A.; Cheetham, Anthony K. (Cambridge); (UCSB)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature.

Nguyen, H. S.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J., E-mail: jacqueline.bloch@lpn.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, LPN/CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Han, Z. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, LPN/CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, bat. 505, campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France); Abdel-Baki, K.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, bat. 505, campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

Physiological responses of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to organic and inorganic amended heavy-metal contaminated chat tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Study plots established at the Galena subsite of the Cherokee County Superfund Site in Southeastern Kansas by the US Bureau of Mines in 1990 were examined during the summer of 1996 to determine whether physiological criteria could be used to determine suitability of switchgrass for remediation of heavy-metal contaminated substrates. Switchgrass was chosen because it was the most frequently encountered species on these plots. Treatment plots included a treatment control, an organic residue treatment of 89.6 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1} composted cattle manure, and two inorganic fertilizer treatments recommended for either native grass or grass/legume mixtures. Plant response variables were photosynthetic rate, leaf conductance to water vapor, internal concentration of carbon dioxide in leaves, foliar transpiration rate, leaf water-use-efficiency, predawn leaf xylem water potential, and midday leaf xylem water potential. Predawn and midday xylem water potentials were higher for grass/legume inorganic treatment than for the other inorganic treatments. Leaf conductances were lower for organically treated plots than those plots not organically amended and both photosynthesis and transpiration were lower for organically treated plots. Leaf conductances and transpiration were higher for grass/legume treated plots than for plots lacking inorganic treatment. Water-use-efficiency was higher for native grass inorganically treated plots than for other inorganic treatments.

Youngman, A.L. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Polymeric media comprising polybenzimidazoles N-substituted with organic-inorganic hybrid moiety  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be included in a separator medium. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The separatory medium may exhibit an H.sub.2, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, CH.sub.3, or CO.sub.2 gas permeability greater than the gas permeability of a comparable separatory medium comprising the PBI compound without substitution. The separatory medium may further include an electronically conductive medium and/or ionically conductive medium. The separatory medium may be used as a membrane (semi-permeable, permeable, and non-permeable), a barrier, an ion exhcange media, a filter, a gas chromatography coating (such as stationary phase coating in affinity chromatography), etc.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID) [Shelley, ID; Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Electron spin and the origin of Bio-homochirality II. Prebiotic inorganic-organic reaction model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of biomolecular homochirality is a critically important question about life phenomenon and the origins of life. In a previous paper (arXiv:1309.1229), I tentatively put forward a new hypothesis that the emergence of a single chiral form of biomolecules in living organisms is specifically determined by the electron spin state during their enzyme-catalyzed synthesis processes. However, how a homochirality world of biomolecules could have formed in the absence of enzymatic networks before the origins of life remains unanswered. Here I discussed the electron spin properties in Fe3S4, ZnS, and transition metal doped dilute magnetic ZnS, and their possible roles in the prebiotic synthesis of chiral molecules. Since the existence of these minerals in hydrothermal vent systems is matter of fact, the suggested prebiotic inorganic-organic reaction model, if can be experimentally demonstrated, may help explain where and how life originated on early Earth.

Wang, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a “meringue” type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (?500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the “meringue” approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico [Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Iannace, Salvatore [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples, Italy and IMAST SCRAL, Piazza Bovio 22 Napoli 80133 (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High-performance hybrid organic-inorganic solar cell based on planar n-type silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells were fabricated by spin coating the hole transporting conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) film on n-type crystalline silicon (n-Si). By incorporating different additives into the PEDOT:PSS, the conductivity and wettability of PEDOT:PSS film are markedly improved, and the device performance is greatly enhanced accordingly. To further optimize the device performance, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) layer was inserted between the n-Si and PEDOT:PSS layer. The P3HT layer blocks electrons from diffusing to the PEDOT:PSS, and hence reduces recombination at the anode side. The device eventually exhibits a high power conversion efficiency of 11.52%.

Chi, Dan [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qi, Boyuan; Wang, Jizheng [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qu, Shengchun, E-mail: qsc@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Zhanguo [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

Improved oxidation resistance of organic/inorganic composite atomic layer deposition coated cellulose nanocrystal aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels are coated with thin conformal layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using atomic layer deposition to form hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} penetrated more than 1500??m into the aerogel for extended precursor pulse and exposure/purge times. The measured profile of coated fiber radius versus depth from the aerogel surface agrees well with simulations of precursor penetration depth in modeled aerogel structures. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated CNC aerogel nanocomposites do not show significant thermal degradation below 295?°C as compared with 175?°C for uncoated CNC aerogels, an improvement of over 100?°C.

Smith, Sean W.; Matthews, David J.; Conley, John F., E-mail: jconley@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1148 Kelley Engineering Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Buesch, Christian; Simonsen, John [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 119 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Co, {sup 79}Se, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc as pertechnetate, {sup 106}Ru/Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, and {sup 243+244}Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}AMU, {sup 242}AMU, {sup 243}AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all contract limits (molar ratio of analyte to sodium or ratio of becquerels of analyte to moles of sodium) defined in Specification 7 for Envelope A. Except for a few cases, the characterization results met or surpassed the quality control requirements established by the governing quality assurance plan and met or surpassed the minimum reportable quantity requirements specified by BNFL.

SK Fiskum; PR Bredt; JA Campbell; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; GJ Lumetta; GM Mong; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist; RG Swoboda; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively in situ at 467 and 530 nm. Closure modeling with the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) refractive index model was able to capture the increasing absorption trend with RH indicating that the droplets were heterogeneously mixed while containing dispersed insoluble absorbing material within those droplets. Seven other refractive index mixing models including LVA did not adequately describe the measurements for OC. Mixing the biomass OC aerosol with select mass fractions of ammonium sulfate ranging from 25 to 36% and sodium chloride ranging from 21 to 30% resulted in an increase in light scattering and extinction with RH and inorganic mass fraction. However, no detectable difference in light absorption behavior in comparison to pure biomass OC was observed. The main finding of this research is a measured increase in absorption with increasing RH, which is currently not represented in radiative transfer models even though biomass burning produces most of the primary OC aerosol in the atmosphere.

Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Removal mechanisms of organic and inorganic solutes in raw, upland drinking water by nanofiltration: influence of solute-solute and solute-membrane interactions   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofiltration (NF) membranes have been applied successfully for the removal of inorganic and organic pollutants, including micropollutants, from drinking water for the past two decades. However, a complete and quantitative ...

De Munari, Annalisa; Munari, Annalisa de

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

Coupling of Organic and Inorganic Vibrational States and Their Thermal Transport in Nanocrystal Arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is a close-packed structure of nanocrystals (i.e., inorganic cores 2-20 nm in diameter encapsulated transistors,4 memory devices,5 light-emitting diodes,6 photodetectors,7,8 solar cells,9-11 and thermoelectric

Malen, Jonathan A.

47

Morphology and properties of a hybrid organic-inorganic system: Al nanoparticles embedded into CuPc thin film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of the morphology and the electronic structure of the hybrid organic-inorganic system composed of aluminum nanoparticles (NPs) distributed in an organic semiconductor matrix—copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)—as a function of nominal aluminum content was studied by transmission electron microscopy and by photoemission spectroscopy methods. The aluminum atoms deposited onto the CuPc surface diffuse into the organic matrix and self-assemble to NPs in a well-defined manner with a narrow diameter distribution, which depends on the amount of aluminum that is evaporated onto the CuPc film. We find clear evidence of a charge transfer from Al to CuPc and we have been able to determine the lattice sites where Al ions sit. The finally at high coverage about 64?Å the formation of metallic aluminum overlayer on CuPc thin film takes place.

Molodtsova, O. V.; Babenkov, S. V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Aristova, I. M. [Institute of Solid State Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Vilkov, O. V. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Aristov, V. Yu., E-mail: aristov@issp.ac.ru [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

49

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance, quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Influence of image charge effect on exciton fine structure in an organic-inorganic quantum well material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated experimentally excitonic properties in organic-inorganic hybrid multi quantum well crystals, (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4} and (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}?C{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4}, by measuring photoluminescence, reflectance, photoluminescence excitation spectra. In these materials, the excitonic binding energies are enhanced not only by quantum confinement effect (QCE) but also by image charge effect (ICE), since the dielectric constant of the barrier layers is much smaller than that of the well layers. By comparing the 1s-exciton and 2s-exciton energies, we have investigated the influence of ICE with regard to the difference of the Bohr radius.

Takagi, Hidetsugu; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Ema, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Sato, Mikio; Takeoka, Yuko [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

53

Organic and inorganic components in estuarine colloids: Implications for sorption and transport of pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In colloids isolated from Chesapeake Bay and its subestuaries the concentrations of Al, Fe, and a number of trace elements were determined to vary with the clay mineral fraction that was most abundant in freshwater samples collected during the winter. The elements As, Ba, Sb, and Zn, however, increased with increasing organic content, indicating a covariance with the organic component. Organic analyses for amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids indicate that these biopolymers comprised 4 to 22%, 20 to 60%, and less than 1%, respectively, of the colloidal organic carbon in these samples. The results are significant because amino acids and carbohydrates contain oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functional groups capable of reacting with trace metals and organic pollutants. The sorption properties of several neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, including PAHs and herbicides, and several aromatic amines were investigated using the estuarine colloidal material. The effects of several environmental variables on these sorption properties were determined. The results indicate that colloids have the capacity to sorb and transport relatively insoluble pollutants that otherwise might remain immobile in the environment. Colloidal organic matter in natural water systems may serve as substrates for the sorption or binding of organic contaminants. Although most of the data has been developed using neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, data also exist for selected polar compound groups such as aromatic amines. The chemical behavior of these compound groups in interaction with DOM appears to have some similarity to their chemical interaction with sediments and soils. Partitioning constants are linear, except for polar compounds, and appear to be closely correlated to fundamental compound properties such as solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. 84 references.

Sigleo, A.C.; Means, J.C. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Dialkylenecarbonate-Bridged Polysilsesquioxanes. Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Sol-Gels with a Thermally Labile Bridging Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a new approach for altering the properties of bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels using post-processing mobilization of the polymeric network. The bridging organic group contains latent functionalities that can be liberated thermally, photochemically, or by chemical means after the gel has been processed to a xerogel. These modifications can produce changes in density, volubility, porosity, and or chemical properties of the material. Since every monomer possesses two latent functional groups, the technique allows for the introduction of high levels of functionality in hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Dialkylenecarbonate-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels were prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of bis(triethoxysilylpropyl)carbonate (1) and bis(triethoxysilylisobutyl)-carbonate (2). Thermal treatment of the resulting non-porous xerogels and aerogels at 300-350 C resulted in quantitative decarboxylation of the dialkylenecarbonate bridging groups to give new hydroxyalkyl and olefinic substituted polysilsesquioxane monolithic xerogels and aerogels that can not be directly prepared through direct sol-gel polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes.

Assink, Roger A.; Baugher, Brigitta M.; Beach, James V.; Loy, Douglas A.; Shea, Kenneth J.; Small, James H.; Tran, Joseph

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Our planet is becoming increasingly polluted with inorganic and organic compounds, primarily as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced or expected to be present in organ- isms). Many of them are toxic and/or carcinogenic. Sources cleanup in the US, and $25­50 billion per year worldwide (Glass 1999; Tsao 2003). Most remediation that use plants to remove, reduce, degrade, or immobilize environmental pollutants from soil and water

56

Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

Paulson, S E

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

OrganicInorganic Hybrid Composites DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903234  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Low Thermal Conductivity: The Role of Organic Diamines** Xiaoying Huang, Mojgan Roushan, Thomas J, mechanical, and thermal behaviors of these hybrid materials. Herein, we report five crystal structures of 3D transitions, mechanical properties, specific heat capacity, thermal diffu- sivity, and thermal conductivity

Li, Jing

58

Formation of helix-containing rods in a hybrid inorganic-organic material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The novel aluminum ethylenediphosphonate fluoride, [HN(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 3}){sub 3}][Al{sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 2}].H{sub 2}O (1) (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/n, a=12.145(4) A, b=9.265(3) A, c=20.422(6) A, beta=104.952(4){sup o}, Z=3, R{sub 1}=0.092, wR{sub 2}=0.196) has been synthesized by solvothermal methods in the presence of tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and its structure determined using single microcrystal X-ray diffraction data. Compound 1 is a one-dimensional extended chain structure composed of well-separated anionic [Al{sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 2}]{sup 4-} rods containing helical chains of corner-shared cis-AlO{sub 4}F{sub 2} octahedra at their core. The charge-compensating tris(2-aminoethyl)ammonium cations separate the anionic [Al{sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 2}]{sup 4-} rods that contain either left- or right-handed helical chains. The incorporation of the organic components into this hybrid material has aided the adoption of one-dimensionality by the compound and defined the pitch of the helical AlO{sub 4}F chain. - Graphical abstract: Helical chains of corner-shared cis-AlO{sub 4}F{sub 2} octahedra form the core of well-separated anionic [Al{sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 2}]{sup 4-} rods in the novel hybrid aluminum diphosphonate material, (H{sub 4}tren)[Al{sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 2}].(H{sub 2}O). The incorporation of the organic components into this hybrid material has aided the adoption of a uni-dimensional structure and a specific structural aspect, the helical pitch, within the resulting material, which indicates the potential of this approach to form particular structural features within hybrid materials.

Yuan Zhanhui [School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Clegg, William, E-mail: w.clegg@ncl.ac.u [School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Attfield, Martin P., E-mail: m.attfield@manchester.ac.u [Centre for Nanoporous Materials, School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Crystal structure and electric properties of the organic–inorganic hybrid: [(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]ZnCl{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new organic-inorganic hybrid [(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]ZnCl{sub 4}, M{sub r}=325.406 crystallized in a triclinic, P1¯, a=7.2816 (5) Å, b=10.0996 (7) Å, c=10.0972 (7) Å, ?=74.368 (4)°, ?=88.046 (4)°, ?=85.974 (3)°, V=713.24 (9) Å{sup 3} and Z=2, D{sub x}=1.486 Mg m{sup ?3}. Differential thermal scanning and x-ray powder diffraction, permittivity and ac conductivity indicated three phase transitions. Conduction takes place via correlated barrier hopping. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted.

Mostafa, M.F., E-mail: Mohga40@Yahoo.com; El-khiyami, S.S.

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

The research of Dr. Rafi Shikler is focused on organic and organic/inorganic hybrid optoelectronic devices. In specifically to study the physical processes that take place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are discussed. The science and technology of electronic and optoelectronic devices based on organic -conjugated

Vardi, Amichay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Novel silica-based ion exchange resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

MMMaaattteeerrriiiaaalllsss SSSeeemmmiiinnnaaarrr There have been great interests in recent years in exploring the use of organic-inorganic hybrid electronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation and a Solar Energy energy applications including photovoltaics and light-emitting devices (LEDs). Organic electronic materials such as conjugated polymers have advantages in low material cost, tunability in material

63

Spatial and temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the Fraser River, Canada : a coupled organic-inorganic perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The great geologic and climatic diversity of the Fraser River basin in southwestern Canada render it an excellent location for understanding biogeochemical cycling of sediments and terrigenous organic carbon in a relatively ...

Voss, Britta Marie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Multi-scale Detection of Organic and Inorganic Signatures Provides Insights into Gas Shale Properties and Evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic geochemical analyses, including solvent extraction or pyrolysis, followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, are generally conducted on bulk gas shale samples to evaluate their source and reservoir properties. While organic petrology has been directed at unravelling the matrix composition and textures of these economically important unconventional resources, their spatial variability in chemistry and structure is still poorly documented at the sub-micrometre scale. Here, a combination of techniques including transmission electron microscopy and a synchrotron-based microscopy tool, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, have been used to characterize at a multiple length scale an overmature organic-rich calcareous mudstone from northern Germany. We document multi-scale chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities within the sample, from the millimetre down to the nanometre-scale. From the detection of different types of bitumen and authigenic minerals associated with the organic matter, we show that the multi-scale approach used in this study may provide new insights into gaseous hydrocarbon generation/retention processes occurring within gas shales and may shed new light on their thermal history.

Bernard, S.; Horsfield, B; Schultz, H; Schreiber, A; Wirth, R; Thi AnhVu, T; Perssen, F; Konitzer, S; Volk, H; et. al.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Synthesis and characterization of a new layered organic-inorganic hybrid nickel(II) 1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide bis-phosphonate, exhibiting canted antiferromagnetism, with T{sub c}{approx}21 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new Ni(II) layered hybrid organic-inorganic compound of formula Ni{sub 2}[(NDI-BP)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O has been prepared in very mild conditions from N,N'-bis(2-phosphonoethyl)napthalene-1,4:5,8-tetracarboximide (NDI-BP ligand) and NiCl{sub 2}. The X-ray powder structure characterization of the title compound suggests a pillared layered organic-inorganic hybrid structure. The distance between the organic and inorganic layers has been found to be 17.8 A. The inorganic layers consist of corner sharing [NiO{sub 5}(H{sub 2}O)] octahedra and they are pillared by the diphosphonate groups. DC and AC magnetic measurements as a function of temperature and field indicate the presence of 2D antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between the nearest-neighbor Ni(II) ions below 100 K. A long-range magnetic ordering at T{sub c}{approx}21 K has been established and is attributed to the presence of spin canting. AC magnetic measurements as a function of temperature at different frequencies confirm the occurrence of the magnetic ordering temperature at T=21 K and the presence of a slight structural disorder in the title compound. - Graphical abstract: A new layered hybrid organic-inorganic Ni(II) N,N'-bis(2-phosphonoethyl)-naphthalene 1,4:5,8 tetracarboxydiimide complex has been synthesized and characterized. Magnetic measurements as a function of temperature and at different fields show that the compound is magnetically ordered below T{sub c}{approx}21 K.

Bauer, Elvira M. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia del CNR, Sez. di Montelibretti, Via Salaria km 29.3, I-00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy)], E-mail: Elvira.Bauer@ism.cnr.it; Bellitto, Carlo [Istituto di Struttura della Materia del CNR, Sez. di Montelibretti, Via Salaria km 29.3, I-00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Gomez Garcia, Carlos J. [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, University of Valencia, Pol La Coma s/n, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: carlos.gomez@uv.es; Righini, Guido [Istituto di Struttura della Materia del CNR, Sez. di Montelibretti, Via Salaria km 29.3, I-00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ filling through hydrolysis and condensation of silicon alkoxides has been utilized to generate nanocomposites in which the filler phase can be intimately associated with the polymer on relatively small length scales. One problem of the method has been achieving useful fill volumes without bulk phase separation of the reacting silicon monomer from the polymer. In this paper, we describe the preparation of a new class of nanocomposite materials in which the inorganic filler phase is pre-assembled before copolymerization with an organic species. Maleimide monomers, prepared from alkoxysilylpropyl amines and maleic anhydride, were protected against side reactions by forming the oxonorbornene Diels-Alder adduct with furan. The monomers were then reacted under sol-gel conditions to form oligomers or polymers-the filler phase. The material was activated by thermal deprotection of the maleimide and reacted with organic monomers or polymers to form the filled nanocomposite.

Shaltout, R.M.; Loy, D.A.; Wheeler, D.R.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1989-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Delayed cure bismaleimide resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work to quantify mercury on sRF resin. Resin mercury content is important in plans for the disposition of used sRF resin. Mercury speciation in high level waste (HLW) is unknown. It may be partly organic, one example being methyl mercury cation. Further study of the resin's affinity for mercury is recommended.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

71

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer Total Organic Carbon Analyzer The carbon analyzer is used to analyze total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), total organic carbon (TOC), purgeable...

72

PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of inorganic nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapy has become a critical component in targeted treatment of diseases. The surface modification of inorganic oxides is important for providing diversity in size, shape, solubility, long term stability and attachment of selective functional groups. PEGylation of surfaces is a key strategic approach for providing stealth characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by human body. The current review describes the role of surface modification of oxides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in providing versatile characteristics to inorganic oxide nanoparticles with a focus on their biomedical applications. The role of PEG as structure directing agent in synthesis of oxides is also captured in this short review.

Karakoti, Ajay S.; Das, Soumya; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

73

MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab 3: Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction Compounds of nitrogen. Silicate can play a regulating role in the growth of such organisms that carry shells of silicate. Most important are diatoms, which may form phytoplankton blooms under conditions of sufficient silicate

Jochem, Frank J.

75

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

76

Vitrification of ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Workman, Rhonda Jackson (North Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2014: Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-ion Anode Systems Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes...

78

Supported inorganic membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

Sehgal, Rakesh (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A novel organic–inorganic hybrid with Anderson type polyanions as building blocks: (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}){sub 2}Na(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}[Al(OH){sub 6}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 18}]·6H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Synthesis of a novel inorganic–organic hybrid compound based on Anderson polyoxomolybdates. ? Characterization by X-ray diffraction, IR and UV–Vis spectroscopies of the new compound. ? Potential applications in catalysis, biochemical analysis and electrical conductivity of the organic–inorganic compound. -- Abstract: A new organic–inorganic hybrid compound based on Anderson polyoxomolybdates, (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}){sub 2}Na(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}[Al(OH){sub 6}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 18}]·6H{sub 2}O (1) have been isolated by the conventional solution method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared, ultraviolet spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). This compound crystallized in the triclinic system, space group P?1, with a = 94.635(1) ?, b = 10.958(1) ?, c = 11.602(1) ?, ? = 67.525(1)°, ? = 71.049(1)°, ? = 70.124(1)° and Z = 1. The crystal structures of the compounds exhibit three-dimensional supramolecular assembly based on the extensive hydrogen bonding interactions between organic cations, sodium cations, water molecules and Anderson polyoxoanions. The infrared spectrum fully confirms the X-ray crystal structure and the UV spectrum of the title compound exhibits an absorption peak at 210 nm.

Thabet, Safa, E-mail: safathabet@hotmail.fr [Laboratoire de matériaux et cristallochimie, Département de chimie, Institut Supérieur des Sciences Appliquées et Technologier, Avenue El Mourouj, 5111 Mahdia (Tunisia)] [Laboratoire de matériaux et cristallochimie, Département de chimie, Institut Supérieur des Sciences Appliquées et Technologier, Avenue El Mourouj, 5111 Mahdia (Tunisia); Ayed, Brahim, E-mail: brahimayed@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de matériaux et cristallochimie, Département de chimie, Institut Supérieur des Sciences Appliquées et Technologier, Avenue El Mourouj, 5111 Mahdia (Tunisia)] [Laboratoire de matériaux et cristallochimie, Département de chimie, Institut Supérieur des Sciences Appliquées et Technologier, Avenue El Mourouj, 5111 Mahdia (Tunisia); Haddad, Amor [Laboratoire de matériaux et cristallochimie, Département de chimie, Institut Supérieur des Sciences Appliquées et Technologier, Avenue El Mourouj, 5111 Mahdia (Tunisia)] [Laboratoire de matériaux et cristallochimie, Département de chimie, Institut Supérieur des Sciences Appliquées et Technologier, Avenue El Mourouj, 5111 Mahdia (Tunisia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Chromatography resin support  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

Dobos, James G. (North Augusta, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxbille, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method. 12 figs.

Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Yu, Q.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin from by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method.

Miller, Jan D. (1886 Atkin Ave., Salt Lake City, UT 84106); Yi, Ye (2875 E. Wander Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84117); Yu, Qiang (224 University Village, Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Retrofit for Plastic Resin Driers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETROFIT FOR PLASTIC RESIN DRIERS BABU JOSEPH PH.D. Supervising Engineer Southern California Edison Company, Irwindale, California GEORGE THURO Thuro, & Associates, Costa Mesa, California Plastic resins used in injection molding have... installation of dew point meters and a programmable controller to tailor the regeneration cycle to the required dew point temperature. Background It was estimated that there are about 450 plastic processors in the Southern California Edison service...

