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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Large-scale synthesis of inorganic and organic nanomaterials (single-crystalline nanowires and functionalized conducting polymer thin films) together with strategies for large-scale assembly are discussed

2

NSF/DOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics NSFDOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

3

Inorganic resins for clinical use of .sup.213Bi generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Applicant's invention is a radionuclide generator resin material for radiochemical separation of daughter radionuclides, particularly .sup.213Bi, from a solution of parental radionuclides, the resin material capable of providing clinical quantities of .sup.213Bi of at least 20-mCi, wherein the resin material comprises a silica-based structure having at least one bifunctional ligand covalently attached to the surface of the silica-based structure. The bifunctional ligand comprises a chemical group having desirable surface functionality to enable the covalent attachment of the bifunctional ligand thereon the surface of the structure and the bifunctional ligand further comprises a second chemical group capable of binding and holding the parental radionuclides on the resin material while allowing the daughter radionuclides to elute off the resin material. The bifunctional ligand has a carbon chain with a limited number of carbons to maintain radiation stability of the resin material.

DePaoli, David W. (Knoxville, TN); Hu, Michael Z. (Knoxville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Clavier, John W. (Elizabethton, TN)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics...

5

Organic-Inorganic Hetero Junction White Light Emitting Diode.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The purpose of this thesis work is to design and fabricates organic-inorganic hetero junction White Light Emitting Diode (WLED). In this WLED, inorganic material… (more)

Lubuna Beegum, Shafeek

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Inorganic-organic hybrid aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organically modified silica aerogels were prepared by NH{sub 4}OH-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of RSi(OMe){sub 3} / Si(OMe){sub 4} mixtures, followed by supercritical drying of the alcogels with methanol or CO{sub 2}. Terminal alkyl or aryl groups, bridging groups or functional organic (methacryloxypropyl or glycidoxypropyl) groups were employed for R. By the proper choice of the organic groups, the RSi(OMe){sub 3} / Si(OMe){sub 4} ratio and the drying conditions, hydrophobic aerogels, being insensitive towards moisture, were obtained with no residual SiOH or Si-OMe groups left. The transparency and porosity of the organically modified aerogels was only slightly diminished relative to unmodified silica aerogels. The elastic constant of the aerogels was significantly influenced by the kind of organic groups. By pyrolysis of the phenyl-substituted aerogels, nanometer-sized carbon structures were generated. They partly coat the primary aerogel particles and provide a very high mass specific extinction in the wavelengths interval critical for thermal radiative transport.

Schubert, U.; Schwertfeger, F.; Huesing, N.; Seyfried, E. [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Organic—inorganic hybrid solar cells: A comparative review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic materials have recently become of great interest for photovoltaic applications, due to their potential to utilise high throughput, solution phase processing, which will lead to low cost electricity production. Hybrid solar cells combine organic and inorganic materials with the aim of utilising the low cost cell production of organic photovoltaics (OPV) as well as obtaining other advantages, such as tuneable absorption spectra, from the inorganic component. Whilst hybrid solar cells have the potential to achieve high power conversion efficiencies (PCE), currently obtained efficiencies are quite low. The design of the inorganic material used as the electron acceptor in hybrid solar cells, particularly the electronic structure, is crucial to the performance of the device. There exists an optimal electronic structure design for an inorganic acceptor. To date, four major material types have been investigated, being cadmium compounds, silicon, metal oxide nanoparticles and low band gap nanoparticles. Currently, Cadmium Sulfide (CdS) quantum dots represent the state of the art, yielding a PCE of greater than 4%. This review compares the electronic structure of these materials with the optimal design components of an inorganic material and also explores possible limitations to the PCE of these devices, such as nanomorphology control and nanoparticle surface chemistry. This report provides the reader with a concise synthesis of the current state of the art for bulk heterojunction organic—inorganic hybrid solar cells. Additionally, it highlights key research areas which require attention to allow for the commercialisation of this technology.

Matthew Wright; Ashraf Uddin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demonstrates self-catalytic schemes for large-scale synthesis of compound semiconductor nanowire powders for inorganic-organic hybrid thermoelectric cells

9

Engineering Organic/inorganic hybrids comprise a mixture of oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examine the current status of using organic/inorganic hybrids in fabrication of solid oxide fuel cells, and reactions on solid oxide fuel cell catalysts. The objectives of his research program are (i) developing of potential applications in coatings, fuel cells, solar cells, and sensors. Organic amino (-NH2) silane

10

Heterostructures based on inorganic and organic van der Waals systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-dimensional limit of layered materials has recently been realized through the use of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures composed of weakly interacting layers. In this paper, we describe two different classes of vdW heterostructures: inorganic vdW heterostructures prepared by co-lamination and restacking; and organic-inorganic hetero-epitaxy created by physical vapor deposition of organic molecule crystals on an inorganic vdW substrate. Both types of heterostructures exhibit atomically clean vdW interfaces. Employing such vdW heterostructures, we have demonstrated various novel devices, including graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and MoS{sub 2} heterostructures for memory devices; graphene/MoS{sub 2}/WSe{sub 2}/graphene vertical p-n junctions for photovoltaic devices, and organic crystals on hBN with graphene electrodes for high-performance transistors.

Lee, Gwan-Hyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chul-Ho [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Zande, Arend M. van der [Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Han, Minyong [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cui, Xu; Arefe, Ghidewon; Hone, James [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Nuckolls, Colin [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Heinz, Tony F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Kim, Philip, E-mail: pk2015@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Toward High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells: Bringing Conjugated Polymers and Inorganic Nanocrystals in Close  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to traditional silicon solar cells due to the capacity of producing high- efficiency solar energy in a cost these advantages and progress, organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells still exhibit much lower PCEs (iToward High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells: Bringing Conjugated Polymers

Lin, Zhiqun

12

High-Performance Nanostructured Inorganic?Organic Heterojunction Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Performance Nanostructured Inorganic?Organic Heterojunction Solar Cells ... Although single-crystalline Si-based solar cells are successfully used to harvest solar energy, inexpensive production of photovoltaic (PV) devices at a cost comparable to the energy production cost of fossil fuels has become a critical issue to meet the global energy crisis. ... The photocurrent output of a solar cell based on exciton dissociation from sensitized solar cells depends on the quantum efficiencies of light harvesting (?lh), electron injection (?inj), and electron collection (?cc), which is determined by the competition between recombination and charge collection. ...

Jeong Ah Chang; Jae Hui Rhee; Sang Hyuk Im; Yong Hui Lee; Hi-jung Kim; Sang Il Seok; Md. K. Nazeeruddin; Michael Gratzel

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mold-Templated Inorganic–Organic Hybrid Supraparticles for Codelivery of Drugs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mold-Templated Inorganic–Organic Hybrid Supraparticles for Codelivery of Drugs ... The Bionics Institute acknowledges funding from the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. ...

James W. Maina; Jiwei Cui; Mattias Björnmalm; Andrew K. Wise; Robert K. Shepherd; Frank Caruso

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Optimization of material composition and processing parameters for hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The widespread adoption of hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells has been delayed by low performance. Improving performance requires a firm understanding of how to optimize both… (more)

Salpeter, Garrett Morgan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electronic properties of 2D and 3D hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for optoelectronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic properties of 2D and 3D hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for optoelectronic, optoelectronic properties, photovoltaic, exciton 1. Introduction Over the past decade, Hybrid Organic/inorganic Perovskites (HOP) have attracted increasing interest in the field of optoelectronics (Mitzi et al. 1995

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

Removal of organic and inorganic compounds from landfill leachate using reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this work was to evaluate an effectiveness of removing organic and inorganic pollutants from landfill leachate in a long-term reverse osmosis (RO) study. Investigations were carried out...4 ...

I. A. Talalaj

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Organic/inorganic nanocomposites, methods of making, and uses as a permeable reactive barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nanocomposite materials having a composition including an inorganic constituent, a preformed organic polymer constituent, and a metal ion sequestration constituent are disclosed. The nanocomposites are characterized by being single phase, substantially homogeneous materials wherein the preformed polymer constituent and the inorganic constituent form an interpenetrating network with each other. The inorganic constituent may be an inorganic oxide, such as silicon dioxide, formed by the in situ catalyzed condensation of an inorganic precursor in the presence of the solvated polymer and metal ion sequestration constituent. The polymer constituent may be any hydrophilic polymer capable of forming a type I nanocomposite such as, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and combinations thereof. Nanocomposite materials of the present invention may be used as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate contaminated groundwater. Methods for making nanocomposite materials, PRB systems, and methods of treating groundwater are also disclosed.

Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Questions and Answers - Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atoms make up sugar? atoms make up sugar? Previous Question (What atoms make up sugar?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (In the equation for methane, why is there more hydrogen than carbon?) In the equation for methane, why isthere more hydrogen than carbon? Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic matter? The answer is yes and no. Yes, carbon IS found in all organic matter, but NOT in inorganic matter. Although there are many definitions of "organic," in the scientific disciplines, the basic definition comes from chemistry. In chemistry, organic means chemical compounds with carbon in them. In a more general sense, organic refers to living things. And this is connected to the idea of organic chemistry being based on carbon compounds. Organic

19

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3rd World Conference on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion (IEEEProgress of photovoltaic solar energy development in Europe,in organic photovoltaic devices, Solar Energy Materials and

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, Helena L. (8448 Allison Ct., Arvada, CO 80005); Black, Stuart K. (4976 Raleigh St., Denver, CO 80212); Diebold, James P. (57 N. Yank Way, Lakewood, CO 80228); Kreibich, Roland E. (4201 S. 344th, Auburn, WA 98001)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

called ‘thin-film’ solar cell technology was first made byOrganic solar cells are a relatively novel technology, yettechnology development: A perspective from patent growth analysis, Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

materials analysis of inorganic, organic, and bioma-terials. See ELECTRON MICROSCOPE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28 Plaster materials analysis of inorganic, organic, and bioma- terials. See ELECTRON MICROSCOPE: The next chip-scale technology, Mater. Today, 9:20­27, 2006. Plaster A plastic mixture of solids and water plaster is also used in the industry to designate plaster of paris. Plaster is usually applied in one

Anderson, Peter M.

24

Preparation of poly(acrylamide)/nanoclay organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles with average size of ?250 nm via inverse Pickering emulsion polymerization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the preparation of poly(acrylamide)/nanoclay organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles via surfactant-free...

Samira Abdolbaghi; Saeed Pourmahdian; Younes Saadat

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Determination of organic inorganic associations of trace elements in New Albany shale kerogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic and organic trace element associations in the kerogen isolated from the New Albany shale were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue obtained using density separations. Elemental mass balance data from these fractions indicate a predominantly inorganic association with pyrite and marcasite for several elements (As, Co, Ga, Mn, Ni, Sb and Se). The degree of inorganic association of these elements was determined by treatment of the mineral residue ({approximately}85% FeS{sub 2}) with dilute HNO{sub 3} to remove pyrite and marcasite. The association of several other elements in minerals which are insoluble in dilute HNO{sub 3} (rutile, zircon, etc.) were also determined. The results of these studies indicate an essentially total organic association for V and approximately 95% organic association for Ni in New Albany kerogen. The determination of organically combined elements is very difficult for those elements which are predominantly concentrated in the mineral fraction. Correction methods based on low temperature ashing, chemical removal of pyrite, and physical methods of separation are compared.

Mercer, G.E.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Inorganic-Organic Molecules and Solids with Nanometer-Sized Pores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are constructing porous inorganic-organic hybrid molecules and solids, many of which contain coordinatively unsaturated metal centers. In this work, we use multifunctional ���²-diketone ligands as �¢����building blocks�¢��� to prepare extended-solid and molecular porous materials that are capable of reacting with a variety of guest molecules.

Maverick, Andrew W.

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Direct determination of organic and inorganic sulfur in coal by controlled oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop an analytical method to directly measure the forms of organic sulfur in coal. The method will provide a route to monitor the effectiveness of coal preparation research directed toward removal of organic sulfur in coal. The approach involves subjecting diluted coal samples simultaneously to an oxygen flow and a linear increase in temperature. Distinctive sulfur dioxide evolution patterns are observed among coals of different rank and between raw and treated coals. Assignments have been made relating each specific sulfur dioxide evolution to the non-aromatic organic, aromatic organic, and inorganic sulfur present in coals and treated coals. Work is progressing on schedule to optimize experimental conditions and to improve the efficiency of the controlled-atmosphere programmed-temperature oxidation (CAPTO) method by developing a multiple sample instrumental system.

LaCount, R.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Direct determination of organic and inorganic sulfur in coal by controlled oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop an analytical method to directly measure the forms of organic sulfur in coal. The method will provide a route to monitor the effectiveness of coal preparation research directed toward removal of organic sulfur in coal. The approach involves subjecting diluted coal samples simultaneously to an oxygen flow and a linear increase in temperature. Distinctive sulfur dioxide evolution patterns are observed among coals of different rank and between raw and treated coals. Assignments have been made relating each specific sulfur dioxide evolution to the non-aromatic organic, aromatic organic, and inorganic sulfur present in coals and treated coals. Work is progressing on schedule to optimize experimental conditions and to improve the efficiency of the controlled-atmosphere programmed-temperature oxidation (CAPTO) method by developing a multiple sample instrumental system.

LaCount, R.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Chemical Form Matters: Differential Accumulation of Mercury Following Inorganic and Organic Mercury Exposures in Zebrafish Larvae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versus L-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of L-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with L-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-L-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

Korbas, Malgorzata; MacDonald, Tracy C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Krone, Patrick H. (Saskatchewan)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

30

Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature.

Nguyen, H. S.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J., E-mail: jacqueline.bloch@lpn.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, LPN/CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Han, Z. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, LPN/CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, bat. 505, campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France); Abdel-Baki, K.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, bat. 505, campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

Physiological responses of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to organic and inorganic amended heavy-metal contaminated chat tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Study plots established at the Galena subsite of the Cherokee County Superfund Site in Southeastern Kansas by the US Bureau of Mines in 1990 were examined during the summer of 1996 to determine whether physiological criteria could be used to determine suitability of switchgrass for remediation of heavy-metal contaminated substrates. Switchgrass was chosen because it was the most frequently encountered species on these plots. Treatment plots included a treatment control, an organic residue treatment of 89.6 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1} composted cattle manure, and two inorganic fertilizer treatments recommended for either native grass or grass/legume mixtures. Plant response variables were photosynthetic rate, leaf conductance to water vapor, internal concentration of carbon dioxide in leaves, foliar transpiration rate, leaf water-use-efficiency, predawn leaf xylem water potential, and midday leaf xylem water potential. Predawn and midday xylem water potentials were higher for grass/legume inorganic treatment than for the other inorganic treatments. Leaf conductances were lower for organically treated plots than those plots not organically amended and both photosynthesis and transpiration were lower for organically treated plots. Leaf conductances and transpiration were higher for grass/legume treated plots than for plots lacking inorganic treatment. Water-use-efficiency was higher for native grass inorganically treated plots than for other inorganic treatments.

Youngman, A.L. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Organic and Inorganic Solid Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries - Nader Hagh, NEI Corporation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organic and Inorganic Solid Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Organic and Inorganic Solid Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Background & Objectives * Lithium ion batteries widely used in consumer applications Solvent leakage and flammability of conventional liquid electrolytes * Current solid state electrolytes suffer from low ionic conductivity, inferior rate capability, and interfacial instability * Objective of the program is to develop solid state organic and inorganic electrolyte that has enhanced ionic conductivity * PEO based polymer electrolyte has poor room ionic conductivity due to crystallinity * The current program develops a PEO based hybrid copolymer that disrupts crystallization and at the same time provides mechanical integrity Abstract: The use of a solid polymer electrolyte instead of the conventional liquid or gel electrolyte can drastically improve the safety

33

High-performance hybrid organic-inorganic solar cell based on planar n-type silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells were fabricated by spin coating the hole transporting conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) film on n-type crystalline silicon (n-Si). By incorporating different additives into the PEDOT:PSS, the conductivity and wettability of PEDOT:PSS film are markedly improved, and the device performance is greatly enhanced accordingly. To further optimize the device performance, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) layer was inserted between the n-Si and PEDOT:PSS layer. The P3HT layer blocks electrons from diffusing to the PEDOT:PSS, and hence reduces recombination at the anode side. The device eventually exhibits a high power conversion efficiency of 11.52%.

Chi, Dan [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qi, Boyuan; Wang, Jizheng [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qu, Shengchun, E-mail: qsc@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Zhanguo [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Improved oxidation resistance of organic/inorganic composite atomic layer deposition coated cellulose nanocrystal aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels are coated with thin conformal layers of Al2O3 using atomic layer deposition to form hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the Al2O3 penetrated more than 1500??m into the aerogel for extended precursor pulse and exposure/purge times. The measured profile of coated fiber radius versus depth from the aerogel surface agrees well with simulations of precursor penetration depth in modeled aerogel structures. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that Al2O3 coated CNC aerogel nanocomposites do not show significant thermal degradation below 295?°C as compared with 175?°C for uncoated CNC aerogels an improvement of over 100?°C.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Co, {sup 79}Se, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc as pertechnetate, {sup 106}Ru/Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, and {sup 243+244}Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}AMU, {sup 242}AMU, {sup 243}AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all contract limits (molar ratio of analyte to sodium or ratio of becquerels of analyte to moles of sodium) defined in Specification 7 for Envelope A. Except for a few cases, the characterization results met or surpassed the quality control requirements established by the governing quality assurance plan and met or surpassed the minimum reportable quantity requirements specified by BNFL.

SK Fiskum; PR Bredt; JA Campbell; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; GJ Lumetta; GM Mong; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist; RG Swoboda; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Drug Release from Self-Assembled Inorganic?Organic Hybrid Gels and Gated Porosity Detected by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drug Release from Self-Assembled Inorganic?Organic Hybrid Gels and Gated Porosity Detected by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy ... Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Münster, Corrensstrasse 36, 48149 Münster, Germany, CSIRO Manufacturing and Infrastructure Technology, Victoria, Australia, and School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton Victoria, Australia ...

Ansgar Bögershausen; Steven J. Pas; Anita J. Hill; Hubert Koller

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

37

Alkyl Surface Treatments of Planar Zinc Oxide in Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells have not lived up to their potential because of poor interface properties. Interfacial molecular layers provide a way of adjusting these devices to improve their performance. We have studied a prototypical system involving poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) on planar zinc oxide (ZnO) films that have been modified with two types of molecules having identical 18-carbon alkyl chain termination and different surface attachments: octadecanethiol (ODT) and octadecyltriethoxysilane (OTES). We examined the functionalized surfaces using water contact angle measurements, Kelvin probe measurements, infrared absorbance spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. These have shown that OTES forms disordered incomplete monolayers, while ODT is prone to develop multilayered islands. Both treatments enhance polymer ordering. However, inverted solar cell devices fabricated with these treated interfaces performed very differently. ODT improves the short circuit current (J{sub SC}), open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), and power conversion efficiency ({eta}), while these parameters all decrease in devices constructed from OTES-treated ZnO. The differences in V{sub OC} are related to modifications of the surface dipole associated with deposition of the two types of alkyl molecules, while changes in J{sub SC} are attributed to a balance between charge transfer blocking caused by the saturated hydrocarbon and the improved hole mobility in the polymer.

Allen, C. G.; Baker, D. J.; Brenner, T. M.; Weigand, C. C.; Albin, J. M.; Steirer, K. X.; Olson, D. C.; Ladam, C.; Ginley, D. S.; Collins, R. T.; Furtak, T. E.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Determination of transport parameters of coincident inorganic and organic plumes in the Savannah River Plant M-Area, Aiken, South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis by TOYA. LYN CAUFFMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Geology DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN& SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis...

Cauffman, Toya Lyn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Importance of spin-orbit coupling in hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for photovoltaic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economically more competitive. The quest for quality and performances of future solar cells has attracted recently been suggested as a novel class of materials for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) with improved/inorganic perovskiteshave recently been suggested as a novel class of materials for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC

Boyer, Edmond

40

Morphology and properties of a hybrid organic-inorganic system: Al nanoparticles embedded into CuPc thin film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of the morphology and the electronic structure of the hybrid organic-inorganic system composed of aluminum nanoparticles (NPs) distributed in an organic semiconductor matrix—copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)—as a function of nominal aluminum content was studied by transmission electron microscopy and by photoemission spectroscopy methods. The aluminum atoms deposited onto the CuPc surface diffuse into the organic matrix and self-assemble to NPs in a well-defined manner with a narrow diameter distribution, which depends on the amount of aluminum that is evaporated onto the CuPc film. We find clear evidence of a charge transfer from Al to CuPc and we have been able to determine the lattice sites where Al ions sit. The finally at high coverage about 64?Ĺ the formation of metallic aluminum overlayer on CuPc thin film takes place.

Molodtsova, O. V.; Babenkov, S. V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Aristova, I. M. [Institute of Solid State Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Vilkov, O. V. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Aristov, V. Yu., E-mail: aristov@issp.ac.ru [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Designing artificial photosynthetic devices using hybrid organic–inorganic modules based on polyoxometalates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular Cell and Systems...Issue Can solar power deliver...easily oxidized organic molecules...photosynthesis in the production of biofuels...water (using solar irradiation...silicon-based solar cells (typically...contains no organic components...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Enhancing the performance of organic-inorganic hybrid light-emitting diodes by inserting a conjugated polyelectrolyte interlayer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid light-emitting diodes (HyLEDs) incorporating the advantages of organic and inorganic semiconductors, were promising to realise efficient electroluminescence with air-stable charge-injection interfaces. However, HyLEDs with only inorganic semiconductor such as zinc oxide (ZnO) as electron-injection layer suffered from low devices efficiencies due to large electron injection barrier. To improve the electron injection, conjugated polyelectrolyte poly[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) was used together with ZnO as electron-injection layer by fabricating it on top of ZnO. Experimental data showed that the light efficiencies of HyLEDs were almost doubled after the insertion of PFN. The performances enhancement was attributed to the reduced energy barrier for electron injection from ZnO. The electron current increased. And therefore, the balance of electron and hole currents was improved.

Yongli Wang; Qiaoli Niu; Donghuan Qin; Hongmei Liu; Yong Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Influence of image charge effect on exciton fine structure in an organic-inorganic quantum well material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated experimentally excitonic properties in organic-inorganic hybrid multi quantum well crystals, (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4} and (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}?C{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4}, by measuring photoluminescence, reflectance, photoluminescence excitation spectra. In these materials, the excitonic binding energies are enhanced not only by quantum confinement effect (QCE) but also by image charge effect (ICE), since the dielectric constant of the barrier layers is much smaller than that of the well layers. By comparing the 1s-exciton and 2s-exciton energies, we have investigated the influence of ICE with regard to the difference of the Bohr radius.

Takagi, Hidetsugu; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Ema, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Sato, Mikio; Takeoka, Yuko [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

Organic and inorganic components in estuarine colloids: Implications for sorption and transport of pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In colloids isolated from Chesapeake Bay and its subestuaries the concentrations of Al, Fe, and a number of trace elements were determined to vary with the clay mineral fraction that was most abundant in freshwater samples collected during the winter. The elements As, Ba, Sb, and Zn, however, increased with increasing organic content, indicating a covariance with the organic component. Organic analyses for amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids indicate that these biopolymers comprised 4 to 22%, 20 to 60%, and less than 1%, respectively, of the colloidal organic carbon in these samples. The results are significant because amino acids and carbohydrates contain oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functional groups capable of reacting with trace metals and organic pollutants. The sorption properties of several neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, including PAHs and herbicides, and several aromatic amines were investigated using the estuarine colloidal material. The effects of several environmental variables on these sorption properties were determined. The results indicate that colloids have the capacity to sorb and transport relatively insoluble pollutants that otherwise might remain immobile in the environment. Colloidal organic matter in natural water systems may serve as substrates for the sorption or binding of organic contaminants. Although most of the data has been developed using neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, data also exist for selected polar compound groups such as aromatic amines. The chemical behavior of these compound groups in interaction with DOM appears to have some similarity to their chemical interaction with sediments and soils. Partitioning constants are linear, except for polar compounds, and appear to be closely correlated to fundamental compound properties such as solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. 84 references.

Sigleo, A.C.; Means, J.C. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Organic-inorganic nanocomposite membranes from highly ordered mesoporous thin films for solubility-based separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the impact of organic oligomer size, chemistry, and surface coverage, as well as substrate pore size and structure, on membrane performance. First, we did a model study to verify the feasibility of dendrimer growth inside mesopores by using ordered mesoporous...

Yoo, Suk Joon

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Antibacterial Inorganic?Organic Hybrid Coatings on Stainless Steel via Consecutive Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Biocorrosion Prevention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(45) Recent developments in controlled/“living” radical polymerization have provided an alternative approach to the preparation of inorganic?organic hybrids materials. ... Effect of chlorine and chlorine/bromine biocide treatments on the number and activity of biofilm bacteria and on carbon steel corrosion ... Finally, other alternatives, which may eventually give rise to an efficient and environmentally benign antifouling system, are outlined. ...

S. J. Yuan; S. O. Pehkonen; Y. P. Ting; K. G. Neoh; E. T. Kang

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance, quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...High DON bioavailability in boreal streams during a spring flood. Limnol. Oceanogr. 45 :1298-1307. 32. Mulholland...organic nitrogen in minimally disturbed montane streams of Colorado, U. S. A. Biogeochemistry 74 :303-321. 44. Chrost...