Joseph, B.; Thuro, G.

87

Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Guayule resin separation and purification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fraction and reducing the presence of these terpenes to practically non-detectable levels in the polar fraction. A single component, as identified by gas chromatograph (GC) was also effectively extracted from the Texas A&M resins. Saponification..., using an FID Solvent fractionation of the Firestone resin between methanol and hexane was also apparently effective in separating the low molecular weight rubber. Figure 16 and Figure 17 show the gas chromatographs of the bottom phase (fraction "a...

Bajwa, Mohinder P.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

0-D and 1-D inorganic-organic composite polyoxotungstates constructed from in-situ generated monocopper{sup II}-substituted Keggin polyoxoanions and copper{sup II}-organoamine complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combination of in-situ generated monocopper{sup II}-substituted Keggin polyoxoanions with copper{sup II}-organoamine complexes under hydrothermal conditions results in seven inorganic-organic composite polyoxotungstates [Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}][{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}Cl]{r_brace}.3H{sub 2}O (1), {l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)][Cu(en){sub 2}]{sub 2}[{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}Cl]{r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (2), {l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}[Cu(en){sub 2}][{alpha}-XCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{r_brace}.5H{sub 2}O (3/4, X=Si{sup IV}/Ge{sup IV}), {l_brace}[Cu(deta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(deta)(H{sub 2}O)][{alpha}-XCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{r_brace}.5H{sub 2}O (5/6, X=Ge{sup IV}/Si{sup IV}) and [Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(dap){sub 2}][{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sub 2}{r_brace} (7) (en=ethylenediamine, dap=1,2-diaminopropane and deta=diethylenetriamine). 1 is an isolated structure whereas 2 is a 1-D chain structure, but both contain [{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}Cl]{sup 6-} polyoxoanions. 3-6 contain the 1-D linear chains made up of [{alpha}-XCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sup 6-} polyoxoanions in the pattern of -A-A-A- (A=[{alpha}-XCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sup 6-}), while 7 demonstrates the first 1-D zigzag chain constructed from [{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sub 2}{sup 10-} polyoxoanions via [Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+} bridges in the pattern of -A-B-A-B- (A=[{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sub 2}{sup 10-}, B=[Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+}). The successful syntheses of 1-7 can provide some experimental evidences that di-/tri-/hexa-vacant polyoxoanions can be transformed into mono-vacant Keggin polyoxoanions under hydrothermal conditions. - Graphical abstract: A family of inorganic-organic composite polyoxotugstates have been harvested by combination of in-situ generated monocopper{sup II}-substituted Keggin polyoxoanions and copper{sup II}-organoamine complexes based on di-/tri-/hexa-vacant polyoxoanion precursors, CuCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O and organoamines under hydrothermal conditions and structurally characterized by the elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, TGA and single-crystal X-ray crystallography.

Zhao Junwei; Zheng Shoutian [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Yang Guoyu [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)], E-mail: guoyu.yang@hotmail.com

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Dissolution of mega-voids in resin transfer molding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Gas Bubbles in an Epoxy Resin: Evaluating the Inputof Gas Bubbles in an Epoxy Resin: Evaluating the Inputin panel mold Item: Epoxy resin and hardener Manufacturer:

Clark, Paul Nordstrom

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Inorganic Nanoarchitectures by Organic Self Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.2 Photonic device architectures for enhanced light absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 4 Experimental and analytical techniques 59 4... T 1 T 2 T 3 T c T 5 fr e e e n e rg y ? G f A f ’’ A f ’ A b 5 ?m C C’ Figure 1.2: Phase separation of polymer blends. a) Schematic of two chemically distinct ho- mopolymer chains. b) Atomic force microscopy image of a phase separated polymer film...

Guldin, Stefan

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Farmers practices in organic and inorganic fertilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Management and Environmental Protection: a Case Study in Thai Binh Province, Northern Vietnam.0-10.0 ton/ha/year compared with the whole country. Area of high-quality food plants such as potato, tomato

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Phenolic cation-exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear wate solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs/sup +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

Ebra, M.A.; Wallace, R.M.

1982-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

Ebra, Martha A. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

Inorganic membranes: The new industrial revolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separation systems are a vital part of most industrial processes. These systems account for a large fraction of the capital equipment used and the operating costs of industrial processes. Inorganic membranes have the potential for providing separation systems that can significantly reduce both the capital equipment and operating costs. These separation processes include waste management and recycle as well as the primary production of raw materials and products. The authors are rapidly learning to understand the effect of physical and chemical properties on the different transport mechanisms that occur in inorganic membranes. Such understanding can be expected to provide the information needed to design, engineer and manufacture inorganic membranes to produce very high separation factors for almost any separation function. To implement such a revolution, the authors need to organize a unique partnership between the national laboratories, and industry. The university can provide research to understand the materials and transport mechanisms that produce various separations, the national laboratories the development of an economical fabrication and manufacturing capability, and industry the practical understanding of the operational problems required to achieve inplementation.

Fain, D.E. [Martin Merietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Combinatorial screening of inorganic and organometallic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Ross, Debra A. (Mountain Ranch, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Danville, CA); Briceno, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xian-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Preparation and screening of crystalline inorganic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Danville, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Brice{hacek over (n)}o, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xiao-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN CHEMISTRY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange technology is being considered for cesium removal using a polymer resin made of resorcinol formaldehyde that has been engineered into microspheres. The waste under study is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste; therefore, the resin performance was evaluated with actual dissolved salt waste. The ion exchange performance and resin chemistry results are discussed.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternate Methods for Eluting Cesium from Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small-column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removing cesium from the supernate and dissolved salt solutions in the high-level-waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX system could use either crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, non-regenerable sorbent, or spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), a new regenerable resin, to remove cesium from the waste solutions. The baseline method for eluting the cesium from the RF resin uses 15 bed volumes (BV) of 0.5 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The nitric acid eluate, containing the radioactive cesium, would be combined with the sludge from the waste tanks and would be converted into glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The amount of nitric acid that would be used to elute the RF resin, using the current elution protocol, exceeds the capacity of DWPF to destroy the nitrate ions and maintain the required chemical reducing environment in the glass melt. Installing a denitration evaporator at SRS is technically feasible but would add considerable cost to the project. Alternate methods for eluting the resin have been tested, including using lower concentrations of nitric acid, other acids, and changing the flow regimes. About 4 BV of 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} are required to remove the sodium (titrate the resin) and most of the cesium from the resin, so the bulk of the acid used for the baseline elution method removes a very small quantity of cesium from the resin. A summary of the elution methods that have been tested are listed.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Johnson, Heather Lauren [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Extracting inorganics from scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Identifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomaterials for Hybrid Solar Cells Hongjun Xiang* and Su-Huai Wei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomaterials for Hybrid Solar Cells Hongjun Xiang* and Su-Huai Wei and Department of Physics, Fudan UniVersity, Shanghai 200433, China ReceiVed: August 17, 2009 As a newly developed photovoltaic technology, organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells have attracted great interest

Gong, Xingao

104

Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL); St. Martin, Edward (Libertyville, IL); Arora, Michelle (Woodridge, IL); de la Garza, Linda (Woodridge, IL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical...

106

Ortho-ortho aramatic bis maleimide-diamine resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

APO-BMI is a chain-extended with certain diamines to provide thermosetting resins retaining the improved properties of APO-BMI resins, but having increased toughness in the cured resins.

Zupancic, J.J.; Swedo, R.J.; Jamieson, D.R.; Schumacher, E.F.; Buehler, A.J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

NON-ISOTHERMAL INJECTION MOULDING WITH RESIN CURE AND PREFORM DEFORMABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transfer Molding), SRIM (Structural Resin Injection Molding), SCRIMP (Seeman Com- posite Resin Infusion

Preziosi, Luigi

108

Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye Chemistry", 5th Edition, Freeman Press. Available at SU bookstore. The solution manual is optional. (Suggested for CHE611 Students pursuing Inorganic) Huheey, "Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure

Mather, Patrick T.

109

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

110

acrylic resin denture: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

39 ANALYSIS OF CYANATE ESTER RESINS AND GRAPHITE FABRIC FOR USE IN RESIN FILM INFUSION PROCESSING CiteSeer Summary: The objective of this investigation was to characterize...

111

Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC) Laboratories »OrganicOrganization

113

Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Ft. Collins, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Planning study, resin and debris removal system. Three Mile Island nuclear station unit 2 make-up and purification demineralizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various methods were evaluated to remove the resin and debris from the makeup and purification demineralizers. There are two preferred concepts. The existing waste disposal system should be utilized if some contamination of currently clean lines is acceptable. A skid mounted, temporary, upflow/downflow system should be utilized if the demineralizers and associated piping are to be cleaned to the maximum extent practicable with minimum contamination of the existing system. Both methods provide for removal of complex organic compounds from the effluent and elution of cesium from the resin. The resin and debris will be diluted with concrete to be disposed of in accordance with 10CFR61 burial limits.

Renkey, E.J.; Jenkins, W.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing the oxygenated simulant into the feed tank. The dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of the recirculating simulant was monitored, and the amount of oxygen that reacted with the resin was determined from the change in the DO concentration of the recirculating simulant solution. Prior to hydraulic testing the resin for runs 2 and 3 was covered with the simulant solution and irradiated in a spent fuel element at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Both batches of resin were irradiated to a total gamma dose of 177 Mrad, but the resin for run 2 reached a maximum temperature during irradiation of 51 C, while the resin for run 3 reached a temperature of 38 C. The different temperatures were the result of the operating status of HFIR at the time of the irradiation and were not part of the test plan; however, the results clearly show the impact of the higher-temperature exposure during irradiation. The flow rate and pressure drop data from the test loop runs show that irradiating the RF resin reduces both the void fraction and the permeability of the resin bed. The mechanism for the reduction in permeability is not clear because irradiation increases the particle size of the resin beads and makes them deform less under pressure. Microscopic examination of the resin beads shows that they are all smooth regular spheres and that irradiation or oxygen uptake did not change the shape of the beads. The resin reacts rapidly with DO in the simulant solution, and the reaction with oxygen reduces the permeability of a bed of new resin by about 10% but has less impact on the permeability of irradiated resin. Irradiation increases the toughness of the resin beads, probably by initiating cross-linking reactions in them. Oxygen uptake reduces the crush strength of both new and irradiated resin; however, the pressures that caused the beads to crush are much higher than would be expected during the operation of an ion exchange column. There was no visible evidence of broken beads in any of the resin samples taken from the test loop. Reaction with oxygen red

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Inorganic Nanocrystal Bulk Heterojunctions - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Inorganic Nanocrystal Bulk Heterojunctions Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This...

120

Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructure Building Blocks...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanostructure Building Blocks to Octahedral Superstructures – A True Template-Free Self Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructure Building Blocks to Octahedral...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Chemically stabilized ionomers containing inorganic fillers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ionomeric polymers that are chemically stabilized and contain inorganic fillers are prepared, and show reduced degradation. The ionomers care useful in membranes and electrochemical cells.

Roelofs, Mark Gerrit

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fire Safety Tests for Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping, which may be overly bounding based on the fire performance data from the manufacturer of the ion exchange resin selected for use at the WTP. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), following the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedures, through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). For some tests, the ASTM standard procedures were not entirely appropriate or practical for the SRF resin material, so the procedures were modified and deviations from the ASTM standard procedures were noted. This report summarizes the results of fire safety tests performed and reported by SwRI. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. All as-received SwRI reports are attached to this report in the Appendix. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each ASTM standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Peterson, Reid A.; Schweiger, Michael J.

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

DESCRIPTIVE TEXT SEA WATER INORGANIC CARBON DATABASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTIVE TEXT SEA WATER INORGANIC CARBON DATABASE for the CARBON DIOXIDE INFORMATION OF OCEANOGRAPHY (SIO) I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION The database consists of tables presenting oceanic inorganic carbon, titration (total) alkalinity (database abbreviation: "ALK"), and the 13 C / 12 C isotopic ratio

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali metal-doped organic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

appeared to be rich in alkali... CI), inorganic grains finely dispersed in the organic structure of these materials or as cations associated... with the organic structure...

127

Rational design of hybrid organic solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we will present a novel design for a nano-structured organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic material that will address current challenges in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic-based solar cell materials. ...

Lentz, Levi (Levi Carl)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

acids inorganic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for inorganic synthesis MIT - DSpace Summary: Thin film nanocomposites consisting of inorganic matter embedded within a soft polymeric matrix on the nanometer length scale are an...

129

Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants...

130

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

131

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

132

All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in Chemistry. All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in...

133

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues surrounding nuclear power production and waste...

134

Charge transfer and reactivity of n[pi]* and [pi][pi]* organic triplets, including anthraquinonesulfonates, in interactions with inorganic anions. A comparative study based on classical Marcus theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of rates and radical yields in charge-transfer (CT) interactions between organic triplets and simple anions has been extended to triplets of 1-sulfonate, 1,5-disulfonate, and 2,6-disulfonate derivatives of 9,10-anthraquinone and of fluorescein dianion. New information is also presented on 1,4-naphthoquinone. For comparison, H-atom-transfer reactions of the anthraquinone triplets with 2-propanol were also studied. The new triplet-anion results, together with many previously reported data, are analyzed in the framework of a simplified Marcus theory by which the activation energy of formation of the pure charge-transfer exciplex, [Delta]G[sup [double dagger

Loeff, I.; Rabani, J.; Treinin, A. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)); Linschitz, H. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States))

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

Viscoelastic Properties of an Epoxy Resin during Cure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Viscoelastic Properties of an Epoxy Resin during Cure DANIEL J. O'BRIEN1 Department of Mechanical: The cure dependent relaxation modulus of an epoxy resin was investigated over the entire range of cure as well as thermal asymmetry can result in uneven curing of the part. Second, epoxy resins can shrink

Mather, Patrick T.

136

Research Article Kinetic Study of Epoxy Resin Decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Article Kinetic Study of Epoxy Resin Decomposition in Near-Critical Water A diglycidyl ether type epoxy resin from bisphenol A, E-51, was cured by methyl- hexahydrophthalic anhydride (Me, hydrogenolysis, and alcoholysis [13­16] have been reported to decompose epoxy resin into its original mono- mers

Guo, John Zhanhu

137

Polygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiwalled inorganic nanotubes with circular cross sections must have either an incoherent interface or a large amount of strain. However, nanotubes with a polygonal cross section can have a coherent interface with ...

Tibbetts, Kevin

138

February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume 26 Number 3 February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry 0 Copyright 1987 by the American uranium phthalocyanine derivatives have been crystallographically (I) (a) Kasuga, K.; Tsutsui, M. Coord

Girolami, Gregory S.

139

NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same before the current treatment (759 ppm dry) and after treatment (745 ppm dry or {approx}248 ppm wet). Treatment of the second batch of resin (No.23408) was very successful. Chloride concentration decreased from 120,000 ppm dry to an average of 44 ppm dry or {approx}15ppm wet, which easily passes the 250 ppm wet criterion. Per guidance from HB Line Engineering, SRNL blended Batch 80302 resin with Batch P9059 resin which had been treated previously by ResinTech to remove chloride. The chloride concentrations for the two drums of Batch P9059 were 248 ppm dry ({approx}83 ppm wet) {+-}22.8% and 583 ppm dry ({approx}194 ppm wet) {+-} 11.8%. The blended resin was packaged in five gallon buckets.

Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.; Leishear, R.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40 to 365/sup 0/C to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

Snowden, T.M. Jr.; Wells, B.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Destruction of organic wastes by ammonium peroxydisulfate with electrolytic regeneration of the oxidant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is reported concerning a new aqueous process for oxidative destruction of solid- and liquid organic wastes. This process uses acidified ammonium peroxydisulfate and operates at ambient pressure and at 80- to 100 {degrees}C. The oxidant may be efficiently regenerated by electrolysis of the sulfate by-product at Pt anodes, even in the presence of organic and inorganic contaminants expected to be entrained in the cycle. Integral rate constants were determined for the oxidation of 25 diverse organic compounds at low (50 ppm) concentrations through fixed-time experiments with excess oxidant and a Pt wire catalyst. For high initial concentrations, uncatalyzed mineralization rates were measured for waste surrogates including kerosene, triethylamine, ion exchange resin, oxalic acid, trinitrotoluene, and cellulose. A packed bed reactor was tested with ethylene glycol, with offgas analysis by mass spectroscopy. Rate data extrapolate to throughputs of approximately 200 kg/m{sub 3}-day. The process may benefit the destruction of highly toxic or specialized industrial wastes as well as the organic fraction of mixed wastes.

Cooper, J.F.; Wang, J.F.; Krueger, R.; King, K.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Inorganic-organic hybrid structure: Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of a cobalt phosphite-oxalate, [C{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 12}][Co{sub 4}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrothermal reaction of a mixture of cobalt (II) oxalate, phosphorous acid, piperazine and water at 150{sup o}C for 96h followed by heating at 180{sup o}C for 24h gave rise to a new inorganic-organic hybrid solid, [C{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 12}][Co{sub 4}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}], I. The structure consists of edge-shared CoO{sub 6} octahedra forming a [Co{sub 2}O{sub 10}] dimers that are connected by HPO{sub 3} and C{sub 2}O{sub 4} units forming a three-dimensional structure with one-dimensional channels. The amine molecules are positioned within these channels. The oxalate units have a dual role of connecting within the plane of the layer as well as out of the plane. Magnetic susceptibility measurement shows the compound orders antiferromagnetically at low temperature (T{sub N}=22K). Crystal data: I, monoclinic, space group=P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14). a=7.614(15), b=7.514(14), c=17.750(3)A, {beta}=97.351(3){sup o}, V=1007.30(3)A{sup 3}, Z=2, {rho}{sub calc}=2.466g/cm{sup 3}, {mu}{sub (MoK{alpha}}{sub )}=3.496mm{sup -1}, R{sub 1}=0.0310 and wR{sub 2}=0.0807 data [I>2{sigma}(I)].

Mandal, Sukhendu [Framework Solids Laboratory, Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Natarajan, Srinivasan [Framework Solids Laboratory, Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)]. E-mail: snatarajan@sscu.iisc.ernet.in

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following investigations were performed: (1) batch mode screening of eleven(11) commercially available resins and selection of three candidate resins for further evaluation in a fixed-bed setup. (2) Process variables study using three candidate resins in the fixed-bed setup and selection of the ``best`` resin for process economics development. (3) Exhaustion efficiency and solution concentration were found to be inversely related necessitating a trade-off between the resin cost versus the cost of evaporation/concentration of ensuing effluents. (4) Higher concentration of the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} form of active sites over less active CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} form of sites in the resin was believed to be the main reason for the observed increase in the equilibrium capacity of the resin at an elevated static CO{sub 2}-pressure. This Increase in capacity was found to level off around 80--120 psig range. The increase in CO{sub 2}-pressure, however, did not appear to affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics. (5) In the fixed-bed mode, the solution concentration was found to affect the equilibrium capacity of candidate resins. Their relationship was well satisfied by the Langmuir type non-linear equilibrium isotherm. Alternatively, the effect of solution concentration on overall ion-exchange kinetics varied from resin to resin. (6) Product inhibition effect on the resin was observed as an initial increase followed by a significant decrease in the resin`s equilibrium capacity for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} as the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} molar ratio in the solution was increased from 0 to 1.0. This ratio, however, did not affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics.

Sheth, A C; Dharmapurikar, R; Strevel, S D

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Direct vitrification of Fermi 2 bead resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants produce large quantities of spent ion exchange resins from primary and secondary side water treatment systems. Detroit Edison`s experience with vitrification of bead resin was conducted at Catholic University with the objective of using the DuraMelter{trademark} vitrification technology to perform both for volume reduction and to create a stable glass waste form. Detroit Edison had been without disposal capability since November 1990, and very minimal progress had been made in Michigan to build a radioactive disposal site. Encouraging results from non-radioactive tests conducted on a DuraMelter{trademark} 10 system in January and February 1995 by Duratek aided in our decision to use this process. Our experience is the subject of this report.

Weber, B.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE WITH SPHERICAL RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN EXPERIMENTAL TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal. The spherical form of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) is being evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake waste at SRS, which is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. The sRF performance with SRS waste was evaluated in two phases: resin batch contacts and IX column testing with both simulated and actual dissolved salt waste. The tests, equipment, and results are discussed.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is described from its power conversion efficiency (PCE).PCE of a photovoltaic device is determined from the currentPower conversion efficiency (PCE) of all of the fabricated

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic/Organic Hybrid Si Negative...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

calendar life Cost: High manufacture cost (Research in high energy system) Partners LBNL (Vince Battaglia, Venkat Srinivasan, Robert Kostecki, Wanli Yang, Andrew Minor,...

149

Degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants by zero valent iron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Feo. The only product observed in the reduction of 2,4-DNT was 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT). The 2,4-DAT produced accounted for 83-100% and only 42-54% of the initial mass of 2@4.DNT under anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. Since no degradation of 2...

Malla, Deepak Babu

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and their influence on photovoltaic cells, Solar EnergyPhotodiodes, and Photovoltaic Cells, Applied Physics LettersHeeger, Polymer Photovoltaic Cells - Enhanced Efficiencies

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fabrication of organic and inorganic nanoparticles using electrospray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) porous cups were made using the electrospray technique. However, the average diameter of these cup structures was micron scale and the difficulty to make nano scale cups was also described. The setup for the experiments...

Deotare, Parag Bhaskar

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 Figure 1-3 World energy consumption (in British Thermal5 Figure 1-4 World energy consumption (in Btu) according toforms and (b) world energy consumption (in Btu) according to

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Pattern Replication in Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 4 Experimental Techniques 51 4.1 Atomic Force Microscopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 4.2 Magnetic Force Microscopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 4.3 X-Ray Di#11;raction... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 4.6 Absorption Spectroscopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 4.7 Device Characterization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 4.7.1 External Quantum E#14;ciency...

Nedelcu, Mihaela

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010). [41] National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL),to conventional materials, Renewable Energy 36 (10), 2753-cell's performance, Renewable Energy 28 (7), 1097-1104 (

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells based on a metal-freeAbsorbing Dyes[70]: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) arematerial. The dye-sensitized solar cell depends on a

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facilities. Worldwide, hydroelectricity and wind are the twothe same with the hydroelectricity power plants; instead of

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Solidification/stabilization of organics and inorganics. Engineering bulletin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering bulletin on solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate hazardous waste into a solid material of high structural integrity. Encapsulation involves either fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Stabilization refers to techniques that treat hazardous waste by converting it into a less soluble, mobile, or toxic form. Solidification/Stabilization processes utilize one or both of these techniques. The bulletin provides information on the technology applicability, the technology limitations, a description of the technology, the types of residuals produced, site requirements, the latest performance data, the status of the technology, and sources of further information.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Organic and Inorganic Aerosol Below-Cloud Scavenging by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations, with an average gravimetric PM1.0 of 8.2 ( 1.6 µg m-3 and an average Fourier transform infrared-rinsing behavior was unaffected by source type. The aerosol OM was hydrophilic throughout the sampling period the description of aerosol lifetimes in global models. Introduction Wet and dry deposition of aerosol particles

Russell, Lynn

159

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing the cost for photovoltaic devices by introducing aPhotovoltaic Cell Materials Different materials display different efficiencies and have different costs.photovoltaic devices have recently drawn tremendous attention because of their technological advantages for actualization of large-area and cost

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Directed Organization of Functional Materials at Inorganic-Macromolecular  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel prices topDirectCollapse

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NSF/DOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOEToward aInnovationHydrogenNRG Energy, Inc.NSF

162

Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOEToward aInnovationHydrogenNRGA C TTechnologies | Department

163

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy sources (Figure 1-6b). Solar Energy: Solar energy isSolar energy is one of the major alternative energy sourcessources and consumption according to regions. Finally, the current situation in solar energy

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Simulation of the vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process and the development of light-weight composite bridging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

versus time constitutive model for epoxy resin at fixedconstitutive model for epoxy resin at fixed temperature.dependence, the viscosity of epoxy resin is also dependent

Robinson, Marc J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Crystallization and functionality of inorganic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, we briefly summarized our recent work on the studies of crystallization and functionality of inorganic materials. On the basis of the chemical bonding theory of single crystal growth, we can quantitatively simulate Cu{sub 2}O crystallization processes in solution system. We also kinetically controlled Cu{sub 2}O crystallization process in the reduction solution route. Lithium ion battery and supercapacitor performances of some oxides such as Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnO{sub 2} were shown to elucidate the important effect of crystallization on functionality of inorganic materials. This work encourages us to create novel functionalities through the study of crystallization of inorganic materials, which warrants more chances in the field of functional materials.

Xue, Dongfeng, E-mail: dongfeng@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Keyan [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Jun [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, 411105 (China); Sun, Congting; Chen, Kunfeng [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Machine for applying a two component resin to a roadway surface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable machine for spraying two component resins onto a roadway, the machine having a pneumatic control system, including means for purging the machine of mixed resin with air and then removing remaining resin with solvent. Interlocks prevent contamination of solvent and resin, and mixed resin can be purged in the event of a power failure.

Huszagh, D.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

amberlite irc-718 resins: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Myslinski 1997-01-01 16 Team 1: Design of Carbon Fiber Resin Composites for Improved Materials Science Websites Summary: composite material with optimum fatigue performance. This...

168

amberlite xad-4 resin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Myslinski 1997-01-01 18 Team 1: Design of Carbon Fiber Resin Composites for Improved Materials Science Websites Summary: composite material with optimum fatigue performance. This...

169

amberlite xad-16 resin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Myslinski 1997-01-01 16 Team 1: Design of Carbon Fiber Resin Composites for Improved Materials Science Websites Summary: composite material with optimum fatigue performance. This...

170

alkyd resins: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

German, Donovan P. 17 Team 1: Design of Carbon Fiber Resin Composites for Improved Materials Science Websites Summary: composite material with optimum fatigue performance. This...

171

amberlite xad-7 resin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Myslinski 1997-01-01 16 Team 1: Design of Carbon Fiber Resin Composites for Improved Materials Science Websites Summary: composite material with optimum fatigue performance. This...

172

Resin-assisted Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing Proteolytic Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proteolytic processing is a ubiquitous, irreversible posttranslational modification that plays an important role in cellular regulation in all living organisms. Herein we report a resin-assisted positive selection method for specifically enriching protein N-terminal peptides to facilitate the characterization of proteolytic processing events by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In this approach, proteins are initially reduced and alkylated and their lysine residues are converted to homoarginines. Then, protein N-termini are selectively converted to reactive thiol groups. We demonstrate that these sequential reactions were achieved with nearly quantitative efficiencies. Thiol-containing N-terminal peptides are then captured (>98% efficiency) by a thiol-affinity resin, a significant improvement over the traditional avidin/biotin enrichment. Application to cell lysates of Aspergillus niger, a filamentous fungus of interest for biomass degradation, enabled the identification of 1672 unique protein N-termini and proteolytic cleavage sites from 690 unique proteins.

Kim, Jong Seo; Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Baker, Scott E.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

173

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry Syracuse University The Department of Chemistry at Syracuse University invites applications for a tenure track faculty position at the Assistant Professor level in inorganic chemistry with specialization in materials chemistry (broadly defined

Doyle, Robert

174

HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit.

Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined July 31, 2013 The journal Inorganic Chemistry published a special Forum issue on the role of inorganic chemistry in nuclear energy. John Gordon and Argonne National Laboratory collaborated on the work. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy and the Office

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - acp resin composites Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RTM, Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer... Molding (VARTM), Seemann Composites Resin Infusion Molding Process (SCRIMP), has emerged as an important... 1 Experimental...

178

Development of Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films and Membranes for Low-Energy Gas Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are hybrid organic-inorganic micro- or mesoporous materials that exhibit regular crystalline lattices with rigid pore structures. Chemical functionalization of the organic linkers in the structures of MOFs affords...

McCarthy, Michael

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

179

Wood ants use resin to protect themselves against pathogens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood ants use resin to protect themselves against pathogens Michel Chapuisat1,*, Anne Oppliger2. Wood ants, Formica paralugubris, commonly bring back pieces of solidified coniferous resin of larvae exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. These results show that wood ants

Lehmann, Laurent

180

Measuring Asphaltenes and Resins, and Dipole Moment in Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Asphaltenes and Resins, and Dipole Moment in Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual Earth Science, Palo Alto, CA 94306 A petroleum fluid can be di®ided into three types of species: asphaltenes, resins or mildly polar. The interaction among these species strongly affect asphaltene precipitation from petroleum

Firoozabadi, Abbas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Method and solvent composition for regenerating an ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and composition for removing perchlorate from a highly selective ion exchange resin is disclosed. The disclosed approach comprises treating the resin in a solution of super critical or liquid carbon dioxide and one or more quaternary ammonium chloride surfactant compounds.

Even, William R. (Livermore, CA); Irvin, David J. (Livermore, CA); Irvin, Jennifer A. (Livermore, CA); Tarver, Edward E. (Livermore, CA); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Wang, James C. F. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) has been directed to further develop an anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept. It is necessary that the soluble sulfates of alkali metal sorbents be desulfurized (regenerated) and recycled to make regenerative flue gas desulfurization options more attractive. In order to achieve this, a low-temperature, low-cost desulfurization process to reactivate spent alkali metal sorbents is necessary. UTSI's anion-exchange, resin-based concept is believed to satisfy this requirement. Investigators will perform the following investigations: screening of commercially available resins; process variables study and improving resin performance; optimization of resin-regeneration; evaluation of performance enhancers; development of Best-Process Schematic and related economics; and planing for proof-of-concept (POC) scale testing. 2 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Ft. Collins, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. [Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading B of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube CNT composites to shock wave compression. For phenolic resin, our strain hardening. Shock loading of the CNT-resin composites is applied parallel or perpendicular

Goddard III, William A.

188

Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using distributed sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using the Liquid Resin Infusion process under industrial environment is proposed. To detect the resin front; Liquid Resin Infusion. #12;2 1. Introduction Recently, Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes have been

Boyer, Edmond

189

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

190

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C[sub 3] or larger.

Lockridge, J.E.; Fritz, J.S.

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

acid chelating resin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

unsaturated polyester resin and provides a (more) Kayatin, Matthew J. 2012-01-01 108 Boric acid reversibly inhibits the second step of pre-mRNA splicing Noam Shomron, Gil Ast...

193

applied inorganic chemistry: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bus.Admin.Public Admin. Chemical Engineering Chem. Eng.Comp. Sci. Chemistry Civil Engineering Heller, Barbara 6 Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined...

194

Evaluating guayule resin fractions for mutagenicity and toxicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATING GUAYULE RESIN FRACTIONS FOR NUTAGENICITY AND TOXICITY A Thesis by DONALD BAKER AVIRETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene EVALUATING GUAYULE RESIN FRACTIONS FOR MUTAGENICITY AND TOXICITY A Thesis by DONALD BAKER AVIRETT Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Avirett, Donald Baker

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Herman E. (Santa Fe, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Advanced Resin Cleaning System (ARCS) at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam generation system in-core components can undergo serious material degradation by a variety of corrosion-related phenomena. These phenomena are largely controlled by boiler water (i.e. reactor water) chemistry which is strongly impacted by the performance of the condensate system mixed bed ion exchange units. In Boiling Water Reactors (BWR), the mixed bed ion exchange units not only provide protection from ionic contaminants, but also remove insoluble corrosion products by filtration/adsorption. These insoluble corrosion products removed by the ion exchange units must then be periodically cleaned from the resin bed by some process external to the BWR primary water loop. A unique resin cleaning process called the {open_quotes}Advanced Resin Cleaning System{close_quotes} (ARCS) was developed in the late 1980`s by members of CENTEC-XXI, located in Santa Clara, CA. This system, which has been successfully operated for several years at a Pressurized Water Reactor is highly efficient for removal of both insoluble corrosion products and anion/cation resin fines, and generates significantly less waste water than other cleaning methods. The ARCS was considered the most attractive method for meeting the demanding and costly resin cleaning needs of a BWR. A {open_quotes}Tailored Collaboration{close_quotes} project was initiated between EPRI, Entergy Operations (Grand Gulf Station), and CENTEC-XXI to demonstrate the {open_quotes}Advanced Resin Cleaning System{close_quotes} in a BWR.

Asay, R.H.; Earls, J.E.; Naughton, M.D. [Centec 21, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the current grant (FG22-90PC90309), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) will carry out the necessary bench scale experiments to further develop it anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. In particular, it is planned to screen commercially available resins and then carry out process optimization work with three selected resins. Further optimization of the resin regeneration step as well as evaluation of the effect of various performance enhancers will then be carried out with one selected resin. A process schematic, to be developed based on the bench scale results, will be used to estimate the related economics. Some limited scope testing will also be carried out using the spent-seed and sorbent materials obtained from both the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and the in-duct sorbent injection pilot scale facilities. During this reporting period, 90% of the planned batch mode screening experiments for the eleven samples of candidate resins were completed. Preliminary evaluation of the resulting data is continuing in order to select a smaller number (3--4) of samples for screening in the fixed-bed setup. The installation of the semi-automated fixed-bed setup is about 70% complete and shakedown experiments will be started in 3--4 weeks. Progress made in relation to these activities is presented below. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

2013 INORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (MARCH 3-8, 2013 - HOTEL GALVEZ, GALVESTON TX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2013 Gordon Conference on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms will present cutting-edge research on the molecular aspects of inorganic reactions involving elements from throughout the periodic table and state-of-the art techniques that are used in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, such as homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, metallobiochemistry, electron-transfer in energy reactions, polymerization, nitrogen fixation, green chemistry, oxidation, solar conversion, alkane functionalization, organotransition metal chemistry, and computational chemistry. The talks will cover themes of current interest including energy, materials, and bioinorganic chemistry. Sections cover: Electron-Transfer in Energy Reactions; Catalytic Polymerization and Oxidation Chemistry; Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Catalysts; Metal-Organic Chemistry and its Application in Synthesis; Green Energy Conversion;Organometallic Chemistry and Activation of Small Molecules; Advances in Kinetics Modeling and Green Chemistry; Metals in Biology and Disease; Frontiers in Catalytic Bond Activation and Cleavage.

Abu-Omar, Mahdi M.

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Inorganic Nanotubes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803447  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Angewandte Chemie Inorganic Nanotubes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803447 Core­Shell PbI2@WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes from Capillary Wetting** Ronen Kreizman, Sung You Hong, Jeremy Sloan, Ronit Popovitz-Biro, Ana cavity. Capillarity has been shown to drive the wetting and filling of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

Davis, Ben G.

202

2012 ELECTRONIC PROCESSES IN ORGANIC MATERIALS GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JUNE 2-8, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This meeting focuses on the latest progress and challenges regarding organic electronics devices, artificial light-harvesting systems, and inorganic/organic hybrid nanoscale systems and especially on the synergy between these fields.

Eisele, Dorthe

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Theory and simulation of amorphous organic electronic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electronic properties of amorphous organic thin films are of great interest due to their application in devices such as light emitting devices, solar cells, photodetectors, and lasers. Compared to conventional inorganic ...

Madigan, Conor (Conor Francis), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite: Chemistry 242,syntheticmethodology,mod- ernsyntheticreactions,protectinggroups,naturalprod- uctssynthesis,andcombinatorialchemistry.France. Spring Chemistry 350 (3)--Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisites: Chemistry 250, 252, and 262. Anintro

Dresden, Gregory

205

Polymerization of trialkoxysilanes. Effect of the organic substituent on the formation of gels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrolysis and condensation of trialkoxysilanes, R-Si(OR{prime}){sub 3}, generally leads to the formation of silsesquioxane oligomers and polymers. These polymers are composed of a monomer repeat unit, [R-SiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n}, with a single silicon atom attached to other repeat units in the polymer through one to three siloxane bonds. The remaining substituent is an organic group attached to the silicon through a silicon-carbon single bond. Silsesquioxanes have been the subject of intensive study in the past and are becoming important again as a vehicle for introducing organic functionalities into hybrid organic-inorganic materials through sol-gel processing. Despite all of this interest, there has not been a systematic study of the ability of trialkoxysilanes to form gels through the sol-gel process. In fact, it has been noted that silsesquioxanes are generally isolated as soluble resins rather than the highly crosslinked network polymers (gels) one would expect from a tri-functional monomer. In this study, the authors have examined the sol-gel chemistry of a variety of trialkoxysilanes with different organic substituents (R = H, Me, Et, n-Pr, i-Pr, n-Bu, i-Bu, t-Bu, n-octadecyl, n-dodecyl, cyclohexyl, vinyl, phenyl, benzyl, phenethyl), with methoxide or ethoxide substituents on silicon, at varying monomer concentrations ranging up to neat monomer, and with different catalysts (HCl, NaOH, formic acid, fluoride). Gels were prepared from tetramethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane at identical concentrations for purposes of comparison.

Loy, D.A.; Baugher, B.M.; Schneider, D.A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

Fehrmann, Henning [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION BASED ON ORGANIC AND ORGANIC/INORGANIC HYBRID SOLAR CELLS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A Thesis Submitted to the School of Graduate Studies of Addis Ababa University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Of Doctor of… (more)

ASSEFA, SERGAWIE

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthe U.S.Solar Company

209

Research and development of hydrogen separation technology with inorganic membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane technology has long been expected to provide new economical methods for industrial and waste management processes. At this time, the only commercially valuable inorganic membranes are the ultra filters derived from the French process that was used to produce the barrier for the French Gaseous Diffusion Plants. But these membranes are very expensive and have limited areas of application. Over the past fifteen years, scientists now in the Inorganic Membrane Technology Laboratory (IMTL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have developed theories and processes for inorganic membranes that can be used to design and produce inorganic membranes for a very broad range of applications. A part of the fabrication process is an adaptive spinoff from the still classified process used to manufacture barriers for the U.S. Gaseous Diffusion Process. Although that part of the process is classified, it is a very flexible and adaptable process and it can be used with a broad range of materials. With the theories and design capabilities developed in the last fifteen years, this new adaptive manufacturing technology can be used to manufacture commercial inorganic membranes that are not useful for the separation of uranium isotopes and they have little or no relation to the barriers that were used to separate uranium isotopes. The development and deployment of such inorganic membranes can be very beneficial to U.S. industry. Inorganic membranes can be specifically designed and manufactured for a large number of different applications. Such membranes can greatly improve the efficiency of a broad range of industrial processes and provide new technology for waste management. These inorganic membranes have the potential for major energy savings and conservation of energy. They can provide the means for significant improvements in the competitiveness of US Industry and improve the economy and health and welfare of the nation.

Fain, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced resin cleaning Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new composite... at this world-class research center is the Composites Pressure Resin Infusion System or ComPRIS (patent pending... ) that employs applied pressure to infuse resin...

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - adhesive composite resin Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

35 40 m2) G1 G2 GT G1 resin crack blue 25 30 ase Rate (J... Schematic of the resin infusion ... Source: Montana State University, Chemical and Biological Engineering Department,...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid exchange resins Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 38 2114 J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 2114-2180 FKN mechanism of the BZ reaction (expanded "Oregonator") Summary: resin. A thin layer of ferroin-loaded resin beads covered...

213

Investigating the Use of Ion Exchange Resins for Processing Biodiesel Feedstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion exchange resins, commonly used in water treatment, demonstrate promise for the production of biodiesel from biomass feedstocks. The goal of this presented PhD research is to investigate novel uses of ion exchange resins for processing biodiesel...

Jamal, Yousuf 1973-

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

Janke, Christopher J. (Oliver Springs, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under DOE Grant No. FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI's anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements.

Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.; Dharmapurikar, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

MODELING AND SIMULATION OF SOLID FLUIDIZATION IN A RESIN COLUMN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present work is to model the resin particles within the column during fluidization and sedimentation processes using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The calculated results will help interpret experimental results, and they will assist in providing guidance on specific details of testing design and establishing a basic understanding of particle’s hydraulic characteristics within the column. The model is benchmarked against the literature data and the test data (2003) conducted at Savannah River Site (SRS). The paper presents the benchmarking results and the modeling predictions of the SRS resin column using the improved literature correlations applicable for liquid-solid granular flow.

Lee, S.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Regeneration of anion exchange resins by catalyzed electrochemical reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Anion exchange resins sorbed with perchlorate may be regenerated by a combination of chemical reduction of perchlorate to chloride using a reducing agent and an electrochemical reduction of the oxidized reducing agent. Transitional metals including Ti, Re, and V are preferred chemical reagents for the reduction of perchlorate to chloride. Complexing agents such as oxalate are used to prevent the precipitation of the oxidized Ti(IV) species, and ethyl alcohol may be added to accelerate the reduction kinetics of perchlorate. The regeneration may be performed by continuously recycling the regenerating solution through the resin bed and an electrochemical cell so that the secondary waste generation is minimized.

Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES.............................................................................................................7 Composite Materials...................................................................................................7 Material Properties

220

Interfacial Coatings for Inorganic Composite Insulation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic (ceramic) insulation materials are known to have good radiation resistance and desirable electrical and mechanical properties at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. In addition, ceramic materials can withstand the high-temperature reaction cycle used with Nb3Sn superconductor materials, allowing the insulation to be co-processed with the superconductor in a wind-and-react fabrication process. A critical aspect in the manufacture of ceramic-based insulation systems is the deposition of suitable fiber-coating materials that prevent chemical reaction of the fiber and matrix materials, and thus provide a compliant interface between the fiber and matrix, which minimizes the impact of brittle failure of the ceramic matrix. Ceramic insulation produced with CTD-FI-202 fiber interfaces have been found to exhibit very high shear and compressive strengths. However, this material is costly to produce. Thus, the goal of the present work is to evaluate alternative, lower-cost materials and processes. A variety of oxide and polyimide coatings were evaluated, and one commercially available polyimide coating has been shown to provide some improvement as compared to uncoated and de-sized S2 glass.

Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Stewart, M. W.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Kano, K. S. [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO, 80026 (United States)

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Small angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies of carbons prepared using inorganic templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering analyses of carbons derived from organic-loaded inorganic template materials, used as anodes in lithium ion cells, have been performed. Two clays were used as templates to load the organic precursors, pillared montmorrillonite (PILC), a layered silicate clay whose sheets have been permanently propped open by sets of thermally stable molecular props, and sepiolite, a natural channeled clay. Five different organic precursors were used to load the PILC: pyrene, styrene, pyrene/trioxane copolymer, ethylene and propylene, whereas only propylene and ethylene were used to load sepiolite. Pyrolysis took place at 700{degrees}C under nitrogen. Values such as hole radius, fractal dimension, cutoff length and density of the final carbons will be compared as a function of the clay and carbon precursors.

Sandi, G.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Curing and post-curing luminescence in an epoxy resin O. Gallot-lavalle 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Curing and post-curing luminescence in an epoxy resin O. Gallot-lavallée 1 *, G. Teyssedre 1 , C of Applied Polymer Science Keywords: Epoxy resin, Luminescence, Thermo-stimulation, Chemiluminescence, Post epoxy resin samples are heated in air. This phenomenon is very sensitive to the nature of the atmosphere

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

Optical microstructure and viscosity enhancement for an epoxy resin matrix containing multiwall carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical microstructure and viscosity enhancement for an epoxy resin matrix containing multiwall of multiwall carbon nanotubes MWCNTs suspended in an epoxy resin matrix. The base epoxy resin was found;pended in an essentially Newtonian epoxy matrix. The particular carbon nanotubes con- sidered

Elliott, James

224

Non-isothermal preform infiltration during the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the infiltration of a rectangular carbon fiber based preform with the NBV-800 epoxy resin and to optimize the VARTMNon-isothermal preform infiltration during the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM-element model is developed to analyze the infiltration of a fiber preform with resin under non- isothermal

Grujicic, Mica

225

Space charge behaviour in an epoxy resin: the influence of fillers, temperature and electrode material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Space charge behaviour in an epoxy resin: the influence of fillers, temperature and electrode material Short title: Space charge in an epoxy resin O. Gallot-lavallée 1 *, G. Teyssedre 1 , C. Laurent 1 the possibility of performing space charge measurement on filled epoxy resin despite the piezoelectricity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Comparing the Degree of Exothermic Polymerization in Commonly Used Acrylic and Provisional Composite Resins for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composite Resins for Intraoral Appliances CA Rice, DVM; Jessica Riehl, DVM;Karl Broman, PhD;Jason W. Soukup, DVM; William R. Gengler, DVM Summary: The use ofdental acrylics and composite resins in veteri- naryylics and composite resins produce an exothermic reaction during the polymerization ptvcess. The aim q

Broman, Karl W.

227

Liquid Resin Infusion process monitoring with superimposed Fibre Bragg Grating sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Liquid Resin Infusion process monitoring with superimposed Fibre Bragg Grating sensor Emmanuel Resin Infusion (LRI) , with the FBG/LPG sensor embedded in a composite part. Dielectric analysis the material and the structure. Among the various composite manufacturing processes, Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Numerical and experimental analyses of resin infusion manufacturing processes of composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Numerical and experimental analyses of resin infusion manufacturing processes of composite SAS, 38630 Les Avenières, France Abstract: Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) processes are promising between the deformations of the porous medium and the resin flow during infusion [1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

229

Terebinth resin in antiquity: possible uses in the Late Bronze Age Aegean region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The remains of an estimated one metric ton of terebinth resin, the yellowish, semi-fluid, aromatic resin of a Pistacia tree, were recently discovered on the Late Bronze Age shipwreck site at Uluburun, Turkey. The resin was carried in an estimated...

Peachey, Claire Patricia

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual and Abbas different petroleum fluids. Various resins are added to three different petroleum fluids to measure of precipitation. However, addition of resins to a petroleum fluid increases the amount of precipitated asphaltenes

Firoozabadi, Abbas

231

The synthesis of inorganic semiconductor nanocrystalline materials for the purpose of creating hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) can be synthesized to efficiently emit light from the ultraviolet, across the entire visible spectrum, and into the near infrared. This is now possible due ...

Steckel, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Stephen)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Organically modified silicate coatings for optical fibers A. B. Wojcik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organically modified silicate coatings for optical fibers A. B. Wojcik L. C. Klein V. V. Rondinella 909 Piscataway, NJ 08855-0909 ABSTRACT Three kinds of UV-curable organically modified silicates have linked to inorganics. In particular, organically modified silicates were investigated. In the search

Matthewson, M. John

233

Polyelectrolyte multilayers as nanostructured templates for inorganic synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin film nanocomposites consisting of inorganic matter embedded within a soft polymeric matrix on the nanometer length scale are an important class of materials with potential application in optoelectronics and photonics, ...

Wang, Tom Chih-Hung, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nanoporous Metal-Inorganic Materials for Storage and Capture...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Nanoporous Metal-Inorganic Materials for Storage and...

235

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Hydrocarbon Resin Manufacturing Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"The results of a plant-wide assessment of the manufacturing facilities of Neville Chemical Company, a manufacturer of hydrocarbon resins will be presented in this paper. The project was co-funded by US Department of Energy under its Plant...

Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.; Lonergan, R.; Wimer, J.