Suchismita Ghosh; Laura G. Leff

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

OrganicInorganic Hybrid Composites DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903234  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Low Thermal Conductivity: The Role of Organic Diamines** Xiaoying Huang, Mojgan Roushan, Thomas J, mechanical, and thermal behaviors of these hybrid materials. Herein, we report five crystal structures of 3D transitions, mechanical properties, specific heat capacity, thermal diffu- sivity, and thermal conductivity

Li, Jing

50

Our planet is becoming increasingly polluted with inorganic and organic compounds, primarily as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced or expected to be present in organ- isms). Many of them are toxic and/or carcinogenic. Sources cleanup in the US, and $25­50 billion per year worldwide (Glass 1999; Tsao 2003). Most remediation that use plants to remove, reduce, degrade, or immobilize environmental pollutants from soil and water

51

Electroluminescence from colloidal semiconductor CdSe nanoplatelets in hybrid organic–inorganic light emitting diode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We report on the fabrication of a hybrid light-emitting-diode based on colloidal semiconductor CdSe nanoplatelets as emitters and organic TAZ [3-(Biphenyl-4-yl)-5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-4-phenyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole] and TPD [N, N?-bis (3-methylphenyl)-N, N?-bis (phenyl)-benzidine] materials as the electron and hole transporting layers. Electroluminescent and current–voltage characteristics of the developed hybrid device with the turn-on voltage of 5.5 V and the radiation wavelength of 515 nm have been obtained. Semiconductor nanoplatelets like CdSe are attractive for the fabrication of hybrid \\{LEDs\\} with low operating voltages, spectrally pure color and short-wavelength electroluminescence, which is required for RGB devices.

A.G. Vitukhnovsky; V.S. Lebedev; A.S. Selyukov; A.A. Vashchenko; R.B. Vasiliev; M.S. Sokolikova

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Layered inorganic/organic mercaptopropyl pendant chain hybrid for chelating heavy cations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Crystalline lamellar silicate RUB-18 was immobilized with mercaptopropyl groups at the surface and then used as support for cadmium and lead removal from aqueous solutions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthetic methodology requires intercalation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organofunctionalized ilerite compound as sorbent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Active mercaptopropyl groups remove cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High maximum sorption capacity for cadmium. -- Abstract: Heavy metal sorbents with uptake capacities for divalent cadmium and lead cation removal from aqueous solutions have been synthesized by grafting mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane onto the surface of two different precursors obtained from lamellar ilerite, its acidic and the cetyltrimethylammonium exchanged forms. The organofunctionalization was carried out by two different procedures: reflux and solvent evaporation methodologies. Elemental analysis data based on carbon content gave 1.37 and 3.53 mmol of organic pendant groups per gram of hybrid by the reflux method, when starting from acidic ilerite and the surfactant form. X-ray diffraction corroborated the maintenance of the original crystallinity. Infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance for {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C nuclei are in agreement with the success of the proposed method. The sulfur basic centers attached to the lamellar structure are used to coordinate both cations at the solid/liquid interface. The isotherms were obtained through the batchwise process and the experimental data were adjusted to the Freundlich model. The maximum sorption capacities of 5.55 and 5.12 mmol g{sup -1} for lead and 6.10 and 7.10 mmol g{sup -1} for cadmium were obtained for organofunctionalized ilerite and its surfactant form, synthesized by reflux methodology. This behavior suggested that these hybrids could be employed as promising sorbents with a polluted system.

Macedo, Thais R. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-71 Campinas, SP (Brazil)] [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-71 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Petrucelli, Giovanni C. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Goias, Jatai, P.O. Box 03, 75805-190 Jatai, GO (Brazil)] [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Goias, Jatai, P.O. Box 03, 75805-190 Jatai, GO (Brazil); Pinto, Alane A. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-71 Campinas, SP (Brazil) [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-71 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Goias, Jatai, P.O. Box 03, 75805-190 Jatai, GO (Brazil); Airoldi, Claudio, E-mail: airoldi@iqm.unicamp.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-71 Campinas, SP (Brazil)] [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-71 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Enhanced biodegradation of diesel fuel through the addition of particulate organic carbon and inorganic nutrients in coastal marine waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel fuel pollution in coastal waters, resulting from recreational ... operations, is common and can adversely affect marine biota. The purpose of this study was...Spartina alterniflora...), inorganic nutrients...

Michael F. Piehler; Hans W. Paerl

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The origin of efficiency enhancement of inorganic/organic Hybrid solar Cells by robust samarium phosphate nanophosphors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An effective energy level regulation of acceptor by doping samarium phosphate nanophosphors (SmPO4 NPs) was reported for inorganic/organic hybrid solar cell applications. SmPO4 \\{NPs\\} doped TiO2/P3HT bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell shows an enhanced power conversion efficiency of approaching 3% as compared with that of its counterpart without SmPO4 \\{NPs\\} (1.98%). The underlying photophysical mechanism was probed by applying femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and the results show that the efficiency enhancement was ascribed to the improved hot electron, less energetic electron, hole transports at the interface of BHJ apart from down-conversion photoluminescence of SmPO4 NPs. It has been evidenced that the hot electron transfer life time was shortened by more than 40% (i.e., from ?hot-e=30.2 to 17.9 ps) than pure TiO2 acceptor while the hole transfer lifetime was boosted by almost 20% (i.e., from 6.92 to 5.58 ns). Such charge carrier improvements stem from the efficient energy level regulations by SmPO4 NPs. In detail, the conduction band (CB) edge of TiO2 has been elevated by 0.57 eV while the valence band (VB) edge has been elevated by 0.32 eV, thus not only narrowing down the energy offset between CB energy levels of acceptor TiO2 and donor P3HT, but also meanwhile enlarging the band gap of TiO2 itself that permits to inhibit electron-hole recombination within TiO2. This work demonstrates that samarium ions can efficiently facilitate exciton generation, dissociation and charge transport and have an important role in enhancing photovoltaic performance.

Qinghua Li; Yongbiao Yuan; Taihuei Wei; Yue Li; Zihan Chen; Xiao Jin; Yuancheng Qin; Weifu Sun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Investigation of pure green-colour emission from inorganic-organic hybrid LEDs based on colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the operation characteristics of inorganic-organic hybrid light emitting devices (HLEDs) that have a green CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) emitting layer (EML) and a 1,3,5-tris(N-phenylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-benzene (TPBi) hole blocking layer (HBL). A series of devices with a different thickness TPBi HBL all showed pure electroluminescence that is consistent with green photoluminescence of colloidal QDs without any colour contamination from organic layers. The best performance, which we attributed to more balanced charge carrier supply to a QD EML and efficient energy transfer from excitions in a TPBi layer to QDs, was observed from the device with a TPBi HBL of 20 nm thickness: the deep green emission with the luminous efficiency of 1.55 cd/A at standard video brightness (200 cd/m˛) and the luminance as large as ~1800 cd/m˛.

Nguyen Huu Tuan; Soonil Lee; Nguyen Nang Dinh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Inorganic nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Terrones and Humberto Terrones Inorganic nanotubes Reshef Tenne 1 C. N. R. Rao 2 1 Department...discovery of carbon fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, it was hypothesized that nanoparticles...not be stable against folding and form nanotubes and fullerene-like structures: IF...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hydrothermal Synthesis and Characterization of a Metal–Organic Framework by Thermogravimetric Analysis, Powder X-ray Diffraction, and Infrared Spectroscopy: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upper-Division Undergraduate; Inorganic Chemistry; Laboratory Instruction; Gravimetric Analysis; Hydrogen Bonding; IR Spectroscopy; Materials Science; Thermal Analysis ...

Johanna L. Crane; Kelly E. Anderson; Samantha G. Conway

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

The research of Dr. Rafi Shikler is focused on organic and organic/inorganic hybrid optoelectronic devices. In specifically to study the physical processes that take place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are discussed. The science and technology of electronic and optoelectronic devices based on organic -conjugated

Vardi, Amichay

59

MMMaaattteeerrriiiaaalllsss SSSeeemmmiiinnnaaarrr There have been great interests in recent years in exploring the use of organic-inorganic hybrid electronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation and a Solar Energy energy applications including photovoltaics and light-emitting devices (LEDs). Organic electronic materials such as conjugated polymers have advantages in low material cost, tunability in material

60

Self assembly of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots for organic/inorganic light emitting devices for the next generation display technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the effect of quantum dot (QD) concentrations, spin speed and temperature on the self assembly of CdSe/ZnS QDs on substrate for the optimisation of QDs used in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) applications. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) results showed that surface morphology and coverage are varied with different process parameters. There is also a tendency for the formation of aggregates/islands on a smooth substrate that could be caused by spinodal phase separation. The uniform distribution of QDs with controllable density was achieved using the conventional spin-coating method. We fabricated and investigated the effect of CdSe/ZnS QD concentrations on the self-assembly hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting diodes (QD-OLEDs) for the tuning of performance. There was a QD threshold concentration below which there was no emission from the QDs. The estimated QD concentration was around 9 × 1011 cm?2 for the best performance of QD-OLED. The annealing of QD-OLED increased the QD emission about three times. No wavelength shift was observed in the electroluminescence spectra from the QD before and after the annealing of QD-OLEDs. The mechanism of this emission improvement is discussed.

A. Uddin; C.C. Teo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mechanisms for formation of organic and inorganic by-products and their control in nonthermal plasma chemical processing of VOCs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the major by-products derived from Nonthermal Plasma (NTP) chemical processing of different types of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), mechanisms for their formation, effects of reactor types and additives such as water and gaseous oxygen on by-product distribution, and safe operations of NTP reactors for the removal of VOCs.

Shigeru Futamura; Masami Sugasawa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Novel silica-based ion exchange resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Information security knowledge sharing in organizations: Investigating the effect of behavioral information security governance and national culture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an empirical investigation on what behavioral information security governance factors drives the establishment of information security knowledge sharing in organizations. Data was collected from organizations located in different geographic regions of the world, and the amount of data collected from two countries – namely, USA and Sweden – allowed us to investigate if the effect of behavioral information security governance factors on the establishment of security knowledge sharing differs based on national culture. The study followed a mixed methods research design, wherein qualitative data was collected to both establish the study's research model and develop a survey instrument that was distributed to 578 information security executives. The results suggest that processes to coordinate implemented security knowledge sharing mechanisms have a major direct influence on the establishment of security knowledge sharing in organizations; the effect of organizational structure (e.g., centralized security function to develop and deploy uniform firm-wide policies, and use of steering committees to facilitate information security planning) is slightly weaker, while business-based information security management has no significant direct effect on security knowledge sharing. A mediation analysis revealed that the reason for the nonsignificant direct relation between business-based information security management and security knowledge sharing is the fully mediating effect of coordinating information security processes. Thus, the results disentangles the interrelated influences of behavioral information security governance factors on security knowledge sharing by showing that information security governance sets the platform to establish security knowledge sharing, and coordinating processes realize the effect of both the structure of the information security function and the alignment of information security management with business needs. A multigroup analysis identified that national culture had a significant moderating effect on the association between four of the six proposed relations. In Sweden – which is seen as a less individualist, feminine country – managers tend to focus their efforts on implementing controls that are aligned with business activities and employees' need; monitoring the effectiveness of the implemented controls, and assuring that the controls are not too obtrusive to the end-user. On the contrary, US organizations establish security knowledge sharing in their organization through formal arrangements and structures. These results imply that Swedish managers perceive it to be important to involve, or at least know how their employees cope with the decisions that have been made, thus favoring local participation in information security management, while US managers may feel the need to have more central control when running their information security function. The findings suggest that national culture should be taken into consideration in future studies – in particular when investigating organizations operating in a global environment – and understand how it affects behaviors and decision-making.

Waldo Rocha Flores; Egil Antonsen; Mathias Ekstedt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1989-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

65

Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ filling through hydrolysis and condensation of silicon alkoxides has been utilized to generate nanocomposites in which the filler phase can be intimately associated with the polymer on relatively small length scales. One problem of the method has been achieving useful fill volumes without bulk phase separation of the reacting silicon monomer from the polymer. In this paper, we describe the preparation of a new class of nanocomposite materials in which the inorganic filler phase is pre-assembled before copolymerization with an organic species. Maleimide monomers, prepared from alkoxysilylpropyl amines and maleic anhydride, were protected against side reactions by forming the oxonorbornene Diels-Alder adduct with furan. The monomers were then reacted under sol-gel conditions to form oligomers or polymers-the filler phase. The material was activated by thermal deprotection of the maleimide and reacted with organic monomers or polymers to form the filled nanocomposite.

Shaltout, R.M.; Loy, D.A.; Wheeler, D.R.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Purification Or Organic Acids Using Anion Exchange Chromatography.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a cost-effective method for purifying and acidifying carboxylic acids, including organic acids and amino acids. The method involves removing impurities by allowing the anionic form of the carboxylic acid to bind to an anion exchange column and washing the column. The carboxylic anion is displaced as carboxylic acid by washing the resin with a strong inorganic anion. This method is effective in removing organic carboxylic acids and amino acids from a variety of industrial sources, including fermentation broths, hydrolysates, and waste streams.

Ponnampalam; Elankovan (Okemos, MI)

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

DSM BUYS RESINS UNIT OF AVECIA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM BUYS RESINS UNIT OF AVECIA ... DSM HAS AGREED TO ACQUIRE Avecia's NeoResins coating resins business for almost $680 million. ... The unit will be known as DSM NeoResins and will become part of DSM Coating Resins. ...

PATRICIA SHORT

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

68

PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

body. The current review describes the role of surface modification of oxides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in providing versatile characteristics to inorganic oxide...

69

Influence of substrate refractive index and antireflection coating on excitons generation in organic solar cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar cells are manufactured with the application of inorganic semiconductors and with the application of organic semiconductors. Organic solar cells have presently lower efficiency than their inorganic...2010).

Ewa Gondek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alternate Methods For Eluting Cesium From Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removing cesium from the supernate and dissolved salt solutions in the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX system could use either crystalline silicotitanate (CST) an inorganic, non-regenerable sorbent or spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), a new regenerable resin, to remove cesium from the waste solutions. The standard method for eluting the cesium from the RF resin uses 15-20 bed volumes (BV) of 0.5 M nitric acid (HNO3). The nitric acid eluate, containing the radioactive cesium, would be combined with the sludge from the waste tanks, and would be converted into glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The amount of nitric acid generated by the standard elution method exceeds the capacity of DWPF to destroy the nitrate ions and maintain the required chemical reducing conditions in the glass melt. Alternate methods for eluting the resin have been tested, including using lower concentrations of nitric acid, other acids, and changing the flow regimes. About 4 bed volumes of 0.5 M nitric acid are required to remove the sodium (titrate the resin) and most of the cesium from the resin, so the bulk of the acid used for the standard elution method removes a very small quantity of cesium from the resin. The resin was loaded with 9.5 g Cs/L of resin prior to elution, which is the maximum expected loading for RF resin treating the actual dissolved salt waste at SRS. For the baseline elution method, 465 g of nitrate is used per liter of resin, and >99.9999% of the cesium is removed from the resin. An alternative method that used 4 bed volumes of 0.5 M HNO3 followed by 11 bed volumes of 0.05 M HNO3, used 158 g of nitrate per liter of resin (66% less nitrate than used for the standard elution) and removed >99.998% of the cesium. A staccato flow mode using 0.5 M HNO3 (1 hr on at 1 BV/hr, followed by 3 hrs off) after the resin had been titrated using a continuous flow of acid at 1 BV/hr removed 99.9998% of the cesium while using 12 BV of acid (20% less than the baseline). Formic acid was slightly less efficient than nitric acid for eluting the resin, but 20 BV of 0.5 M HCOOH removed 99.98% of the cesium from the resin.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Johnson, Heather Lauren [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the degradation process. It was possible to correlate it with the final amount of non-degraded resins. These results show that these conditions were favorable to destroy the resins, indicating to be the AOP an effective technique to reduce the volume of the waste. (authors)

Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil)] [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil); Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)] [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Inorganic Nanoarchitectures by Organic Self Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.2 Photonic device architectures for enhanced light absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 4 Experimental and analytical techniques 59 4... T 1 T 2 T 3 T c T 5 fr e e e n e rg y ? G f A f ’’ A f ’ A b 5 ?m C C’ Figure 1.2: Phase separation of polymer blends. a) Schematic of two chemically distinct ho- mopolymer chains. b) Atomic force microscopy image of a phase separated polymer film...

Guldin, Stefan

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

Farmers practices in organic and inorganic fertilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Management and Environmental Protection: a Case Study in Thai Binh Province, Northern Vietnam.0-10.0 ton/ha/year compared with the whole country. Area of high-quality food plants such as potato, tomato

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

74

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxbille, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fabrication of a seamless roll mold using inorganic electron beam resist with postexposure bake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fabrication of next-generation devices via roll-to-roll (RTR) nanoimprinting has received considerable attention due to the high throughput and resolution associated with the process. In particular RTR nanoimprinting with ultraviolet (UV)-curable resin is expected to be useful for the fabrication of large-area devices such as nonreflective films transparent conductive sheets and organic solar cells. In order to improve the resolution of such devices the roll mold must be able to produce seamless fine patterns. Generally a roll mold for nanoimprinting is made by attaching a planar mold replicated from the master mold via a nickel electroforming technique. However this method produces seams which reduces the product yield. In order to resolve these issues the authors have developed a direct writing method using electron beam (EB) lithography on a rotating cylindrical substrate. In this study the authors examined the potential for fabricating a seamless roll mold using high-resolution inorganic EB resist and the pattern shrink effect from postexposure bake (PEB). The authors used the dip-and-pull method to form the EB resist layer on the roll mold substrate (32?mm diameter made of brass). The cleaned roll mold was dipped in the inorganic EB resist and then pulled out at a constant speed. The resulting sample was cured at 300?°C for 1?h. Next the sample was mounted on rotating equipment and placed in a scanning electron microscope(SEM) equipped with an EB writing system and the roll substrate was exposed to 10?kV EB while rotating at a constant speed. The revolution speed was set to ten turns per line pattern. Subsequently PEB was carried out at 200?°C for 10?min in air. After the sample was cooled to room temperature the EB-exposed area of the EB resist layer was developed using buffered HF. The obtained pattern on the roll mold was examined with the same SEM used for writing. Finally RTR nanoimprinting using the obtained roll mold was carried out using UV-photocurable resin. At that time the sample was coated with an antisticking layer of fluorinated silane coupling agent. As a result a seamless line pattern 190?nm wide was obtained on a polyethylene terephthalate film over a length of 10?cm.

Noriyuki Unno; Jun Taniguchi; Kiyoshi Ishikawa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method. 12 figs.

Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Yu, Q.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin from by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method.

Miller, Jan D. (1886 Atkin Ave., Salt Lake City, UT 84106); Yi, Ye (2875 E. Wander Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84117); Yu, Qiang (224 University Village, Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Self-Indicating Resins:? Sensor Beads and in Situ Reaction Monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid-phase organic synthesis and solution-phase parallel synthesis assisted by polymer-supported reagents, or scavenger resins, enable painstaking purifications to be avoided during synthesis. This concept was applied to reaction monitoring through the ...

Jin K. Cho; Peter D. White; Wolfgang Klute; Tony W. Dean; Mark Bradley

2003-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Retrofit for Plastic Resin Driers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETROFIT FOR PLASTIC RESIN DRIERS BABU JOSEPH PH.D. Supervising Engineer Southern California Edison Company, Irwindale, California GEORGE THURO Thuro, & Associates, Costa Mesa, California Plastic resins used in injection molding have... installation of dew point meters and a programmable controller to tailor the regeneration cycle to the required dew point temperature. Background It was estimated that there are about 450 plastic processors in the Southern California Edison service...

Joseph, B.; Thuro, G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Guayule resin separation and purification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fraction and reducing the presence of these terpenes to practically non-detectable levels in the polar fraction. A single component, as identified by gas chromatograph (GC) was also effectively extracted from the Texas A&M resins. Saponification..., using an FID Solvent fractionation of the Firestone resin between methanol and hexane was also apparently effective in separating the low molecular weight rubber. Figure 16 and Figure 17 show the gas chromatographs of the bottom phase (fraction "a...

Bajwa, Mohinder P.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Inorganic membranes: The new industrial revolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separation systems are a vital part of most industrial processes. These systems account for a large fraction of the capital equipment used and the operating costs of industrial processes. Inorganic membranes have the potential for providing separation systems that can significantly reduce both the capital equipment and operating costs. These separation processes include waste management and recycle as well as the primary production of raw materials and products. The authors are rapidly learning to understand the effect of physical and chemical properties on the different transport mechanisms that occur in inorganic membranes. Such understanding can be expected to provide the information needed to design, engineer and manufacture inorganic membranes to produce very high separation factors for almost any separation function. To implement such a revolution, the authors need to organize a unique partnership between the national laboratories, and industry. The university can provide research to understand the materials and transport mechanisms that produce various separations, the national laboratories the development of an economical fabrication and manufacturing capability, and industry the practical understanding of the operational problems required to achieve inplementation.

Fain, D.E. [Martin Merietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Preparation and screening of crystalline inorganic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Danville, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Brice{hacek over (n)}o, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xiao-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Combinatorial screening of inorganic and organometallic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Ross, Debra A. (Mountain Ranch, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Danville, CA); Briceno, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xian-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

86

Argonne CNM Highlight: Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructures Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructures Lee Makowski A number of potential methods might be useful in guiding the assembly of inorganic nanostructures. A key objective in this effort is the ability to specify the exact locations of different nanoparticles within a nanostructure, a capability that will be critical in designing and producing future nanodevices. Nanoparticles One technique discussed involves the possibility of using proteins to create a framework on which nanoparticles could then be attached at specified points. Some type of chemical processing could then be used to remove the organics after assembly. Attaching the inorganic particles to a protein framework might be accomplished using binding sites identified via "phage display" techniques where phage-displaying proteins with randomized surfaces are selected for an affinity to a desired inorganic material. The advantages of this method include the ability to isolate a single binding phage and then grow large quantities of it for characterization. A particularly advantageous type of protein for these constructs are diabodies, constructed from fragments of antibodies. These can incorporate binding sites identified through phage display and then be used to attach inorganic materials at preselected places on the protein framework.

87

RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN CHEMISTRY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange technology is being considered for cesium removal using a polymer resin made of resorcinol formaldehyde that has been engineered into microspheres. The waste under study is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste; therefore, the resin performance was evaluated with actual dissolved salt waste. The ion exchange performance and resin chemistry results are discussed.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Small Angle Neutron Scattering Characterization of the Porous Structure of Carbons Prepared Using Inorganic Templates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used for the characterization of the microstructure of carbons derived from organic-loaded inorganic template materials that are used as anodes in lithium ion cells. Pillared clays (PILC), layered silicates whose ...

Giselle Sandí; P. Thiyagarajan; Kathleen A. Carrado; Randall E. Winans

1999-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL); St. Martin, Edward (Libertyville, IL); Arora, Michelle (Woodridge, IL); de la Garza, Linda (Woodridge, IL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

90

The many faces of ion-exchange resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion-exchange resins have been used commercially for over 60 years. Softening and demineralization of water for boiler feed and process use were then, and continue to be, the most familiar and widespread applications of ion-exchange resins throughout the chemical process industries (CPI). Several types of membrane-based technologies, such as electrodialysis, reverse osmosis and, more recently, electrodeionization are recognized as alternative methods for water treatment. Yet, modern versions of ion-exchange resins remain a major player in water treatment. In addition, these versatile materials can be found performing a wide range of tasks in both aqueous and nonaqueous environments. Some of these diverse applications include: acid or base catalysis; manufacture of high-purity solvents and reagent chemicals; separation of by-products of fermentation processes; deacidification of organic solvents; high-purity water production for semiconductor manufacture; recovery of valuable waste from dilute process effluents; controlled release of pharmaceutical products; and chromatography, both on the analytical and the industrial scale. The key to understanding the potential of ion-exchange resins is to look beyond their exchange and adsorptive characteristics, and to see their fundamental nature. In other words, it`s necessary to first consider them as spherical, particulate reactive polymers that perform chemical reactions.

McNutty, J.T. [Rohm and Haas Co., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical...

92

Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organization Print Organization Print 2012-12 org chart A complete ALS organization chart (June 2013) is available in PDF. Appointed and elected members of advisory panels provide guidance to Berkeley Lab and ALS management in developing the ALS scientific and user programs. ALS Staff Photo staff photo thumb Click on the image to see a recent photo of ALS staff in front of the dome. The photo was taken on May 14, 2013. ALS Management and Advisory Team Steve Kevan, Deputy Division Director, Science Michael J. Banda, Deputy Division Director, Operations Robert W. Schoenlein, Senior Staff Scientist, Next Generation Light Source Initiative Janos Kirz, Scientific Advisor Paul Adams, Division Deputy for Biosciences ALS Scientific, Technical, and User Support Groups Accelerator Physics

93

2D-network of inorganic-organic hybrid material built on Keggin type polyoxometallate and amino acid: [L-C{sub 2}H{sub 6}NO{sub 2}]{sub 3}[(PO{sub 4})Mo{sub 12}O{sub 36}].5H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new inorganic-organic hybrid material based on polyoxometallate, [L-C{sub 2}H{sub 6}NO{sub 2}]{sub 3}[(PO{sub 4})Mo{sub 12}O{sub 36}].5H{sub 2}O, has been successfully synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis, elemental analysis, infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance and differential thermal analysis techniques. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group, P2{sub 1}/c{sub ,} with a = 12.4938 (8) A, b = 19.9326 (12) A, c = 17.9270 (11) A, {beta} = 102.129 (1){sup o}, V = 4364.8 (5) A{sup 3}, Z = 4 and R{sub 1}(wR{sub 2}) = 0.0513, 0.0877. The most remarkable structural feature of this hybrid can be described as two-dimensional inorganic infinite plane-like (2D/{infinity} [(PO{sub 4})Mo{sub 12}O{sub 36}]{sup 3-}) which forming via weak Van der Waals interactions along the z axis. The characteristic band of the Keggin anion [(PO{sub 4})Mo{sub 12}O{sub 36}]{sup 3-} appears at 210 nm in the UV spectrum. Thermal analysis indicates that the Keggin anion skeleton begins to decompose at 520 deg. C.