236

Project Summary Title: EFRI-RESIN Proposal, 21st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Summary: Most US energy usage is for electricity production and vehicle transportation, two interdependentProject Summary Title: EFRI-RESIN Proposal, 21st Century National Energy and Transportation prominent. There are several new energy supply technologies reaching maturity, accelerated by public concern

Vaswani, Namrata

237

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24-inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

SYLLABUS CH317 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The course has been organized into three modules: 1) Basic skills and the scientific method; 2) Energy. The course does not require students to have extensive prior laboratory experience. As part of the course that include plastics and textiles, and from the formation of low-energy LED light sources to porous materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed. 10 figs.

Alivisatos, A.P.; Colvin, V.L.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

242

Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Colvin, Vicki L. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Dynamic Asphaltene-Resin Exchange at the Oil/Water Interface: Time-Dependent W/O Emulsion Stability for Asphaltene/Resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Asphaltene-Resin Exchange at the Oil/Water Interface: Time-Dependent W/O Emulsion Stability for Asphaltene/Resin Model Oils Xiaoli Yang, Vincent J. Verruto, and Peter K. Kilpatrick* Department of Chemical was used to determine the time-dependent stability of water-in- oil emulsions in which asphaltenes

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

244

Rheology Analysis of Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compacting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AGR-1 and AGR-2 overcoating and compacting method utilized a wet mixing process where liquid resin (Hexion Durite SC-1008) was blended with natural and synthetic graphite to produce a graphite/resin matrix for overcoating. The matrix production method specified in the scale-up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered resin and graphite are fed at the same time into a jet mill. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC-1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. Also, attempts to dry out matrix made with SC-1008 for use in the overcoating process at B&W had mixed results. The SC-1008 resin became tacky when dried which caused the matrix to build up inside the overcoater. The scale- up jet milling/mixing and overcoating processes required that a suite of solid or powdered resins be identified. Suitable resins candidates were down selected to two resins, specifically Plenco 14838 and Hexion SD-1708. These resins are referred to as novolac or “two-stage” resins because they require the addition of a curing agent such as hexamethylenetetramine (Hexa) to promote an increased level of cross linking. The overcoating matrix is made of 3 components; natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and resin. The most influential component of the compacting process is the resin component and how it behaves with regards to time, temperature, and pressure. The selected scale-up resins are considered fast curing which means that the increase in molecular weight (curing) occurs over a relatively short period of time, ranging from a few seconds to several minutes depending on the temperature. To find the optimal compacting conditions it is useful to quantify this behavior. In this report, rheology is used to investigate viscosity as a function of time at specific temperatures for the previously mentioned resins.

Trammell, Michael P. [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Characterization and fractionation by ultrafiltration of guayule resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rubber Production. 2. Solute Flow Through GPC Column. 3. Comparison of UF, MF, and RO Processes. 4. Pressure Gradient in Tubular Membrane. 5. Flow Pattern for Hollow Tube Asymmetric UF Membranes. 6. Structure of an Asymmetric Tubular Membrane. 7... information from the GPC analysis, indicates which compounds were present in each fraction. Identification and separation of potentially valuable fractions in the resin would increase the overall market value of the guayule shrub. Ultrafiltration (UF...

Daly, Monica Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Lamellar L? Mesophases Doped with Inorganic Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of nanostructured hybrid systems is a flourishing area of research, which brings together chemistry, physics and materials science. These systems are composed of nanoparticles with interesting properties (e.g. optical, magnetic, catalytic) dispersed within an organic matrix. Control of both the position and orientation of the particles in a precise and reproducible way is an important goal. Towards this goal, the use of lyotropic liquid crystals as host phases is a promising strategy that has prompted sustained experimental work over the last decade. Here we briefly review this field, with an emphasis on the structure and the physical characterization of these novel materials.

Doru Constantin; Patrick Davidson

2014-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ion Exchange Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site contains more than 53 million gallons of legacy waste generated as a byproduct of plutonium production and reprocessing operations. The wastes are a complex mixture composed mostly of NaNO3, NaNO2, NaOH, NaAlO2, Na3PO4, and Na2SO4, with a number of minor and trace metals, organics, and radionuclides stored in underground waste tanks. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has contracted Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI) to build a pretreatment facility, the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP), that will separate long-lived transuranics (TRU) and highly radioactive components (specifically 137Cs and, in selected cases, 90Sr) from the bulk (non-radioactive) constituents and immobilize the wastes by vitrification. The plant is designed to produce two waste streams: a high-volume low-activity waste (LAW) and a low-volume high-activity waste (HLW).

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Injection repair of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite panels with bisphenol E cyanate ester resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resin injection of bisphenol E cyanate ester, a low viscosity resin that cures into a high temperature thermoset polymer, is investigated as a reliable repair method to restore strength and stiffness in delaminated carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites used in aircraft panels. The influence of temperature on the viscosity of the uncured resin was measured to optimize the injection conditions for high resin infiltration into the delaminations. The repair efficiency of the resin was evaluated by varying the panel thickness and the method by which the delamination damage was created in the composite specimens. Ultrasonic scanning (C-scan), flash thermography images, and cross-section analysis of repaired panels revealed excellent resin infiltration into the damaged region. Evaluation of mechanical repair efficiency using both bending stiffness and in-plain compressive strength of the composite panels as the repair metrics showed values exceeding 100%.

Thunga, Mahendra [Ames Laboratory; Bauer, Amy [Iowa State University; Obusek, Kristine [Fleet Readiness Center East; Meilunas, Ray [Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division; Akinc, Mufit [Ames Laboratory; Kessler, Michael R [Ames Laboratory

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Aspects of charge recombination and charge transport in organic solar cells and light-emitting devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, aspects of charge reconbination and charge transport in organic solar cells and light-emitting devices are presented. These devices show promise relative to traditional inorganic semiconductors. We show ...

Difley, Seth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin hydraulic cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Sixteen of these cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column (1/2 scale column). Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 3 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale IX system. The RF resin bed showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. The hydraulic and chemical performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins. The pilot-scale testing indicates that the RF resin is durable and should hold up to many hydraulic cycles in actual radioactive Cesium (Cs) separation.

Adamson, D.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Influence of inorganic compounds on char formation and quality of fast pyrolysis oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic compounds, especially potassium, calcium, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, and chlorine, are the main constituents of ash in biomass feedstocks. The concentrations of ash in biomass feedstocks range from less than 1% in softwoods to 15% in herbaceous biomass and agricultural residues. During biomass pyrolysis, these inorganics, especially potassium and calcium, catalyze both decomposition and char formation reactions. Decomposition reactions may either result in levoglucosan-rich or hydroxyacetaldehyde-rich pyrolysis products depending on the concentration of the ash in the feedstocks. The catalytic effect of the ash levels off at high organic ion concentrations. Chars formed during these reactions invariably end up in the pyrolysis oils (biofuel oils). A high proportion of the alkali metals in the ash are sequestered in the chars. The presence of high concentrations of alkali metals in the biofuel oils make them unsuitable for combustion in boilers, diesel engines, and in turbine operations. The highest concentration of alkali metals are found in herbaceous feedstocks and agricultural residue biofuel oils. Leaching studies conducted on the chars suspended in the oils showed no leaching of the alkali metals from the chars into the oils. Our data suggest that hot gas filtration of the oils can effectively reduce the alkali metals contents of the biofuel oils to acceptable levels to be used as turbine, diesel engine, and boiler fuels.

Agbleyor, F.A.; Besler, S.; Montane, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced thermoplastic resins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Collection: Engineering 8 Mathematical model of cavitation during resin lm infusion process I. Sevostianov a,*, V.E. Verijenko b Summary: Mathematical model of...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - adhesive resin cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, Orono, ME E-Mail: goodell@umit.maine.edu Abstract The Composites Pressure Resin Infusion System (Com Source: Lopez-Anido, Roberto - Advanced Engineered Wood Composites Center...

256

Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using distributed sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel direct approach to detect the resin flow front during the Liquid Resin Infusion process under industrial environment is proposed. To detect the resin front accurately and verify the results, which are deduced from indirect micro-thermocouples measurements, optical fiber sensors based on Fresnel reflection are utilized. It is expected that the results derived from both techniques will lead to an improvement of our understanding of the resin flow and in particular prove that micro-thermocouples can be used as sensors as routine technique under our experimental conditions. Moreover, comparisons with numerical simulations are carried out and experimental and simulated mold filling times are successfully compared.

Wang, Peng; Drapier, Sylvain; Vautrin, Alain; Minni, Jean-Christophe; 10.1177/0021998311410479

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - acrylate ipn resin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which... terpolymer resins composed of 1) tetrafluoroethylene (TFE), 2) a ... Source: French, Roger H. - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - acrylic resin oral Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which... terpolymer resins composed of 1) tetrafluoroethylene (TFE), 2) a ... Source: French, Roger H. - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of...

259

EFFECTS OF TOUGHENED MATRIX RESINS ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF TOUGHENED MATRIX RESINS ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES by Ricardo Orozco turbine energy project. #12;v TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES

260

EVALUATION OF HAND LAY-UP AND RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF HAND LAY-UP AND RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE MANUFACTURING..........................................................................................................1 Hand Lay-up in Turbine Blade Fabrication

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

anion-exchange resin technique: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mohd Meraj Jafri; Dr. D. K. Singh; Dr. P. K. Kamani 13 Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using distributed sensors CERN...

262

Production of Lignin-Based Phenolic Resins Using De-Polymerized Kraft Lignin and Process Optimization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Commercialization of Lignin-based phenol formaldehyde resins (LPF) has been limited due to the increase in curing temperatures and decrease in adhesive strength of LPF compared… (more)

Siddiqui, Homaira

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Phonon Confinement Effects in Hybrid Virus-Inorganic Nanotubes for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phonon Confinement Effects in Hybrid Virus-Inorganic Nanotubes for Nanoelectronic Applications as nanotemplates, viruses can actually improve the electron transport properties in semiconductor nanotubes grown nanotubes deposited on tobacco mosaic viruses, the confined acoustic phonons are found to be redistributed

Fonoberov, Vladimir

264

ATOMISTIC MODELING OF OIL SHALE KEROGENS AND ASPHALTENES ALONG WITH THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE INORGANIC MINERAL MATRIX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to obtain and validate three dimensional atomistic models for the organic matter in both oil shales and oil sands. In the case of oil shales the modeling was completed for kerogen, the insoluble portion of the organic matter; for oil sands it was for asphaltenes, a class of molecules found in crude oil. The three dimensional models discussed in this report were developed starting from existing literature two dimensional models. The models developed included one kerogen, based on experimental data on a kerogen isolated from a Green River oil shale, and a set of six representative asphaltenes. Subsequently, the interactions between these organic models and an inorganic matrix was explored in order to gain insight into the chemical nature of this interaction, which could provide vital information in developing efficient methods to remove the organic material from inorganic mineral substrate. The inorganic substrate used to model the interaction was illite, an aluminum silicate oxide clay. In order to obtain the feedback necessary to validate the models, it is necessary to be able to calculate different observable quantities and to show that these observables both reproduce the results of experimental measurements on actual samples as well as that the observables are sensitive to structural differences between models. The observables that were calculated using the models include 13C NMR spectra, the IR vibrational spectra, and the atomic pair wise distribution function; these were chosen as they are among the methods for which both experimental and calculated values can be readily obtained. Where available, comparison was made to experiment results. Finally, molecular dynamic simulations of pyrolysis were completed on the models to gain an understanding into the nature of the decomposition of these materials when heated.

Facelli, Julio; Pugmire, Ronald; Pimienta, Ian

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The focus of this thesis is the design and development of a system for rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating. The Rapid Extraction of Dissolved Inorganic ...

Gospodinova, Kalina Doneva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Catalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of InorganicSynthetic Modeling of Inorganic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance Hydrogen technology in fuel cellsHydrogen technology in fuel cells As a combustion fuel, it producesCatalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of Inorganic of evolution ·Optimized catalyst for water splitting in all oxygenic phototrophs S0 S4 S1 S2 S3 O2 2 H O2 e- e

Petta, Jason

267

Recycling of cleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane 2 stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols. From the data collected in this work, a preliminary process design and economic evaluations were performed for a model mill with 1,000-ton/day pulp production that uses a bleaching sequence based on chlorine dioxide. Assuming 3 m{sup 3} acidic effluents to be treated per ton of pulp produced, the electrodialysis process would require a membrane area of about 361 m{sup 2} for this model mill. The energy consumption of the electrodialytic stack for separation is estimated to be about $160/day, and the estimated capital cost of the electrodia

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.; Energy Systems; Inst. of Paper Science and Tech.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evaluation of ultrafiltration membranes in the purification of guayule resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Methanol at 370 ml/nun 150 MWCO Membrane Feed: Water at 20 psi 150 MWCO Membrane Feed: Water at 50 psi 200 MWCO Membrane Feed: AVater at 370 ml/min 200 MWCO Membrane Feed: Methanol at 370 ml/min 20 27 30 31 200 MWCO Membrane Feed: Guayule Resin... at 370 ml/min . . . 33 350 MWCO Membrane Feed: AVater at 86. 8 ml/min 10 12 13 14 350 MWCO Membrane Feed: Water at 20 psi 350 MWCO Membrane Feed: Water at 40 psi 350 MWCO Membrane Iced: Methanol at 86. 8 ml/min 350 MWCO Membrane Feed: Methanol...

Jeyaseelan, Ranjit S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Aerogels derived from multifunctional organic monomers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional inorganic aerogels are mad via the hydrolysis and condensation of metal alkoxides. Recently, we reported the synthesis of organic aerogels based upon the aqueous polycondensation of (1) resorcinol with formaldehyde and (2) melamine with formaldehyde. The former materials can also be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form vitreous carbon aerogels. In both the inorganic and organic systems, the structure and properties of the dried aerogel are dictated by polymerization conditions. Factors such as pH, reactant ratio, and temperature influence the crosslinking chemistry and growth processes taking place prior to gelation. The ability to tailor the structure and properties of aerogels at the nanometer scale opens up exciting possibilities for these novel materials. This paper addresses the chemistry-structure-property relationships of organic aerogels. 22 refs., 7 figs.

Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Curing Properties of Epoxy Resins for Use to Abandon Wells Destroyed by Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

completely destroyed and toppled. This project tested the curing properties of several epoxy resin systems in different environments. A bisphenol-F/epichlorohydrin (BPF) resin cured by curing agent MBOEA system was successfully tested in the laboratory as a...

Gao, Suining

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Acoustic propagation in an epoxy resin at very low temperatures P. Doussineau and W. Schn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

397 Acoustic propagation in an epoxy resin at very low temperatures P. Doussineau and W. Schön measur- ed in an epoxy resin in the temperature range 0.1 to 80 K. At the lowest temperatures (T ~ 0.8 K

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

FLUORINATED HYDROXYTELECHELIC POLYBUTADIENE AS ADDITIVE IN CATIONIC PHOTOPOLYMERIZATION OF AN EPOXY RESIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF AN EPOXY RESIN B. Ameduri 1 , R. Bongiovanni2 , M. Sangermano2 , A. Priola2 1 Ingénierie et Architectures in original formulations to enable the UV cationic polymerization of a telechelic diepoxy cycloaliphatic resin) values showing a surface modification of the epoxy based system. Indeed, great modifications were noted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

273

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.; Havens, S.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Moulton, R.J.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Acceleration of rate of cure in boron trifluoride amine catalyzed cure of epoxy resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes the process for the acceleration of the cure rate of an epoxy resin comprising forming a mixture of an epoxy resin with a boron trifluoride-amine complex and an isocyanate compound and curing the mixture at a temperature in the range of from about ambient to about 130/sup 0/C.

Goel, A.B.

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment P r o b of groundwater containing high levels of radium-226 activity (Objective 1) were regenerated with prescribed brine that the concentration of salt in the brine cleaning solution was the most influential factor in the resin regeneration

277

Hydro-Mechanical Loading and Compressibility of Fibrous Media for Resin Infusion Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Hydro-Mechanical Loading and Compressibility of Fibrous Media for Resin Infusion Processes P investigating the compressibility behaviour of composite preform with a view of modelling resin infusion Infusion The need for manufacturing large composite parts in the aeronautic industry is ever increasing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

278

Acrylic-based resin with favorable properties for three-dimensional two-photon polymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acrylic-based resin with favorable properties for three-dimensional two-photon polymerization suited for the fabrication of three-dimensional structures with two-photon polymerization. We a polymerization chain-reaction, thereby hardening the resin locally. Once fabrication is complete, the unexposed

Teich, Malvin C.

279

PLASTIC RESINS INDUSTRY HIT HARD BY GLOBAL ECONOMIC RECESSION IN 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but buying only 4.5 billion pounds per month. Although the demand for plastics is ultimately tied to overallPLASTIC RESINS INDUSTRY HIT HARD BY GLOBAL ECONOMIC RECESSION IN 2008 The US plastic resins in the second half of the year. According to the American Chemistry Council (ACC) Plastics Industry Producers

Laughlin, Robert B.

280

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Griffith 4/2004 Small Scale His Tag Enzyme Purification with TALON Affinity Column Resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Griffith 4/2004 Small Scale His Tag Enzyme Purification with TALON Affinity Column Resin Overview: This is a small scale method for purifying a His-tagged protein using commercial affinity resin. Materials: TALON rotor, at 18 K rpm) at 4 °C. 7. Save supernatant fraction for column purification. Supernatant can

Doering, Tamara

282

Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

Maxwell, III, Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC); Nichols, Sheldon T. (Augusta, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Survey of electrochemical production of inorganic compounds. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical generation of inorganic compounds, excluding chlorine/caustic, has been critically reviewed. About 60 x 10/sup 12/ Btu/y fossil fuel equivalent will be used in the year 2000 for the electrosynthesis of inorganic compounds. Significant energy savings in chlorate production can result from the development of suitable electrocatalysts for lowering the cathodic overpotential. Perchlorates, electrolytic hypochlorite, electrolytic manganese dioxide, fluorine and other miscellaneous compounds use relatively small amounts of electrical energy. Implementation of caustic scrubber technology for stack gas cleanup would result in appreciable amounts of sodium sulfate which could be electrolyzed to regenerate caustic. Hydrogen peroxide, now produced by the alkyl anthraquinone process, could be made electrolytically by a new process coupling anodic oxidation of sulfate with cathodic reduction of oxygen in alkaline solution. Ozone is currently manufactured using energy-inefficient silent discharge equipment. A novel energy-efficient approach which uses an oxygen-enhanced anodic reaction is examined.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Bending properties of epoxy resin matrix composites filled with NiMnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy powders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bending properties of epoxy resin matrix composites filled with Ni­Mn­Ga ferromagnetic shape memory­Mn­Ga Composite materials Mechanical properties Microstructure Two types of epoxy resin matrix composites filled­Mn­Ga epoxy resin composites were reported, yet the bending property of Ni­Mn­Ga-polymer smart composites has

Zheng, Yufeng

286

Rheological and thermal study of the curing process of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin: application to the optimization of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rheological and thermal study of the curing process of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin: application-4-67-14-37-80; Fax: 33-4-67-14-40-28 ABSTRACT The curing process of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin was defined using of structure-properties relationships. Keywords: curing kinetics, epoxy resin, dynamic mechanical properties

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

Mathematical model of cavitation during resin lm infusion process I. Sevostianov a,*, V.E. Verijenko b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of cavitation during resin ®lm infusion process I. Sevostianov a,*, V ®lm infusion (RFI) process. An analytical model is developed to describe the cavitation conditions formation; Resin ®lm infusion 1. Introduction The resin ®lm infusion (RFI) method of producing composite

Sevostianov, Igor

288

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches are considered in this work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches in manufacturing ultrapure water for nuclear power plants. Resins allow the removal of ionic impurities to subparts-per-million. Thereby in nuclear power plants, resins contribute to guarantee personnel safety, to control feed system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

289

Size and Crystallinity in Protein-Templated Inorganic Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protein cages such as ferritins and virus capsids have been used as containers to synthesize a wide variety of protein-templated inorganic nanoparticles. While identification of the inorganic crystal phase has been successful in some cases, very little is known about the detailed nanoscale structure of the inorganic component. We have used pair distribution function analysis of total X-ray scattering to measure the crystalline domain size in nanoparticles of ferrihydrite, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, CoPt, and FePt grown inside 24-meric ferritin cages from H. sapiens and P. furiosus. The material properties of these protein-templated nanoparticles are influenced by processes at a variety of length scales: the chemistry of the material determines the precise arrangement of atoms at very short distances, while the interior volume of the protein cage constrains the maximum nanoparticle size attainable. At intermediate length scales, the size of coherent crystalline domains appears to be constrained by the arrangement of crystal nucleation sites on the interior of the cage. On the basis of these observations, some potential synthetic strategies for the control of crystalline domain size in protein-templated nanoparticles are suggested.

Jolley, Craig C.; Uchida, Masaki; Reichhardt, Courtney; Harrington, Richard; Kang, Sebyung; Klem, Michael T.; Parise, John B.; Douglas, Trevor (SBU); (Montana)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a literature review to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Several impurities, such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and trace metal compounds are generated during coal conversion, and they must be removed from the coal gas or the combustor flue gas to meet environmental standards. The use of membranes to separate these noxious gases is an attractive alternative to their removal by sorbents such as zinc titanate or calcium oxide. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting investigations to develop inorganic membranes for separating hydrogen from coal gas streams and noxious impurities from hot coal- and flue-gas streams. Membrane materials that have been investigated in the past include glass (silica), alumina, zirconia, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt).

Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values {>=}126 mg/100 ml ({>=}7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 {mu}g/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

Coronado-Gonzalez, Jose Antonio [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Razo, Luz Maria del [Toxicology Departament, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo [School of Medicine, Durango State Juarez University, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico); Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca [Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Escobedo-de la Pena, Jorge [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jorgeep@servidor.unam.mx

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Small angle neutron scattering characterization of the porous structure of carbons prepared using inorganic templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used for the characterization of the microstructure of carbons derived from organic-loaded inorganic template materials that are used as anodes in lithium ion cells. Pillared clays (PILC), layered silicates whose sheets have been permanently propped open by sets of thermally stable molecular props, were used as a template to load the organic precursors. Five organic precursors, namely pyrene, styrene, pyrene/trioxane copolymer, ethylene, and propylene, were used to load the PILC. Pyrolysis was carried out at 700 C under nitrogen atmosphere. From SANS, information has been derived about the pore radius, mass fractal dimension, and the cutoff length (above which the fractal property breaks down) on each carbon. In general, the pore radius ranges from 4 to 11 {angstrom}, and the mass fractal dimension varies in the range from 2.5 to 2.9. Contrast-match SANS studies of carbons wetted in 84% deuterated toluene indicate that a significant amount of pores in carbon from pyrene are not accessible to the solvent, while most of the porous network of carbon from propylene is accessible.

Sandi, G.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Carrado, K.A.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Self-assembly of resins and asphaltenes facilitates asphaltene dissolution by an organic acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stability Non-polar electrostatics a b s t r a c t Asphaltene precipitation occurs in petroleum fluids under quantities can prevent precipitation entirely and can dissolve already precipitated asphaltenes. Some by aromatic solvents. Other dispersants can truncate asphaltene precipitation at the sub-micron length scale

Firoozabadi, Abbas

294

2010 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JUNE 20 - 25, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Inorganic Chemistry GRC is one of the longest-standing of the GRCs, originating in 1951. Over the years, this conference has played a role in spawning many other GRCs in specialized fields, due to the involvement of elements from most of the periodic table. These include coordination, organometallic, main group, f-element, and solid state chemistries; materials science, catalysis, computational chemistry, nanotechnology, bioinorganic, environmental, and biomedical sciences just to name a few. The 2010 Inorganic Chemistry GRC will continue this tradition, where scientists at all levels from academic, industrial, and national laboratories meet to define the important problems in the field and to highlight emerging opportunities through exchange of ideas and discussion of unpublished results. Invited speakers will present on a wide variety of topics, giving attendees a look at areas both inside and outside of their specialized areas of interest. In addition to invited speakers, the poster sessions at GRCs are a key feature of the conference. All conferees at the Inorganic Chemistry GRC are invited to present a poster on their work, and here the informal setting promotes the free exchange of ideas and fosters new relationships. As in previous years, we will offer poster presenters the opportunity to compete for one of several program spots in which they can give an oral presentation based on the subject matter of their poster. This is a great way to get your work noticed by the scientists attending the meeting, especially for those early in their career path such as junior faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, and those at comparable ranks. Anyone interested in participating in the poster competition should bring an electronic slide presentation and a small hard copy of their poster to submit to the committee.

JOHN LOCKEMEYER

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

Thorn, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

Engineering the Interface Between Inorganic Materials and Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To further optimize cell function in hybrid “living materials”, it would be advantageous to render mammalian cells responsive to novel “orthogonal” cues, i.e. signals they would not ordinarily respond to but that can be engineered to feed into defined intracellular signaling pathways. We recently developed an optogenetic method, based on A. thaliana Cry2, for rapid and reversible protein oligomerization in response to blue light. We also demonstrated the ability to use this method to channel the light input into several defined signaling pathways, work that will enhance communication between inorganic devices and living systems.

Schaffer, David

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical chemistry inorganic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analytical chemistry inorganic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Department of Chemistry Three Year Projection...

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted resin transfer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy 3 Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1 Summary: on...

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyd-amino resins based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science 11 Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1 Summary:...

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged composite resin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences 2 Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1 Summary: ....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Numerical and experimental analyses of resin infusion manufacturing processes of composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid resin infusion (LRI) processes are promising manufacturing routes to produce large, thick, or complex structural parts. They are based on the resin flow induced, across its thickness, by a pressure applied onto a preform/resin stacking. However, both thickness and fiber volume fraction of the final piece are not well controlled since they result from complex mechanisms which drive the transient mechanical equilibrium leading to the final geometrical configuration. In order to optimize both design and manufacturing parameters, but also to monitor the LRI process, an isothermal numerical model has been developed which describes the mechanical interaction between the deformations of the porous medium and the resin flow during infusion.1, 2 With this numerical model, it is possible to investigate the LRI process of classical industrial part shapes. To validate the numerical model, first in 2D, and to improve the knowledge of the LRI process, this study details a comparison between numerical simulations and...

Wang, Peng; Molimard, Jérôme; Vautrin, Alain; Minni, Jean-Christophe; 10.1177/0021998311421990

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs were leached out from the spent resin while {sup 60}Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

Wahida, Nurul [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Irwan, M. N. [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

Inorganic-Organic Shape Memory Polymers and Foams for Bone Defect Repairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increased its bioactivity, giving rise to the formation of “bone-bonding” hydroxyapatite (HAp) when exposed to simulated body fluid (SBF). It was also shown that the coating largely enhanced the scaffold’s capacities to support osteoblasts adhesion...

Zhang, Dawei

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA 94720 ABSTRACT in the boiler used to make process steam.water, gas condensate, and boiler blowdown. A summary of thewater, gas condensate, and boiler blowd01m. Retort water and

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Structural Investigations of Strontium in Inorganic Crystals, Organic Crystals, and Phyllosilicate Minerals with Strontium-87 NMR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??At numerous United States Department of Energy (US DOE) facilities such as Hanford near Richland, Washington, an enormous volume of high-level liquid nuclear waste has… (more)

Bowers, Geoffrey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic/Organic Hybrid Si Negative Electrodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

307

Nanoscale Engineering for the Design of Efficient Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research aimed at enhancing the thermoelectric performance of semiconductors comprised of only earth-abundant elements has recently come under renewed focus as these materials systems offer a cost-effective path for scavenging waste heat. In light...

Brockway, Lance Robert

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

OrganicInorganic Nanohybrids through the Direct Tailoring of Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Conjugated Polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in photovoltaic cells.[17­19] This indicates that an interpenetrated network of CP/NC on the scale of the exciton with Conjugated Polymers Zhiqun Lin*[a] 2008 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Chem. Eur. J. 2008, 14- gated polymers (CPs; i.e., forming the CP/NC hybrids). Hybrids of electroactive CPs with NCs inherit

Lin, Zhiqun

309

LDRD final report on polyphosphaacetylenes, new hybrid conducting organic-inorganic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal, electrochemical and transition metal mediated reactions of phosphaacetylene monomers were conducted in attempts to form novel polyphosphaacetylenes as a new class of potentially electrically conducting polymers. Molecular modeling was used to simulate the molecular conformations of optimized, isolated oligomers to identify the proper monomeric repeat units for highly conjugated molecules. Electrodeposition of suitable monomers led to low molecular weight oligomers. Thermal polymerization of phosphaacetylene monomers bearing aromatic substituents ed to the formation of polyhedral cage oligomers. Under metathesis polymerization conditions the phosphaacetylene monomers form unique complexes via an unprecedented sequence of intermediates which suggest that metathesis to linear oligomers is achievable. Conductivity measurements on electrodeposited oligomers indicate modest electrical conductivity.

Jamison, G.M.; Loy, D.A.; Saunders, R.S.; Alam, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Properties of Organic Materials Dept.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Mechanisms of Organic-inorganic Interactions in Soils and Aqueous Environments Elucidated using Calorimetric Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Biochars belong to the char/charcoal- BC category of continuum and can be produced from a number of different biomass feedstocks [50, 73, 74, 78-83]. Components of the BC continuum all have high carbon content, and are dominated by aromatic structures...

Harvey, Omar R.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Experimental and theoretical adsorption studies in tuneable organic-inorganic materials   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adsorption processes are widely used for the storage and separation of gases in many industrial and environmental applications. The performance of the process depends strongly on the adsorbent and its interaction with ...

Prosenjak, Claudia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Climate induced changes as registered in inorganic and organic sediment components from Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potrok Aike (Argentina) during the past 51 ka A. Hahn a,*, P. Kliem a , C. Ohlendorf a , B. Zolitschka Spectrometry (DRIFTS) Lake level Primary productivity Patagonia Argentina ICDP project PASADO a b s t r a c

St-Ong, Guillaume

313

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a flameless atomic absorption detector for speciationA. , "Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometerscoupled with an atomic absorption detector," in preparation,

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organoarsenic compounds in oi.l shale process waters using aPresented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Investigation of Anion-pi Interactions in Inorganic, Organic and Biological Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?-pyrimidyl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (bmtz) was synthesized and reacted with [Cu(NCMe)4][BF4] to form the octanuclear complex [Cu8(bmtz)6][BF6]6·6MeCN. Crystallographic evidence indicates an in situ reduction of two of the complexed bmtz ligands to radical anions...

Funck, Edward Sterling

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

Strong exciton-photon coupling in inorganic-organic multiple quantum wells embedded low-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Dimensional Lithium Niobate Photonic Crystals," Adv. Mater. 21(34), 3526 (2009). 3. M. Li, A. Xia, J. Wang, Y. Song

Steiner, Ullrich

317

Method for gettering organic, inorganic and elemental iodine in aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the removal of iodine from aqueous solutions, particularly the trapping of radioactive iodine to mitigate damage resulting from accidents or spills associated with nuclear reactors, by exposing the solution to well dispersed silver carbonate which reacts with the iodine and iodides, thereby gettering iodine and iodine compounds from solution. The iodine is not only removed from solution but also from the contiguous vapor.

Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Shockley, William E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Novel Noninterpenetrating Polycyclohexane Network: A New Inorganic/Organic Coordination Polymer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7(1) Å3, Z ) 4) and its coordination chemistry with cadmium and cobalt nitrate hydrates investigated. Two-pyridyl)ethene (2), and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethyne (3) (Figure 1), have proven popular in recent years

zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

319

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979). retort water, boiler blowdown, and heater- treaterGeokinetics Retort Water Occidental Heater-Treater :ss.ssa) situ Occidental Heater-Treater Water Retort 6 modified

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Terahertz and infrared transmission of an organic/inorganic hybrid thermoelectric material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report terahertz and infrared transmission measurements of a high-performance thermoelectric material containing tellurium nanowires in a conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) matrix. The DC electrical conductivity of the hybrid material (41?S/cm) is approximately one hundred times that of pure PEDOT:PSS and more than 400 times that of a film of pure tellurium nanowires, while the terahertz-frequency (THz) conductivity of PEDOT:PSS and the hybrid material are comparable at f???2THz. A frequency-dependent conductivity model indicates that the increased DC conductivity of the hybrid material results from an increase in the DC charge mobility rather than in the free charge density. We suggest that the increased DC conductivity of the hybrid material results from an increase in linkage between PEDOT domains by the tellurium nanowires.

Heyman, J. N., E-mail: heyman@macalester.edu; Alebachew, B. A.; Kaminski, Z. S.; Nguyen, M. D. [Physics Department, Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota 55105 (United States); Coates, N. E.; Urban, J. J. [The Molecular Foundry, Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Environmental impacts of petroleum production: Fate of inorganic and organic chemicals in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in USA, and forecasts indicate that by 2020 natural gas and oil consumption will increase by 40% and 29 and inactive tank batteries. Results to date show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (~150 `A' site, 35 water samples were obtained from an asphaltic pit and an adjacent weathered-oil pit

322

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Organic-Inorganic Complexes Containing a Luminescent Rare Earth-Metal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002Optics Group (X-ray

324

In-situ intercalation dynamics in inorganic-organic layered perovskite thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Efficient Hybrid Solar Cells Based on Meso-Superstructured Organometal Halide Perovskites Science 2012, 338, 643-647. 16. Heo, J. H.; Im, S. H.; Noh, J. H.; Mandal, T. N.; Lim, C.; Chang, J. A.; Lee, Y. H.; Kim, H.; Sarkar, A.; Nazeeruddin, M. K.; Gra...

Ahmad, Shahab; Kanaujia, Pawan K.; Niu, Wendy; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Prakash, G. Vijaya

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Measurement and modeling of uranium and strategic element sorption by amidoxime resins in natural seawater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF URANIUM AND STRATEGIC ELEMENT SORPTION BY AMIDOXIME RESINS IN NATURAL SEAMATER A Thesis by JOSE GREGORIO PINA-JORDAN Submitted to the Graduate College oi' Texas A&M University in partial I...'ulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE December i985 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF URANIUM AND STRATEGIC ELEMENT SORPTION BY AMIDOXIME RESINS IN NATURAL SEANATER A thesis by JOSE GREGORIO PINA...

Pina-Jordan, Jose Gregorio

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Effect of resin toughness on fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis Dy RONALD NELSON COHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1982 Mlajor Subject: Interdisciplinary Enqi neeri ng EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by RONALD NELSON COHEN Approved as to style and content by: (N. L. Bradley, Cha man) (R. A...

Cohen, Ronald Nelson

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Effect of external stress on moisture diffusion in an epoxy resin and its composite material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF EXTERNAL STRESS ON MOISTURE DIFFUSION IN AN EPOXY RESIN AND ITS C(MPOSITE MATERIAL A Thesis by MICHAEL CHAMBERLAIN HENSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EFFECT OF EXTERNAL STRESS ON MOISTURE DIFFUSION IN AN EPOXY RESIN AND ITS CCNPOSITE MATERIAL A Thesis by MICHAEL CHAMBERLAIN HENSON Approved as to style and content by: (Y...

Henson, Michael Chamberlain

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The effect of molecular architecture on the mechanical properties of epoxy resin systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF EPOXY RESIN SYSTEMS A Thesis by GALE ANTRUS HOLMES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE EFFECT OF MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF EPOXY RESIN SYSTEMS A Thesis bY GALE ANTRUS HOLMES Approved as to style an content by: Alan Let. ton...

Holmes, Gale Antrus

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

REAL WASTE TESTING OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data on batch contact and column testing tasks for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. The testing used a non-radioactive simulant of SRS Tank 2F dissolved salt, as well as an actual radioactive waste sample of similar composition, which are both notably high in sodium (6 M). The resin was Microbeads batch 5E-370/641 which had been made on the hundred gallon scale. Equilibrium batch contact work focused on cesium at a temperature of 25 C due to the lack of such data to better benchmark existing isotherm models. Two campaigns were performed with small-scale ion exchange columns, first with Tank 2F simulant, then with actual dissolved salt in the Shielded Cells. An extrapolation of the batch contact results with radioactive waste over-predicted the cesium loaded onto the IX sRF resin bed by approximately 11%. This difference is not unexpected considering uncertainties from measurement and extrapolation and because the ion exchange that occurs when waste flows through a resin bed probably cannot reach the same level of equilibrium as when waste and resin are joined in a long term batch contact. Resin was also characterized to better understand basic chemistry issues such as holdup of trace transition metals present in the waste feed streams. The column tests involved using two beds of sRF resin in series, with the first bed referred to as the Lead column and the second bed as the Lag column. The test matrix included two complete IX cycles for both the simulant and actual waste phases. A cycle involves cesium adsorption, until the resin in the Lead column reaches saturation, and then regenerating the sRF resin, which includes eluting the cesium. Both the simulated and the actual wastes were treated with two cycles of operation, and the resin beds that were used in the Lead and Lag columns of simulant test phase were regenerated and reused in the actual waste test phase. This task is the first to demonstrate the treatment of SRS waste with sRF resin and the tests clearly demonstrated cesium decontamination for actual waste. The results of the column tests were similar for both the simulated and the actual waste and demonstrated Cs removal with sRF from both wastes. For a flowrate of 1.4 bed volumes (BV)/hour at 25 C those results with sRF resin were: (1) Simulant and actual waste results are equivalent; (2) Cs breakthrough began between 200 and 250 BV; (3) Cs breakthrough reached 100% at around 400 BV; (4) Cs breakthrough curve from 5% to 100% is approximately linear; (5) Cs elution with 0.5 M HNO3 starts at 2 BV and ends at 6BV; (6) Most, if not all, of Cs adsorbed during treatment is released during elution; (7) At 100% breakthrough of Cs the resin bed adsorbs approximately 85% of full capacity before detection in the effluent; the remaining 15% is adsorbed at saturation; (8) Approximately 90% of resin bed changes (color and volume) are complete by 6 BV; and (9) During elution the resin shrinks to about 80% of its fully working (sodium form) BV.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon SequestrationA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3 ­ uptake and grew under the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy. Keywords: CO2 and HCO3 � uptake -- CO2

Roegner, Matthias

331

Elucidation of the inorganic chemistry of hydrotreating catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New environmental regulations are making it necessary to developed improved hydrotreating catalysts for the removal of sulfur, nitrogen and aromatics from refinery streams. In order to develop better catalysts, the authors must gain a more detailed understanding of the inorganic chemistry of these catalysts. Commercial catalysts typically contain ca. 15 wt% molybdenum or tungsten oxides and ca. 4 wt% nickel or cobalt. Additives, such as phosphate and fluoride, are often added to improve the catalytic activity. However, the role of these additives is not fully understood. The authors have, therefore, carried out studies on alumina supported phosphate and flouride materials using FT-IR, powder x-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR ({sup 31}P, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 1}H). The results of this work have enabled the authors to determine the structures of the various compounds formed on the alumina system when fluoride or phosphate is present.

DeCanio, E.C.; Edwards, J.C.; Storm, D.A. [Texaco, Inc., Beacon, NY (United States); Bruno, J.W. [Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Inorganic nanotubes and electro-fluidic devices fabricated therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nanofluidic devices incorporating inorganic nanotubes fluidly coupled to channels or nanopores for supplying a fluid containing chemical or bio-chemical species are described. In one aspect, two channels are fluidly interconnected with a nanotube. Electrodes on opposing sides of the nanotube establish electrical contact with the fluid therein. A bias current is passed between the electrodes through the fluid, and current changes are detected to ascertain the passage of select molecules, such as DNA, through the nanotube. In another aspect, a gate electrode is located proximal the nanotube between the two electrodes thus forming a nanofluidic transistor. The voltage applied to the gate controls the passage of ionic species through the nanotube selected as either or both ionic polarities. In either of these aspects the nanotube can be modified, or functionalized, to control the selectivity of detection or passage.

Yang, Peidong (Kensington, CA); Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Fan, Rong (Pasadena, CA); Karnik, Rohit (Cambridge, MA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Comptes Rendus des JNC 16 Toulouse 2009 Suivi du procd de la fabrication Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) sur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comptes Rendus des JNC 16 Toulouse 2009 Suivi du procédé de la fabrication Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) sur simulateur industriel par capteurs distribués Monitoring the Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI.HENRAT@hexcel.com Résumé Les procédés par infusion de résine LRI (Liquid Resin Infusion) sont des procédés de fabrication

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical objectives of this project are: (a) To (1) define the partitioning of inorganic constituents associated with raw coal particles among products (including vapors, aerosols, and residual char/ash particles) formed under conditions representative of pulverized coal flames as a function of the specific (intrinsic and extrinsic) characteristics of the raw coal and the environment in which the transformations occur; and (2) to characterize the resultant spectrum of products in detail; (b) To elucidate and quantify the fundamental processes (involving basic principles of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics) by which transformations of the inorganic constituents occur; and (c) To develop, based on the information required in a. and b. above, a tractable process model capable of predicting the significant features of the transformation process, most importantly, the distribution and nature of products. This report represents work accomplished in the tenth quarter of performance on the contract. The authors specifically highlight work accomplished: at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) on developing and constructing a thermophoretic sampling probe, for submicron fume particle sampling; at MIT on (1) completion of the baseline ash particle size distribution measurements for seven program coals (five US and two Australian), and (2) analysis of the fragmentation model results in terms of a closed-form solution for a simplified case; at the University of Arizona, on obtaining detailed ash particle and submicron fume chemistry for four program coals; and at PSI Technology Company (PSIT) on concluding data analysis and describing mineral interaction trends observed during combustion of two program coals. Individual progress reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Boni, A.A.; Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (USA)); Flagan, R.C. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (USA)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA)); Sarofim, A.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

COSIMA-Rosetta calibration for in-situ characterization of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko cometary inorganic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) is a time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer (TOF-SIMS) on board the Rosetta space mission. COSIMA has been designed to measure the composition of cometary dust grains. It has a mass resolution m/{\\Delta}m of 1400 at mass 100 u, thus enabling the discrimination of inorganic mass peaks from organic ones in the mass spectra. We have evaluated the identification capabilities of the reference model of COSIMA for inorganic compounds using a suite of terrestrial minerals that are relevant for cometary science. Ground calibration demonstrated that the performances of the flight model were similar to that of the reference model. The list of minerals used in this study was chosen based on the mineralogy of meteorites, interplanetary dust particles and Stardust samples. It contains anhydrous and hydrous ferromagnesian silicates, refractory silicates and oxides (present in meteoritic Ca-Al-rich inclusions), carbonates, and Fe-Ni sulfides. From the analyses of these mi...

Krüger, Harald; Engrand, Cécile; Briois, Christelle; Siljeström, Sandra; Merouane, Sihane; Baklouti, Donia; Fischer, Henning; Fray, Nicolas; Hornung, Klaus; Lehto, Harry; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Rynö, Jouni; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Thirkell, Laurent; Trieloff, Mario; Hilchenbach, Martin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Using Process Knowledge to Manage Disposal Classification of Ion-Exchange Resin - 13566  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been previously shown by EPRI [1] that Class B and C resins represent a small portion by volume of the overall generation of radioactively contaminated resins. In fact, if all of the resins were taken together the overall classification would meet Class A disposal requirements. Lowering the classification of the ion exchange resins as they are presented for disposal provides a path for minimizing the amount of waste stored. Currently there are commercial options for blending wastes from various generators for Class A disposal in development. The NRC may have by this time introduced changes and clarifications to the Branch Technical Position (BTP) on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation [2] that may ultimately add more flexibility to what can be done at the plant level. The BTP has always maintained that mixtures of resins that are combined for ALARA purposes or operational efficiency can be classified on the basis of the mixture. This is a point often misinterpreted and misapplied. This paper will address options that can be exercised by the generator that can limit B and C waste generation by more rigorous tracking of generation and taking advantage of the normal mix of wastes. This can be achieved through the monitoring of reactor coolant chemistry data and coupled with our knowledge of radionuclide production mechanisms. This knowledge can be used to determine the overall accumulation of activity in ion-exchange resins and provides a 'real-time' waste classification determination of the resin and thereby provide a mechanism to reduce the production of waste that exceeds class A limits. It should be noted that this alternative approach, although rarely used in a nuclear power plant setting, is acknowledged in the original BTP on classification [3] as a viable option for determining radionuclide inventories for classification of waste. Also included is a discussion of an examination performed at the Byron plant to estimate radionuclide content in the final waste stream from upstream sampling of reactor coolant and fuel pool water. (authors)

Bohnsack, Jonathan N.; James, David W. [DW James Consulting, LLC 855 Village Center Drive No. 330 North Oaks, MN 55127 (United States)] [DW James Consulting, LLC 855 Village Center Drive No. 330 North Oaks, MN 55127 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Jute fiber composites from coal, super clean coal, and petroleum vacuum residue-modified phenolic resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jute fiber composites were prepared with novolac and coal, phenolated-oxidized super clean coal (POS), petroleum vacuum residue (XVR)-modified phenol-formaldehyde (novolac) resin. Five different type of resins, i.e., coal, POS, and XVR-modified resins were used by replacing (10% to 50%) with coal, POS, and XVR. The composites thus prepared have been characterized by tensile strength, hardness, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transfer infrared (FT-IR), water absorption, steam absorption, and thickness swelling studies. Twenty percent POS-modified novolac composites showed almost the same tensile strength as that of pure novolac composites. After 30% POS incorporation, the tensile strength decreased to 25.84MPa from 33.96MPa in the case of pure novolac resin composites. However, after 50% POS incorporation, the percent retention of tensile strength was appreciable, i.e., 50.80% retention of tensile strength to that of pure novolac jute composites. The tensile strength of coal and XVR-rnodified composites showed a trend similar to that shown by POS-modified novolac resin composites. However, composites prepared from coal and XVR-modified resin with 50% phenol replacement showed 25.4% and 42% tensile strength retention, respectively, compared to that of pure novolac jute composites. It was found that the hardness of the modified composites slightly decreased with an increase in coal, POS, and XVR incorporation in the resin. The XVR-modified composites showed comparatively lower steam absorption than did coal or POS-modified composites. The thermal stability of the POS-modified composites was the highest among the composites studied. The detailed results obtained are being reported.

Ahmaruzzaman, M.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India). Center of Energy Studies

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We investigate with nonreactive molecular dynamics simulations the dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube (CNT) composites to shock wave compression. For phenolic resin, our simulations yield shock states in agreement with experiments on similar polymers except the “phase change” observed in experiments, indicating that such phase change is chemical in nature. The elastic–plastic transition is characterized by shear stress relaxation and atomic-level slip, and phenolic resin shows strong strain hardening. Shock loading of the CNT-resin composites is applied parallel or perpendicular to the CNT axis, and the composites demonstrate anisotropy in wave propagation, yield and CNT deformation. The CNTs induce stress concentrations in the composites and may increase the yield strength. Our simulations suggest that the bulk shock response of the composites depends on the volume fraction, length ratio, impact cross-section, and geometry of the CNT components; the short CNTs in current simulations have insignificant effect on the bulk response of resin polymer.