Alizadeh, M.H. [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad 91779-1436 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mhalizadehg@yahoo.com; Mirzaei, M. [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad 91779-1436 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, H. [Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

94

Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye Chemistry", 5th Edition, Freeman Press. Available at SU bookstore. The solution manual is optional. (Suggested for CHE611 Students pursuing Inorganic) Huheey, "Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure

Mather, Patrick T.

95

New modified hydrocarbon resins; An alternative to styrenated terpene resins in hot melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of two hydrocarbon-based resin formulations that could be used with different thermoplastic block copolymers to formulate pressure-sensitive adhesives. Results are examined with one of these resins in formulations with styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) and styrene-butadiene (SB) compounds. The new modified hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 98{degrees} C, matches the adhesive performance of a terpene resin with a softening point of 105{degrees} C. The resin performs as well as the modified terpene in SIS-, SB-, and EVA-based adhesives. The new hydrocarbon resin is especially well suited for hot-melt adhesives. It exhibits low volatility, good color stability, and excellent melt viscosity stability. Since the new resin is based on petroleum hydrocarbon feedstocks, it should be available at moderate, stable prices. The other hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 85{degrees} C, produced comparable results.

Carper, J.D. (Hercules Inc., Wilmington, DE (US))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

OrganicHybrid PV Background.pptx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Excitonic solar cells, comprised of materials such as organic semiconductors, inorganic colloidal quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes, are fundamentally different than crystalline,...

97

Application of Electrospun Nanofibers in Organic Photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter highlights the introduction of organic thin-film solar cells and organic–inorganic hybrid solar cells and the development of electrospun nanofibers for those applications. Organic solar cells need...

Surawut Chuangchote; Takashi Sagawa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fluorene-based macromolecular nanostructures and nanomaterials for organic (opto)electronics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting diode using azide-functionalized...azide hybridized on near-UV light emitting diode for high color rendering index...hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting diode using azide functionalized...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ortho-ortho aramatic bis maleimide-diamine resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

APO-BMI is a chain-extended with certain diamines to provide thermosetting resins retaining the improved properties of APO-BMI resins, but having increased toughness in the cured resins.

Zupancic, J.J.; Swedo, R.J.; Jamieson, D.R.; Schumacher, E.F.; Buehler, A.J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

7th International Symposium on Inorganic Phosphate Materials - Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ISIPM7 Home ISIPM7 Home About ISIPM7 Conference Brochure Organizers Scientific Committee Proceedings Sponsors Speakers Exhibitors Program Call for Abstracts & Posters Registration Hotels Maps Bus Schedule Contact Us isipm7 header About the Conference It is a great pleasure for the organizing committee of the 7th International Symposium on Inorganic Phosphate Materials (ISIPM7) to invite all who are interested in the design and development of inorganic phosphate materials with applications in various domains of modern technology including energy storage, biomaterials, storage of waste, catalysis, and optics. Read more » Dates to Remember July 18 - Abstracts due (new) July 18 - Registration opens July 25 - Paper and poster acceptance (new) October 17 - Final registration and payment due

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NON-ISOTHERMAL INJECTION MOULDING WITH RESIN CURE AND PREFORM DEFORMABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transfer Molding), SRIM (Structural Resin Injection Molding), SCRIMP (Seeman Com- posite Resin Infusion

Preziosi, Luigi

102

Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Ft. Collins, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layers for organic diodes and solar cells, and contacts tosensitized solar cells, as well as organic and inorganicorganic semiconductors in both diode (OLED and solar cell)[

Bakhishev, Teymur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or GoNo-Go Decision March 2013 Demonstrated scalable synthesis of hollow silicon nanotubes (h-SiNTs) using sacrificial inorganic nanowire template showing capacities >2000...

106

Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructure Building Blocks...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanostructure Building Blocks to Octahedral Superstructures – A True Template-Free Self Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructure Building Blocks to Octahedral...

107

Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems along the Columbia River to increase efficiency and reduce costs. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems

109

Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

111

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

112

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues surrounding nuclear power production and waste...

113

Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hydrothermal synthesis and crystal structure of a new inorganic/organic hybrid of scandium sulfate: (H{sub 2}en)Sc{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}.(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.72}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first organically templated layered structure of scandium sulfate, (H{sub 2}en)Sc{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}.(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.72}, (en=ethylenediamine) was synthesized by a hydrothermal method and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the title compound, scandium ions are bridged by sulfate groups with a ratio of 1:2 into a 4{sub 3}{sup 6} layer structure. These layers are parallel packed and separated from each other by ethylenediammonium dications and water molecules. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/c, with cell parameters a=8.5966(13)A, b=5.1068(8)A, c=18.847(3)A, {beta}=91.210(3){sup o}, V=827.2(2)A{sup 3} and Z=2. Refinement gave R{sub 1}[I>2{sigma}(I)]=0.0354 and wR{sub 2}[I>2{sigma}(I)]=0.0878. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that this material is thermally stable to above 400 deg. C.

Lu Jianjiang [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: j.lu@anl.gov; Schlueter, John A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Geiser, Urs [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Organic matter in ancient meteorites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......asteroids. 3: Organic matter in...lead to the production of hydroxy...useful in cell membranes...a part in cell membranes...meteorite organic matter because...form the solar system bequeathed...the early solar system and organic-inorganic......

Mark A Sephton

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Application of Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane Technology to Cat Cracker Recycle Gas Hydrogen* FINAL REPORT DOE FEW FEAC324 June 2003 L.D. Trowbridge *AKA: Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology to Hydrogen-Hydrocarbon Separations ORNL/TM-2003/139 Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology To Hydrogen-hydrocarbon Separations June 2003 Prepared by L. D. Trowbridge DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847)

117

Polygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiwalled inorganic nanotubes with circular cross sections must have either an incoherent interface or a large amount of strain. However, nanotubes with a polygonal cross section can have a coherent interface with ...

Tibbetts, Kevin

118

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Title Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wang, Yungang, Philip K. Hopke, X. Xia, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, and M. J. Source Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 55 Start Page 525 Pagination 525-532 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords source apportionment positive matrix factorization (pmf) particulate matter (pm) molecular markers (mm) aethalometer delta-c Abstract Source apportionment is typically performed on chemical composition data derived from particulate matter (PM) samples. However, many common sources no longer emit significant amounts of characteristic trace elements requiring the use of more comprehensive chemical characterization in order to fully resolve the PM sources. Positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF, version 4.1) was used to analyze 24-hr integrated molecular marker (MM), secondary inorganic ions, trace elements, carbonaceous species and light absorption data to investigate sources of PM2.5 in Rochester, New York between October 2009 and October 2010 to explore the role of specific MMs. An eight-factor solutionwas found for which the factors were identified as isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA), airborne soil, other SOA, diesel emissions, secondary sulfate, wood combustion, gasoline vehicle, and secondary nitrate contributing 6.9%, 12.8%, 3.7%, 7.8%, 45.5%, 9.1%, 7.9%, and 6.3% to the average PM2.5 concentration, respectively Concentrations of pentacosane, hexacosane, heptacosane, and octacosane in the gasoline vehicles factor were larger compared to diesel emissions. Aethalometer Delta-C was strongly associated with wood combustion. The compounds, n-heptacosanoic acid and n-octacosanoic acid, occasionally used in the past as tracers for road dust, were found to largely associate with SOA in this study. In comparison with a standard PMF analyses without MM, inclusion of themwas necessary to resolve SOA and wood combustion factors in urban areas.

119

Inorganic-organic hybrid structure: Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of a cobalt phosphite-oxalate, [C{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 12}][Co{sub 4}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrothermal reaction of a mixture of cobalt (II) oxalate, phosphorous acid, piperazine and water at 150{sup o}C for 96h followed by heating at 180{sup o}C for 24h gave rise to a new inorganic-organic hybrid solid, [C{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 12}][Co{sub 4}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}], I. The structure consists of edge-shared CoO{sub 6} octahedra forming a [Co{sub 2}O{sub 10}] dimers that are connected by HPO{sub 3} and C{sub 2}O{sub 4} units forming a three-dimensional structure with one-dimensional channels. The amine molecules are positioned within these channels. The oxalate units have a dual role of connecting within the plane of the layer as well as out of the plane. Magnetic susceptibility measurement shows the compound orders antiferromagnetically at low temperature (T{sub N}=22K). Crystal data: I, monoclinic, space group=P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14). a=7.614(15), b=7.514(14), c=17.750(3)A, {beta}=97.351(3){sup o}, V=1007.30(3)A{sup 3}, Z=2, {rho}{sub calc}=2.466g/cm{sup 3}, {mu}{sub (MoK{alpha}}{sub )}=3.496mm{sup -1}, R{sub 1}=0.0310 and wR{sub 2}=0.0807 data [I>2{sigma}(I)].

Mandal, Sukhendu [Framework Solids Laboratory, Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Natarajan, Srinivasan [Framework Solids Laboratory, Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)]. E-mail: snatarajan@sscu.iisc.ernet.in

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing the cost for photovoltaic devices by introducing aPhotovoltaic Cell Materials Different materials display different efficiencies and have different costs.photovoltaic devices have recently drawn tremendous attention because of their technological advantages for actualization of large-area and cost

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

123

Fabrication of organic and inorganic nanoparticles using electrospray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) porous cups were made using the electrospray technique. However, the average diameter of these cup structures was micron scale and the difficulty to make nano scale cups was also described. The setup for the experiments...

Deotare, Parag Bhaskar

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Organic and Inorganic Aerosol Below-Cloud Scavenging by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations, with an average gravimetric PM1.0 of 8.2 ( 1.6 µg m-3 and an average Fourier transform infrared-rinsing behavior was unaffected by source type. The aerosol OM was hydrophilic throughout the sampling period the description of aerosol lifetimes in global models. Introduction Wet and dry deposition of aerosol particles

Russell, Lynn

125

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is described from its power conversion efficiency (PCE).PCE of a photovoltaic device is determined from the currentPower conversion efficiency (PCE) of all of the fabricated

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development and study of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

???Both the increasing demand for energy and the environmental crisis lead to development of clean and renewable energy sources. Among a variety of new energy… (more)

Liu, Chaoping ( ???)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

NSF/DOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

128

Degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants by zero valent iron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Feo. The only product observed in the reduction of 2,4-DNT was 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT). The 2,4-DAT produced accounted for 83-100% and only 42-54% of the initial mass of 2@4.DNT under anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. Since no degradation of 2...

Malla, Deepak Babu

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and their influence on photovoltaic cells, Solar EnergyPhotodiodes, and Photovoltaic Cells, Applied Physics LettersHeeger, Polymer Photovoltaic Cells - Enhanced Efficiencies

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 Figure 1-7 Peak oil: smoothed annual discoveries of oilsince 1960s following the peak oil discoveries except forsources. Figure 1-7 Peak oil: smoothed annual discoveries of

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facilities. Worldwide, hydroelectricity and wind are the twothe same with the hydroelectricity power plants; instead of

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Solidification/stabilization of organics and inorganics. Engineering bulletin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering bulletin on solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate hazardous waste into a solid material of high structural integrity. Encapsulation involves either fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Stabilization refers to techniques that treat hazardous waste by converting it into a less soluble, mobile, or toxic form. Solidification/Stabilization processes utilize one or both of these techniques. The bulletin provides information on the technology applicability, the technology limitations, a description of the technology, the types of residuals produced, site requirements, the latest performance data, the status of the technology, and sources of further information.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Photocurable Inorganic-Organic Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bovine serum albumin in vitro. Poloxamer gels have also been used as delivery system. The poloxamers (Pluronic ? ) are ABA-type triblock copolymers composed of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)(A) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) (B) units. In the work... liquid that gels in situ. Table 1.2. Advantages and disadvantages of hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds Advantages Aqueous environment can protect cells and fragile drugs Good transport of nutrient to cells and products from cells May...

Hou, Yaping

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy sources (Figure 1-6b). Solar Energy: Solar energy isSolar energy is one of the major alternative energy sourcessources and consumption according to regions. Finally, the current situation in solar energy

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Resin infusion analysis of nanoclay filled glass fiber laminates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper focuses on the resin flow characteristics of nanoclay filled glass fiber laminates processed by Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion Molding (VARIM). Laminates with varying quantities of nanoclays (0–5 wt.%) were prepared and the effect of these nanoclays on the epoxy resin flow characteristics was studied. It was found that the flow rate of resin continuously decreased as nanoclay content continuously increased. The reduction in the flow rate was attributed to the rate of change of curing and the subsequent change in viscosity of the nanoclay filled resin. Analysis of infusion process by Darcy’s law show that the permeability of the fiber decreased in the nanoclay filled resin system. Nanoclay filled laminates show improved static and dynamic mechanical properties than that of unfilled resin composites.

K. Kanny; T.P. Mohan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NETL: Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0007632 Ohio State University is developing a cost-effective design and manufacturing process for new membrane modules that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas. The membranes consist of a thin, selective inorganic layer, embedded in a polymer structure so that it can be made in a continuous manufacturing process. They will be incorporated in spiral-wound modules for bench-scale tests using coal-fired flue gas. Preliminary cost calculations show that a single-stage membrane process is economically unfavorable, primarily because of the low concentration of CO2 (~14 percent) in the flue gas stream. A two-stage process is more economical, but requires plant operation with a CO2-enriched recycle stream.

137

Chapter 30 - Inorganic Arsenic in Rice and Rice Bran: Health Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rice is a staple food for people in many countries in all parts of the world. Arsenic in food, including rice, is present in several forms that have different toxicities. Inorganic arsenic species (AsIII and AsV) are the most toxic forms of arsenic present in food. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified inorganic arsenic, but not organic arsenic, in Group 1, as carcinogenic to humans. There has been increasing concern about the health implications regarding exposure to inorganic arsenic through rice consumption. An extensive review of published reports has shown that no epidemiological studies have been conducted indicating the health effects associated with the ingestion of inorganic arsenic through consumption of rice. Several studies suggested that drinking water containing high levels of inorganic arsenic plays a major role in the health risk of cancers among people residing in arsenic-contaminated areas. Two leading research groups in this field have concluded that “At present, it is impossible to fully assess the health risk of arsenic in rice,” and “Even if epidemiological studies were to be initiated, it would take decades to understand how elevated arsenic in rice affects lifetime health outcomes”.

Suthep Ruangwises; Piyawat Saipan; Nongluck Ruangwises

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Semiconductor Aspects of Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the last few years organic solar cells have been discussed as a promising alternative to inorganic semiconductors for renewable energy production. These organic photovoltaic devices offer the possibility o...

Christoph J. Brabec

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Recent advances as materials of functional metal-organic frameworks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), also known as hybrid inorganic-organic materials, represent an emerging class of materials that have attracted the imagination of solid-state chemists because MOFs combine unprecedented levels of porosity with a range ...

Xiao-Lan Tong; Hai-Lu Lin; Jian-Hua Xin; Fen Liu; Min Li; Xia-Ping Zhu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE WITH SPHERICAL RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN EXPERIMENTAL TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal. The spherical form of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) is being evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake waste at SRS, which is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. The sRF performance with SRS waste was evaluated in two phases: resin batch contacts and IX column testing with both simulated and actual dissolved salt waste. The tests, equipment, and results are discussed.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following investigations were performed: (1) batch mode screening of eleven(11) commercially available resins and selection of three candidate resins for further evaluation in a fixed-bed setup. (2) Process variables study using three candidate resins in the fixed-bed setup and selection of the ``best`` resin for process economics development. (3) Exhaustion efficiency and solution concentration were found to be inversely related necessitating a trade-off between the resin cost versus the cost of evaporation/concentration of ensuing effluents. (4) Higher concentration of the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} form of active sites over less active CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} form of sites in the resin was believed to be the main reason for the observed increase in the equilibrium capacity of the resin at an elevated static CO{sub 2}-pressure. This Increase in capacity was found to level off around 80--120 psig range. The increase in CO{sub 2}-pressure, however, did not appear to affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics. (5) In the fixed-bed mode, the solution concentration was found to affect the equilibrium capacity of candidate resins. Their relationship was well satisfied by the Langmuir type non-linear equilibrium isotherm. Alternatively, the effect of solution concentration on overall ion-exchange kinetics varied from resin to resin. (6) Product inhibition effect on the resin was observed as an initial increase followed by a significant decrease in the resin`s equilibrium capacity for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} as the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} molar ratio in the solution was increased from 0 to 1.0. This ratio, however, did not affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics.

Sheth, A C; Dharmapurikar, R; Strevel, S D

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

143

Direct vitrification of Fermi 2 bead resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants produce large quantities of spent ion exchange resins from primary and secondary side water treatment systems. Detroit Edison`s experience with vitrification of bead resin was conducted at Catholic University with the objective of using the DuraMelter{trademark} vitrification technology to perform both for volume reduction and to create a stable glass waste form. Detroit Edison had been without disposal capability since November 1990, and very minimal progress had been made in Michigan to build a radioactive disposal site. Encouraging results from non-radioactive tests conducted on a DuraMelter{trademark} 10 system in January and February 1995 by Duratek aided in our decision to use this process. Our experience is the subject of this report.

Weber, B.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry Syracuse University The Department of Chemistry at Syracuse University invites applications for a tenure track faculty position at the Assistant Professor level in inorganic chemistry with specialization in materials chemistry (broadly defined

Doyle, Robert

146

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined July 31, 2013 The journal Inorganic Chemistry published a special Forum issue on the role of inorganic chemistry in nuclear energy. John Gordon and Argonne National Laboratory collaborated on the work. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy and the Office

147

HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit.

Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

148

2007 Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Gordon Research Conference-February 18-23  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference focuses on kinetic, mechanistic, and thermodynamic studies of reactions that play a role in fields as diverse as catalysis, energy, bioinorganic chemistry, green chemistry, organometallics, and activation of small molecules (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, alkanes). Participants from universities, industry, and national laboratories present results and engage in discussions of pathways, intermediates, and outcome of various reactions of inorganic, organic, coordination, organometallic, and biological species. This knowledge is essential for rational development and design of novel reactions, compounds, and catalysts.

Andreja Bakac

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - acp resin composites Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RTM, Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer... Molding (VARTM), Seemann Composites Resin Infusion Molding Process (SCRIMP), has emerged as an important... 1 Experimental...

150

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. [Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Measuring Asphaltenes and Resins, and Dipole Moment in Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Asphaltenes and Resins, and Dipole Moment in Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual Earth Science, Palo Alto, CA 94306 A petroleum fluid can be di®ided into three types of species: asphaltenes, resins or mildly polar. The interaction among these species strongly affect asphaltene precipitation from petroleum

Firoozabadi, Abbas

153

Method and solvent composition for regenerating an ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and composition for removing perchlorate from a highly selective ion exchange resin is disclosed. The disclosed approach comprises treating the resin in a solution of super critical or liquid carbon dioxide and one or more quaternary ammonium chloride surfactant compounds.

Even, William R. (Livermore, CA); Irvin, David J. (Livermore, CA); Irvin, Jennifer A. (Livermore, CA); Tarver, Edward E. (Livermore, CA); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Wang, James C. F. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Wood ants use resin to protect themselves against pathogens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood ants use resin to protect themselves against pathogens Michel Chapuisat1,*, Anne Oppliger2. Wood ants, Formica paralugubris, commonly bring back pieces of solidified coniferous resin of larvae exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. These results show that wood ants

Lehmann, Laurent

155

Patterned Growth of Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanowire Arrays on Inorganic Substrates at Low Temperature without Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as optoelectronic and electromechanical nanodevices, such as solar cells,1 field emission devices,2,3 UV lasers,4 with many other materials. Metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxial growth12 and template-assisted growth13 have). The nonepitaxial growth of ZnO NW arrays on Si wafers (or any other inorganic substrates) was assisted by a thin

Wang, Zhong L.

156

New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products capable of removing contaminants from the groundwater. Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products

157

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

158

Thermal analysis of cast-resin dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-flammable characteristic of dry-type cast-resin transformers make them suitable for residential and hospital usages. However, because of resin’s property, thermal behavior of these transformers is undesirable, so it is important to analyze their thermal behavior. In this paper temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers is modeled by two different approaches. A FEM-based model which uses experimental-analytical formula for air–cooling vertical ducts and a 3D finite volume based CFD model which is established in the ANSYS CFX software. In order to evaluate and compare the models, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data measured from an 800 kVA transformer. Finally, the influences of some construction parameters and environmental conditions on temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers were discussed.

M. Eslamian; B. Vahidi; A. Eslamian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Ft. Collins, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Introduction Ammonium is the most reduced form of inorganic nitrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

144 Introduction Ammonium is the most reduced form of inorganic nitrogen in seawater time. Uncertainties result from a com- bination of factors including: sample storage effects, contami

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using distributed sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using the Liquid Resin Infusion process under industrial environment is proposed. To detect the resin front; Liquid Resin Infusion. #12;2 1. Introduction Recently, Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes have been

Boyer, Edmond

163

Pd and Pd–Ag Nanoparticles within a Macroreticular Basic Resin: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Production from Formic Acid Decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pd and Pd–Ag Nanoparticles within a Macroreticular Basic Resin: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Production from Formic Acid Decomposition ... Palladium nanoparticles were immobilized within the pores of metal organic frameworks MIL-125 and amine-functionalized NH2-MIL-125 using photoassisted and ion exchange deposition methods. ...

Kohsuke Mori; Masahiro Dojo; Hiromi Yamashita

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

2012 ELECTRONIC PROCESSES IN ORGANIC MATERIALS GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JUNE 2-8, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This meeting focuses on the latest progress and challenges regarding organic electronics devices, artificial light-harvesting systems, and inorganic/organic hybrid nanoscale systems and especially on the synergy between these fields.

Eisele, Dorthe

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

Bulk heterojunction organic solar cell based on a novel fluorescent fluorine–boron complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic materials in solar cells are a promising alternative to inorganic ones...1–4...]. Moreover, the chemical flexibility for modifications on organic materials via chemical synthesis methods drives the...5–7....

Fen Qiao; Aimin Liu; Ying Zhou; Yi Xiao; Ping Ou Yang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Theory and simulation of amorphous organic electronic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electronic properties of amorphous organic thin films are of great interest due to their application in devices such as light emitting devices, solar cells, photodetectors, and lasers. Compared to conventional inorganic ...

Madigan, Conor (Conor Francis), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Dissolved Organic Matter Kinetically Controls Mercury Bioavailability to Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicting the bioavailability of inorganic mercury (Hg) to bacteria that produce the potent bioaccumulative neurotoxin monomethylmercury remains one of the greatest challenges in predicting the environmental fate and transport of Hg. Dissolved organic ...

Sophie A. Chiasson-Gould; Jules M. Blais; Alexandre J. Poulain

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

168

148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite: Chemistry 242,syntheticmethodology,mod- ernsyntheticreactions,protectinggroups,naturalprod- uctssynthesis,andcombinatorialchemistry.France. Spring Chemistry 350 (3)--Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisites: Chemistry 250, 252, and 262. Anintro

Dresden, Gregory

169

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Inorganic Nanotubes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803447  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Angewandte Chemie Inorganic Nanotubes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803447 Core­Shell PbI2@WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes from Capillary Wetting** Ronen Kreizman, Sung You Hong, Jeremy Sloan, Ronit Popovitz-Biro, Ana cavity. Capillarity has been shown to drive the wetting and filling of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

Davis, Ben G.

171

Nalco and Argonne reach licensing agreement covering resin wafer technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the USA, Nalco Co has reached a licensing agreement with the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, covering its resin wafer electrodeionisation (RW-EDI) technology.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Scratch resistance of different silica filled resins for obturation materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scratch resistance of different silica filled resins for obturation materials B. Bilyeu1,2 , W have scratch resistance values in the range appropriate for applications as obturation materials. Keywords: Obturation materials, Polymerzsilica, Hybrids, Polymer tribology, Scratch resistance Introduction

North Texas, University of

173

A NEW EXTRACTION CHROMATOGRAPHY RESIN CONTAINING KLÄUI LIGANDS...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of 1 wt% L on Amberlite® XAD-7. This resin strongly sorbs Am(III) and Pu(IV). The sorption of these ions decreases with increasing nitric acid concentration, but this effect is...