Arman, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) and Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); An, Q. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) and California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States); Luo, S. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Desai, T. G. [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States); Tonks, D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cagin, T. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Goddard III, W. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hydrogen Selective Inorganic membranes for Gas Separations under High Pressure Intermediate Temperature Hydrocarbonic Envrionment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, we have successfully developed a full scale commercially ready carbon molecular sieve (CMS) based membrane for applications in H{sub 2} recovery from refinery waste and other aggressive gas streams. Field tests at a refinery pilot plant and a coal gasification facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to recovery hydrogen from hydrotreating and raw syngas respectively. High purity H{sub 2} and excellent stability of the membrane permeance and selectivity were obtained in testing conducted over >500 hours at each site. The results from these field tests as well as laboratory testing conclude that the membranes can be operated at high pressures (up to 1,000 psig) and temperatures (up to 300 C) in presence of aggressive contaminants, such as sulfur and nitrogen containing species (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, etc), condensable hydrocarbons, tar-like species, heavy metals, etc. with no observable effect on membrane performance. By comparison, similar operating conditions and/or environments would rapidly destroy competing membranes, such as polymeric, palladium, zeolitic, etc. Significant cost savings can be achieved through recovering H{sub 2} from refinery waste gas using this newly developed CMS membrane. Annual savings of $2 to 4MM/year (per 20,000 scfd of waste gas) can be realized by recovering the H{sub 2} for reuse (versus fuel). Projecting these values over the entire US market, potential H{sub 2} savings from refinery waste gases on the order of 750 to 1,000MM scfd and $750 to $1,000MM per year are possible. In addition to the cost savings, potential energy savings are projected to be ca. 150 to 220 tBTU/yr and CO{sub 2} gas emission reductions are projected to be ca. 5,000 to 6,500MMtons/year. The full scale membrane bundle developed as part of this project, i.e., 85 x 30 inch ceramic membrane tubes packaged into a full ceramic potting, is an important accomplishment. No comparable commercial scale product exists in the inorganic membrane field. Further, this newly developed full scale bundle concept can be extended to other thin film inorganic membrane technology (Pd, zeolite, etc), providing a potential commercialization pathway for these membrane materials that demonstrate high potential in a variety of separation applications yet remain a laboratory 'novelty' for lack of a full scale support. Overall, the project has been highly successful and all of the project objectives have been met. We have developed the first of its kind commercial scale carbon molecular sieve membrane and demonstrated its performance in field testing under aggressive operating conditions and in the presence of chemical contaminants that would rapidly destroy alternative organic and inorganic membranes. This innovative membrane permits H{sub 2} recovery from gas streams that up until now have not been successfully treated with membrane or conventional technology. Our end user participant is currently pursuing the field demonstration of this membrane for hydrogen recovery at its refinery site.

Rich Ciora; Paul KT Liu

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Comparative laboratory evaluation of resin-grouted roof bolt elements. Report of Investigations/1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laboratory testing, the Bureau of Mines established criteria by which common resin-grouted roof-bolting systems can be evaluated and compared. Ultimate strength and stiffness were determined for nontensioned full-column, point-anchor, tensioned full-column, and debondable resin-grouted bolts, and for variations on full-column bolts. Bolt performances were compared using the performance of the 3/4-in full-column resin-grouted bolt as the standard. New and innovative systems can also be qualitatively compared against this standard. Various host mediums were used in the testing: sandstone, concrete, simulated coal, simulated shale, and plaster. Bolt performances expected in other mediums can be inferred from the response patterns obtained in these mediums.

Bartels, J.R.; Pappas, D.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 ..mu..g of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Li, T.K.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Epoxy Resin-Photopolymer Composites for Volume Timothy J. Trentler, Joel E. Boyd, and Vicki L. Colvin*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epoxy Resin-Photopolymer Composites for Volume Holography Timothy J. Trentler, Joel E. Boyd by mixing photopo- lymerizable vinyl monomers with a liquid epoxy resin and an amine hardener. A solid matrix is formed in situ as the epoxy cures at room temperature. The unreacted vinyl monomers

344

Characterization of the pentacene thin-film transistors with an epoxy resin-based polymeric gate insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of the pentacene thin-film transistors with an epoxy resin-based polymeric gate seeking desirable semi- conductor/insulator combinations [3]. In this study, we adopted an epoxy resin fabricated and characterized. SU-8, a reliable epoxy-based pho- toresist, is tested as a potential highly

Boyer, Edmond

345

Processing and property investigation of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) buckypaper/epoxy resin matrix nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buckypaper was realized by infiltrating acetone diluted epoxy resin (Epon 862/EPI Cure W system) alongProcessing and property investigation of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) buckypaper/epoxy resin matrix nanocomposites Zhi Wanga , Zhiyong Lianga , Ben Wanga,*, Chuck Zhanga , Leslie Kramerb

Das, Suman

346

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles What determines their composition Whether or not particles deposit How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexingt

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Waste Tank Organic Safety Project: Analysis of liquid samples from Hanford waste tank 241-C-103  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A suite of physical and chemical analyses has been performed in support of activities directed toward the resolution of an Unreviewed Safety Question concerning the potential for a floating organic layer in Hanford waste tank 241-C-103 to sustain a pool fire. The analysis program was the result of a Data Quality Objectives exercise conducted jointly with staff from Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The organic layer has been analyzed for flash point, organic composition including volatile organics, inorganic anions and cations, radionuclides, and other physical and chemical parameters needed for a safety assessment leading to the resolution of the Unreviewed Safety Question. The aqueous layer underlying the floating organic material was also analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide composition, as well as other physical and chemical properties. This work was conducted to PNL Quality Assurance impact level III standards (Good Laboratory Practices).

Pool, K.H.; Bean, R.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Investigation of gamma induced degradation of Amberlite 200 cation resin by mass spectrometer and liquid chromatograph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, provisions were made for collecting samples of any gas produced. The irradiated resin was exposed to total 7 8 8 accumulations of 1. 0129X10 , 1. 0215XIO , and 5. 0168X10 Rads in three separate runs. It should be noted that the same amount of demineral.... (December 1977) Albert Antonio Freitag, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James 8. Smathers Amberlite 200 cation exchange resin was irradiated by gamma 7 8 radiation to doses of 10 to 5X10 Rads. Results of the analysis...

Freitag, Albert Antonio

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A Fully Biobased Epoxy Resin from Vegetable Oils: From the Synthesis of the Precursors by Thiol-ene Reaction to the Study of the Final Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Fully Biobased Epoxy Resin from Vegetable Oils: From the Synthesis of the Precursors by Thiol agent for bio-based epoxy resin. The thermal crosslinking reaction between AGSO and epoxi- dized linseed and thermal behav- iors. But, the substitution of bis-phenol A based epoxy resins by materials coming from

Boyer, Edmond

350

Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

First principles study of structure and lithium storage in inorganic nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exact structure of layered inorganic nanotubes is difficult to determine, but this information is vital to using atomistic calculations to predict nanotube properties. A multi-walled nanotube with a circular cross ...

Tibbetts, Kevin (Kevin Joseph)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

FRED E. WOOD University of California, Davis, Ph.D., Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry, 1984  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRED E. WOOD EDUCATION University of California, Davis, Ph.D., Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry scholarship and $1 million for endowed reentry student scholarships. #12;FRED E. WOOD Page 2 Obtained over

Amin, S. Massoud

353

Salmon Carcasses Increase Stream Productivity More than Inorganic Fertilizer Pellets: A Test on Multiple Trophic Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salmon Carcasses Increase Stream Productivity More than Inorganic Fertilizer Pellets: A Test experiment, we examined the short-term (6 weeks) comparative effects of artificial nutrient pellets pellet treatment was soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration. Ammonium-nitrogen concentration

Wagner, Diane

354

Removal of inorganic trace contaminants by electrodialysis in a remote Australian community   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water provision for developing countries is a critical issue as a vast number of lives are lost annually due to lack of access to safe drinking water. The presence and fate of inorganic trace contaminants is of particular ...

Banasiak, Laura J.; Schäfer, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Formation of semivolatile inorganic aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most challenging tasks for chemical transport models (CTMs) is the prediction of the formation and partitioning of the major semi-volatile inorganic aerosol components (nitrate, chloride, ammonium) between the ...

Karydis, V. A.

356

The nature and fate of natural resins in the geosphere - VIII - NMR and Py-GC-MS characterization of soluble labdanoid polymers isolated from holocene class I resins.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soluble polylabdanoids isolated by sequential solvent extraction have been characterized by liquid-state {sup 13}C- and {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H HMQC (heteronuclear correlation) NMR spectroscopy in addition to solid-state NMR and Py-GC-MS techniques. Two Holocene resins originating from Santander, Colombia and Mombasa, Kenya were analyzed. Soluble polymers were isolated by extraction with a 1:1 (v/v) methylene chloride-methanol mixture following sequential extractions with methylene chloride and methanol. The molecular weight of polymer extracts was shown by GPC analyses to exceed that of non-polymeric occluded terpenoids. Py-GC-MS, solid-state {sup 13}C CP/MAS and {sup 13}C cross-polarization/depolarization NMR spectroscopy results indicated that chemical compositions of soluble polymers isolated from immature resins are highly representative of the structure of corresponding insoluble polymers, i.e. polylabdatrienes. These data provide evidence for cross-linking or cyclization of side-chain olefinic carbons during or shortly after polymerization. Generally, the characterization of soluble resin polymers by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy has proven to be an excellent means for investigating the maturation mechanism of polylabdanoid resinites, and has potential for furthering the application of Class I resinites as geothermal indicators.

Clifford, D. J.; Hatcher, P. G.; Botto, R. E.; Muntean, J. V.; Michaels, B.; Anderson, K. B.; Chemistry; Pennsylvania State Univ.; Amoco Oil Co.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Rare earth element concentrations and speciation in organic-rich blackwaters of the Great Dismal Swamp, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rare earth element concentrations and speciation in organic-rich blackwaters of the Great Dismal Concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), major inorganic solutes, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were reserved. Keywords: Rare earth elements; Speciation; Humic substances; Geochemistry; Great Dismal Swamp

Burdige, David

358

High-density organic light emitting diodes by nanoimprint technology Krutarth Trivedi, Caleb Nelson, Li Tao, Mathew Goeckner, Walter Hua)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-density organic light emitting diodes by nanoimprint technology Krutarth Trivedi, Caleb Nelson sources. Despite the considerable development of inorganic semiconductor based light emitting diodes of miniaturization to nanoscale. Organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology is immune to quantum confinement

Hu, Wenchuang "Walter"

359

Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

Dell`Orco, P.C. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles embedded in polystyrene resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles embedded in polystyrene resin P. P. Vaishnava online 20 April 2006 Samples of maghemite and cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles sizes, 3­10 nm were prepared.6­8 How- ever, the ion-exchange method can also produce nanopar- ticles of ferrites and other

Boolchand, Punit

363

Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Smoke and toxic species analyses from controlled combustion of wood impregnated with guayule resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulated. The need for an environmentally benign combined fire/rot retardant treatment for wood that will effectively reduce both fire and decay is clearly evident. Guayule resin, a co-by-product during rubber extraction from the guayule shrub, is being...

Smith, Lonnie

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Composition and structure of resins in lube distillates from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the lower contents of lube components in the crudes being processed today, along with a steady increase of demand for high-quality oils and solid hydrocarbons, as well as the trend toward processing crudes with unregulated composition, it has become necessary to develop new technology for the manufacture of lube stocks, along with the use of additives for various purposes. The effectiveness of additives is determined by their properties and also by the chemical composition of the raw material in each stage of oil production. Resins are important components of raw lube stocks. These resins are complex in composition, and vary in the nature and number of heteroatoms in the molecule and in the structure of the hydrocarbon part of the molecule. The hydrocarbon radicals may include aromatic and naphthenic rings, as well as chains with various configurations. Depending on the structural features of the resin molecules, they may vary in their effects on processes of selective solvent treating, dewaxing, and deoiling with the use of additives. The authors have investigated the resins present in the intermediate and final products of lube oil production.

Kazakova, L.P.; Gundyrev, A.A.; Litvin, N.I.; Shubina, E.S.; Mukhin, M.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Effects of Glass Fabric and Laminate Construction on the Fatigue of Resin Infused Blade Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Glass Fabric and Laminate Construction on the Fatigue of Resin Infused Blade Materials. Introduction Wind turbine blades experience very high numbers of fatigue cycles varying between tension and wind conditions. The fatigue of composite laminates appropriate for wind turbine blades has been

367

Effects of petroleum resins on asphaltene aggregation and water-in-oil emulsion formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of petroleum resins on asphaltene aggregation and water-in-oil emulsion formation P; accepted 30 December 2002 Abstract Asphaltenes from four crude oils were fractionated by precipitation) indicated the onset of asphaltene precipitation occurred at lower toluene volume fractions (0.1Á/0.2) than

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

368

Utilization of Methacrylates and Polymer Matrices for the Synthesis of Ion Specific Resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal, storage, and/or transmutation of actinides such as americium (Am) will require the development of specific separation schemes. Existing efforts focus on solvent extraction systems for achieving suitable separation of actinide from lanthanides. However, previous work has shown the feasibility of ion-imprinting polymer-based resins for use in ion-exchange-type separations with metal ion recognition. Phenolic-based resins have been shown to function well for Am-Eu separations, but these resins exhibited slow kinetics and difficulties in the imprinting process. This project addresses the need for new and innovative methods for the selective separation of actinides through novel ion-imprinted resins. The project team will explore incorporation of metals into extended frameworks, including the possibility of 3D polymerized matrices that can serve as a solid-state template for specific resin preparation. For example, an anhydrous trivalent f-element chain can be formed directly from a metal carbonate, and methacrylic acid from water. From these simple coordination complexes, molecules of discrete size or shape can be formed via the utilization of coordinating ligands or by use of an anionic multi-ligand system incorporating methacrylate. Additionally, alkyl methyl methacrylates have been used successfully to create template nanospaces, which underscores their potential utility as 3D polymerized matrices. This evidence provides a unique route for the preparation of a specific metal ion template for the basis of ion-exchange separations. Such separations may prove to be excellent discriminators of metal ions, even between f-elements.

Czerwinski, Kenneth

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

Complexant stability investigation. Task 2. Organic complexants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety of high-level defense waste operations has always been given highest priority at the Hanford site. This document is part of the continued effort to appraise and reevaluate the safety of the waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Reservation. Hanford high-level defense waste consists mainly of moist, inorganic salts, NaNO/sub 3/, NaAl(OH)/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and other sodium salts. However, in addition to these salts, quantities of organic compounds constitute a significant portion of the waste. The potential reaction of the organic compounds with inorganic salts to form explosive substances is examined and found to be nonexistent or negligible. The concept that the waste mixture might react exothermically is found to be untenable under the present storage conditions. The phenomenon of slurry growth in double-shell waste storage tanks is expected to cause no increase in exothermic reaction potential within the waste. The results of this study indicate that the presence of organic material in the high-level defense waste does not constitute undue hazard under the present storage conditions.

Martin, E.C.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, D.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig.

Bickford, D.F.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, Dennis F. (Aiken, SC)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Deliverable for F?ST project: Ln Resin based PLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This memo describes the fabrication of a polymer ligand extractant based on Eichrom's LN-1 resin. This work has been in support of the Fast Alpha Spectrometry Tool (F{alpha}ST) project. The first part of LANL's role in this project is to evaluate new extractants for use in polymer ligand extractants (PLEs). The first new extractant evaluated is Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), which is an effective metal extractant. It has very efficient chelating properties for a wide variety of metal ions. HDEHP is an amphiphillic molecule with two long hydrocarbon chains and a polar end with a phosphoryl oxygen (P=O) and an acidic -OH group as shown in Figure 1. HDEHP has shown effectiveness in extracting lanthanides, selective actinides, and other trivalent elements. Several authors have reported that lanthanides and elements with +3 oxidation state have similar extraction behavior in nitric acid. The distribution ratio for lanthanides rapidly decreases at lower nitric concentration then start to increase at higher concentration as shown in. The trivalent americium, curium, and yttrium exhibit similar trend as trivalent lanthanides. This extraction trend can be also observed from hydrogen chloride solution. This work describes the use of this ligand in a PLE to extract plutonium from solution. Polymer ligand films were prepared by dissolving HDEHP ligands and polystyrene beads in THF. The solution was directly deposited onto a 40 mm diameter stainless steel substrate using an automated pipette. HDEHP based PLEs with direct stippling method are shown in Figure 2. The solution was air dried at room temperature overnight to ensure complete evaporation of THF. The plutonium tracer solution was prepared in 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 8M nitric solutions to study the effect of nitric concentration in plutonium extraction. 0.1667 Bq {sup 239}Pu tracer solution was directly stippled on each PLE and was allowed to equilibrate for 3 hours before removing the solution. The plutonium activity of each sample was measured by direct alpha counting to quantify the plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE. The alpha spectra from alpha spectroscopy are shown in Figure 3. 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 PLEs had sharp peak with low tailing. 1:2 had an extremely long tail, which is a possible indication that a large amount of ligands caused the film to not form a smooth surface. Also, it can be noted that 1:2 ratio PLE surface was not as rigid as the other ratio PLEs and it was prone to scratching during sample handing. The resolution of alpha spectra was quantified by measuring Full Width at Half of the Maximum (FWHM) using Bortels equation. The tailing component of the peak was also measured along with FWHM. The peak resolutions and tailing measurements for 0.1M nitric solution samples are given in Table 1. The best resolution was achieved with 1:5 PLE and worst was given by 1:2 PLE. The plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE was dependent on both nitric concentration and ligand to polymer ratio. 1:2 PLE consistently had the highest recovery followed by 1:5 as shown in Figure 4. It should be noted that 1:2 ratio PLEs consistently had long tailing and the ROI of the spectrum had to be increased to encompass total counts from the tracer. 1:10 and 1:20 PLEs had close to zero percent recovery in all nitric concentration except for 0.01M. The highest plutonium recovery was observed for 0.1M nitric acid. 1:5 PLE gave the best combination of alpha spectroscopy resolution and plutonium recovery. Radiography image of samples were generated to study the plutonium distribution on the PLE surface. Samples were placed on an imaging plate (Fujifilm BAS-TR 2025) for 24 hours and the plate was scanned using GE Typhoon FLA 7000 system. The radiography image in Figure 5 shows uneven distribution with hot spots along the edge and in the center of the samples. These hot spots may be the result of highly localized concentration of ligands or surface defects that were observed in SEM. This unevenness in distribution may cause inaccurate activity measurement by alpha spectroscopy due to a bias in the

Peterson, Dominic S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armenta, Claudine E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rim, Jung H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

374

Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Final report, August 1992--May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted a theoretical and experimental program to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate the gaseous products of coal gasification. A variety of developmental efforts are underway, including a number of projects sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to improve the selectivity and permeability of porous inorganic membranes. DOE is also sponsoring efforts to extend the use of metallic membranes to new applications. Most developmental efforts have focused on hydrogen separation by inorganic membranes, which may be used to maximize hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition in integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. Membrane materials that have been investigated include glass (silica), alumina, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt). This report describes inorganic membrane materials, long term membrane exposure tests, membrane permeation tests, coal gasifier exposure tests, conclusions, and recommendations.

Damle, A.S.; Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ernesto Joselevich Research Summary -May 2008 Molecular Wires: From Self-Organization to Functional Nanosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, inorganic nanowires and polymers, their integration into functional the development of epitaxial approaches to carbon nanotube organization, namely, the directed growth of carbon highly straight, kinked, wavy, crossed8 , serpentine9 and looped. A second contribution has been

Martin, Jan M.L.

376

Numerical Modelling of Light Emission and Propagation in (Organic) LEDs with the Green's Tensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

light emitting diodes, light emission, light extraction, dipole radiation, stratified media, layered surpasses incandescent sources by a factor of 2 and with further improvements light emitting diodes could on light extraction techniques from inorganic light emitting diodes we recommend chapter 5 in 1 . Organic

Floreano, Dario

377

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Predicting the adsorption of second generation biofuels by polymeric resins with applications for in situ product recovery (ISPR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The application of hydrophobic polymeric resins as solid-phase adsorbent materials for the recovery and purification of prospective second generation biofuel compounds, including ethanol, iso-propanol, n-propanol, iso-butanol, ...

Nielsen, David R.

379

An experimental investigation of thermal contact conductance across carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites as a function of interface pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE ACROSS CARBON FIBER/EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES AS A FUNCTION OF INTERFACE PRESSURE A Thesis by MICHAEL EVERETT RHOADES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE ACROSS CARBON FIBER/EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES AS A...

Rhoades, Michael Everett

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Investigation of the ion exchange equilibrium between NA+, Ca++, Mg++, and a sulfonated polystyrene resin at various concentrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATiON OF THE ION EXCHANGE EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN Na , Ca++, Mg++, AND A SULFONATED POLYSTYRENE RESIN AT VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS A THESIS BY WILLIAM FRANKLIN McILHENNY Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical... College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1958 MaJor Subject: Chemical Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE ION EXCHANGE EQUILIBRIUM BFTWEEN Na+, Ca++ Mg++ AND A SULFONATED POLYSTYRENE RESIN...

McIlhenny, William Franklin

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Organic Superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

Charles Mielke

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evaluation of bisphenol E cyanate ester for the resin-injection repair of advanced composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis is a compilation of a general introduction and literature review that ties together the subsequent chapters which consist of two journal articles that have yet to be submitted for publication. The overall topic relates to the evaluation and application of a new class of cyanate ester resin with unique properties that lend it applicable to use as a resin for injection repair of high glass transition temperature polymer matrix composites. The first article (Chapter 2) details the evaluation and optimization of adhesive properties of this cyanate ester and alumina nanocomposites under different conditions. The second article (Chapter 3) describes the development and evaluation of an injection repair system for repairing delaminations in polymer matrix composites.

Wilber Yaote Lio

2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

New bifunctional anion-exchange resins for nuclear waste treatment: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additional bifunctional anion-exchange resins have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to take up Pu(IV) from nitric acid solutions. Bifunctionality is achieved by adding a second anion-exchange site to the pyridine nitrogen (also an anion-exchange site) of the base poly(4-vinylpyridine) resin. Previous work focused on the effect of varying the chemical properties of the added site along with the length of an alkylene spacer between the two sites. Here the authors examine four new 3- and 4-picolyl derivatives which maintain more rigidly defined geometries between the two nitrogen cationic sites. These materials, which have the two anion-exchange sites separated by three and four carbons, respectively, exhibit lower overall Pu(IV) distribution coefficients than the corresponding N-alkylenepyridium derivatives with more flexible spacers. Methylation of the second pyridium site results in a ca. 20% increase in the Pu(IV) distribution coefficients.

Marsh, S.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bartsch, R.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The retention time of inorganic mercury in the brain — A systematic review of the evidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports from human case studies indicate a half-life for inorganic mercury in the brain in the order of years—contradicting older radioisotope studies that estimated half-lives in the order of weeks to months in duration. This study systematically reviews available evidence on the retention time of inorganic mercury in humans and primates to better understand this conflicting evidence. A broad search strategy was used to capture 16,539 abstracts on the Pubmed database. Abstracts were screened to include only study types containing relevant information. 131 studies of interest were identified. Only 1 primate study made a numeric estimate for the half-life of inorganic mercury (227–540 days). Eighteen human mercury poisoning cases were followed up long term including autopsy. Brain inorganic mercury concentrations at death were consistent with a half-life of several years or longer. 5 radionucleotide studies were found, one of which estimated head half-life (21 days). This estimate has sometimes been misinterpreted to be equivalent to brain half-life—which ignores several confounding factors including limited radioactive half-life and radioactive decay from surrounding tissues including circulating blood. No autopsy cohort study estimated a half-life for inorganic mercury, although some noted bioaccumulation of brain mercury with age. Modelling studies provided some extreme estimates (69 days vs 22 years). Estimates from modelling studies appear sensitive to model assumptions, however predications based on a long half-life (27.4 years) are consistent with autopsy findings. In summary, shorter estimates of half-life are not supported by evidence from animal studies, human case studies, or modelling studies based on appropriate assumptions. Evidence from such studies point to a half-life of inorganic mercury in human brains of several years to several decades. This finding carries important implications for pharmcokinetic modelling of mercury and potentially for the regulatory toxicology of mercury.

Rooney, James P.K., E-mail: jrooney@rcsi.ie

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

386

Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

387

Heterogeneous models of tubular reactors packed with ion-exchange resins: Simulation of the MTBE synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of behavior of fixed-bed reactors using ion-exchange resins as catalysts was carried out by making use of a complete bidimensional heterogeneous model for the reactor, which included the resistances inside the ion-exchange resin particles, considered with a macroreticular structure. The active sites were located inside the gel phase of the resin, represented by microspheres, and on the macropores walls. The overall efficiency of such heterogeneous catalyst particles was defined by the macroeffectiveness and microeffectiveness factors accounting for the process behavior on the macropores and inside the microspheres. The synthesis of methyl tert-butyl ether, MTBE, a liquid-phase reversible exothermic reaction between methanol and isobutene, was considered as a reference case. This system was studied in the temperature range of 313--338 K, and the effect of the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions was examined. The results predicted by the complete heterogeneous model were compared with those obtained with the simple pseudohomogeneous model, which revealed higher hot spots. Moreover, a comparison between bidimensional and unidimensional models was also performed. The orthogonal collocation method was used for the discretization of the differential equations inside the catalyst particles, which were reduced from three (corresponding to the three mass balances for the three compounds, isobutene, methanol, and MTBE) to only one differential equation, by using the concept of the generalized variable.

Quinta Ferreira, R.M.; Almeida-Costa, C.A. [Univ. of Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rodrigues, A.E. [Univ. of Porto (Portugal). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Mechanically flexible organic electroluminescent device with directional light emission  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mechanically flexible and environmentally stable organic electroluminescent ("EL") device with directional light emission comprises an organic EL member disposed on a flexible substrate, a surface of which is coated with a multilayer barrier coating which includes at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent organic polymer and at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent inorganic material. The device includes a reflective metal layer disposed on the organic EL member opposite to the substrate. The reflective metal layer provides an increased external quantum efficiency of the device. The reflective metal layer and the multilayer barrier coating form a seal around the organic EL member to reduce the degradation of the device due to environmental elements.

Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Schaepkens, Marc

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Polygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes Kevin Tibbetts,* Robert Doe, and Gerbrand Ceder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the shape of the cross section. Circular and polygonal nanotubes are compared based on their strain energy of several concentric "single-walled" nanotubes.2,19,20 In this paper we develop a model for the energyPolygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes Kevin Tibbetts,* Robert Doe, and Gerbrand Ceder

Ceder, Gerbrand

391

Binary inorganic salt mixtures as high conductivity liquid electrolytes for .100 uC fuel cells{  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binary inorganic salt mixtures as high conductivity liquid electrolytes for .100 uC fuel cells cations (e.g. ammonium) as electrolytes in fuel cells operating in the temperature range 100­200 uC, where cell operating with optimized electrodes in the same temperature range, while open circuit voltages

Angell, C. Austen

392

Inorganic Surface Nanostructuring by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inorganic Surface Nanostructuring by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft PolymerizationVed February 27, 2007. In Final Form: May 29, 2007 Surface graft polymerization of 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone onto by graft polymerization in both N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and in an NMP/water solvent mixture

Hicks, Robert F.

393

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

Pennycook, Steve

394

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Karsten Meyer Chair of Inorganic and General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Uranium Coordination Chemistry Structure & Bonding 2008, 127, 119 ­ 176. C. Hauser and K. Meyer Uranchemie-Atom Transfer Chemistry Mediated by a Nucleophilic Uranium(V) Imido Complex Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2006, 45, 1757Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Karsten Meyer Chair of Inorganic and General Chemistry Department of Chemistry

Meyer, Karsten

395

Nano Res (2010) 3: 170173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nano Res (2010) 3: 170­173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes]. Folding and bonding of edge atoms on the periphery of the quasi two-dimensional planar nano- structure this nanotubular structure is suitable for capillary filling using molten metal halides. Nano Res (2010) 3: 170

Davis, Ben G.

396

Catalytic Upgrading of bio-oil using 1-octene and 1-butanol over sulfonic acid resin catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raw bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass must be refined before it can be used as a transporation fuel, a petroleum refinery feed or for many other fuel uses. Raw bio-oil was upgraded with the neat model olefin, 1-octene, and with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures over sulfonic acid resin catalysts frin 80 to 150 degrees celisus in order to simultaneously lower water content and acidity and to increase hydrophobicity and heating value. Phase separation and coke formation were key factors limiting the reaction rate during upgrading with neat 1-octene although octanols were formed by 1-octene hydration along with small amounts of octyl acetates and ethers. GC-MS analysis confirmed that olefin hydration, carboxylic acid esterification, acetal formation from aldehydes and ketones and O- and C-alkylations of phenolic compounds occurred simultaneously during upgrading with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures. Addition of 1-butanol increased olefin conversion dramatically be reducing mass transfer restraints and serving as a cosolvent or emulsifying agent. It also reacted with carboxylic acids and aldehydes/ketones to form esters, and acetals, respectively, while also serving to stabilize bio-oil during heating. 1-Butanol addition also protected the catalysts, increasing catalyst lifetime and reducing or eliminationg coking. Upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, polyhydric alcohols and organic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rise from 2.5 to >3.0), removed the uppleasant ordor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content decreased from 37.2% to < 7.5% dramatically and calorific value increased from 12.6 MJ kg to about 30.0 MJ kg.

Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Qingwen; Tripathi, Prabhat; Pittman, Charles U.

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

ESTIMATION OF RADIOLYTIC GAS GENERATION RATE FOR CYLINDRICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES - APPLICATION TO SPENT ION EXCHANGE RESIN CONTAINERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste packages containing water and/or organic substances have the potential to radiolytically generate hydrogen and other combustible gases. Typically, the radiolytic gas generation rate is estimated from the energy deposition rate and the radiolytic gas yield. Estimation of the energy deposition rate must take into account the contributions from all radionuclides. While the contributions from non-gamma emitting radionuclides are relatively easy to estimate, an average geometry factor must be computed to determine the contribution from gamma emitters. Hitherto, no satisfactory method existed for estimating the geometry factors for a cylindrical package. In the present study, a formulation was developed taking into account the effect of photon buildup. A prototype code, called PC-CAGE, was developed to numerically solve the integrals involved. Based on the selected dimensions for a cylinder, the specified waste material, the photon energy of interest and a value for either the absorption or attenuation coefficient, the code outputs values for point and average geometry factors. These can then be used to estimate the internal dose rate to the material in the cylinder and hence to calculate the radiolytic gas generation rate. Besides the ability to estimate the rates of radiolytic gas generation, PC-CAGE can also estimate the dose received by the container material. This is based on values for the point geometry factors at the surface of the cylinder. PC-CAGE was used to calculate geometry factors for a number of cylindrical geometries. Estimates for the absorbed dose rate in container material were also obtained. The results for Ontario Power Generation's 3 m3 resin containers indicate that about 80% of the source gamma energy is deposited internally. In general, the fraction of gamma energy deposited internally depends on the dimensions of the cylinder, the material within it and the photon energy; the fraction deposited increases with increasing dimensions of the cylinder and decreases with increasing photon energy.

Husain, A.; Lewis, Brent J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

Radioactive Spent Ion-Exchange Resins Conditioning by the Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange NPP - Early Experience - 12200  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent ion-exchange resins are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during their conditioning to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. In Belgium, for economical reasons, the Volume Reduction Factor is a key criterion. After Tractebel Engineering performed a technical and economical comparison of the industrially available systems, Tihange NPP decided to install a spent ion-exchange resins hot supercompaction unit with Tractebel Engineering in the role of architect-engineer. The treatment and conditioning unit processes the spent ion-exchange resins through the following steps: dewatering of the resins, drying the resins under deep vacuum, discharging the dried resins into compactable drums, super-compacting the drums to generate pellets, grouting the pellets into standard 400 litres waste drums (overpacks) licensed for final disposal in the near-surface repository in Belgium. Several developments were required to adapt the reference process and equipment to PWR spent ion-exchange bead resins and Belgian radioactive waste acceptance criteria. In order to avoid cracks on the compacted drum, and external surface contamination from resin leaks, some improvements were achieved to minimize spring-back as well as the risk of cracking the drum wall. Placing the compactable drum inside a second, slightly larger drum, guarantees clean and reproducible pellets. Currently the commissioning phase is on-going. Numerous process validation tests have been completed. An acceptance file was transmitted to the Belgian Waste Management Authority recently. This will be followed by demonstration tests necessary to obtain their final acceptance of the installation. More than 3 800 drums of mixed powdered and bead resins have been processed by the reference Hot Compaction process, achieving a Volume Reduction Factor (VRF) of 2.5. The equipment has been proven to be a reliable technology with low operation and maintenance costs. Tractebel Engineering has managed the construction of a new application of this process in Belgium at Tihange NPP. Several developments were required to adapt the reference process and equipment to PWR spent ion-exchange bead resins and Belgian radioactive waste acceptance criteria. The chosen method of conditioning (draining, drying and compaction of the spent resins followed by grouting of the pellets in a 400 litres drum) immobilizes the spent resins under the form of a solid, compact, stable, and non dispersible block free of interstitial water. The various series of inactive tests which were conducted at Tihange NPP, helped among others to determine the best design of the compactable drum and lid and to set the value of critical parameters such as vapour temperature at the end of drying, speed, force and duration of compaction. In an environment of very limited space for interim storage and in the absence of an operational final repository site, or in the case of high final disposal costs, the process exhibits the following key advantages: - Achieving a Volume Reduction Factor (VRF) close to 1 (overpack included) for the interim storage instead of increased volumes observed with other currently available processes; - Achieving a water free end product; - Creating a flexible waste product for interim storage (pellet), which can be retrieved and routed into alternative types of package later, if not initially grouted; - Using well proven standard technologies like drying and compaction; - Flexible use of the system components for the supercompaction of other operational solid waste streams when not conducting resins conditioning campaigns. (authors)

Braet, Johan; Charpentier, David; Centner, Baudouin; Vanderperre, Serge [Nuclear Department, Tractebel Engineering (GDF-SUEZ), Avenue Ariane 7, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Controlled binding and assembly of peptides onto inorganic substrates is at the core of bionanotechnology and biological-materials engineering. Peptides offer several  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inorganic surfaces that are distinguishable by shape, crystallography, mineralogy, and chemistry. Second and theoretical approaches and concepts that will help advance this emerging field. Molecular Design of Inorganic-inorganic materials is dependent upon our understanding of the molecular factors that govern sequence

Samudrala, Ram

400

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent.

Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent. 11 figs.

Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Improved resins and novel materials and methods for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-phase extraction (SPE) has grown to be one of the most widely used methods for isolation and preconcentration of a vast range of compounds from aqueous solutions. By modifying polymeric SPE resins with chelating functional groups, the selective uptake of metals was accomplished. The resin, along with adsorbed metals, was vaporized in the ICP and detection of the metals was then possible using either mass or emission spectroscopy. Drug analyses in biological fluids have received heightened attention as drug testing is on the increase both in sports and in the work environment. By using a direct-injection technique, biological fluids can be injected directly into the liquid chromatographic system with no pretreatment. A new surfactant, a sulfonated form of Brij-30 (Brij-S) is shown to prevent the uptake of serum proteins on commercial HPLC columns by forming a thin coating on the silica C18 surface. Excellent separations of eight or more drugs with a wide range of retention times were obtained. The separations had sharper peaks and lower retention times than similar separations performed with the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). Quantitative recovery of a number of drugs with limits of detection near 1 ppm with a 5 {micro}l injection volume were obtained. Finally, a method for solid-phase extraction in a syringe is introduced. The system greatly reduced the volume of solvent required to elute adsorbed analytes from the SPE bed while providing a semi-automated setup. SPE in a syringe consists of a very small bed of resin-loaded membrane packed into a GC or HPLC syringe. After extraction, elution was performed with just a few {micro}l of solvent. This small elution volume allowed injection of the eluent directly from the syringe into the chromatographic system, eliminating the handling problems associated with such small volumes.

Freeze, R.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

Standard Test Method for Resin Flow of Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Prepreg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the amount of resin flow that will take place from prepreg tape or sheet under given conditions of temperature and pressure. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values in parentheses are for reference only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Oxidation reactions of solid carbonaceous and resinous substances in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent kinetic studies, particularly those by means of shadowgraphy and X-ray radiography, for supercritical water oxidation of solid carbonaceous and resinous substances have revealed the importance of the O{sub 2} mass transfer process over the intrinsic surface reaction at higher temperatures. The mass transfer processes, internal and external one, should be incorporated in designing SCWO processes for solid substances and related processes such as catalytic SCWO. Some model calculation efforts of late are briefly described. Finally, fundamental information required for future development is itemed.

Koda, S. [Sophia University, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Material and Life Science

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Development of hybrid organic-inorganic light emitting diodes using conducting polymers deposited by oxidative chemical vapor deposition process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Difficulties with traditional methods of synthesis and film formation for conducting polymers, many of which are insoluble, motivate the development of CVD methods. Indeed, conjugated polymers with rigid linear backbones ...

Chelawat, Hitesh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Inorganic and organic carbon variations in surface water, Konza prairie LTER site, USA, and Maolan karst experimental site, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Maolan Karst Experimental (Maolan) Site, China. For the stream at the Konza LTER site, little variation in water chemistry was observed among the upstream, midstream and downstream locations, indicating the groundwater and stream water chemistry...

Liu, Huan

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Phase Behavior of a Structurally Constrained Organic-Inorganic Crystal: Temperature-Dependent Infrared Spectroscopy of Silver n-Dodecanethiolate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Basil I. Swanson Bioscience DiVision, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 Recei imparted by the thermal energy are generally shown to be associated with the translational (lateral

Parikh, Atul N.

409

In(OH)BDC,0.75BDCH2 (BDC ) Benzenedicarboxylate), a Hybrid Inorganic-Organic Vernier Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geometry and the octahedral M-O centers are linked by sharing trans- hydroxyl groups forming bent M different car- boxylate ligands. In the related compounds In(BDC)1.5(bipyridine) and In2(OH)2(BDC)2(o

Wang, Xiqu

410

Interactions between Copper(II) Complexes of Mono-, Bis-, and Tris(macrocyclic) Ligands and Inorganic or Organic Guests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL PAPER Interactions between Copper(II) Complexes of Mono-, Bis-, and Tris(macrocyclic) Ligands. Prikhod'ko,[b] and Hans Pritzkow[a] Keywords: Copper / Host-guest complexes / Macrocycles / Molecular recognition Template synthesis The copper(II)-assisted condensation of [Cu(2,3,2-tet)]2+ [2,3,2-tet = bis

Nazarenko, Alexander

411

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 21, 2002, 251 255 Organic-inorganic sol-gel coating for corrosion protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for corrosion protection of stainless steel T. P. CHOU Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA E-mail: gzcao@u.washington.edu One of the most effective corrosion example. This is the main reason for the durability and corrosion resistance be- havior of this particular

Cao, Guozhong

412

Emissions of black carbon, organic, and inorganic aerosols from biomass burning in North America and Asia in 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessment of the impact of aerosols emitted from boreal forest fires on the Arctic climate necessitates) in summer 2008 and in those transported from Asia (Siberia in Russia and Kazakhstan) in spring 2008. We the microphysical properties of clouds [Lubin and Vogelmann, 2006]. Deposition of BC onto snow and ice changes

Jimenez, Jose-Luis

413

Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion process I.B. Sevostianov, V manufacturing technology based on vacuum infusion which is also known as resin film infusion technology to be infused by the vacuum to completely wet-out the reinforcements and eliminate air voids in the laminate

Sevostianov, Igor

415

REMOVAL OF TECHNETIUM 99 FROM THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) BASIN 44 USING PUROLITE A-530E & REILLEX HPQ & SYBRON IONAC SR-7 ION EXCHANGE RESINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the laboratory testing and analyses as directed under the test plan, RPP-20407. The overall goal of this task was to evaluate and compare candidate anion exchange resins for their capacity to remove Technetium-99 from Basin 44 Reverse Osmosis reject stream. The candidate resins evaluated were Purolite A-530E, Reillex HPQ, and Sybron IONAC SR-7.

DUNCAN JB

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

416

Elemental and isotopic analysis of inorganic salts by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is applied for the analysis of elements as well as their isotopic composition in different inorganic salts. At very low laser energies the inorganic ions are desorbed and ionized from the thin layer of the sample surface. The naturally occurring isotopes of alkali and silver ions are resolved using time of flight mass spectrometer. Further increase in laser energy shows the appearance of Al, Cr, and Fe ions in the mass spectra. This indicates the penetration laser beam beyond the sample surface leading to the ablation of sample target at higher energies. The simultaneous appearance of atomic ions from the sample target at relatively higher laser energies hampers the unambiguous identification of amino acid residues from the biomolecular ions in MALDI-MS.

Jayasekharan, T.; Sahoo, N. K. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

417

Organic Based Nanocomposite Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-145  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This CRADA will focus on the development of organic-based solar cells. Key interfacial issues in these cells will be investigated. In this rapidly emerging technology, it is increasingly clear that cell architecture will need to be at the nanoscale and the interfacial issues between organic elements (small molecule and polymer), transparent conducting oxides, and contact metallizations are critical. Thus this work will focus on the development of high surface area and nanostructured nanocarpets of inorganic oxides, the development of appropriate surface binding/acceptor molecules for the inorganic/organic interface, and the development of next-generation organic materials. Work will be performed in all three areas jointly at NREL and Konarka (with their partner in the third area of the University of Delaware). Results should be more rapid progress toward cheap large-area photovoltaic cells.

Olson, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

1981-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Primary diamines are disclosed of the formula shown in a diagram wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzomethane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

1981-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Quarterly technical progress report, Januray 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under DOE Grant No. FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI`s anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements.

Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.; Dharmapurikar, R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbons for lithium ion cells prepared using sepiolite as an inorganic template.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon anodes for Li ion cells have been prepared by the in situ polymerization of olefins such as propylene and ethylene in the channels of sepiolite clay mineral. Upon dissolution of the inorganic framework, a disordered carbon was obtained. The carbon was tested as anode in coin cells, yielding a reversible capacity of 633 mAh/g, 1.70 times higher than the capacity delivered by graphitic carbon, assuming 100% efficiency. The coulombic efficiency was higher than 90%.

Sandi, G.

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

Recent advances in UTSI`s anion-exchange resin-based seed regeneration process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) system the combustion gases are seeded with easily ionized potassium carbonate to provide about 1% by weight of potassium in the resulting plasma. The potassium carbonate seed serves the dual purpose of increasing the electrical conductivity of the plasma and of removing the sulfur-containing gaseous products derived from combustion of the fossil fuel. To improve the economics of the MHD technology, a high percentage of the potassium is recovered and recycled in the form of sulfur-free potassium salts such as potassium carbonate. The process of sulfur removal from the spent seed, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-rich material, is termed seed regeneration. A seed regeneration concept has been developed and tested at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), wherein a commercially available weak-base, anion-exchange resin is used at ambient conditions to remove sulfur from the alkali metal sulfates. Currently, under grants from the University Coal Research (UCR) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, and from the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program administered by the U.S. DOE Headquarters, UTSI is developing an anion-exchange resin-based seed regeneration concept. In this paper, the major results from these two concurrent studies are discussed, and the recommendations for the appropriate future efforts are provided.

Sheth, A.C.; Holt, J.K.; Strevel, S.D.; Parthasarathy, S. [Univ. of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahoma, TN (United States)] [and others

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Kreutzer, Cory (Brighton, CO); Wilson, Carolina (Arvada, CO); Meiser, Manfred (Aurora, CO)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

424

High yield production of inorganic graphene-like materials (MoS?, WS?, BN) through liquid exfoliation testing key parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inorganic graphene-like materials such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS?), tungsten sulfide (WS?), and boron nitride (BN) are known to have electronic properties. When exfoliated into layers and casted onto carbon nanofilms, ...

Pu, Fei, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplment au n" 8, Tome 39, aot 1978, page C6-982 PHONON SCATTERING AND THE LINEAR SPECIFIC HEAT TERM IN EPOXY-RESINS AT LOW TEMPERATURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCATTERING AND THE LINEAR SPECIFIC HEAT TERM IN EPOXY-RESINS AT LOW TEMPERATURES S. Kelham and H.M. Rosenberg. Abstract.- The specific heat and the thermal conductivity of an epoxy--resin has been measured from 0 on the thermal conductivity and speci- fic heat of an epoxy-resin in the range 0.1 to 80 K in which

Boyer, Edmond

426

Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

Sklarew, D.S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Estimation of aboveground biomass and inorganic nutrient content of a 25-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON MOUSER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August lqBO Major Si bject: Forestry ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON HOUSER Approved...

Houser, James Nelson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Organization Chart - Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LSD Logo About Us People & Organization Research News & Events Safety Internal Resources Organization Chart Departments Scientific Staff Directory Committees Organization Chart...

429

Simulating the Initial Stage of Phenolic Resin Carbonization via the ReaxFF Reactive Force De-en Jiang,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a carbon source to make carbon/carbon composite materials.3 Recently, the soft-template synthesisSimulating the Initial Stage of Phenolic Resin Carbonization via the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field De, and Materials and Process Simulation Center, DiVision of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California

Goddard III, William A.

430

Improvement effect of small scale recycled milled carbon fibre in DGEBA epoxy resin creating an improved matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy [4, 5]. Also, till the last decade fibre reinforced composite materials were regarded as non, 10]. The reinforced material used in this paper is recycled milled carbon fibre (MCF). Addition1 Improvement effect of small scale recycled milled carbon fibre in DGEBA epoxy resin creating

431

Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric University MCARE 2012 #12;Outline · Overview of MSU Fatigue Program on Wind Blade MaterialsWind Blade Wind Blade Component Materials Acknowledgements: Sandia National Laboratories/DOE (Joshua Paquette

432

Iodine Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins and Activated Carbons– Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows: • The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. • The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. • The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. • In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine sorption.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Detailed balance limit of power conversion efficiency for organic photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fundamental difference between inorganic photovoltaic (IPV) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is that charges are generated at the interface in OPV cells, while free charges can be generated in the bulk in IPV cells. In OPV cells, charge generation involves intrinsic energy losses to dissociate excitons at the interface between the donor and acceptor. By taking into account the energy losses, we show the theoretical limits of the power conversion efficiency set by radiative recombination of the carriers on the basis of the detailed balance relation between radiation from the cell and black-body radiation.

Seki, Kazuhiko, E-mail: k-seki@aist.go.jp [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Furube, Akihiro [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, Yuji [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™ 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently onsite, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation, and return of resin for regeneration.

Nesham, Dean O. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Ivarson, Kristine A. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Hanson, James P. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Charles W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Meyers, P. [USDOE, Richland Operations Office, WA (United States); Jaschke, Naomi M. [USDOE, Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

435

More stable hybrid organic solar cells deposited on amorphous Si electron transfer layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on defect densities, performance, and stability of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells produced using n-doped inorganic amorphous silicon-carbide layers as the electron transport layer (ETL). The organic material was poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT) and heterojunction was formed using phenyl-C{sub 71}-Butyric-Acid-Methyl Ester (PCBM). For comparison, inverted solar cells fabricated using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as ETL were fabricated. Defect densities and subgap quantum efficiency curves were found to be nearly identical for both types of cells. The cells were subjected to 2xsun illumination and it was found that the cells produced using doped a-Si as ETL were much more stable than the cells produced using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

Samiee, Mehran; Modtland, Brian; Dalal, Vikram L., E-mail: vdalal@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Aidarkhanov, Damir [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Test plan for immobilization of salt-containing surrogate mixed wastes using polyester resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past operations at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites have resulted in the generation of several waste streams with high salt content. These wastes contain listed and characteristic hazardous constituents and are radioactive. The salts contained in the wastes are primarily chloride, sulfate, nitrate, metal oxides, and hydroxides. DOE has placed these types of wastes under the purview of the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The MWFA has been tasked with developing and facilitating the implementation of technologies to treat these wastes in support of customer needs and requirements. The MWFA has developed a Technology Development Requirements Document (TDRD), which specifies performance requirements for technology owners and developers to use as a framework in developing effective waste treatment solutions. This project will demonstrate the use of polyester resins in encapsulating and solidifying DOE`s mixed wastes containing salts, as an alternative to conventional and other emerging immobilization technologies.