174

Microporous Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Purification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microporous Microporous Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Purification Brian L. Bischoff, Roddie R. Judkins, and Timothy R. Armstrong Oak Ridge National Laboratory Presented at: DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies Arlington, Virginia September 8, 2004 2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen Separation Membranes * Non-Porous - Palladium based films - Ion transport membranes * Porous - Ordered microporous membranes (IUPAC Recommendations 2001), e.g. zeolite membranes - Microporous membranes 3 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Microporous Membranes * IUPAC defines micropores as pores smaller than 2nm in diameter * Generally a microporous membrane is made by applying 1 to 3 thin layers to a porous support * Porous support can be ceramic or metallic

175

Polymerization of trialkoxysilanes. Effect of the organic substituent on the formation of gels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrolysis and condensation of trialkoxysilanes, R-Si(OR{prime}){sub 3}, generally leads to the formation of silsesquioxane oligomers and polymers. These polymers are composed of a monomer repeat unit, [R-SiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n}, with a single silicon atom attached to other repeat units in the polymer through one to three siloxane bonds. The remaining substituent is an organic group attached to the silicon through a silicon-carbon single bond. Silsesquioxanes have been the subject of intensive study in the past and are becoming important again as a vehicle for introducing organic functionalities into hybrid organic-inorganic materials through sol-gel processing. Despite all of this interest, there has not been a systematic study of the ability of trialkoxysilanes to form gels through the sol-gel process. In fact, it has been noted that silsesquioxanes are generally isolated as soluble resins rather than the highly crosslinked network polymers (gels) one would expect from a tri-functional monomer. In this study, the authors have examined the sol-gel chemistry of a variety of trialkoxysilanes with different organic substituents (R = H, Me, Et, n-Pr, i-Pr, n-Bu, i-Bu, t-Bu, n-octadecyl, n-dodecyl, cyclohexyl, vinyl, phenyl, benzyl, phenethyl), with methoxide or ethoxide substituents on silicon, at varying monomer concentrations ranging up to neat monomer, and with different catalysts (HCl, NaOH, formic acid, fluoride). Gels were prepared from tetramethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane at identical concentrations for purposes of comparison.

Loy, D.A.; Baugher, B.M.; Schneider, D.A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Advanced Resin Cleaning System (ARCS) at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam generation system in-core components can undergo serious material degradation by a variety of corrosion-related phenomena. These phenomena are largely controlled by boiler water (i.e. reactor water) chemistry which is strongly impacted by the performance of the condensate system mixed bed ion exchange units. In Boiling Water Reactors (BWR), the mixed bed ion exchange units not only provide protection from ionic contaminants, but also remove insoluble corrosion products by filtration/adsorption. These insoluble corrosion products removed by the ion exchange units must then be periodically cleaned from the resin bed by some process external to the BWR primary water loop. A unique resin cleaning process called the {open_quotes}Advanced Resin Cleaning System{close_quotes} (ARCS) was developed in the late 1980`s by members of CENTEC-XXI, located in Santa Clara, CA. This system, which has been successfully operated for several years at a Pressurized Water Reactor is highly efficient for removal of both insoluble corrosion products and anion/cation resin fines, and generates significantly less waste water than other cleaning methods. The ARCS was considered the most attractive method for meeting the demanding and costly resin cleaning needs of a BWR. A {open_quotes}Tailored Collaboration{close_quotes} project was initiated between EPRI, Entergy Operations (Grand Gulf Station), and CENTEC-XXI to demonstrate the {open_quotes}Advanced Resin Cleaning System{close_quotes} in a BWR.

Asay, R.H.; Earls, J.E.; Naughton, M.D. [Centec 21, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Effects of nanoclay on the thermal and rheological properties of a vartm (vacuum assisted resin transfer molding) epoxy resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three types of commercially available organophilic Montmorillonite (Cloisite 30B, 25A and 15A) were used to prepare VARTM epoxy resin nanocomposites in order to study the effect of the nanoclay organophilic modif...

Roberta Peila; J. C. Seferis; T. Karaki…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION BASED ON ORGANIC AND ORGANIC/INORGANIC HYBRID SOLAR CELLS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A Thesis Submitted to the School of Graduate Studies of Addis Ababa University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Of Doctor of… (more)

ASSEFA, SERGAWIE

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Inorganic Compounds in Biomass Feedstocks. 1. Effect on the Quality of Fast Pyrolysis Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inorganic Compounds in Biomass Feedstocks. 1. ... Inorganic compoundsespecially potassium, calcium, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, and chlorineare the main constituents of the ash in biomass feedstocks. ...

F. A. Agblevor; S. Besler

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied inorganic chemistry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inorganic chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: applied inorganic chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Our research...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly of hybrid thin films using polyelectrolytes and inorganic nanoparticles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Polymer/inorganic nanoparticle hybrid thin films, primarily composed of functional inorganic nanoparticles, are of great interest to researchers because of their interesting electronic, photonic, and optical… (more)

Peng, Chunqing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Denitration of Rocky Flats Ion-Exchange Resins: Recommendation of Denitration Processes, October 19, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resin denitration via anion-exchange is an implementable process that can effectively mitigate the hazards associated with stored resins in which the bulk of the nitrate consists of an "exchangeable nitrate" ionically bound to the cationic sites of the anion-exchange resins. Salicylate has been selected as the exchange anion of choice because of its superior selectivity for the Rocky Flats resins and its unique potential for comprehensive recovery and recycle. This report outlines a single recommended resin denigration procedure that is reasonably independent of the resin composition and the current stored form. This procedure is not optimized but rather seeks to `over-treat' the resins so that a single procedure works for the variety of stored resins. The recommended treatment with sodium salicylate reduces resins by 95-99+% the measured exothermic behavior of the ion-exchange.

Jacob Espinoza; Mary Barr; Wayne Smith

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Research and development of hydrogen separation technology with inorganic membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane technology has long been expected to provide new economical methods for industrial and waste management processes. At this time, the only commercially valuable inorganic membranes are the ultra filters derived from the French process that was used to produce the barrier for the French Gaseous Diffusion Plants. But these membranes are very expensive and have limited areas of application. Over the past fifteen years, scientists now in the Inorganic Membrane Technology Laboratory (IMTL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have developed theories and processes for inorganic membranes that can be used to design and produce inorganic membranes for a very broad range of applications. A part of the fabrication process is an adaptive spinoff from the still classified process used to manufacture barriers for the U.S. Gaseous Diffusion Process. Although that part of the process is classified, it is a very flexible and adaptable process and it can be used with a broad range of materials. With the theories and design capabilities developed in the last fifteen years, this new adaptive manufacturing technology can be used to manufacture commercial inorganic membranes that are not useful for the separation of uranium isotopes and they have little or no relation to the barriers that were used to separate uranium isotopes. The development and deployment of such inorganic membranes can be very beneficial to U.S. industry. Inorganic membranes can be specifically designed and manufactured for a large number of different applications. Such membranes can greatly improve the efficiency of a broad range of industrial processes and provide new technology for waste management. These inorganic membranes have the potential for major energy savings and conservation of energy. They can provide the means for significant improvements in the competitiveness of US Industry and improve the economy and health and welfare of the nation.

Fain, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Small angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies of carbons prepared using inorganic templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering analyses of carbons derived from organic-loaded inorganic template materials, used as anodes in lithium ion cells, have been performed. Two clays were used as templates to load the organic precursors, pillared montmorrillonite (PILC), a layered silicate clay whose sheets have been permanently propped open by sets of thermally stable molecular props, and sepiolite, a natural channeled clay. Five different organic precursors were used to load the PILC: pyrene, styrene, pyrene/trioxane copolymer, ethylene and propylene, whereas only propylene and ethylene were used to load sepiolite. Pyrolysis took place at 700{degrees}C under nitrogen. Values such as hole radius, fractal dimension, cutoff length and density of the final carbons will be compared as a function of the clay and carbon precursors.

Sandi, G.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The synthesis of inorganic semiconductor nanocrystalline materials for the purpose of creating hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) can be synthesized to efficiently emit light from the ultraviolet, across the entire visible spectrum, and into the near infrared. This is now possible due ...

Steckel, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Stephen)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Innovative Resin Transfer and Disposition at Indian Point Unit 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of sites have both operating and shuttered nuclear facilities. Reducing dose to the caretakers can have beneficial effects for other site personnel who may work or pass near the shuttered facility. Furthermore, disposition of waste can have a positive effect on NRC required regular reporting of, and plans for the disposition of on-site wastes. Entergy's Indian Point Energy Center recently reduced the on-site curie load by working with RWE NUKEM and WMG, Inc. to innovatively free and ship nearly 1,000 cubic feet and nearly 600 curies of 30 year old resin and sludge from Unit 1. Old drawings, operations logs, were consulted and transfer lines were remotely checked. The tank selection sequence was primarily based on dose rates. System modifications to facilitate resin transfer were made on the lowest dose tanks first to gain current operating experience. Resin transfers were performed in accordance with the procedures developed, into waiting cask with appropriate waste containers. Decomposed resin of varying consistency could clog discharge lines and operational changes were made to mitigate against flow interruptions. Hydrogen buildup in the tanks was carefully addressed while solidified resin remains a challenge to be overcome. (authors)

Posivak, E.J.; Freitag, A.A.; Miller, R.J. [WMG, Inc., Peekskill, NY (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

Fehrmann, Henning [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Polyelectrolyte multilayers as nanostructured templates for inorganic synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin film nanocomposites consisting of inorganic matter embedded within a soft polymeric matrix on the nanometer length scale are an important class of materials with potential application in optoelectronics and photonics, ...

Wang, Tom Chih-Hung, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Development of Inorganic Solar Cells by Nano-technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inorganic solar cells, as durable photovoltaic devices for harvesting electric energy from sun light, have received tremendous attention due to the fear of exhausting the earth’s energy resources and damaging ...

Yafei Zhang; Huijuan Geng; Zhihua Zhou; Jiang Wu; Zhiming Wang…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Is thioacetamide a serious health hazard in inorganic chemistry laboratories?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Is thioacetamide a serious health hazard in inorganic chemistry laboratories? ... The dangerous properties of thioacetamide seemingly are not well known by many of those who use it; presented here is a collection of data on its toxic effects. ...

Hannu Elo

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Inorganic Chemistry of Biomass Combustion: Problems and Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High temperature molten products of the combustion of biomass present special problems related to fouling and ... performed calculations of the total inorganic chemistry of biomass combustion using a free energy ...

M. Blander

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

5.04 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry II, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic presentation of the chemical applications of group theory. Emphasis on the formal development of the subject and its applications to the physical methods of inorganic chemical compounds. Against the backdrop of ...

Nocera, Daniel G., 1957-

193

Reverse osmosis treatment to remove inorganic contaminants from drinking water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the research project was to determine the removal of inorganic contaminants from drinking water using several state-of-the-art reverse osmosis membrane elements. A small 5-KGPD reverse osmosis system was utilized and five different membrane elements were studied individually with the specific inorganic contaminants added to several natural Florida ground waters. Removal data were also collected on naturally occurring substances.

Huxstep, M.R.; Sorg, T.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid exchange resins Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 38 2114 J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 2114-2180 FKN mechanism of the BZ reaction (expanded "Oregonator") Summary: resin. A thin layer of ferroin-loaded resin beads covered...

196

Two studies in process modelling: injection moulding and resin film infusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......line to any desired shape. When this is accomplished, many car components and machine components generally will be produced...residual resin film [ INJECTION MOULDING AND RESIN FILM INFUSION defective but [ impregnated ply 35 FIG. 6. Section through centre of......

David Blest; Brian R. Duffy; Sean McKee; Murilo F. Tomé

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced resin cleaning Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new composite... at this world-class research center is the Composites Pressure Resin Infusion System or ComPRIS (patent pending... ) that employs applied pressure to infuse resin...

198

Investigating the Use of Ion Exchange Resins for Processing Biodiesel Feedstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion exchange resins, commonly used in water treatment, demonstrate promise for the production of biodiesel from biomass feedstocks. The goal of this presented PhD research is to investigate novel uses of ion exchange resins for processing biodiesel...

Jamal, Yousuf 1973-

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

MODELING AND SIMULATION OF SOLID FLUIDIZATION IN A RESIN COLUMN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present work is to model the resin particles within the column during fluidization and sedimentation processes using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The calculated results will help interpret experimental results, and they will assist in providing guidance on specific details of testing design and establishing a basic understanding of particle’s hydraulic characteristics within the column. The model is benchmarked against the literature data and the test data (2003) conducted at Savannah River Site (SRS). The paper presents the benchmarking results and the modeling predictions of the SRS resin column using the improved literature correlations applicable for liquid-solid granular flow.

Lee, S.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

200

Evaluation of ultrafiltration membranes in the purification of guayule resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF ULTRAFILTRATlON hfEMBRANES IN TEIE PURIFICATION OF GUAYULE RESIN A Thesi" bv RANJIT S. JEYASEELAN Submitted to the Office of Gra. duate Studies of Texas ARM Ilniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Safety Engineering EVALUATION OF' ULTRAF'ILTRATION MEMBRANES IN THE PURIFICATION OF GUAYULE RESIN A Thesis by RANJIT S. JEYASEELAN Appr ed as to style and content by John P. Wagn ( ' air of the Committee...

Jeyaseelan, Ranjit S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual and Abbas different petroleum fluids. Various resins are added to three different petroleum fluids to measure of precipitation. However, addition of resins to a petroleum fluid increases the amount of precipitated asphaltenes

Firoozabadi, Abbas

202

Comparing the Degree of Exothermic Polymerization in Commonly Used Acrylic and Provisional Composite Resins for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composite Resins for Intraoral Appliances CA Rice, DVM; Jessica Riehl, DVM;Karl Broman, PhD;Jason W. Soukup, DVM; William R. Gengler, DVM Summary: The use ofdental acrylics and composite resins in veteri- naryylics and composite resins produce an exothermic reaction during the polymerization ptvcess. The aim q

Broman, Karl W.

203

Terebinth resin in antiquity: possible uses in the Late Bronze Age Aegean region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The remains of an estimated one metric ton of terebinth resin, the yellowish, semi-fluid, aromatic resin of a Pistacia tree, were recently discovered on the Late Bronze Age shipwreck site at Uluburun, Turkey. The resin was carried in an estimated...

Peachey, Claire Patricia

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

THE SCOPE OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...present in the crude oil as such, or whether...1926] Persian Oil Company has established...the world's production. Great Britain...is thus a wide field for research into...that the vast field of organic chemistry...ex-plored for the production of new types...countries, including cumulative experience, unified...

J. F. Thorpe

1926-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

SYLLABUS CH317 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The course has been organized into three modules: 1) Basic skills and the scientific method; 2) Energy. The course does not require students to have extensive prior laboratory experience. As part of the course that include plastics and textiles, and from the formation of low-energy LED light sources to porous materials

206

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Hydrocarbon Resin Manufacturing Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"The results of a plant-wide assessment of the manufacturing facilities of Neville Chemical Company, a manufacturer of hydrocarbon resins will be presented in this paper. The project was co-funded by US Department of Energy under its Plant...

Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.; Lonergan, R.; Wimer, J.

207

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24-inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

208

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Primary Production of Benthic Micro-organisms in South West Arm, Port Hacking, New South Wales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Net photosynthetic incorporation of dissolved inorganic carbon into the micro-organisms of shallow benthic areas of South West Arm, Port Hacking, New South Wales was measured in situ and in the laboratory. Method...

Max S. Giles

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Lamellar L? Mesophases Doped with Inorganic Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of nanostructured hybrid systems is a flourishing area of research, which brings together chemistry, physics and materials science. These systems are composed of nanoparticles with interesting properties (e.g. optical, magnetic, catalytic) dispersed within an organic matrix. Control of both the position and orientation of the particles in a precise and reproducible way is an important goal. Towards this goal, the use of lyotropic liquid crystals as host phases is a promising strategy that has prompted sustained experimental work over the last decade. Here we briefly review this field, with an emphasis on the structure and the physical characterization of these novel materials.

Doru Constantin; Patrick Davidson

2014-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

212

Carbon Dioxide Separation with Novel Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation with Separation with Novel Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks Background UOP LLC, the University of Michigan, and Northwestern University are collaborating on a three-year program to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) suitable for CO 2 capture and separation. MOFs are hybrid organic/inorganic structures in which the organic moiety is readily derivatized. This innovative program is using sophisticated molecular modeling to evaluate the structurally

213

Influence of inorganic compounds on char formation and quality of fast pyrolysis oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic compounds, especially potassium, calcium, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, and chlorine, are the main constituents of ash in biomass feedstocks. The concentrations of ash in biomass feedstocks range from less than 1% in softwoods to 15% in herbaceous biomass and agricultural residues. During biomass pyrolysis, these inorganics, especially potassium and calcium, catalyze both decomposition and char formation reactions. Decomposition reactions may either result in levoglucosan-rich or hydroxyacetaldehyde-rich pyrolysis products depending on the concentration of the ash in the feedstocks. The catalytic effect of the ash levels off at high organic ion concentrations. Chars formed during these reactions invariably end up in the pyrolysis oils (biofuel oils). A high proportion of the alkali metals in the ash are sequestered in the chars. The presence of high concentrations of alkali metals in the biofuel oils make them unsuitable for combustion in boilers, diesel engines, and in turbine operations. The highest concentration of alkali metals are found in herbaceous feedstocks and agricultural residue biofuel oils. Leaching studies conducted on the chars suspended in the oils showed no leaching of the alkali metals from the chars into the oils. Our data suggest that hot gas filtration of the oils can effectively reduce the alkali metals contents of the biofuel oils to acceptable levels to be used as turbine, diesel engine, and boiler fuels.

Agbleyor, F.A.; Besler, S.; Montane, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

ATOMISTIC MODELING OF OIL SHALE KEROGENS AND ASPHALTENES ALONG WITH THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE INORGANIC MINERAL MATRIX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to obtain and validate three dimensional atomistic models for the organic matter in both oil shales and oil sands. In the case of oil shales the modeling was completed for kerogen, the insoluble portion of the organic matter; for oil sands it was for asphaltenes, a class of molecules found in crude oil. The three dimensional models discussed in this report were developed starting from existing literature two dimensional models. The models developed included one kerogen, based on experimental data on a kerogen isolated from a Green River oil shale, and a set of six representative asphaltenes. Subsequently, the interactions between these organic models and an inorganic matrix was explored in order to gain insight into the chemical nature of this interaction, which could provide vital information in developing efficient methods to remove the organic material from inorganic mineral substrate. The inorganic substrate used to model the interaction was illite, an aluminum silicate oxide clay. In order to obtain the feedback necessary to validate the models, it is necessary to be able to calculate different observable quantities and to show that these observables both reproduce the results of experimental measurements on actual samples as well as that the observables are sensitive to structural differences between models. The observables that were calculated using the models include 13C NMR spectra, the IR vibrational spectra, and the atomic pair wise distribution function; these were chosen as they are among the methods for which both experimental and calculated values can be readily obtained. Where available, comparison was made to experiment results. Finally, molecular dynamic simulations of pyrolysis were completed on the models to gain an understanding into the nature of the decomposition of these materials when heated.

Facelli, Julio; Pugmire, Ronald; Pimienta, Ian

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Rheology Analysis of Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compacting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AGR-1 and AGR-2 overcoating and compacting method utilized a wet mixing process where liquid resin (Hexion Durite SC-1008) was blended with natural and synthetic graphite to produce a graphite/resin matrix for overcoating. The matrix production method specified in the scale-up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered resin and graphite are fed at the same time into a jet mill. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC-1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. Also, attempts to dry out matrix made with SC-1008 for use in the overcoating process at B&W had mixed results. The SC-1008 resin became tacky when dried which caused the matrix to build up inside the overcoater. The scale- up jet milling/mixing and overcoating processes required that a suite of solid or powdered resins be identified. Suitable resins candidates were down selected to two resins, specifically Plenco 14838 and Hexion SD-1708. These resins are referred to as novolac or “two-stage” resins because they require the addition of a curing agent such as hexamethylenetetramine (Hexa) to promote an increased level of cross linking. The overcoating matrix is made of 3 components; natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and resin. The most influential component of the compacting process is the resin component and how it behaves with regards to time, temperature, and pressure. The selected scale-up resins are considered fast curing which means that the increase in molecular weight (curing) occurs over a relatively short period of time, ranging from a few seconds to several minutes depending on the temperature. To find the optimal compacting conditions it is useful to quantify this behavior. In this report, rheology is used to investigate viscosity as a function of time at specific temperatures for the previously mentioned resins.

Trammell, Michael P. [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Release of Inorganic Constituents from Leached Biomass during Thermal Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of Inorganic Constituents from Leached Biomass during Thermal Conversion ... This suggests that while leaching reduces fuel nitrogen, it may also affect the nitrogen combustion chemistry in that a larger fraction of the fuel-bound nitrogen was converted to NO(g) during combustion of the leached samples compared to the unleached samples. ... Six biomasses with different chemical compositions ... ...

D. C. Dayton; B. M. Jenkins; S. Q. Turn; R. R. Bakker; R. B. Williams; D. Belle-Oudry; L. M. Hill

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Phonon Confinement Effects in Hybrid Virus-Inorganic Nanotubes for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phonon Confinement Effects in Hybrid Virus-Inorganic Nanotubes for Nanoelectronic Applications as nanotemplates, viruses can actually improve the electron transport properties in semiconductor nanotubes grown nanotubes deposited on tobacco mosaic viruses, the confined acoustic phonons are found to be redistributed

Fonoberov, Vladimir

218

Biological monitoring of arsenic exposure of gallium arsenide- and inorganic arsenic-exposed workers by determination of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites in urine and hair  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to establish a method for biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure, the chemical species of arsenic were measured in the urine and hair of gallium arsenide (GaAs) plant and copper smelter workers. Determination of urinary inorganic arsenic concentration proved sensitive enough to monitor the low-level inorganic arsenic exposure of the GaAs plant workers. The urinary inorganic arsenic concentration in the copper smelter workers was far higher than that of a control group and was associated with high urinary concentrations of the inorganic arsenic metabolites, methylarsonic acid (MAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA). The results established a method for exposure level-dependent biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure. Low-level exposures could be monitored only by determining urinary inorganic arsenic concentration. High-level exposures clearly produced an increased urinary inorganic arsenic concentration, with an increased sum of urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites (inorganic arsenic + MAA + DMAA). The determination of urinary arsenobetaine proved to determine specifically the seafood-derived arsenic, allowing this arsenic to be distinguished clearly from the arsenic from occupational exposure. Monitoring arsenic exposure by determining the arsenic in the hair appeared to be of value only when used for environmental monitoring of arsenic contamination rather than for biological monitoring.

Yamauchi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Mashiko, M.; Yamamura, Y. (St. Marianna Univ. School of Medicine, Kawasaki (Japan))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The focus of this thesis is the design and development of a system for rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating. The Rapid Extraction of Dissolved Inorganic ...

Gospodinova, Kalina Doneva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Characterization and fractionation by ultrafiltration of guayule resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rubber Production. 2. Solute Flow Through GPC Column. 3. Comparison of UF, MF, and RO Processes. 4. Pressure Gradient in Tubular Membrane. 5. Flow Pattern for Hollow Tube Asymmetric UF Membranes. 6. Structure of an Asymmetric Tubular Membrane. 7... information from the GPC analysis, indicates which compounds were present in each fraction. Identification and separation of potentially valuable fractions in the resin would increase the overall market value of the guayule shrub. Ultrafiltration (UF...

Daly, Monica Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluating guayule resin fractions for mutagenicity and toxicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the production of guayule rubber becoming more economically viable. At Texas A&M University and elsewhere research is currently being conducted to develop such commercial coproducts from the guayule resin (a byproduct of the extraction process) . Some... of the southeast Asian rubber supplies were cut off by the Japanese, guayule crop development and research was again revived in the U. S. , with the enactment of Public Law 473 initiating the Emergency Rubber Project(4) . As a result, domestic production...

Avirett, Donald Baker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

223

Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ion Exchange Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site contains more than 53 million gallons of legacy waste generated as a byproduct of plutonium production and reprocessing operations. The wastes are a complex mixture composed mostly of NaNO3, NaNO2, NaOH, NaAlO2, Na3PO4, and Na2SO4, with a number of minor and trace metals, organics, and radionuclides stored in underground waste tanks. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has contracted Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI) to build a pretreatment facility, the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP), that will separate long-lived transuranics (TRU) and highly radioactive components (specifically 137Cs and, in selected cases, 90Sr) from the bulk (non-radioactive) constituents and immobilize the wastes by vitrification. The plant is designed to produce two waste streams: a high-volume low-activity waste (LAW) and a low-volume high-activity waste (HLW).

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Catalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of InorganicSynthetic Modeling of Inorganic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance Hydrogen technology in fuel cellsHydrogen technology in fuel cells As a combustion fuel, it producesCatalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of Inorganic of evolution ·Optimized catalyst for water splitting in all oxygenic phototrophs S0 S4 S1 S2 S3 O2 2 H O2 e- e

Petta, Jason

227

Recycling of cleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane 2 stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols. From the data collected in this work, a preliminary process design and economic evaluations were performed for a model mill with 1,000-ton/day pulp production that uses a bleaching sequence based on chlorine dioxide. Assuming 3 m{sup 3} acidic effluents to be treated per ton of pulp produced, the electrodialysis process would require a membrane area of about 361 m{sup 2} for this model mill. The energy consumption of the electrodialytic stack for separation is estimated to be about $160/day, and the estimated capital cost of the electrodia

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.; Energy Systems; Inst. of Paper Science and Tech.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Recycling of bleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols.

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, regeneration, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; food processing; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Methods are included for the processing of spent ion exchange resins and for protecting ion exchange resins from oxidation and chemical degradation. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Production of Lignin-Based Phenolic Resins Using De-Polymerized Kraft Lignin and Process Optimization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Commercialization of Lignin-based phenol formaldehyde resins (LPF) has been limited due to the increase in curing temperatures and decrease in adhesive strength of LPF compared… (more)

Siddiqui, Homaira

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced thermoplastic resins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of pounds, dry weight basis) Major... selected thermoplastic resins: Low-Density Polyethylene Polyvinyl Chloride Linear-Low-Density Polyethylene... -Acrylonitrile Polystyrene...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - adhesive resin cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, Orono, ME E-Mail: goodell@umit.maine.edu Abstract The Composites Pressure Resin Infusion System (Com Source: Lopez-Anido, Roberto - Advanced Engineered Wood Composites Center...