Biyani, R.K.; Douglas, J.C.; Hendrickson, D.W.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

AL-SX (H1616) Container Support: Out-gassing of Polyethylene and Polycarbonate Resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Out-gassing tests were carried out on samples of polyethylene and polycarbonate packaging components used within the AL-SX (H1616) shipping container and compared to known samples of high and low density polyethylene and polycarbonate. Polyethylene is used to fabricate the shipping container overpack for the MC3007A/MC4059 and 1X-Acorn; LEXAN{reg_sign} polycarbonate (General Electric) is used to fabricate the lid of the Protective Container utilized to package the MC4213/MC4240 and MC4524 for shipment in the AL-SX (H1616). Pressure was monitored up to about 650 F and all the samples showed similar increases in pressure which were only slightly above those measured for control runs using no resin sample. None of the polymer samples showed out-gassing behavior that would lead to excessive pressure increases in the H1616 within that temperature range.

G.Cook Story; Leon Seibel and Linda Domeier

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The adsorption and desorption of picloram, trifluralin, and paraquat by ionic and nonionic exchange resins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!nc of soi ution and vc ry s!n&11 anount o( a&isorbe?t us?&i in !! nst of. 1:he =, t urlies r&v i ?wed. Th? srna1 1 vol u!nes us& d in ti!is sLuriy . I I!niLcd the lr vel s of. herhi cidal co!. cent rations. I CHg CI-Ig c . J 2' 2CI C N-IC ? C-(. )2...THE ADSORPTION AND DESORPTIOV OF PICLORAM, TRIi LURALIN, AND PARAQUAT BY IONIC AND NON-IOiVIC EXCHANGE RESINS A Thesi. s HO~!1L'R GEiVE MCCAJ I. Silhmfti c~1 1 o the Cr icli! ite C& I lece of ieicc! s Arc M Ull 1 i '1". s1. I v i. il part Ial...

McCall, Homer Gene

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Modifying the organic/electrode interface in Organic Solar Cells (OSCs) and improving the efficiency of solution-processed phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic semiconductors devices, such as, organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have drawn increasing interest in recent decades. As organic materials are flexible, light weight, and potentially low-cost, organic semiconductor devices are considered to be an alternative to their inorganic counterparts. This dissertation will focus mainly on OSCs and OLEDs. As a clean and renewable energy source, the development of OSCs is very promising. Cells with 9.2% power conversion efficiency (PCE) were reported this year, compared to < 8% two years ago. OSCs belong to the so-called third generation solar cells and are still under development. While OLEDs are a more mature and better studied field, with commercial products already launched in the market, there are still several key issues: (1) the cost of OSCs/OLEDs is still high, largely due to the costly manufacturing processes; (2) the efficiency of OSCs/OLEDs needs to be improved; (3) the lifetime of OSCs/OLEDs is not sufficient compared to their inorganic counterparts; (4) the physics models of the behavior of the devices are not satisfactory. All these limitations invoke the demand for new organic materials, improved device architectures, low-cost fabrication methods, and better understanding of device physics. For OSCs, we attempted to improve the PCE by modifying the interlayer between active layer/metal. We found that ethylene glycol (EG) treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT: PSS) improves hole collection at the metal/polymer interface, furthermore it also affects the growth of the poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends, making the phase segregation more favorable for charge collection. We then studied organic/inorganic tandem cells. We also investigated the effect of a thin LiF layer on the hole-collection of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C70-based small molecular OSCs. A thin LiF layer serves typically as the electron injection layer in OLEDs and electron collection interlayer in the OSCs. However, several reports showed that it can also assist in holeinjection in OLEDs. Here we first demonstrate that it assists hole-collection in OSCs, which is more obvious after air-plasma treatment, and explore this intriguing dual role. For OLEDs, we focus on solution processing methods to fabricate highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs. First, we investigated OLEDs with a polymer host matrix, and enhanced charge injection by adding hole- and electron-transport materials into the system. We also applied a hole-blocking and electron-transport material to prevent luminescence quenching by the cathode. Finally, we substituted the polymer host by a small molecule, to achieve more efficient solution processed small molecular OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common vacuum thermal evaporation. All these studies help us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OSCs and OLEDs’ performance and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiencies of OSCs and OLEDs. With better efficiency and longer lifetime, the OSCs and OLEDs will be competitive with their inorganic counterparts.

Xiao, Teng

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

Sheng Wu

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

442

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty perform research in molecular machines, exotic CHEMISTRY FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS Anne M. Andrews, Professor-in-Residence: Understanding how areas of interest include cross- coupling reactions, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and natural

Levine, Alex J.

443

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

444

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

Scheffer, K.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

445

Use of EIChroM`s TRU resin in the determination of americium, plutonium and uranium in air filter and water samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TRU Resin, an extraction chromatographic material (octyl (phenyl)-N,Ndiisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphene oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP)) manufactured by EIChroM Industries, was tested for its actinide sorption and desorption characteristics. A study was initiated to demonstrate the effectiveness of extracting plutonium, americium and uranium from water and air filter samples from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Quality Assessment Program (QAP), and the effectiveness of subsequent desorption of one chemical species at a time in order to prepare each of them for a spectrometry. Crossover of plutonium into the americium fraction with the TRU Resin was observed and could not be eliminated while using TRU Resin only. However, prior extraction of plutonium using an anion exchange resin can overcome this problem. A method for the determination of americium is proposed which combines the extraction of plutonium onto Bio-Rad AG 1-X8 anion exchange resin with the extraction of americium using the TRU Resin. This method was tested on three triplicate sets of QAP air filters and two triplicate sets of QAP water samples. The recoveries ranged from 70 to 90 percent, and the results were identical to those obtained by the existing methods. The time required to perform the analysis for americium was shortened from 5 weeks to 1 week.

Berne, A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new field instrument is described that quantifies total particle phase organic nitrates. The instrument is based on the thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) method that thermally converts nitrates to NO2 which is then detected by LIF. This instrument is unique in its ability to provide fast sensitive measurements of particle phase organic nitrates, without interference from inorganic nitrate. Here we use it to quantify organic nitrates in SOA generated from high-NOx photooxidation of limonene, a-pinene, D-3-carene, and tridecane. In these experiments the organic nitrate moiety is observed to be 6-15percent of the total SOA mass, depending on the organic precursor.

Rollins, Andrew W.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Cohen, Ronald C.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk.

Goheen, S.C.; Campbell, J.A.; Fryxell, G.E. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Chemistry and Engineering News Volume 90 Issue 7 | February 13, 2012 | pp. 48-49 | F. Albert Cotton Award In Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Engineering News Volume 90 Issue 7 | February 13, 2012 | pp. 48-49 | Awards F. Albert Cotton Award In Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry By Sophie Rovner Department: ACS News Keywords: inorganic chemistry, Christopher Reed Awards Reed Credit: Courtesy of Christopher A. Reed Sponsored by the F. Albert

Reed, Christopher A.

449

Controlling the release of active compounds from the inorganic carrier halloysite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Halloysite (HNTs), a natural material characterized by a nanotube structure, has been used as an inorganic carrier of active compounds in several applications from medicine to anticorrosion coatings. In this present work, vanillin (VAN) used as a antimicrobial model, has been encapsulated within HNTs for exploiting its applicability in the active food packaging sector. The molecule release rate has been controlled by crosslinking at the tube ends the loaded vanillin with copper ions, thus producing a stopper network. The vanillin-loaded HNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The antimicrobial release kinetics from the loaded nanoparticles (VAN/HNTs) in water was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the vanillin crosslinked with cupper ions is a feasible method to tailor the release rate of antimicrobial model from HTNs nanoparticles.

Tescione, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Stanzione, M.; Oliviero, M.; Lavorgna, M. [National Research Council - Institute of Composites and Biomedical Materials, P.le E. Fermi, 1 80055 Portici (Naples) (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location.

Moore, G.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Beam coupling in hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric liquid crystal cells: Impact of optical rotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a theoretical model to describe two-beam energy exchange in a hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric cell. A cholesteric layer is placed between two inorganic substrates. One of the substrates is photorefractive (Ce:SBN). Weak and strong light beams are incident on the hybrid cell. The interfering light beams induce a periodic space-charge field in the photorefractive window. This penetrates into the cholesteric liquid crystal (LC), inducing a diffraction grating written on the LC director. In the theory, the flexoelectric mechanism for electric field-director coupling is more important than the LC static dielectric anisotropy coupling. The LC optics is described in the Bragg regime. Each beam induces two circular polarized waves propagating in the cholesteric cell with different velocities. The model thus includes optical rotation in the cholesteric LC. The incident light beam wavelength can fall above, below, or inside the cholesteric gap. The theory calculates the energy gain of the weak beam, as a result of its interaction with the pump beam within the diffraction grating. Theoretical results for exponential gain coefficients are compared with experimental results for hybrid cells filled with cholesteric mixture BL038/CB15 at different concentrations of chiral agent CB15. Reconciliation between theory and experiment requires the inclusion of a phenomenological multiplier in the magnitude of the director grating. This multiplier is cubic in the space-charge field, and we provide a justification of the q-dependence of the multiplier. Within this paradigm, we are able to fit theory to experimental data for cholesteric mixtures with different spectral position of cholesteric gap relative to the wavelength of incident beams, subject to the use of some fitting parameters.

Reshetnyak, V. Yu.; Pinkevych, I. P. [Physics Faculty, National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Volodymyrs’ka Street 64, Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Sluckin, T. J. [Division of Mathematical Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Cook, G.; Evans, D. R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

acid-resin modified composites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

increase stiffness Resasco, Daniel 5 Research Progress of Organic polymer Composite Materials Modified by Carbon Nanotube CiteSeer Summary: ABSTRACT: Carbon nanotube is a kind of...

454

Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

Firestone, Jeremy

455

Departmental Organization and Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

1993-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

Role of the sediments in scavenging inorganic contaminants in the Syr Daria River and the Small Aral Sea (Kazakhstan)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of the sediments in scavenging inorganic contaminants in the Syr Daria River and the Small Particulate Material, Bottom Sediments, Trace Elements, Solid/Liquid Partitionning Abstract This study Material (SPM) and the Bottom Sediments (BS) of the Syr Daria River in its Kazakh course, including its

Boyer, Edmond

457

Inorganic composition of fine particles in mixed mineral dustpollution plumes observed from airborne measurements during ACE-Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the atmosphere (2419, 2427); 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305Inorganic composition of fine particles in mixed mineral dust­pollution plumes observed from of Earth and Atmospheric Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA G. R. Carmichael

Weber, Rodney

458

Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

von der Linde, D.

459

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 g/L potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent column breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. (3) Improper sample preservation: ion-chromatographic analysis of several samples wit

DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated-carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 giL potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent adsorption tube breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. Linear response was checked using both non-volatile TOX species (trichlorophenol) an

JG DOUGLAS; HK MEZNARICH, PHD; JR OLSEN; GA ROSS PHD; M STAUFFER

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

New organically templated photoluminescence iodocuprates(I)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two types of organic cyclic aliphatic diamine molecules piperazine (pip) and 1,3-bis(4-piperidyl)propane (bpp) were used, respectively, to react with an inorganic mixture of CuI and KI in the acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions under the solvothermal conditions, generating finally three new organically templated iodocuprates as 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 (tmpip=N,N,N',N'-tetramethylpiperazinium) and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Note that the templating agent tmpip{sup 2+} in compound 2 originated from the in situ N-alkylation reaction between the pip molecule and the methanol solvent. The photoluminescence analysis indicates that the title compounds emit the different lights: yellow for 1, blue for 2 and yellow-green for 3, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The solvothermal self-assemblies of CuI, KI and pip/bpp in acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions created three iodocuprates 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Highlights: > A new layered iodocuprate(I) with 20-membered rings was hydrothermally prepared. > A simple approach to prepare the new organic templating agent was reported. > Photoluminescence analysis indicates the emission for iodocuprate(I) is associated with the Cu...Cu interactions.

Hou Qin [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Zhao Jinjing [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Zhao Tianqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Jin Juan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Yu Jiehui, E-mail: jiehuiyu@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xu Jiqing, E-mail: xjq@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Room temperature organic exciton-polariton flow exploiting high-speed, high-Q propagating modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exciton-polaritons, bosonic quasi-particles formed by the interaction of light and matter, have shown a plethora of exciting phenomena that have been chiefly restricted to inorganic semiconductors and low temperature operation. Only recently, polariton condensation and non-linear effects have been demonstrated with polymers and organic molecules, making these systems suited for a realistic new generation of all-optical devices. However, polariton propagation in the plane of the device, essential for on-chip integration, is still limited by the very strong dissipation inherent to present organic microcavities. Here, we demonstrate strong-coupling of organic excitons with a Bloch surface wave (Q $\\approx$ 3000) which sustains polariton propagation for distances longer than 300 $\\mu$m and polariton lifetimes of about 1 ps, a record value in organic devices. The group velocity of the polariton mode is found to be $\\approx$ 50% the speed of light, about two order of magnitude higher than in any planar microcavity.

Lerario, Giovanni; Cannavale, Alessandro; Mangione, Federica; Gambino, Salvatore; Dominici, Lorenzo; De Giorgi, Milena; Gigli, Giuseppe; Sanvitto, Daniele

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Mixed crystal organic scintillators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat [Faculty of Science, University of Malaya (UM), 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd [Faculty of Science and Technology, National University Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

465

Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is preferably dried and stored until it is used (along with an alkali, an aldehyde and an adhesive filler) in compounding an adhesive of the type generally used in the manufacture of plywood.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Ft. Collins, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Organic photovoltaics and concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

Mapel, Jonathan King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Preliminary flowsheet: Ion exchange for separation of cesium from Hanford tank waste using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preliminary flowsheet document describes an ion exchange process which uses resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin to remove cesium from Hanford tank waste. The flowsheet describes one possible equipment configuration, and contains mass balances based on that configuration with feeds of Neutralized Current Acid Waste, and Double Shell Slurry Feed. The flowsheet also discusses process alternatives, unresolved issues, and development needs associated with the ion exchange process. It is expected that this flowsheet will evolve as open issues are resolved and progress is made on development needs. This is part of the Tank Waste Remediation Program at Hanford. 26 refs, 6 figs, 25 tabs.

Penwell, D.L.

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

468

Organic photosensitive devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M., E-mail: roverney@u.washington.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1750 (United States)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

470

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 1, sections 1--5: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles? What determines their composition? Whether or not particles deposit? How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes? remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

Helble, J.J. [ed.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 3, Inorganic instrumental methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods cover: C in solutions, F (electrode), elements by atomic emission spectrometry, inorganic anions by ion chromatography, Hg in water/solids/sludges, As, Se, Bi, Pb, data calculations for SST (single shell tank?) samples, Sb, Tl, Ag, Pu, O/M ratio, ignition weight loss, pH value, ammonia (N), Cr(VI), alkalinity, U, C sepn. from soil/sediment/sludge, Pu purif., total N, water, C and S, surface Cl/F, leachable Cl/F, outgassing of Ge detector dewars, gas mixing, gas isotopic analysis, XRF of metals/alloys/compounds, H in Zircaloy, H/O in metals, inpurity extraction, reduced/total Fe in glass, free acid in U/Pu solns, density of solns, Kr/Xe isotopes in FFTF cover gas, H by combustion, MS of Li and Cs isotopes, MS of lanthanide isotopes, GC operation, total Na on filters, XRF spectroscopy QC, multichannel analyzer operation, total cyanide in water/solid/sludge, free cyanide in water/leachate, hydrazine conc., ICP-MS, {sup 99}Tc, U conc./isotopes, microprobe analysis of solids, gas analysis, total cyanide, H/N{sub 2}O in air, and pH in soil.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Catalyzed CO.sub.2-transport membrane on high surface area inorganic support  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are membranes and methods for making the same, which membranes provide improved permeability, stability, and cost-effective manufacturability, for separating CO.sub.2 from gas streams such as flue gas streams. High CO.sub.2 permeation flux is achieved by immobilizing an ultra-thin, optionally catalyzed fluid layer onto a meso-porous modification layer on a thin, porous inorganic substrate such as a porous metallic substrate. The CO.sub.2-selective liquid fluid blocks non-selective pores, and allows for selective absorption of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures such as flue gas mixtures and subsequent transport to the permeation side of the membrane. Carbon dioxide permeance levels are in the order of 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 mol/(m.sup.2sPa) or better. Methods for making such membranes allow commercial scale membrane manufacturing at highly cost-effective rates when compared to conventional commercial-scale CO.sub.2 separation processes and equipment for the same and such membranes are operable on an industrial use scale.

Liu, Wei

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

473

MINTEQ2 geochemical code: provisionary organic data base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic components in aqueous radioactive chemical sources, surface waters, and ground waters could substantially alter the mobility of radioactive and other important nonradioactive elements released from a defense waste disposal system. It is therefore important to be able to predict, as accurately as possible, the effects of selected organic components on the solubilities of radionuclides and important nonradioactive elements. The geochemical code MINTEQ2 can be used to assess solubilities provided that appropriate thermochemical data for organic and inorganic aqueous species and solids are available for its use. The code accepts an assemblage of gaseous and solid phases in contact with an aqueous phase and calculates the thermochemical equilibrium between these phases. Unlike typical hydrologic flow and transport codes where the data base is entirely site specific (i.e., parameters particular to the specific site), MINTEQ2 requires an additional generic thermochemical data base. This report discusses the addition of provisionary organic reactions and associated equilibrium constants to the generic data base that can be used by MINTEQ2 in scoping calculations or preliminary performance assessments.

Morrey, J.R.; Krupka, K.M.; Dove, F.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Use of a unique mode switch test for the measurement of nonlinear viscoelastic shear properties of HDPE programmed-parison blow molding resins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USK OF A UNIQUE MODE SWITCH TEST FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF NONLINEAR VISCOKLASTIC SHEAR PROPERTIES OF HDPE PROGRAMMED-PARISON BLOW MOLDING RESINS A Thesis by KAREN ANNE OWENS STANFILL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...~W-PARISON BLOW MOLDING RESINS A Thesis by KAREN ANNE OWENS STANFILL Approved as to style and content by: A. Ieffrey Giacomin (Chair of Committee) g tJ Alan Wolfe den (Member) Ronald Darby (Member) +z Walter L. Bradley (Head of Department) May 1992...

Stanfill, Karen Anne Owens

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Prediction of heat of melting and heat capacity of inorganic liquids by the method of group contributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex salts and salt/oxide combinations are being considered for the immobilization and storage or disposal of hazardous or radioactive wastes. There is very little information concerning such fundamental properties as heat of fusion and heat capacities for many of these inorganic materials. This work focuses on the use of elements or simple functional groups to estimate some of these fundamental thermodynamic properties for a variety of inorganic compounds. The major emphasis will be on properties for a variety of inorganic compounds. The major emphasis will be on properties for which some ancillary information may be easily measured, but which may be very difficult to measure directly. An example of such a property is the heat of fusion (or melting). The melting temperature for most pure materials is relatively easy to measure. However, the actual amount of energy required to liquefy, or conversely, the amount of energy which must be removed to solidify those same materials has not been measured. Similarly, important properties such as heat capacities of liquids are unavailable for many compounds. Such information is essential in the chemical industry and are paramount for chemical engineers if they are to design, build and operate plants and facilities in an economical and efficient manner.

Williams, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Eakman, J.M. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Montoya, M.M. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

476

Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig 644 Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed facility is being designed for the immobilization of Hanford high-level radioactive waste. One unit process in the facility is designed to remove radioactive cesium by ion-exchange from the strongly alkaline aqueous phase. A resin specifically designed with high selectivity of cesium under alkaline conditions is being investigated. The resin also is elutable under more acidic conditions. The proposed design of the facility consists of two sets of two packed columns placed in series (i.e., a lead column followed by a lag (guard) column configuration). During operation, upon reaching a specified cesium concentration criterion at the exit of the lag column, operation is switched to the second set of lead and lag columns. The cesium-loaded lead column is processed (i.e., washed and eluted) and switched to the lag position. the previous lag column is then placed in the lead position (without eluting) and the system is ready for use in the next cycle. For a well designed process, the loading and elution processes result in significant volume reductions in aqueous high-level waste.

Hamm, L.L.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

Abbreviations: As(V) Arsenate; As(III) Arsenite; MS Murashige and Skoog; PC Phytochelatin; SOD Superoxide dismutase Fig. 1 Inorganic forms of arsenic most prevalent in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with metal ores of copper, lead and gold. Arsenate (AsV) and arsenite (AsIII) are the most common inorganic smeltering, coal combustion, mine tailings, hide tanning waste, dyes, chemical weapons and arsenic pesticides

Ma, Lena

478

Effects of dairy manure and inorganic fertilizer on runoff water quality on common bermudagrass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dairy manure is produced in large quantities in concentrated areas of the United States. This nutrient source has been used in the crop industry for many years and could be a potential organic alternative for turfgrass production. Concerns over...

Gaudreau, Jason Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Inorganic-modified semiconductor TiO2 nanotube arrays for photocatalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

titanium dioxide (TiO2) has become a promising route to degrade organic pollutants.5­8 TiO2 is one and efficient technologies to control and reduce pollution growth. Traditional techniques, such as adsorption

Lin, Zhiqun

480

Nutrient acquisition in dinoflagellates: the role of phosphorus and trace metals on community composition in coastal California and the northern Gulf of Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Inorganic and Organic Phosphorous Compounds as Nutrientsof Inorganic and Organic Phosphorous Compounds as Nutrientsof Inorganic and Organic Phosphorous Compounds as Nutrients

Peacock, Melissa Blakely

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Effects of polymerization and briquetting parameters on the tensile strength of briquettes formed from coal coke and aniline-formaldehyde resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the utilization of aniline (C{sub 6}H{sub 7}N) formaldehyde (HCHO) resins as a binding agent of coke briquetting was investigated. Aniline (AN) formaldehyde (F) resins are a family of thermoplastics synthesized by condensing AN and F in an acid solution exhibiting high dielectric strength. The tensile strength sharply increases as the ratio of F to AN from 0.5 to 1.6, and it reaches the highest values between 1.6 and 2.2 F/AN ratio; it then slightly decreases. The highest tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette (23.66 MN/m{sup 2}) was obtained from the run with 1.5 of F/AN ratio by using (NH4){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} catalyst at 310 K briquetting temperature. The tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette slightly decreased with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.10%, and then it sharply decreased to zero with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.2%. The effect of pH on the tensile strength is irregular. As the pH of the mixture increases from 9.0 to 9.2, the tensile strength shows a sharp increase, and the curve reaches a plateau value between pH 9.3 and 9.9; then the tensile strength shows a slight increase after pH = 9.9.

Demirbas, A.; Simsek, T. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Organic vapor jet printing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

483

PRELIMINARY REPORT ON EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. Studies are ongoing to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. The next phase of testing for this work will focus on the following down selected eluants: Ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, cal