233

Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

Veazey, G.W. [Los Alamos National Labs., NM (United States); Ames, R.L. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

An Additive Resin Reaction Product, a Method of Treating a Wood...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Additive Resin Reaction Product, a Method of Treating a Wood Product, and a Wood Product Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary...

235

Small angle neutron scattering characterization of the porous structure of carbons prepared using inorganic templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used for the characterization of the microstructure of carbons derived from organic-loaded inorganic template materials that are used as anodes in lithium ion cells. Pillared clays (PILC), layered silicates whose sheets have been permanently propped open by sets of thermally stable molecular props, were used as a template to load the organic precursors. Five organic precursors, namely pyrene, styrene, pyrene/trioxane copolymer, ethylene, and propylene, were used to load the PILC. Pyrolysis was carried out at 700 C under nitrogen atmosphere. From SANS, information has been derived about the pore radius, mass fractal dimension, and the cutoff length (above which the fractal property breaks down) on each carbon. In general, the pore radius ranges from 4 to 11 {angstrom}, and the mass fractal dimension varies in the range from 2.5 to 2.9. Contrast-match SANS studies of carbons wetted in 84% deuterated toluene indicate that a significant amount of pores in carbon from pyrene are not accessible to the solvent, while most of the porous network of carbon from propylene is accessible.

Sandi, G.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Carrado, K.A.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

237

Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marketed separately from conventionally grown produce in order to be profitably sold. Because of the amount of organic material include compost, Purdue University · Cooperative Extension Service · Knowledge to Go

238

Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

239

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment P r o b of groundwater containing high levels of radium-226 activity (Objective 1) were regenerated with prescribed brine that the concentration of salt in the brine cleaning solution was the most influential factor in the resin regeneration

240

Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment, chemical recovery, separation, purification, catalysis, desalination, and ore treatment. Regeneration and disposal of ion exchange resins are also covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment, chemical recovery, separation, purification, catalysis, desalination, and ore treatment. Regeneration and disposal of ion exchange resins are also covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment, chemical recovery, separation, purification, catalysis, desalination, and ore treatment. Regeneration and disposal of ion exchange resins are also covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Griffith 4/2004 Small Scale His Tag Enzyme Purification with TALON Affinity Column Resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Griffith 4/2004 Small Scale His Tag Enzyme Purification with TALON Affinity Column Resin Overview: This is a small scale method for purifying a His-tagged protein using commercial affinity resin. Materials: TALON rotor, at 18 K rpm) at 4 °C. 7. Save supernatant fraction for column purification. Supernatant can

Doering, Tamara

245

Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches are considered in this work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches in manufacturing ultrapure water for nuclear power plants. Resins allow the removal of ionic impurities to subparts-per-million. Thereby in nuclear power plants, resins contribute to guarantee personnel safety, to control feed system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

247

Curing Properties of Epoxy Resins for Use to Abandon Wells Destroyed by Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ........................................................................................................... 18 2.5 Use pipet to put the resin sample into the vials. ........................................... 21 3.1 Viscosity of the BPA resin system 1 decreases with increasing temperature.... ................................................................................................. 24 3.2 The viscosity change of the BPA system a during the curing process at 96.5?C. ......................................................................................................... 25 3.3 The pot life of the BPA resin cured...

Gao, Suining

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

UreaFormaldehyde-Resin Gel Time As Affected by the pH Value, Solid Content, and Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urea­Formaldehyde-Resin Gel Time As Affected by the pH Value, Solid Content, and Catalyst Cheng to investigate the effects of the resin solid content, catalyst content, and pH value obtained by the addition of two kinds of catalysts on the gel time of a urea­formaldehyde (UF) resin. Upon the addition

Wang, Siqun

249

Mathematical model of cavitation during resin lm infusion process I. Sevostianov a,*, V.E. Verijenko b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of cavitation during resin ®lm infusion process I. Sevostianov a,*, V ®lm infusion (RFI) process. An analytical model is developed to describe the cavitation conditions formation; Resin ®lm infusion 1. Introduction The resin ®lm infusion (RFI) method of producing composite

Sevostianov, Igor

250

Argonne CNM News: New inorganic semiconductor layers hold promise for solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New inorganic semiconductor layers hold promise for solar energy New inorganic semiconductor layers hold promise for solar energy Inorganic surface ligands Inorganic surface ligands enable facile electron transport between quantum dots and opened novel opportunities for using nanostructures in solar cells. Inorganic dot array Arrays of quantum dots allow fabrication of solar cells by printing and other inexpensive techniques. A team of users from the University of Chicago, working with the NanoBio Interfaces Group, has demonstrated a method that could produce cheaper semiconductor layers for solar cells. The inorganic nanocrystal arrays, created by spraying a new type of colloidal "ink," have excellent electron mobility and could be a step toward addressing fundamental problems with current solar technology.

251

Engineering the Interface Between Inorganic Materials and Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To further optimize cell function in hybrid “living materials”, it would be advantageous to render mammalian cells responsive to novel “orthogonal” cues, i.e. signals they would not ordinarily respond to but that can be engineered to feed into defined intracellular signaling pathways. We recently developed an optogenetic method, based on A. thaliana Cry2, for rapid and reversible protein oligomerization in response to blue light. We also demonstrated the ability to use this method to channel the light input into several defined signaling pathways, work that will enhance communication between inorganic devices and living systems.

Schaffer, David

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Lithium Isotope Analyses of Inorganic Constituents from the Murchison Meteorite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aqueous processes were important modifiers of solid matter during the early stages of solar system history. Lithium isotopes are sensitive indicators of such solid-liquid interactions because 7Li passes preferentially into solution and 6Li remains behind in the solid phase. Lithium isotope ratios of inorganic phases in the Murchison meteorite reveal that the value for the whole rock is simply the average of individual components with widely different isotopic compositions. 7Li content increases from chondrules to phyllosilicate-rich matrices to carbonates, as would be expected from the relative duration each component has spent during aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid.

Mark A. Sephton; Rachael H. James; Philip A. Bland

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

Thorn, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

254

Nonequilibrium atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation and growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mexico City area are shown...inorganic atmospheric aerosols...2005 ) A large organic aerosol source...photochemical and thermal studies of...Characteristic Group Frequencies—Tables and...particle thermal speed...phase-equilibrium in the atmospheric system: Aerosol...Support, Non-U.S...Determination by plasma-based...implications for atmospheric chemistry...2002) A thermal disso-ciation...

Véronique Perraud; Emily A. Bruns; Michael J. Ezell; Stanley N. Johnson; Yong Yu; M. Lizabeth Alexander; Alla Zelenyuk; Dan Imre; Wayne L. Chang; Donald Dabdub; James F. Pankow; Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

Serkiz, S.M.

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sources and Formation of OrganicSources and Formation of Organic Aerosols in our AtmosphereAerosols in our Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Carnegie Mellon University Smog Chamber Air supply Computer Temperature control Clean air 10 m3 Teflon spectrometer Aerosol mass spectrometerOzone monitor Air supply Computer Temperature control Clean air 10 m3 on temperature Hevap also needed Assumes no interactions among organic aerosol species or with inorganics. #12

Einat, Aharonov

257

Silica?Titania-Based Organic?Inorganic Hybrid Materials for Photovoltaic Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OIHM-coated nanocrystalline TiO2 films on FTO glass with an active area of 1 cm2 were used as the working electrodes for photovolatic devices. ...

Cheng-Lan Lin; Mei-Yu Yeh; Chih-Hsien Chen; Sundarraj Sudhakar; Shr-Jie Luo; Ying-Chan Hsu; Chung-Yi Huang; Kuo-Chuan Ho; Tien-Yau Luh

2006-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic/Organic Hybrid Si Negative Electrodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

259

Terahertz and infrared transmission of an organic/inorganic hybrid thermoelectric material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report terahertz and infrared transmission measurements of a high-performance thermoelectric material containing tellurium nanowires in a conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) matrix. The DC electrical conductivity of the hybrid material (41?S/cm) is approximately one hundred times that of pure PEDOT:PSS and more than 400 times that of a film of pure tellurium nanowires, while the terahertz-frequency (THz) conductivity of PEDOT:PSS and the hybrid material are comparable at f???2THz. A frequency-dependent conductivity model indicates that the increased DC conductivity of the hybrid material results from an increase in the DC charge mobility rather than in the free charge density. We suggest that the increased DC conductivity of the hybrid material results from an increase in linkage between PEDOT domains by the tellurium nanowires.

Heyman, J. N., E-mail: heyman@macalester.edu; Alebachew, B. A.; Kaminski, Z. S.; Nguyen, M. D. [Physics Department, Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota 55105 (United States); Coates, N. E.; Urban, J. J. [The Molecular Foundry, Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

260

Nanoscale Engineering for the Design of Efficient Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research aimed at enhancing the thermoelectric performance of semiconductors comprised of only earth-abundant elements has recently come under renewed focus as these materials systems offer a cost-effective path for scavenging waste heat. In light...

Brockway, Lance Robert

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Environmental impacts of petroleum production: Fate of inorganic and organic chemicals in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in USA, and forecasts indicate that by 2020 natural gas and oil consumption will increase by 40% and 29 and inactive tank batteries. Results to date show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (~150 `A' site, 35 water samples were obtained from an asphaltic pit and an adjacent weathered-oil pit

262

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Designing artificial photosynthetic devices using hybrid organic–inorganic modules based on polyoxometalates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...globally distributed renewable energy sources (wind, solar, hydro and tidal power...This presents the problem of energy storage for mobile applications and...Teets, and DG Nocera. 2010 Solar energy supply and storage for the legacy and nonlegacy...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Inorganic-Organic Shape Memory Polymers and Foams for Bone Defect Repairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

revised solvent casting particulate leaching (SCPL) method. By tailoring scaffold parameters including salt fusion, macromer concentration and salt size, scaffold properties (e.g. pore features, compressive modulus and shape memory behavior) were tuned...

Zhang, Dawei

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

Deep-Sea Research I 52 (2005) 22852300 Inorganic and organic nitrogen cycling in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available online 5 October 2005 Abstract On the basis of mass balance calculations performed for nitrogen (N

Ward, Bess

266

Phosphinidene Complexes of Scandium: Powerful PAr Group-Transfer Vehicles to Organic and Inorganic Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Benjamin F. Wicker , Jennifer Scott †, José G. Andino , Xinfeng Gao , Hyunsoo Park , Maren Pink and Daniel J. Mindiola * ... (d) Amor, I., Garcia, M. E., Ruiz, M. A., Saez, D., Hamidov, H., and Jeffery, J. C. Organometallics 2006, 25, 4897 ...

Benjamin F. Wicker; Jennifer Scott; José G. Andino; Xinfeng Gao; Hyunsoo Park; Maren Pink; Daniel J. Mindiola

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

267

Effect of Organic and Inorganic Passivation in Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work was supported by the Institute of Nanotechnologies for Clean Energies (INCE), funded by the Generalitat Valenciana under Project ISIC/2012/008. ... We acknowledge projects CYTED-Nanoenergía, PAPIIT-IN106912 (UNAM-México), and CONACyT-153270 (México) for financial support. ... Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are interesting energy devices because of their (i) impressive ability to harvest sunlight and generate multiple electron/hole pairs, (ii) ease of fabrication, and (iii) low cost. ...

Mauricio Solis de la Fuente; Rafael S. Sánchez; Victoria González-Pedro; Pablo P. Boix; S. G. Mhaisalkar; Marina E. Rincón; Juan Bisquert; Iván Mora-Seró

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA 94720 ABSTRACT in the boiler used to make process steam.water, gas condensate, and boiler blowdown. A summary of thewater, gas condensate, and boiler blowd01m. Retort water and

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Structural Investigations of Strontium in Inorganic Crystals, Organic Crystals, and Phyllosilicate Minerals with Strontium-87 NMR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??At numerous United States Department of Energy (US DOE) facilities such as Hanford near Richland, Washington, an enormous volume of high-level liquid nuclear waste has… (more)

Bowers, Geoffrey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Distributions of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and radiocarbon in the eastern North Pacific continental margin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin from the surrounding California continental borderland were relatively small. In the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight,

Bauer, James E; Druffel, Ellen R.M; Wolgast, David M; Griffin, Sheila; Masiello, Caroline A

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

In-situ intercalation dynamics in inorganic-organic layered perovskite thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(dielectric confinement), such excitons are observable at room temperature, with large binding energies (~300 meV).20,21 The strong room-temperature excitonic features of 2D perovskites make them potential candidates for optoelectronic devices such as IO...

Ahmad, Shahab; Kanaujia, Pawan K.; Niu, Wendy; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Prakash, G. Vijaya

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

272

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a flameless atomic absorption detector for speciationA. , "Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometerscoupled with an atomic absorption detector," in preparation,

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The effect of mechanical elasticity on the surface impedance of a organic/inorganic composite aerogel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous reports on the acoustical properties of monolithic silica aerogels have indicated that although the material's high porosity pore tortuosity and surface area contribute to a low soundvelocity in the material the rigid matrix of the aerogel exhibit a high reflection coefficient. Work by Forest et al. and others have shown that using granules instead of silica aerogel monoliths the acoustical properties can be significantly enhanced. We report the acoustic properties of a polydimethylsilicate (PDMS)/silica composite aerogel that has both high surface area and a mechanically elastic matrix. Both monoliths and granules are studied. The surface impedance (at normal incidence) as a function of open porosity pore size distribution surface area elasticity and granule size will be reported.

Winny Dong; Wayland Dong; Tanya Faltens; Elizabeth Scott; Travis Thompson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Light Energy Conversion at Carbon Nanotubes - Organic and Inorganic Interfaces: Photovoltaics, Photodetectors and Bolometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CNT light absorption is an initial step leading to a generation of bound excitons [13–15]. In order to convert light energy into an electrical signal, excitons should be separated on free charge carriers (electro...

Igor A. Levitsky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mechanisms of Organic-inorganic Interactions in Soils and Aqueous Environments Elucidated using Calorimetric Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Biochars belong to the char/charcoal- BC category of continuum and can be produced from a number of different biomass feedstocks [50, 73, 74, 78-83]. Components of the BC continuum all have high carbon content, and are dominated by aromatic structures...

Harvey, Omar R.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

Strong exciton-photon coupling in inorganic-organic multiple quantum wells embedded low-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Dimensional Lithium Niobate Photonic Crystals," Adv. Mater. 21(34), 3526 (2009). 3. M. Li, A. Xia, J. Wang, Y. Song

Steiner, Ullrich

277

Investigation of Anion-pi Interactions in Inorganic, Organic and Biological Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

omitted for the sake of clarity. Copper atoms (teal), carbon atoms (gray), nitrogen atoms (blue), phosphorus atoms (pink), fluorine atoms (yellow). ................................................................. 46 2.10 Mass spectrum showing [Cu... the olefin and the anion. ............................................................... 73 3.4 Sum of the energies predicted by NBO for the charge transfer interactions between the fluorine lone pairs and the antibonding orbitals of the olefins...

Funck, Edward Sterling

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

Apparatus and method for temperature correction and expanded count rate of inorganic scintillation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. A temperature sensor is attached to an inorganic scintillation detector. The inorganic scintillation detector, due to interaction with incident radiation, creates light pulse signals. A photoreceiver processes the light pulse signals to current signals. Temperature correction circuitry that uses a fast light component signal, a slow light component signal, and the temperature signal from the temperature sensor to corrected an inorganic scintillation detector signal output and expanded the count rate.

Ianakiev, Kiril D. (Los Alamos, NM); Hsue, Sin Tao (Santa Fe, NM); Browne, Michael C. (Los Alamos, NM); Audia, Jeffrey M. (Abiquiu, NM)

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical chemistry inorganic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analytical chemistry inorganic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Department of Chemistry Three Year Projection...

280

Fatigue behaviour of nanoclay reinforced epoxy resin composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nanoparticle filling is a feasible way to increase the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. Abundant research work has been published in the last number of years concerning the enhancement of the mechanical properties of nanoparticle filled polymers, but only a reduced number of studies have been done focusing on the fatigue behaviour. This work analyses the influence of nanoclay reinforcement and water presence on the fatigue behaviour of epoxy matrices. The nanoparticles were dispersed into the epoxy resin using a direct mixing method. The dispersion and exfoliation of nanoparticles was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fatigue strength decreased with the nanoclay incorporation into the matrix. Fatigue life of nanoclay filled composites was significantly reduced by the notch effect and by the immersion in water.

J.A.M. Ferreira; L.P. Borrego; J.D.M. Costa; C. Capela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...min (ultrasonic cleaner, model 2210; Branson Ultrasonics...ANOVA) using JMP statistical software (version 10; SAS Institute...analysis (62). R statistical software (version 2.15.1 for Windows...boreal streams during a spring flood. Limnol. Oceanogr. 45...

Suchismita Ghosh; Laura G. Leff

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

282

Developing carbon-based "organic" compounds for microelectronic applications is a promising, rapidly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Performance and production solutions to electronics, displays, solar cells, white lighting and room lightingDeveloping carbon-based "organic" compounds for microelectronic applications is a promising inorganic materials such as silicon and copper, organic microelectronics are flexible, lighter weight, less

Hayden, Nancy J.

283

Science Organizations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

284

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon SequestrationA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3 ­ uptake and grew under the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy. Keywords: CO2 and HCO3 � uptake -- CO2

Roegner, Matthias

285

Release of Inorganic Phosphate from Irradiated Yeast: Radiation Biodosimetry and Evaluation of Radioprotective Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...irradiated with ionizing radiation, inorganic...radiation dose and on the...somewhat limited range of the yeast...irradiated with ionizing radiation, inorganic...radiation dose and on the...somewhat limited range of the yeast...represent range ofvaluesfrom...but with dose plotted on...effect of ionizing radiation (27...

Hillel S. Levinson; Esther B. Garber

1967-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 March 1922 research-article Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals William A. Bone A. R. Pearson E. Sinkinson W. E. Stockings The Royal Society is...

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Continuous alpha-amylase production using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens adsorbed on an ion exchange resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for the continuous production of extracellular alpha amylase by surface immobilized cells of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens...NRC 2147 has been developed. A large-pore, macroreticular anionic exchange resin ...

Carl A. Groom; Andrew J. Daugulis…

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A comparative study of dispersion techniques for nanocomposite made with nanoclays and an unsaturated polyester resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the last few years, polymer/clay nanocomposites have been an area of intensive research due to their capacity to improve the properties of the polymer resin. These nanocharged polymers exhibit a complex rheological behavior due to their dispersed ...

Farida Bensadoun; Nadir Kchit; Catherine Billotte; François Trochu; Edu Ruiz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - acrylic resin denture Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

denture Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acrylic resin denture Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 OTHER ACCIDENT?24. ANY PERSON WHO...

290

3D printed tooling for vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is widely considered to be one of the low-cost additive manufacturing (AM) processes. In this paper, the suitability of 3DP for making tooling for the vacuum-assisted resin tra...

Dawid Jacobus Dippenaar; Kristiaan Schreve

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

BPA from dental resin material: where are we going with restorative and preventive dental biomaterials?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since a number of years, the question of the impact of BPA released from dental resins and/or sealants ... reaction. The monomers are mainly urethane dimethacrylate, BPA glycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA), its eth...

Michel Goldberg; Sasha Dimitrova-Nakov; Gottfried Schmalz

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Foamed epoxy resin composite waterproofing and heat insulation in hydraulic construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory and field tests and work on an experimental-industrial scale confimed the feasibility of using foamed epoxy resin heat insulation and waterproofing for protecting hydraulic engineering structures...

V. I. Sakharov

1969-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyd-amino resins based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science 11 Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1 Summary:...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted resin transfer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy 3 Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1 Summary: on...

295

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES the guidance and direction provided by my advisors: Dr. Mandell, Dr. Cairns and Dr. Larsen. I would also like

296

Inorganic nanotubes and electro-fluidic devices fabricated therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nanofluidic devices incorporating inorganic nanotubes fluidly coupled to channels or nanopores for supplying a fluid containing chemical or bio-chemical species are described. In one aspect, two channels are fluidly interconnected with a nanotube. Electrodes on opposing sides of the nanotube establish electrical contact with the fluid therein. A bias current is passed between the electrodes through the fluid, and current changes are detected to ascertain the passage of select molecules, such as DNA, through the nanotube. In another aspect, a gate electrode is located proximal the nanotube between the two electrodes thus forming a nanofluidic transistor. The voltage applied to the gate controls the passage of ionic species through the nanotube selected as either or both ionic polarities. In either of these aspects the nanotube can be modified, or functionalized, to control the selectivity of detection or passage.

Yang, Peidong (Kensington, CA); Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Fan, Rong (Pasadena, CA); Karnik, Rohit (Cambridge, MA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

COSIMA-Rosetta calibration for in-situ characterization of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko cometary inorganic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) is a time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer (TOF-SIMS) on board the Rosetta space mission. COSIMA has been designed to measure the composition of cometary dust grains. It has a mass resolution m/{\\Delta}m of 1400 at mass 100 u, thus enabling the discrimination of inorganic mass peaks from organic ones in the mass spectra. We have evaluated the identification capabilities of the reference model of COSIMA for inorganic compounds using a suite of terrestrial minerals that are relevant for cometary science. Ground calibration demonstrated that the performances of the flight model were similar to that of the reference model. The list of minerals used in this study was chosen based on the mineralogy of meteorites, interplanetary dust particles and Stardust samples. It contains anhydrous and hydrous ferromagnesian silicates, refractory silicates and oxides (present in meteoritic Ca-Al-rich inclusions), carbonates, and Fe-Ni sulfides. From the analyses of these mi...

Krüger, Harald; Engrand, Cécile; Briois, Christelle; Siljeström, Sandra; Merouane, Sihane; Baklouti, Donia; Fischer, Henning; Fray, Nicolas; Hornung, Klaus; Lehto, Harry; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Rynö, Jouni; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Thirkell, Laurent; Trieloff, Mario; Hilchenbach, Martin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Measurement and modeling of uranium and strategic element sorption by amidoxime resins in natural seawater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF URANIUM AND STRATEGIC ELEMENT SORPTION BY AMIDOXIME RESINS IN NATURAL SEAMATER A Thesis by JOSE GREGORIO PINA-JORDAN Submitted to the Graduate College oi' Texas A&M University in partial I...'ulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE December i985 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF URANIUM AND STRATEGIC ELEMENT SORPTION BY AMIDOXIME RESINS IN NATURAL SEANATER A thesis by JOSE GREGORIO PINA...

Pina-Jordan, Jose Gregorio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Effect of resin toughness on fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis Dy RONALD NELSON COHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1982 Mlajor Subject: Interdisciplinary Enqi neeri ng EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by RONALD NELSON COHEN Approved as to style and content by: (N. L. Bradley, Cha man) (R. A...

Cohen, Ronald Nelson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

The effect of molecular architecture on the mechanical properties of epoxy resin systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF EPOXY RESIN SYSTEMS A Thesis by GALE ANTRUS HOLMES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE EFFECT OF MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF EPOXY RESIN SYSTEMS A Thesis bY GALE ANTRUS HOLMES Approved as to style an content by: Alan Let. ton...

Holmes, Gale Antrus

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Set of Acidic Resin Catalysts To Correlate Structure and Reactivity in Fructose Conversion to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Set of Acidic Resin Catalysts To Correlate Structure and Reactivity in Fructose Conversion to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural ... With this set of model catalysts, the cross-linker content of the resin was found to be the most influential factor for the liquid phase dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. ... Materials containing either Brřnsted(8-10) or Lewis acid sites(11) were proven to be suitable catalysts for the selective dehydration of carbohydrate feedstocks into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a versatile platform molecule. ...

Felix H. Richter; Kristina Pupovac; Regina Palkovits; Ferdi Schüth

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

About Us Organization Organization Organization Printable PDF News & Blog CIO Leadership Organization Contact Us...

304

Organization | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

About Us Organization Organization Organization News Leadership Organization History Careers Contact Us...

305

REAL WASTE TESTING OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data on batch contact and column testing tasks for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. The testing used a non-radioactive simulant of SRS Tank 2F dissolved salt, as well as an actual radioactive waste sample of similar composition, which are both notably high in sodium (6 M). The resin was Microbeads batch 5E-370/641 which had been made on the hundred gallon scale. Equilibrium batch contact work focused on cesium at a temperature of 25 C due to the lack of such data to better benchmark existing isotherm models. Two campaigns were performed with small-scale ion exchange columns, first with Tank 2F simulant, then with actual dissolved salt in the Shielded Cells. An extrapolation of the batch contact results with radioactive waste over-predicted the cesium loaded onto the IX sRF resin bed by approximately 11%. This difference is not unexpected considering uncertainties from measurement and extrapolation and because the ion exchange that occurs when waste flows through a resin bed probably cannot reach the same level of equilibrium as when waste and resin are joined in a long term batch contact. Resin was also characterized to better understand basic chemistry issues such as holdup of trace transition metals present in the waste feed streams. The column tests involved using two beds of sRF resin in series, with the first bed referred to as the Lead column and the second bed as the Lag column. The test matrix included two complete IX cycles for both the simulant and actual waste phases. A cycle involves cesium adsorption, until the resin in the Lead column reaches saturation, and then regenerating the sRF resin, which includes eluting the cesium. Both the simulated and the actual wastes were treated with two cycles of operation, and the resin beds that were used in the Lead and Lag columns of simulant test phase were regenerated and reused in the actual waste test phase. This task is the first to demonstrate the treatment of SRS waste with sRF resin and the tests clearly demonstrated cesium decontamination for actual waste. The results of the column tests were similar for both the simulated and the actual waste and demonstrated Cs removal with sRF from both wastes. For a flowrate of 1.4 bed volumes (BV)/hour at 25 C those results with sRF resin were: (1) Simulant and actual waste results are equivalent; (2) Cs breakthrough began between 200 and 250 BV; (3) Cs breakthrough reached 100% at around 400 BV; (4) Cs breakthrough curve from 5% to 100% is approximately linear; (5) Cs elution with 0.5 M HNO3 starts at 2 BV and ends at 6BV; (6) Most, if not all, of Cs adsorbed during treatment is released during elution; (7) At 100% breakthrough of Cs the resin bed adsorbs approximately 85% of full capacity before detection in the effluent; the remaining 15% is adsorbed at saturation; (8) Approximately 90% of resin bed changes (color and volume) are complete by 6 BV; and (9) During elution the resin shrinks to about 80% of its fully working (sodium form) BV.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Waste Tank Organic Safety Project: Analysis of liquid samples from Hanford waste tank 241-C-103  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A suite of physical and chemical analyses has been performed in support of activities directed toward the resolution of an Unreviewed Safety Question concerning the potential for a floating organic layer in Hanford waste tank 241-C-103 to sustain a pool fire. The analysis program was the result of a Data Quality Objectives exercise conducted jointly with staff from Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The organic layer has been analyzed for flash point, organic composition including volatile organics, inorganic anions and cations, radionuclides, and other physical and chemical parameters needed for a safety assessment leading to the resolution of the Unreviewed Safety Question. The aqueous layer underlying the floating organic material was also analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide composition, as well as other physical and chemical properties. This work was conducted to PNL Quality Assurance impact level III standards (Good Laboratory Practices).

Pool, K.H.; Bean, R.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Using Process Knowledge to Manage Disposal Classification of Ion-Exchange Resin - 13566  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been previously shown by EPRI [1] that Class B and C resins represent a small portion by volume of the overall generation of radioactively contaminated resins. In fact, if all of the resins were taken together the overall classification would meet Class A disposal requirements. Lowering the classification of the ion exchange resins as they are presented for disposal provides a path for minimizing the amount of waste stored. Currently there are commercial options for blending wastes from various generators for Class A disposal in development. The NRC may have by this time introduced changes and clarifications to the Branch Technical Position (BTP) on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation [2] that may ultimately add more flexibility to what can be done at the plant level. The BTP has always maintained that mixtures of resins that are combined for ALARA purposes or operational efficiency can be classified on the basis of the mixture. This is a point often misinterpreted and misapplied. This paper will address options that can be exercised by the generator that can limit B and C waste generation by more rigorous tracking of generation and taking advantage of the normal mix of wastes. This can be achieved through the monitoring of reactor coolant chemistry data and coupled with our knowledge of radionuclide production mechanisms. This knowledge can be used to determine the overall accumulation of activity in ion-exchange resins and provides a 'real-time' waste classification determination of the resin and thereby provide a mechanism to reduce the production of waste that exceeds class A limits. It should be noted that this alternative approach, although rarely used in a nuclear power plant setting, is acknowledged in the original BTP on classification [3] as a viable option for determining radionuclide inventories for classification of waste. Also included is a discussion of an examination performed at the Byron plant to estimate radionuclide content in the final waste stream from upstream sampling of reactor coolant and fuel pool water. (authors)

Bohnsack, Jonathan N.; James, David W. [DW James Consulting, LLC 855 Village Center Drive No. 330 North Oaks, MN 55127 (United States)] [DW James Consulting, LLC 855 Village Center Drive No. 330 North Oaks, MN 55127 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Jute fiber composites from coal, super clean coal, and petroleum vacuum residue-modified phenolic resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jute fiber composites were prepared with novolac and coal, phenolated-oxidized super clean coal (POS), petroleum vacuum residue (XVR)-modified phenol-formaldehyde (novolac) resin. Five different type of resins, i.e., coal, POS, and XVR-modified resins were used by replacing (10% to 50%) with coal, POS, and XVR. The composites thus prepared have been characterized by tensile strength, hardness, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transfer infrared (FT-IR), water absorption, steam absorption, and thickness swelling studies. Twenty percent POS-modified novolac composites showed almost the same tensile strength as that of pure novolac composites. After 30% POS incorporation, the tensile strength decreased to 25.84MPa from 33.96MPa in the case of pure novolac resin composites. However, after 50% POS incorporation, the percent retention of tensile strength was appreciable, i.e., 50.80% retention of tensile strength to that of pure novolac jute composites. The tensile strength of coal and XVR-rnodified composites showed a trend similar to that shown by POS-modified novolac resin composites. However, composites prepared from coal and XVR-modified resin with 50% phenol replacement showed 25.4% and 42% tensile strength retention, respectively, compared to that of pure novolac jute composites. It was found that the hardness of the modified composites slightly decreased with an increase in coal, POS, and XVR incorporation in the resin. The XVR-modified composites showed comparatively lower steam absorption than did coal or POS-modified composites. The thermal stability of the POS-modified composites was the highest among the composites studied. The detailed results obtained are being reported.

Ahmaruzzaman, M.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India). Center of Energy Studies

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Optimization of Cesium Removal from Hanford Envelope A Simulant with SuperLig 639 Ion Exchange Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford RadioactiveWaste materials have been categorized into four envelopes labeled A through D as specified in the Tank Waste Remediation Contract between BNFL and DOE. 1 Envelopes A, B and C contain only solubilized species and are specified as Low-Activity Waste (LAW). Each envelope is defined based on compositional maximums of chemical and radioactive constituents. Envelopes A and B contain low concentrations of organic species and the primary form of technetium is pertechnetate (TcO4-). Envelope C contains higher levels of organic species and technetium which is primarily in the nonpertechnetate form (presumably complexed TcO2). Envelope D is sludge which has been separated from the supernate and is referred to as High Activity Waste. The current plant design utilizes SuperLig ion exchange resins to remove cesium and technetium (the primary radioactive constituents) from the Hanford LAW. The process is designed to produce a decontaminated waste stream and a concentrated eluate waste stream for vitrification into low and high activity glasses, respectively.

King, W.D.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

Resin Liner Recovery and Over-Packing at Ontario Power Generation's Western Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent resins generated from Ontario Power Generation (OPG)'s and Bruce Power's Candu reactor operations are stored at OPG's Western Waste Management Facility in Kincardine, Ontario, Canada. The older resins are contained in 3 m{sup 3} epoxy-coated cylindrical carbon steel containers known as resin liners. The liners are stored in a stacked configuration within cylindrical in-ground containers. Previous studies indicated evidence of unacceptable liner wall corrosion and the potential for eventual leakage of resin from the liners. Based on this, OPG elected to re-package the majority of the resin liners into stainless steel over-packs. A contract for this work was awarded to a project team consisting of Duratek of Canada, Kinectrics, Inc. and E.S. Fox. This paper provides an overall summary of project activities focusing on the effectiveness of the equipment utilized and the soundness of the developed programs, plans and procedures. Specific information is provided on key aspects of the project and the overall achievement of project goals. (authors)

Pearson, S.D. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, SC (Colombia); Husain, A. [Kinectrics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We investigate with nonreactive molecular dynamics simulations the dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube (CNT) composites to shock wave compression. For phenolic resin, our simulations yield shock states in agreement with experiments on similar polymers except the “phase change” observed in experiments, indicating that such phase change is chemical in nature. The elastic–plastic transition is characterized by shear stress relaxation and atomic-level slip, and phenolic resin shows strong strain hardening. Shock loading of the CNT-resin composites is applied parallel or perpendicular to the CNT axis, and the composites demonstrate anisotropy in wave propagation, yield and CNT deformation. The CNTs induce stress concentrations in the composites and may increase the yield strength. Our simulations suggest that the bulk shock response of the composites depends on the volume fraction, length ratio, impact cross-section, and geometry of the CNT components; the short CNTs in current simulations have insignificant effect on the bulk response of resin polymer.

Arman, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) and Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); An, Q. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) and California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States); Luo, S. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Desai, T. G. [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States); Tonks, D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cagin, T. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Goddard III, W. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

First principles study of structure and lithium storage in inorganic nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exact structure of layered inorganic nanotubes is difficult to determine, but this information is vital to using atomistic calculations to predict nanotube properties. A multi-walled nanotube with a circular cross ...

Tibbetts, Kevin (Kevin Joseph)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Routes to Nanostructured Inorganic Materials with Potential for Solar Energy Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Routes to Nanostructured Inorganic Materials with Potential for Solar Energy Applications ... The behavior of the transition energies with temp. is explained by a self-energy correction attributed to the interaction between electrons and nonpolar phonons. ...

Karthik Ramasamy; Mohammad Azad Malik; Neerish Revaprasadu; Paul O’Brien

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Preparation and performance of inorganic heat insulation panel based on sepiolite nanofibers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High efficiency and low cost thermal insulation energy saving panel materials containing sepiolite nanofibers were developed by means of the synergistic action of inorganic adhesive, curing agent, and hydrogen peroxide. The water soluble sodium silicate ...

Fei Wang, Jinsheng Liang, Haifeng Liu, Xinhui Duan, Qingguo Tang, Huimin Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Assessment of exposure to inorganic arsenic, a human carcinogen, due to the consumption of seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?To assess whether regular consumption of seafood, particularly fish and shellfish, by humans...i..., inorganic form; MMA, monomethylarsonic acid; DMA, dimethylarsinic acid) was compared in groups of subjects wit...

J. P. Buchet; D. Lison; M. Ruggeri; V. Foa; G. Elia; S. Maugeri

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Removal of inorganic anions from drinking water supplies by membrane bio/processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is designed to provide an overview of the main membrane-assisted processes that can be used for the removal of toxic inorganic anions from drinking water supplies. The emphasis has been placed on in...

Svetlozar Velizarov; Joăo G. Crespo…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

FRED E. WOOD University of California, Davis, Ph.D., Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry, 1984  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRED E. WOOD EDUCATION University of California, Davis, Ph.D., Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry scholarship and $1 million for endowed reentry student scholarships. #12;FRED E. WOOD Page 2 Obtained over

Amin, S. Massoud

318

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

A mathematical model to predict leaching of hazardous inorganic wastes from solidified/stabilized waste forms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MATHEMATICAL MODEL TO PREDICT LEACHING OF HAZARDOUS INORGANIC WASTES FROM SOLIDIFIED/STABILIZED WASTE FORMS A Thesis by KRISHAN SABHARWAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment...A MATHEMATICAL MODEL TO PREDICT LEACHING OF HAZARDOUS INORGANIC WASTES FROM SOLIDIFIED/STABILIZED WASTE FORMS A Thesis by KRISHAN SABHARWAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment...

Sabharwal, Krishan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Inorganic Rings and Polymers of the p-Block Elements: From Fundamentals to Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inorganic Rings and Polymers of the p-Block Elements: From Fundamentals to Applications ... Chivers and Manners, two productive and highly respected scholars, have produced a very approachable monograph that presents the current state of knowledge of inorganic rings and polymers from both fundamental and applied perspectives. ... The chapter on electronic structure and bonding should be singled out as a particularly clear, useful, and up-to-date coverage of a topic that can be difficult to grasp. ...

Christopher W. Allen

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Comparative laboratory evaluation of resin-grouted roof bolt elements. Report of Investigations/1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laboratory testing, the Bureau of Mines established criteria by which common resin-grouted roof-bolting systems can be evaluated and compared. Ultimate strength and stiffness were determined for nontensioned full-column, point-anchor, tensioned full-column, and debondable resin-grouted bolts, and for variations on full-column bolts. Bolt performances were compared using the performance of the 3/4-in full-column resin-grouted bolt as the standard. New and innovative systems can also be qualitatively compared against this standard. Various host mediums were used in the testing: sandstone, concrete, simulated coal, simulated shale, and plaster. Bolt performances expected in other mediums can be inferred from the response patterns obtained in these mediums.

Bartels, J.R.; Pappas, D.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Literature search on the use of resins for treatment of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 100 commercial providers with mixed-waste treatability capabilities exist in the US. The maturity level of these technologies varies from a bench scale to a pilot or a commercial scale. The techniques include deactivation, chemical oxidation, recovery of metals, stabilization, vitrification, incineration, biodegradation, and chemical extraction. This report focuses on the use of resins to remove actinides and heavy metals from aqueous waste streams. Only the literature that described resins with high removing efficiency are presented here. The majority of the literature reviewed are proceedings and national or international reports ordered through the Berkeley Lab Library. Some of the reports that the authors requested have not yet arrived. Only a few papers were found in the open literature (journals or magazines). Although this report does not include all existing references, it provides an accurate assessment of efficient resins to be considered for waste minimization procedures. 70 refs.

AlMahamid, I.; Smith, B.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 ..mu..g of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Li, T.K.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Study of the simultaneous effects of MMT nanoclay and hydrophobically modified ethoxylated urethane (HEUR) on viscoelastic and steady shear properties of water-based acrylic resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The storage stability of montmorillonite/acrylic resin was studied via rheological characterizations. The Na+–MMT nanoclay and a water-based acrylic resin were ... . The results showed that adding the montmorillo...

Mohsen Sarrafi; Babak Kaffashi…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Modification of bisphenol-A based bismaleimide resin (BPA-BMI) with an allyl-terminated hyperbranched polyimide (AT-PAEKI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modification of bisphenol-A based bismaleimide resin (BPA-BMI) with an allyl as a modifier of bisphenol-A based bismaleimide resin (BPA-BMI). This was pursued in anticipation

Mather, Patrick T.

327

Modification of Malonamide Ion-Exchange/Chelating Resins Using the Fields–Kabatschnik Reaction and Their Application to Metal Ion Removal from Aqueous Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A resin containing 2-aminoethyl-substituted amides of malonic acid was modified in the Fields–Kabatschnik reaction using diethyl phosphite. The resultant ion-exchange/chelating resins have aminomethylphosphona...

Andrzej W. Trochimczuk; Julia Jezierska

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Organic Photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfying the world's growing demand for energy is an urgent societal challenge. Organic photovoltaics holds promise as a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly solution.

Kippelen, Bernard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Investigation of gamma induced degradation of Amberlite 200 cation resin by mass spectrometer and liquid chromatograph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, provisions were made for collecting samples of any gas produced. The irradiated resin was exposed to total 7 8 8 accumulations of 1. 0129X10 , 1. 0215XIO , and 5. 0168X10 Rads in three separate runs. It should be noted that the same amount of demineral.... (December 1977) Albert Antonio Freitag, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James 8. Smathers Amberlite 200 cation exchange resin was irradiated by gamma 7 8 radiation to doses of 10 to 5X10 Rads. Results of the analysis...

Freitag, Albert Antonio

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Color Test for Selective Detection of Secondary Amines on Resin and in Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Color Test for Selective Detection of Secondary Amines on Resin and in Solution ... Furthermore, the acetaldehyde/Fmoc amino acid method can be used as a selective colorimetric test for secondary amines in solution. ... Experimental details on synthesis and analysis on selected resin bound substrates; experimental details and results on the following: Measurements of the test sensitivity on solid-phase and in solution; the use of 9-methylfluorene versus Fmoc amino acid; experimental procedures on the preparation and isolation of colored dye precipitates together with MS and IR spectra on isolated colored dye precipitates from exposure of N-benzylmethyl amine to the acetaldehyde/Fmoc-amino acid test solution. ...

Ulrik Boas; Sahar Mirsharghi

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

The dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural efficiently catalyzed by acidic ion-exchange resin in ionic liquid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficient dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was developed in ionic liquids (ILs) with acidic ion-exchange resins as catalyst. By screening different resins and \\{ILs\\} respectively, it was found that the structure of resins and \\{ILs\\} had a prominent effect on the dehydration of fructose. In 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl), D001-cc resin showed a high activity. And then the effects of reaction temperatures, dosages of D001-cc, and different initial fructose loadings on the dehydration of fructose were studied in detail. The system of D001-cc resin and [Bmim]Cl exhibited a constant activity at 75 °C for 20 min and a 86.2% yield of HMF was obtained after seven recycles. At 75 °C for 20 min, a 93.0% yield of HMF from the dehydration of fructose was obtained.

Yuan Li; Hui Liu; Changhua Song; Xiaomin Gu; Huaming Li; Wenshuai Zhu; Sheng Yin; Changri Han

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, D.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The path to ubiquitous and low-cost organic electronic appliances on plastic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... films on a variety of very-low-cost substrates such as glass, plastic or metal foils, and the relative ease of processing of the organic compounds that are currently being ... the world of inorganic semiconductors. Many processes involve direct printing through use of contact with stamps, or alternatively via ink-jets and other solution-based methods. ...

Stephen R. Forrest

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

335

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Composition and structure of resins in lube distillates from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the lower contents of lube components in the crudes being processed today, along with a steady increase of demand for high-quality oils and solid hydrocarbons, as well as the trend toward processing crudes with unregulated composition, it has become necessary to develop new technology for the manufacture of lube stocks, along with the use of additives for various purposes. The effectiveness of additives is determined by their properties and also by the chemical composition of the raw material in each stage of oil production. Resins are important components of raw lube stocks. These resins are complex in composition, and vary in the nature and number of heteroatoms in the molecule and in the structure of the hydrocarbon part of the molecule. The hydrocarbon radicals may include aromatic and naphthenic rings, as well as chains with various configurations. Depending on the structural features of the resin molecules, they may vary in their effects on processes of selective solvent treating, dewaxing, and deoiling with the use of additives. The authors have investigated the resins present in the intermediate and final products of lube oil production.

Kazakova, L.P.; Gundyrev, A.A.; Litvin, N.I.; Shubina, E.S.; Mukhin, M.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum ...

Cruz J. R.; Shah C. H.; Postyn A. S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Eco-friendly preparation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from sucrose using ion-exchange resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An efficient preparation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from sucrose, a renewable resource, is reported herein, following a sequence of four steps catalyzed by reusable cation- and anion-exchange resins: hydrolysis, dehydration, glucose/fructose isomerisation and dehydration. The title compound, a key building block in current industrial chemistry, was isolated in its pure form without chromatographic purification in an overall yield of 50%.

Javier Pérez-Maqueda; Irene Arenas-Ligioiz; Óscar López; José G. Fernández-Bolańos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

An Investigation of the Oncogenic Activity of Two Representative Epoxy Resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...95,1955. 16. Suoxua SMITH,W. E.; and SUNDERL@ND,D. A. Ex perimental Production of Carcinoma in Rhesus Monkeys. Cancer Research, 16:951 "55,1956. 17. WA.us,T. A. Epoxy Resins. Tappi, 37: 129A "134A,1954.

C. H. Hine; R. J. Guzman; M. M. Coursey; J. S. Wellington; H. H. Anderson

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Final report, August 1992--May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted a theoretical and experimental program to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate the gaseous products of coal gasification. A variety of developmental efforts are underway, including a number of projects sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to improve the selectivity and permeability of porous inorganic membranes. DOE is also sponsoring efforts to extend the use of metallic membranes to new applications. Most developmental efforts have focused on hydrogen separation by inorganic membranes, which may be used to maximize hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition in integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. Membrane materials that have been investigated include glass (silica), alumina, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt). This report describes inorganic membrane materials, long term membrane exposure tests, membrane permeation tests, coal gasifier exposure tests, conclusions, and recommendations.

Damle, A.S.; Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY MILLENNIUM INORGANIC CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MILLENNIUM INORGANIC CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE MILLENNIUM INORGANIC CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-04GO14153; W(A)-04-084; CH-1263 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE patent counsel, Millennium Inorganic Chemicals, Inc. (Millennium) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above- identified cooperative agreement by its employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories. Millennium is leading a teaming arrangement including Exxon Mobil Research and Engineering and Sandia National

343

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Inorganic and Radiochemical Analysis of AW-101 and AN-107 Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the inorganic and radiochemical analytical results for AW-101 and AN-107 as received materials. The analyses were conducted in support of the BNFL Proposal No. 30406/29274 Task 5.0. The inorganic and radiochemical analysis results obtained from the as received materials are used to provide initial characterization information for subsequent process testing and to provide data to support permit application activities. Quality Assurance (QA) Plan MCS-033 provides the operational and quality control protocols for the analytical activities, and whenever possible, analyses were performed to SW-846 equivalent methods and protocols.

MW Urie; JJ Wagner; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; SK Fiskum; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gasification characteristics to 14CO2 of 14C radionuclide desorbed from spent resin by phosphate solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The removal characteristics of H14CO3 ? ions from IRN-150 mixed resin contaminated with 14C radionuclide and the gasification effects of 14C radionuclide on 14CO2 are investigated in this study. T...

Ho-Yeon Yang; Ji-Hoon Lee; Jung-Jin Lee

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

An experimental investigation of thermal contact conductance across carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites as a function of interface pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE ACROSS CARBON FIBER/EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES AS A FUNCTION OF INTERFACE PRESSURE A Thesis by MICHAEL EVERETT RHOADES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE ACROSS CARBON FIBER/EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES AS A...

Rhoades, Michael Everett

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Identification of Small Molecule Binding Molecules by Affinity Purification Using a Specific Ligand Immobilized on PEGA Resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A synthetic ligand for FK506-binding protein 12 (SLF) was immobilized on various resins, and the binding assays between the SLF-immobilized resins and FK506-binding protein 12 (FKBP12) were performed. ... This matrix enabled the isolation of FKBP12 from a cell lysate, and the identification of SLF-binding peptides from a phage cDNA library. ... We confirmed the interaction between SLF and these peptides using a cuvette type quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) apparatus. ...

Kouji Kuramochi; Yuka Miyano; Yoshihiro Enomoto; Ryo Takeuchi; Kazutomo Ishi; Yoichi Takakusagi; Takeki Saitoh; Keishi Fukudome; Daisuke Manita; Yoshifumi Takeda; Susumu Kobayashi; Kengo Sakaguchi; Fumio Sugawara

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

Investigation of the ion exchange equilibrium between NA+, Ca++, Mg++, and a sulfonated polystyrene resin at various concentrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATiON OF THE ION EXCHANGE EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN Na , Ca++, Mg++, AND A SULFONATED POLYSTYRENE RESIN AT VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS A THESIS BY WILLIAM FRANKLIN McILHENNY Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical... College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1958 MaJor Subject: Chemical Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE ION EXCHANGE EQUILIBRIUM BFTWEEN Na+, Ca++ Mg++ AND A SULFONATED POLYSTYRENE RESIN...

McIlhenny, William Franklin

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Flame-Retardant Epoxy Resin Nanocomposites Reinforced with Polyaniline-Stabilized Silica Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Henry A. Colorado, Suying Wei,*,# and Zhanhu Guo*, Integrated Composites Lab (ICL), Dan F. Smith silsesquioxanes (POSS) reinforced epoxy composites.10 For the third method, the inorganic nanoparticles are often (ATH),13 silica (SiO2),14 nanoclay,15 and newly developed phosphorus- containing flame retardants 9

Guo, John Zhanhu

350

Evaluation of bisphenol E cyanate ester for the resin-injection repair of advanced composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis is a compilation of a general introduction and literature review that ties together the subsequent chapters which consist of two journal articles that have yet to be submitted for publication. The overall topic relates to the evaluation and application of a new class of cyanate ester resin with unique properties that lend it applicable to use as a resin for injection repair of high glass transition temperature polymer matrix composites. The first article (Chapter 2) details the evaluation and optimization of adhesive properties of this cyanate ester and alumina nanocomposites under different conditions. The second article (Chapter 3) describes the development and evaluation of an injection repair system for repairing delaminations in polymer matrix composites.

Wilber Yaote Lio

2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of extractants and chelating resins in polishing actinide-contaminated waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, anion exchange is used for recovering plutonium from nitric acid solutions. Although this approach recovers >99%, the trace amounts of plutonium and other actinides remaining in the effluent require additional processing. We are doing research to develop a secondary unit operation that can directly polish the effluent so that actinide levels are reduced to below the maximum allowed for facility discharge. We selected solvent extraction, the only unit operation that can meet the stringent process requirements imposed; several carbonyl and phosphoryl extractants were evaluated and their performance characterized. We also investigated various engineering approaches for solvent extraction; the most promising was a chelating resin loaded with extractant. Our research now focuses on the synthesis of malonamides, and our goal is to bond these extractants to a resin matrix. 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Yarbro, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Analytical calculation of detailed model parameters of cast resin dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-flammable characteristic of cast resin dry-type transformers make them suitable for different kind of usages. This paper presents an analytical method of how to obtain parameters of detailed model of these transformers. The calculated parameters are compared and verified with the corresponding FEM results and if it was necessary, correction factors are introduced for modification of the analytical solutions. Transient voltages under full and chopped test impulses are calculated using the obtained detailed model. In order to validate the model, a setup was constructed for testing on high-voltage winding of cast resin dry-type transformer. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data measured from FRA and impulse tests.

M. Eslamian; B. Vahidi; S.H. Hosseinian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

New bifunctional anion-exchange resins for nuclear waste treatment: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additional bifunctional anion-exchange resins have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to take up Pu(IV) from nitric acid solutions. Bifunctionality is achieved by adding a second anion-exchange site to the pyridine nitrogen (also an anion-exchange site) of the base poly(4-vinylpyridine) resin. Previous work focused on the effect of varying the chemical properties of the added site along with the length of an alkylene spacer between the two sites. Here the authors examine four new 3- and 4-picolyl derivatives which maintain more rigidly defined geometries between the two nitrogen cationic sites. These materials, which have the two anion-exchange sites separated by three and four carbons, respectively, exhibit lower overall Pu(IV) distribution coefficients than the corresponding N-alkylenepyridium derivatives with more flexible spacers. Methylation of the second pyridium site results in a ca. 20% increase in the Pu(IV) distribution coefficients.

Marsh, S.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bartsch, R.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

Pennycook, Steve

355

Polygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes Kevin Tibbetts,* Robert Doe, and Gerbrand Ceder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the shape of the cross section. Circular and polygonal nanotubes are compared based on their strain energy of several concentric "single-walled" nanotubes.2,19,20 In this paper we develop a model for the energyPolygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes Kevin Tibbetts,* Robert Doe, and Gerbrand Ceder

Ceder, Gerbrand

356

ADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY FALL 2008 CHEMISTRY 410 (CRN 11299:), CHEMISTRY 510 (CRN 11315)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY ­ FALL 2008 CHEMISTRY 410 (CRN 11299:), CHEMISTRY 510 (CRN 11315: 373C Klamath E-Mail: cpage@uoregon.edu Phone: 346-4693 Office Hours: M 11:00 am, U 11:00 am, coordination chemistry, main group chemistry, organometallic chemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry. Because

Richmond, Geraldine L.

357

Inorganic Surface Nanostructuring by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inorganic Surface Nanostructuring by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization a silicon surface was accomplished by atmospheric pressure (AP) hydrogen plasma surface activation followed. The formation of initiation sites was controlled by the plasma exposure period, radio frequency (rf) power

Hicks, Robert F.

358

Inorganic nitrogen availability after severe stand-replacing fire in the Greater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80526 This contribution is part) Understanding ecosystem processes as they relate to wildfire and vegetation dynamics is of growing importance of severe, stand-replacing wildfires are poorly understood. We studied inorganic nitrogen pools

Turner, Monica G.

359

Nano Res (2010) 3: 170173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nano Res (2010) 3: 170­173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes]. Folding and bonding of edge atoms on the periphery of the quasi two-dimensional planar nano- structure this nanotubular structure is suitable for capillary filling using molten metal halides. Nano Res (2010) 3: 170

Davis, Ben G.

360

Modification of Resin-Type Adsorbents for Ethane/Ethylene Separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modification of Resin-Type Adsorbents for Ethane/Ethylene Separation ... On Ag+-exchanged Amberlyst 35 (36.5% exchange) at 25 °C and 1 atm, the equilibrium adsorbed amount for C2H4 is 1.48 mmol/g, and the equilibrium adsorption ratio for C2H4/C2H6 is 6.4. ... The complexation agents can be classified into three forms:? solution, solid adsorbent, and membrane. ...

Zhongbiao Wu; Sang-Sup Han; Soon-Haeng Cho; Jong-Nam Kim; Kuck-Tack Chue; Ralph T. Yang

1997-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

362

Chapter 4 - Detailed accounts of thermoset resins for moulding and composite matrices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Polyurethanes are obtained by the reaction between polyols and isocyanates, which are of diverse chemical natures and applications. Polyureas, obtained by the reaction of amines, and isocyanates, also cover the whole range of hardnesses and are, generally, more resistant to water. Unsaturated polyesters are obtained by the reaction among di-acids or anhydrides containing a proportion of double bonds, and a diol or glycol. Phenolic resins are obtained by the reaction of tri-phenols and formaldehyde, melamines are obtained by the reaction of melamine and formaldehyde, urea formaldehydes are obtained by reaction of urea and formaldehyde, and epoxy resins are obtained by reaction of a multi epoxy monomer and a diamine or anhydride hardener. The polyimide resins are obtained in two ways: BMI or aminobismaleimides or addition polyimides, which is a reaction of a diamine and bismaleimide to make a prepolymer that is then cured by an excess of diamine, and condensation of polyimides or SP-polyimides. Despite the thermoplastic form, they are infusible, and generally insoluble. Silicones are obtained by hydrolysis of chlorosilanes, and cyanate ester are obtained from aromatic prepolymers containing highly reactive cyanate functional groups that cyclotrimerize exothermically to form triazine ring structures, which result in a tightly crosslinked structure.

Michel Biron

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Inorganic by-products in waters disinfected with chlorine dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continuing diminishing sources of fresh waters has stimulated the search for unconventional water resources, such as effluents from municipal sewage treatment plants, which can be reused for purposes of irrigation in agriculture, cooling water in industry, groundwater aquifer recharge and in the long term even for drinking water. The main problem of using effluents is the presence of pathogenic bacteria and viruses that can affect human and animal health. Therefore, disinfection has been used for many years to control and reduce waterborne diseases. At the moment, most water treatment plants use sodium hypochlorite as their primary biocide. However, the toxicity of chlorinated organic compounds produced during the treatment has led to increased interest in the use of alternative agents. One possible candidate as viable substitute of free chlorine is chlorine dioxide. Before this disinfectant can be recommended for routine use, it is imperative that its safety be assessed. In this research we have investigated the presence of chlorite and chlorate in sewage disinfected with chlorine dioxide. The effect of initial concentration of biocide and contact time was evaluated using a pilot plant fed with the effluent of a municipal treatment plant. Moreover, the influence of ClO2 generator performance was analyzed and discussed.

E. Veschetti; B. Cittadini; D. Maresca; G. Citti; M. Ottaviani

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Organic Thin Film Magnet of Nickel-Tetracyanoethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid organic-inorganic materials consisting of a transition metal and an organic compound, TCNE form a unique class of organic magnets denoted by M(TCNE){sub x}(where M = transition metals, and TCNE = tetracyanoethylene). The organic thin film magnet of nickel-tetracyanoethylene, Ni(TCNE){sub x} is deposited on sputtered clean gold substrate using the physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate chemical and electronic properties of Ni(TCNE){sub x} film. XPS derived film thickness and stoichiometry are found to be 6 nm and 1:2 ratio between Ni and TCNE resulting Ni(TCNE){sub 2} film, respectively. In addition, XPS results do not show any signature of the presence of pure metallic Ni or Ni-clustering in the Ni(TCNE){sub x} film.

Bhatt, Pramod; Yusuf, S. M. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Controlled binding and assembly of peptides onto inorganic substrates is at the core of bionanotechnology and biological-materials engineering. Peptides offer several  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inorganic surfaces that are distinguishable by shape, crystallography, mineralogy, and chemistry. Second and theoretical approaches and concepts that will help advance this emerging field. Molecular Design of Inorganic-inorganic materials is dependent upon our understanding of the molecular factors that govern sequence

Samudrala, Ram

366

Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Catalytic Upgrading of bio-oil using 1-octene and 1-butanol over sulfonic acid resin catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raw bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass must be refined before it can be used as a transporation fuel, a petroleum refinery feed or for many other fuel uses. Raw bio-oil was upgraded with the neat model olefin, 1-octene, and with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures over sulfonic acid resin catalysts frin 80 to 150 degrees celisus in order to simultaneously lower water content and acidity and to increase hydrophobicity and heating value. Phase separation and coke formation were key factors limiting the reaction rate during upgrading with neat 1-octene although octanols were formed by 1-octene hydration along with small amounts of octyl acetates and ethers. GC-MS analysis confirmed that olefin hydration, carboxylic acid esterification, acetal formation from aldehydes and ketones and O- and C-alkylations of phenolic compounds occurred simultaneously during upgrading with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures. Addition of 1-butanol increased olefin conversion dramatically be reducing mass transfer restraints and serving as a cosolvent or emulsifying agent. It also reacted with carboxylic acids and aldehydes/ketones to form esters, and acetals, respectively, while also serving to stabilize bio-oil during heating. 1-Butanol addition also protected the catalysts, increasing catalyst lifetime and reducing or eliminationg coking. Upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, polyhydric alcohols and organic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rise from 2.5 to >3.0), removed the uppleasant ordor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content decreased from 37.2% to < 7.5% dramatically and calorific value increased from 12.6 MJ kg to about 30.0 MJ kg.

Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Qingwen; Tripathi, Prabhat; Pittman, Charles U.

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Preparation of electromagnetic reflective wool using nano-ZrO2/citric acid as inorganic/organic hybrid coating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nano-ZrO2 particles were stabilized on wool surface using citric acid (CA) as a crosslinking agent and sodium hypophosphite (SHP) as a catalyst under UV irradiation. The influence of the amount of nano-ZrO2 on the performance of wool fiber was investigated by the use of Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), horizontal flammability apparatus (HFA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), water contact angle tester (WCA), reflectance spectrophotometer (RS) and electromagnetic transition instrument (ETI). The possible interactions between nano-zirconia particles, cross-linking agent and wool free radicals were elucidated by the FTIR spectroscopy. Results indicated that the stabilized nano-zirconia enhances the flame retardancy and electromagnetic reflection of wool.

Mazeyar Parvinzadeh Gashti; Arash Almasian; Mahyar Parvinzadeh Gashti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Inorganic, Organic, and Total Mercury in Blood and Urine: Cold Vapor Analysis with Automated Flow Injection Sample Delivery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and blood and urine specimenswere placed in the dry block heater for 30 min. Di- gestion was considered completewhen foaming...for transfer of nanogram quan- tities of mercury vapor for flameless atomic absorption spec- trophotometry. Anal. Chem. 43......

David E. Nixon; Garry V. Mussmann; Thomas P. Moyer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Dissolved Organic Matter and Inorganic Ions in a Central Himalayan Glacier—Insights into Chemical Composition and Atmospheric Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First, the identification of biomass burning related species in snow pit samples of Himalayas indicates the need to further address the effects of biomass burning on air quality, atmospheric circulation, and snow/glacier albedo in this region. ... Hong, S. M.; Lee, K.; Hou, S. G.; Hur, S. D.; Ren, J. W.; Burn, L. J.; Rosman, K. J. R.; Barbante, C.; Boutron, C. F.An 800-Year Record of Atmospheric As, Mo, Sn, and Sb in Central Asia in High-Altitude Ice Cores from Mt. Qomolangma (Everest), Himalayas Environ. ... Crop wastes common to the region, including rice straw, mustard stalk, jute stalk, soybean stalk, and animal residue burnings, were also characterized. ...

Jianzhong Xu; Qi Zhang; Xiangying Li; Xinlei Ge; Cunde Xiao; Jiawen Ren; Dahe Qin

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

371

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 21, 2002, 251 255 Organic-inorganic sol-gel coating for corrosion protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for corrosion protection of stainless steel T. P. CHOU Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA E-mail: gzcao@u.washington.edu One of the most effective corrosion example. This is the main reason for the durability and corrosion resistance be- havior of this particular

Cao, Guozhong

372

Probing Ag nanoparticle surface oxidation in contact with (in)organics: an X-ray scattering and fluorescence yield approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An advanced characterization approach to spatially resolve the reactions occurring at the interface between silver nanoparticles and a simple aqueous system is presented. Both phase and chemical distributions were obtained from X-ray scattering and fluorescence yield techniques.

Levard, C.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

373

Interactions between Copper(II) Complexes of Mono-, Bis-, and Tris(macrocyclic) Ligands and Inorganic or Organic Guests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL PAPER Interactions between Copper(II) Complexes of Mono-, Bis-, and Tris(macrocyclic) Ligands. Prikhod'ko,[b] and Hans Pritzkow[a] Keywords: Copper / Host-guest complexes / Macrocycles / Molecular recognition Template synthesis The copper(II)-assisted condensation of [Cu(2,3,2-tet)]2+ [2,3,2-tet = bis

Nazarenko, Alexander

374

Air Gasification of Biomass in a Downdraft Fixed Bed:? A Comparative Study of the Inorganic and Organic Products Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of lignocellulosic residues by means of such simple and versatile plants is dictated by the necessity of developing technologies capable of processing different biomass feedstocks for small-scale power production (e.g. ... Elemental Composition (wt %) and Fixed Carbon on Dry Matter of the Three Biomass Feedstocks ... Table 2.? Meana Trace Metal Contents (mg/Kg in ash) of Three Different Biomass Feedstocks ...

I. De Bari; D. Barisano; M. Cardinale; D. Matera; F. Nanna; D. Viggiano

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Detection and location of partial discharge in cast-resin dry-type transformers using a waveguide and a new acoustic emission sensor pair design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic emission (AE) method could be used to detect and locate partial discharges (PD) in cast-resin dry-type transformers. However, due to the high...

Ching-chau Su; Ya-wen Tang; Cheng-chi Tai…

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Empirical MOdels for the Uptake of Inorganic Chemicals from Soil by Plants (BJC/OR-133)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

33 33 Empirical Models for the Uptake of Inorganic Chemicals from Soil by Plants This document has received the appropriate reviews for release to the public. Date: 9/23/98 BJC/OR-133 Empirical Models for the Uptake of Inorganic Chemicals from Soil by Plants Date Issued-September 1998 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management BECHTEL JACOBS COMPANY LLC managing the Environmental Management Activities at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant under contract DE-AC05-98OR22700 for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY iii CONTENTS FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

377

Elemental and isotopic analysis of inorganic salts by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is applied for the analysis of elements as well as their isotopic composition in different inorganic salts. At very low laser energies the inorganic ions are desorbed and ionized from the thin layer of the sample surface. The naturally occurring isotopes of alkali and silver ions are resolved using time of flight mass spectrometer. Further increase in laser energy shows the appearance of Al, Cr, and Fe ions in the mass spectra. This indicates the penetration laser beam beyond the sample surface leading to the ablation of sample target at higher energies. The simultaneous appearance of atomic ions from the sample target at relatively higher laser energies hampers the unambiguous identification of amino acid residues from the biomolecular ions in MALDI-MS.

Jayasekharan, T.; Sahoo, N. K. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

Sklarew, D.S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Carbons for lithium ion cells prepared using sepiolite as an inorganic template.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon anodes for Li ion cells have been prepared by the in situ polymerization of olefins such as propylene and ethylene in the channels of sepiolite clay mineral. Upon dissolution of the inorganic framework, a disordered carbon was obtained. The carbon was tested as anode in coin cells, yielding a reversible capacity of 633 mAh/g, 1.70 times higher than the capacity delivered by graphitic carbon, assuming 100% efficiency. The coulombic efficiency was higher than 90%.

Sandi, G.

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

380

Resin-assisted enrichment of thios as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reversible modifications on cysteine thiols play a significant role in redox signaling and regulation. A number of reversible redox modifications, including disulfide formation, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, have been recognized for their significance in various physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe in detail a resin-assisted thiol-affinity enrichment protocol for both biochemical and proteomics applications. This protocol serves as a general approach for specific isolation of thiol-containing proteins or peptides derived from reversible redox-modified proteins. This approach utilizes thiol-affinity resins to directly capture thiol-containing proteins or peptides through a disulfide exchange reaction followed by on-resin protein digestion and on-resin multiplexed isobaric labeling to facilitate LC?MS/MS based quantitative site-specific analysis of redox modifications. The overall approach requires a much simpler workflow with increased specificity compared to the commonly used biotin switch technique. By coupling different selective reduction strategies, the resin-assisted approach provides the researcher with a useful tool capable of enriching different types of reversible modifications on protein thiols. Procedures for selective enrichment and analyses of S-nitrosylation and total reversible cysteine oxidation are presented to demonstrate the utility of this general strategy.

Guo, Jia; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Inorganic Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study is to synthesize nanomaterials by mixing molten salt (alkali nitrate salt eutectics) with inorganic nanoparticles. The thermo-physical properties of the synthesized nanomaterials were characterized experimentally...

Jung, Seunghwan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Improved resins and novel materials and methods for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-phase extraction (SPE) has grown to be one of the most widely used methods for isolation and preconcentration of a vast range of compounds from aqueous solutions. By modifying polymeric SPE resins with chelating functional groups, the selective uptake of metals was accomplished. The resin, along with adsorbed metals, was vaporized in the ICP and detection of the metals was then possible using either mass or emission spectroscopy. Drug analyses in biological fluids have received heightened attention as drug testing is on the increase both in sports and in the work environment. By using a direct-injection technique, biological fluids can be injected directly into the liquid chromatographic system with no pretreatment. A new surfactant, a sulfonated form of Brij-30 (Brij-S) is shown to prevent the uptake of serum proteins on commercial HPLC columns by forming a thin coating on the silica C18 surface. Excellent separations of eight or more drugs with a wide range of retention times were obtained. The separations had sharper peaks and lower retention times than similar separations performed with the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). Quantitative recovery of a number of drugs with limits of detection near 1 ppm with a 5 {micro}l injection volume were obtained. Finally, a method for solid-phase extraction in a syringe is introduced. The system greatly reduced the volume of solvent required to elute adsorbed analytes from the SPE bed while providing a semi-automated setup. SPE in a syringe consists of a very small bed of resin-loaded membrane packed into a GC or HPLC syringe. After extraction, elution was performed with just a few {micro}l of solvent. This small elution volume allowed injection of the eluent directly from the syringe into the chromatographic system, eliminating the handling problems associated with such small volumes.

Freeze, R.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

383

The adsorption and desorption of picloram, trifluralin, and paraquat by ionic and nonionic exchange resins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!'i?i mi ried by r 1 nsing the ! reat- i ii res lies is i J. . h var Locis . -; 0 lvent s . Where l 1'ice cheer os exi. sted bct . veen Lhe r csin encl herbicide, small amounts of herbicide were adsorbed and where unlike charges were involved..., relatively l. arge amounts &&ere adsorbed. Also, where no cou- lo& rb ic 6 oz!. . er; z!!ere presenL on tin& part of 1 izc-. 1 e sizz 01 her bi& i de, rein&. i v ly 1 arge a!nount s were ads!? bc d. '1'he aniozzic resin (Cl -for&a) adsorbed 375, 0. 08...

McCall, Homer Gene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

Standard Test Method for Resin Flow of Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Prepreg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the amount of resin flow that will take place from prepreg tape or sheet under given conditions of temperature and pressure. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values in parentheses are for reference only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Anion Exchange Resins for the Selective Separation of Technetium from Uranium in Carbonate Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(8) The recovered 99Tc can subsequently be converted to metal or into other waste forms suitable for long-term storage or geological disposal. ... Anion exchange resins have been shown to be viable candidates for removing TcO4– from acidic solutions, from groundwater, and also from caustic solutions such as Hanford tank wastes (where the U has been largely removed using the PUREX process). ... The 1st 4 terms describe the contribution to retention from neutral components of solutes, and the 5th term represents the contribution to retention from solute's ionization. ...

Kristy M. Long; George S. Goff; Stuart D. Ware; Gordon D. Jarvinen; Wolfgang H. Runde

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

A resin-buffered nutrient solution for controlling metal speciation in the algal bottle assay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal speciation in solution is uncontrolled during algal growth in the traditional algal bottle assay. A resin-buffered nutrient solution was developed to overcome this problem and this was applied to test the effect of chloride (Cl?) on cadmium (Cd) uptake. Standard nutrient solution was enriched with 40 mM of either NaNO3 or NaCl, and was prepared to contain equal Cd2+ but varying dissolved Cd due to the presence of CdCln2?n complexes. Both solutions were subsequently used in an algal assay in 100 mL beakers that contained only the solution (designated “?R”) or contained the solution together with a cation exchange sulfonate resin (2 g L?1, designated “+R”) as a deposit on the bottom of the beaker. Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was grown for 72 h (1.4 × 105–1.4 × 106 cells mL?1) in stagnant solution and shaken three times a day. Growth was unaffected by the presence of the resin (p > 0.05). The Cd concentrations in solution of the ?R devices decreased with 50–58% of initial values due to Cd uptake. No such changes were found in the +R devices or in abiotic controls. Cd uptake was unaffected by either NaNO3 or NaCl treatment in the +R device, confirming that Cd2+ is the preferred Cd species in line with the general concept of metal bioavailability. In contrast, Cd uptake in the ?R devices was two-fold larger in the NaCl treatment than in the NaNO3 treatment (p < 0.001), suggesting that CdCln2?n complexes are bioavailable in this traditional set-up. However this bioavailability is partially, but not completely, an apparent one, because of the considerable depletion of solution 109Cd in this set-up. Resin-buffered solutions are advocated in the algal bottle assay to control trace metal supply and to better identify the role of metal complexes on bioavailability.

L. Verheyen; R. Merckx; E. Smolders

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

Estimation of aboveground biomass and inorganic nutrient content of a 25-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON MOUSER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August lqBO Major Si bject: Forestry ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON HOUSER Approved...

Houser, James Nelson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Influence of resinous compounds in petroleum oils on formation of protective films by additives with labeled atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of resinous compounds present in oil media in terms of their effects of protective film formation and corrosive wear of metal is investigated. Radioactive additives consisting of barium salts of an alkylphenol sulfide and an alkylphenol disulfide, containing a functional group of sulfur 35, were synthesized. These additives were added to the test oil in an amount of 3%. In most cases, the additives tend to form more stable films on the metal surface when they are used in oils containing resinous compounds than when they are used in individual groups of hydrocarbons. The quantity and efficiency of the protective film formed by the additive depends not only on the hydrocarbon structure of the oil hydrocarbons, but also on the quality of the additive, the nature of the metal, and the content of resinous compounds in the oil and the structure of these compounds.

Faradzhev, K.F.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Detailed balance limit of power conversion efficiency for organic photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fundamental difference between inorganic photovoltaic (IPV) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is that charges are generated at the interface in OPV cells, while free charges can be generated in the bulk in IPV cells. In OPV cells, charge generation involves intrinsic energy losses to dissociate excitons at the interface between the donor and acceptor. By taking into account the energy losses, we show the theoretical limits of the power conversion efficiency set by radiative recombination of the carriers on the basis of the detailed balance relation between radiation from the cell and black-body radiation.

Seki, Kazuhiko, E-mail: k-seki@aist.go.jp [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Furube, Akihiro [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, Yuji [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

391

More stable hybrid organic solar cells deposited on amorphous Si electron transfer layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on defect densities, performance, and stability of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells produced using n-doped inorganic amorphous silicon-carbide layers as the electron transport layer (ETL). The organic material was poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT) and heterojunction was formed using phenyl-C{sub 71}-Butyric-Acid-Methyl Ester (PCBM). For comparison, inverted solar cells fabricated using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as ETL were fabricated. Defect densities and subgap quantum efficiency curves were found to be nearly identical for both types of cells. The cells were subjected to 2xsun illumination and it was found that the cells produced using doped a-Si as ETL were much more stable than the cells produced using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

Samiee, Mehran; Modtland, Brian; Dalal, Vikram L., E-mail: vdalal@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Aidarkhanov, Damir [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion process I.B. Sevostianov, V manufacturing technology based on vacuum infusion which is also known as resin film infusion technology to be infused by the vacuum to completely wet-out the reinforcements and eliminate air voids in the laminate

Sevostianov, Igor

393

REMOVAL OF TECHNETIUM 99 FROM THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) BASIN 44 USING PUROLITE A-530E & REILLEX HPQ & SYBRON IONAC SR-7 ION EXCHANGE RESINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the laboratory testing and analyses as directed under the test plan, RPP-20407. The overall goal of this task was to evaluate and compare candidate anion exchange resins for their capacity to remove Technetium-99 from Basin 44 Reverse Osmosis reject stream. The candidate resins evaluated were Purolite A-530E, Reillex HPQ, and Sybron IONAC SR-7.

DUNCAN JB

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

1981-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Primary diamines are disclosed of the formula shown in a diagram wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzomethane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

1981-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Continuous biodiesel production from acidic oil using a combination of cation- and anion-exchange resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A continuous process was developed to produce biodiesel from acidic oil containing soybean oil and oleic acid, which combined esterification by cation-exchange resin NKC-9, online separation and transesterification by anion-exchange resin D261. The esterification was carried out with soybean oil/oleic acid weight ratio of 5/5, methanol to oleic acid weight ratio of 1.5/1, reaction temperature of 338 K and residence time of 126.6 min. After the reaction, the mixture was settled to online separate into two layers, and the methanol–water–oleic acid mixture at the top layer was reclaimed. The bottom layer, mainly containing soybean oil and methyl oleate, was transesterified under methanol/soybean oil weight ratio of 1/3 and n-hexane/soybean oil weight ratio of 1/2 at 323 K for the residence time of 112.0 min. The high conversions of oleic acid (above 98%) and soybean oil (92.3%) were achieved. The yield of biodiesel in this process reached up to 95.1%. The main parameters of the product met the Chinese Standard of biodiesel.

Benqiao He; Yixuan Shao; Yanbiao Ren; Jianxin Li; Yu Cheng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Inorganic nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was studied using scanning tunnelling micro- scopy (Remskar et al. 2003). The...In the first study, the photocatalytic oxidation of I- into I- 3 was investigated and...reduced numbers of layers synthesized by arc discharge. Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 47374740...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Inorganic Hollow Nanotube Aerogels by Atomic Layer Deposition onto Native Nanocellulose Templates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First we show a preparation method for titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and aluminum oxide nanotube aerogels based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) on biological nanofibrillar aerogel templates, that is, nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), also called microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) or nanocellulose. ... Inorganic layer thickness data (S1), larger SEM micrographs of single nanocellulose fibrils (S2), several samples demonstrating differences in preparation methods (S3, S4) and different coatings (S5?S7), XRD data for a TiO2 nanotube film (S8). ... Fabrication of Transparent-Conducting-Oxide-Coated Inverse Opals as Mesostructured Architectures for Electrocatalysis Applications: A Case Study with NiO ...

Juuso T. Korhonen; Panu Hiekkataipale; Jari Malm; Maarit Karppinen; Olli Ikkala; Robin H. A. Ras

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cryogenic Properties of Inorganic Insulation Materials for ITER Magnets: A Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a literature search on the cryogenic properties of candidate inorganic insulators for the ITER TF magnets are reported. The materials investigated include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, MgO, porcelain, SiO{sub 2}, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, ZrO{sub 2}, and mica. A graphical presentation is given of mechanical, elastic, electrical, and thermal properties between 4 and 300 K. A companion report reviews the low temperature irradiation resistance of these materials.

Simon, N.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Electronic and Optical Properties at Organic/Organic Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OPVs have the advantage of utilizing cheap, abundant materials which require less-demanding processing techniques than their inorganic counterparts, but their efficiency is currently limited to 12% [18]. In a fun...

Shane R. Yost; Eric Hontz; David P. McMahon…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Anti-DYKDDDDK G1 Affinity Resin Cat. No. L00432 Technical Manual No. TM0634 Version 03222012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detection and purification. GenScript Anti-DYKDDDDK G1 Affinity Resin (Cat. No. L00432) is designed for the purification of DYKDDDDK-tagged protein from commonly used protein expression systems including bacteria, yeast at certain concentrations II. Equipments and Reagents Required But Not Supplied Distilled water

Lebendiker, Mario

402

Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 30, No. 7, July 2004 (C 2004) CREOSOTE BUSH (Larrea tridentata) RESIN INCREASES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) RESIN INCREASES WATER DEMANDS AND REDUCES ENERGY AVAILABILITY IN DESERT WOODRATS (Neotoma lepida Ciencias Biol´ogicas Universidad Nacional de San Luis 5700 San Luis, Argentina 2Department of Wildlife requirement and (2) reduces energy available by increasing fecal and urinary energy losses. We tested

Mladenoff, David

403

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty perform research in molecular machines, exotic CHEMISTRY FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS Anne M. Andrews, Professor-in-Residence: Understanding how areas of interest include cross- coupling reactions, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and natural

Levine, Alex J.

404

Iodine Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins and Activated Carbons– Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows: • The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. • The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. • The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. • In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine sorption.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™ 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently onsite, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation, and return of resin for regeneration.

Nesham, Dean O. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Ivarson, Kristine A. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Hanson, James P. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Charles W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Meyers, P. [USDOE, Richland Operations Office, WA (United States); Jaschke, Naomi M. [USDOE, Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

406

Weakly-Basic Anion Exchange Resin Scavenges Impurities in Ionic Liquid Synthesized from Trialkyloxonium Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Lewis acidic parts of these impurities, that is, H+ and BF3, were demonstrated to be able to transfer to dimethylamino groups of the weakly basic anion exchange resin (DOWEX MARATHON WBA) in aqueous solutions, releasing 1-methylimidazole (mim). ... Although intense reddish brown color was given to the residual oil of [emim]BF4, further purification and decolorization have been achieved by using silica-gel column chromatography (eluent: acetone) and treatment with activated carbon in water. ... The detection and determination of [emim]+, mim, [Hmim]+, [BF3(mim)], and BF4– in the recovered oils and collected volatiles from each batch were performed by using chemical shifts and peak integrals in the 1H and 19F NMR spectra. ...

Koichiro Takao; Taro Tsubomura

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

407

Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Test plan for immobilization of salt-containing surrogate mixed wastes using polyester resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past operations at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites have resulted in the generation of several waste streams with high salt content. These wastes contain listed and characteristic hazardous constituents and are radioactive. The salts contained in the wastes are primarily chloride, sulfate, nitrate, metal oxides, and hydroxides. DOE has placed these types of wastes under the purview of the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The MWFA has been tasked with developing and facilitating the implementation of technologies to treat these wastes in support of customer needs and requirements. The MWFA has developed a Technology Development Requirements Document (TDRD), which specifies performance requirements for technology owners and developers to use as a framework in developing effective waste treatment solutions. This project will demonstrate the use of polyester resins in encapsulating and solidifying DOE`s mixed wastes containing salts, as an alternative to conventional and other emerging immobilization technologies.

Biyani, R.K.; Douglas, J.C.; Hendrickson, D.W.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

Radioactive wastewater treatment using a mixture of TANNIX sorbent and VARION mixed bed ion exchange resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A wastewater treatment system has been developed by using a mixture of ammonium-insoluble tannin (TANNIX, this is the trademark of an adsorbent made by Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd) and mixed (strong acid cation exchanger and strong base anion exchanger) ion exchange resin (MIX) for the selective separation of transuranium isotopes, including Pu, Am, Cm, and U, as well as fission and radioactive corrosion products from boric acid solution (pH ? 4.1). The equilibrium and fixed bed sorption experiments resulted in Kd values of 104â??105 ml/g, and decontamination factors of 1,000, with a breakthrough point between 1500 BV and 5000 BV of accumulated volume.

G. Patzay; P. Tilky; J. Schunk; T. Pinter; F. Feil; K. Hamaguchi; L. Weiser

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Storage of dissolved inorganic nutrients in seawater: poisoning with mercuric chloride  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seawater samples were poisoned with mercuric chloride to assess its suitability for the long-term storage measurement of inorganic nutrients. Two series of seawater samples from the open ocean were taken, and nitrate, silicate, phosphate, nitrite and ammonium measured immediately on board. The same samples were poisoned by adding 105 ?g of mercuric chloride per milliliter of sample (total sample volume 50 ml) and measured again after about 1 and 2 years storage. The results show that the poisoning with mercuric chloride is a suitable method for the storage of inorganic nutrients. For nitrate, silicate and phosphate a good accordance was found between the direct measurements and those after 1 and 2 years storage. The results of the determinations coincided with, or were very close to the optimal 1:1 relationship. The variations for nitrite were higher, but due to the generally low concentrations in the oceans these differences will cause no serious problems for the nitrate determination. In contrast, ammonium data, obtained after long storage periods, should be taken with care.

Gerhard Kattner

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

412

Printing Highly-aligned Single-crystalline Organic Electronic Thin Films |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printing Highly-aligned Single-crystalline Organic Electronic Thin Films Printing Highly-aligned Single-crystalline Organic Electronic Thin Films Monday, September 23, 2013 Organic semiconductor materials have some intriguing advantages compared to their inorganic counterparts: low-cost and versatile manufacturing (e.g. roll-to-roll printing), material abundance and new form factors (e.g. flexible, transparent and stretchable). However, solution-processed organic devices are usually made and optimized with poorly scalable fabrication using lab-based techniques such as spin coating or dip coating. A better route for organic-electronics fabrication is printing, which can potentially realize large-area, high-throughput, low-cost fabrication on an industrial scale. Fluence image FLUENCE: fluid-enhanced crystal engineering. Solution shearing (a) using a

413

The Organic Rankine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chap. 3 is dedicated to Rankine cycles with organic fluids: the so-called organic Rankine cycles (ORC), which in recent years have ... of the use of...

Costante Mario Invernizzi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization Organization The Office of Economic Impact and Diversity is comprised of: The Office of the Director- contact us Office of Minority Business and Economic Development -...

415

Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk.

Goheen, S.C.; Campbell, J.A.; Fryxell, G.E. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Improved Organic Photovoltaics - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary1.pdf (146 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Traditionally, photosensitive optoelectronic devices such as solar cells have been constructed of a number of inorganic...

417

Transportation Organization and Functions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Office of Packaging and Transportation list of organizations and functions, with a list of acronyms.

418

Photo: D. Stevenson and C. Conway/Beckman Institute/University of Illinois An inorganic LED display printed on a flexible substrate bends without breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photo: D. Stevenson and C. Conway/Beckman Institute/University of Illinois An inorganic LED display LED Displays Printed compound semiconductors could challenge OLEDs, say researchers BY WILLIE JONES cameras. Conventional inorganic LEDs, which are poised to put incandescent and fluorescent lightbulbs out

Rogers, John A.

419

Chemistry and Engineering News Volume 90 Issue 7 | February 13, 2012 | pp. 48-49 | F. Albert Cotton Award In Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Engineering News Volume 90 Issue 7 | February 13, 2012 | pp. 48-49 | Awards F. Albert Cotton Award In Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry By Sophie Rovner Department: ACS News Keywords: inorganic chemistry, Christopher Reed Awards Reed Credit: Courtesy of Christopher A. Reed Sponsored by the F. Albert

Reed, Christopher A.

420

Effect of Plasma Deposition Using Low-Power/Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on Promoting Adhesion of Composite Resin to Enamel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This study investigated the effect of monomer deposition through a low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) on adhesion of resin ... stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope. The

Geum-Jun Han; Jae-Hoon Kim; Sung-No Chung…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Catalytic conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethylene glycol: Effects of inorganic impurities in biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effects of typical inorganic impurities on the catalytic conversion of cellulose to ethylene glycol (EG) were investigated, and the mechanism of catalyst deactivation by certain impurities were clarified. It was found that most impurities did not affect the EG yield, but some non-neutral impurities or Ca and Fe ions greatly decreased the EG yield. Conditional experiments and catalyst characterization showed that some impurities changed the pH of the reaction solution and affected the cellulose hydrolysis rate; Ca and Fe cations reacted with tungstate ions and suppressed the retro-aldol condensation. To obtain a high EG yield, the pH of the reaction solution and the concentration of tungstate ions should be respectively adjusted to 5.0–6.0 and higher than 187 ppm. For raw biomass conversion, negative effects were eliminated by suitable pretreatments, and high EG yields comparable to those from pure cellulose were obtained.

Jifeng Pang; Mingyuan Zheng; Ruiyan Sun; Lei Song; Aiqin Wang; Xiaodong Wang; Tao Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Estimating background concentrations of inorganic analytes from on-site soil sample data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Superfund sites, regulatory agencies have commonly required that an extensive off-site study be performed to identify background concentrations of chemicals of concern in the sample medium for the purpose of establishing action levels. However, in an effort to save time and money, graphic statistics were used to estimate background concentrations of inorganic chemicals from 127 on-site soil samples collected at Andersen Air Force Base, a Superfund site on Guam. The statistical method used for this evaluation utilized probability plots, and was a modification of a technique used in mineral exploration to identify anomalous and background geochemical data. This paper provides an overview of the modified statistical method and its application at Andersen Air Force Base, and the results of the evaluation, including estimated background concentrations.

Cook, P.D. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Inorganic Graphenylene: A Porous Two-Dimensional Material With Tunable Band Gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of ab initio calculations we investigate the possibility of existence of a boron nitride (BN) porous two-dimensional nanosheet which is geometrically similar to the carbon allotrope known as biphenylene carbon. The proposed structure, which we called Inorganic Graphenylene (IGP), is formed spontaneously after selective dehydrogenation of the porous Boron Nitride (BN) structure proposed by Ding et al. We study the structural and electronic properties of both porous BN and IGP and it is shown that, by selective substitution of B and N atoms with carbon atoms in these structures, the band gap can be significantly reduced, changing their behavior from insulators to semiconductors, thus opening the possibility of band gap engineering for this class of two-dimensional materials.

Perim, Eric; Atreto, Pedro Alves da Silva; Galvăo, Douglas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Inorganic concepts relevant to metal binding, activity, and toxicity in a biological system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to review selected physical and inorganic concepts and factors which might be important in assessing and/or understanding the fact and disposition of a metal system in a biological environment. Hopefully, such inquiries will ultimately permit us to understand, rationalize, and predict differences and trends in biological effects as a function of the basic nature of a metal system and, in optimal cases, serve as input to a system of guidelines for the notion of Chemical Dosimetry.'' The plan of this paper is to first review, in general terms, the basic principles of the Crystal Field Theory (CFT), a unifying theory of bonding in metal complexes. This will provide the necessary theoretical background for the subsequent discussion of selected concepts and factors. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Hoeschele, J.D. (Warner-Lambert Co., Ann Arbor, MI (USA). Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Div.); Turner, J.E.; England, M.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

Beam coupling in hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric liquid crystal cells: Impact of optical rotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a theoretical model to describe two-beam energy exchange in a hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric cell. A cholesteric layer is placed between two inorganic substrates. One of the substrates is photorefractive (Ce:SBN). Weak and strong light beams are incident on the hybrid cell. The interfering light beams induce a periodic space-charge field in the photorefractive window. This penetrates into the cholesteric liquid crystal (LC), inducing a diffraction grating written on the LC director. In the theory, the flexoelectric mechanism for electric field-director coupling is more important than the LC static dielectric anisotropy coupling. The LC optics is described in the Bragg regime. Each beam induces two circular polarized waves propagating in the cholesteric cell with different velocities. The model thus includes optical rotation in the cholesteric LC. The incident light beam wavelength can fall above, below, or inside the cholesteric gap. The theory calculates the energy gain of the weak beam, as a result of its interaction with the pump beam within the diffraction grating. Theoretical results for exponential gain coefficients are compared with experimental results for hybrid cells filled with cholesteric mixture BL038/CB15 at different concentrations of chiral agent CB15. Reconciliation between theory and experiment requires the inclusion of a phenomenological multiplier in the magnitude of the director grating. This multiplier is cubic in the space-charge field, and we provide a justification of the q-dependence of the multiplier. Within this paradigm, we are able to fit theory to experimental data for cholesteric mixtures with different spectral position of cholesteric gap relative to the wavelength of incident beams, subject to the use of some fitting parameters.

Reshetnyak, V. Yu.; Pinkevych, I. P. [Physics Faculty, National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Volodymyrs’ka Street 64, Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Sluckin, T. J. [Division of Mathematical Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Cook, G.; Evans, D. R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

427

Partitioning of inorganic elements in pilot-scale and demonstration-scale entrained-flow gasifiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) has been recognized as one of the leading methods of power generation with near zero CO2 emissions from fossil fuels via carbon capture and storage. A suite of emerging IGCC technologies provide the promise of both high efficiency and reduced capital costs. Many of these operate at elevated temperature and hence a number of inorganic elements (i.e. elements other than C, H, O, N and S) may be present in the syngas at later stages of processing than is typical of conventional processing arrangements. Experimental results are presented for inorganic element distribution in slag and fly ash from seven entrained-flow slagging gasification plants. Data for the Siemens, Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI), Wabash River, ELCOGAS and Shell gasification systems were taken from literature. Data for the CanmetENERGY and Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) systems are presented for the first time. Mass balances and enrichment factors are calculated. All values are available in supplementary data tables. Challenges in data interpretation and general trends are highlighted. Mass balance closures for low volatility elements are within the range of 80–120% for the PWR, LGTI and Shell systems. Closures for the CanmetENERGY, Wabash River and ELCOGAS systems are further from 100%. Accumulation, unaccounted streams, measurement inaccuracy and sampling imperfections can cause poor mass balance closures. Comparison of enrichment factors for slag and fly ash demonstrate that many elements have similar fates in gasification systems as they do in combustion systems, although several elements are less volatile in gasification systems. Partitioning can vary for a given element when comparing different gasification systems and different operating conditions. The assessments of several elements which are of environmental or technological concern are provided as examples.

Marc A. Duchesne; Robin W. Hughes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Role of the sediments in scavenging inorganic contaminants in the Syr Daria River and the Small Aral Sea (Kazakhstan)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of the sediments in scavenging inorganic contaminants in the Syr Daria River and the Small Particulate Material, Bottom Sediments, Trace Elements, Solid/Liquid Partitionning Abstract This study Material (SPM) and the Bottom Sediments (BS) of the Syr Daria River in its Kazakh course, including its

Boyer, Edmond

430

Inorganic composition of fine particles in mixed mineral dustpollution plumes observed from airborne measurements during ACE-Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the atmosphere (2419, 2427); 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305Inorganic composition of fine particles in mixed mineral dust­pollution plumes observed from of Earth and Atmospheric Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA G. R. Carmichael

Weber, Rodney

431

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated-carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 giL potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent adsorption tube breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. Linear response was checked using both non-volatile TOX species (trichlorophenol) an

JG DOUGLAS; HK MEZNARICH, PHD; JR OLSEN; GA ROSS PHD; M STAUFFER

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 g/L potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent column breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. (3) Improper sample preservation: ion-chromatographic analysis of several samples wit

DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Use of EIChroM`s TRU resin in the determination of americium, plutonium and uranium in air filter and water samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TRU Resin, an extraction chromatographic material (octyl (phenyl)-N,Ndiisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphene oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP)) manufactured by EIChroM Industries, was tested for its actinide sorption and desorption characteristics. A study was initiated to demonstrate the effectiveness of extracting plutonium, americium and uranium from water and air filter samples from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Quality Assessment Program (QAP), and the effectiveness of subsequent desorption of one chemical species at a time in order to prepare each of them for a spectrometry. Crossover of plutonium into the americium fraction with the TRU Resin was observed and could not be eliminated while using TRU Resin only. However, prior extraction of plutonium using an anion exchange resin can overcome this problem. A method for the determination of americium is proposed which combines the extraction of plutonium onto Bio-Rad AG 1-X8 anion exchange resin with the extraction of americium using the TRU Resin. This method was tested on three triplicate sets of QAP air filters and two triplicate sets of QAP water samples. The recoveries ranged from 70 to 90 percent, and the results were identical to those obtained by the existing methods. The time required to perform the analysis for americium was shortened from 5 weeks to 1 week.

Berne, A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Mixed crystal organic scintillators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Semitransparent organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The organic solar cell technology has attracted great interests due to ... low cost solution process capability. Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells offer a potentially much cheaper alternative way to harness...

Furong Zhu

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Organic photosensitive devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

437

Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization Organization Organization Office of Indian Energy Organizational Structure As a program office at DOE responsible for implementing energy programs, the Office of Indian Energy is structurally organized under the Office of the Under Secretary. This programmatic structure also focuses and facilitates the coordination between the Office of Indian Energy and the other companion program offices such as the Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Office of Indian Energy is organized around its major statutory functions, namely, policy and programs: Indian Energy Policy. The Office of Indian Energy coordinates participation in the development, refinement, training, and advice

438

Organic carbon and nitrogen in the surface sediments of world oceans and seas: distribution and relationship to bottom topography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information dealing with the distribution of organic carbon and nitrogen in the top sediments of world oceans and seas has been gathered and evaluated. Based on the available information a master chart has been constructed which shows world distribution of sedimentary organic matter in the oceans and seas. Since organic matter exerts an influence upon the settling properties of fine inorganic particles, e.g. clay minerals and further, the interaction between organic matter and clay minerals is maximal, a relationship between the overall bottom topography and the distribution of clay minerals and organic matter should be observable on a worldwide basis. Initial analysis of the available data indicates that such a relationship does exist and its significance is discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Humic and fluvic acids and organic colloidal materials in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment, occurring in all soils, waters, and sediments of the ecosphere. Humic substances arise from the decomposition of plant and animal tissues yet are more stable than their precursors. Their size, molecular weight, elemental composition, structure, and the number and position of functional groups vary, depending on the origin and age of the material. Humic and fulvic substances have been studied extensively for more than 200 years; however, much remains unknown regarding their structure and properties. Humic substances are those organic compounds found in the environment that cannot be classified as any other chemical class of compounds. They are traditionally defined according to their solubilities. Fulvic acids are those organic materials that are soluble in water at all pH values. Humic acids are those materials that are insoluble at acidic pH values (pH < 2) but are soluble at higher pH values. Humin is the fraction of natural organic materials that is insoluble in water at all pH values. These definitions reflect the traditional methods for separating the different fractions from the original mixture. The humic content of soils varies from 0 to almost 10%. In surface waters, the humic content, expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varies from 0.1 to 50 ppm in dark-water swamps. In ocean waters, the DOC varies from 0.5 to 1.2 ppm at the surface, and the DOC in samples from deep groundwaters varies from 0.1 to 10 ppm. In addition, about 10% of the DOC in surface waters is found in suspended matter, either as organic or organically coated inorganic particulates. Humic materials function as surfactants, with the ability to bind both hydrophobic and hydrophyllic materials, making numic and fluvic materials effective agents in transporting both organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Clark, S.B. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Characterization and Cadmium Ion-Removing Property of Adsorbents Synthesized from Inorganic Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorbents for removing cadmium ions from water were synthesized from inorganic wastes such as oyster shells, drinking–water-treatment sludge (DWTS), and waste glass. The oyster shells and DWTS were pretreated by heating for 2 h at 1173 K before hydrothermal synthesis was started. The Al/(Al+Si) ratio was adjusted, and then, the mixture of pretreated materials was hydrothermally treated in a sodium hydroxide solution for 72 h at 423 K to synthesize the adsorbents. The synthesized adsorbent specimens were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) measurements, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The main components of these specimens were aluminum-substituted tobermorite and sodalite. The formation of sodalite was dependent on the mass ratio of DWTS to glass. The maximum amount of cadmium ions were removed when the mass ratio of the pretreated material was 1:1:1. In the cadmium removal test, the adsorbent with this mass ratio removed almost 100% of the cadmium in a solution with a concentration of 10 mg L-1. Even in the presence of a 1000-fold excess of potassium ions or 10000-fold excess of sodium ions, approximately 80% of the cadmium ions were removed.

Kou Ooishi; Kana Ogino; Hiroshi Nishioka; Yasuji Muramatsu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Catalyzed CO.sub.2-transport membrane on high surface area inorganic support  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are membranes and methods for making the same, which membranes provide improved permeability, stability, and cost-effective manufacturability, for separating CO.sub.2 from gas streams such as flue gas streams. High CO.sub.2 permeation flux is achieved by immobilizing an ultra-thin, optionally catalyzed fluid layer onto a meso-porous modification layer on a thin, porous inorganic substrate such as a porous metallic substrate. The CO.sub.2-selective liquid fluid blocks non-selective pores, and allows for selective absorption of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures such as flue gas mixtures and subsequent transport to the permeation side of the membrane. Carbon dioxide permeance levels are in the order of 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 mol/(m.sup.2sPa) or better. Methods for making such membranes allow commercial scale membrane manufacturing at highly cost-effective rates when compared to conventional commercial-scale CO.sub.2 separation processes and equipment for the same and such membranes are operable on an industrial use scale.

Liu, Wei

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is preferably dried and stored until it is used (along with an alkali, an aldehyde and an adhesive filler) in compounding an adhesive of the type generally used in the manufacture of plywood.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Ft. Collins, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

APS Users Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

APSUO APSUO By-Laws Steering Commitee Employment Meetings Compton Award Franklin Award APS Users Organization The APSUO is responsible for advising the APS Associate Laboratory Director in the following areas: The Organization will serve as an advocacy group for the Facility and its user community. The Organization will provide advice to the ALD on matters affecting the user community. The Organization will assure good communication between the APS user community and the APS management. APSUO By-Laws The by-laws upon which the APS User Organization is based. List of Steering Committee Members Steering committee for the APS Users Organization. Employment Bulletin Board APS-related employment opportunities. APSUO Steering Committee Meetings Minutes and presentations from the APSUO meetings.

444

Strength Degradation of Mechanical Properties of Unidirectional E- Glass Fiber Epoxy Resin Nanoclay Composites under Hygrothermal Loading Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) plays a vital role in many industries because of its high strength to weight ratio. Its strength properties are somewhat lower than carbon fibre and it is less stiff and brittle. Using glass fibre in industries because of its raw material is much less expensive with compare to other materials. In the present work, the epoxy resin was modified using natural montmorillonite Closite 30B (1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt%) nanoclay is used with E-glass unidirectional fiber to manufacture fiber reinforced nanocomposite using hand layup method. Three different types of fiber reinforced nanocomposites are fabricated using 1wt% nanoclay, 3wt% nanoclay and 5wt% nanoclay with 30% wt fiber, epoxy resin and hardener. The epoxy resin and hardener are mixed in 10:4 weight ratios. Three different test, tensile test, hardness test and flexural test were measured through using mechanical test instruments. The mechanical test shows that the tensile and flexural strength for 3wt% nanoclay composite is more compared to 1wt% and 5wt% nanoclay composite. To improve the flexural and tensile properties are 57% and 8% respectively by adding 3wt% of nanoclay. Micro hardness test for 3wt% of nanoclay composite is higher compare to 1wt% and 5wt% nanoclay composite and further increase beyond 3wt% nanoclay hardness start decreasing .Further check durability the specimen were immersed in water and NaOH baths under accelerated hygrothermal loading for 30 days. Due to accelerated hygrothermal loading it is observed that the mechanical properties degradation in NaOH environment was more severe as compared to simple water.

S.K. Singh; S. Singh; S. Sharma; V. Sharma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat [Faculty of Science, University of Malaya (UM), 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd [Faculty of Science and Technology, National University Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

446

Depleted uranium hexafluoride – technogenic raw material for obtaining high-purity inorganic fluorides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of handling depleted uranium hexafluoride is discussed. An effective and ecologically safe variant of complex recycling of depleted uranium hexafluoride with uranium oxides, organic compounds, and hig...

E. P. Magomedbekov; S. V. Chizhevskaya; O. M. Klimenko; A. V. Davydov…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Solvent Effects on Fructose Dehydration to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Biphasic Systems Saturated with Inorganic Salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Furan derivatives, such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), obtained from acid-catalyzed dehydration...R, equal to the concentration of HMF in the organic phase normalized by the concentration in the aqueous phase....

Yuriy Román-Leshkov; James A. Dumesic

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Nutrient acquisition in dinoflagellates: the role of phosphorus and trace metals on community composition in coastal California and the northern Gulf of Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Inorganic and Organic Phosphorous Compounds as Nutrientsof Inorganic and Organic Phosphorous Compounds as Nutrientsof Inorganic and Organic Phosphorous Compounds as Nutrients

Peacock, Melissa Blakely

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cascade Organic Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cascade Organic Solar Cells ... Multiple factors control the efficiency of organic solar cells, making it difficult to use single donor or acceptor materials to balance the, often opposing, material properties required to optimize device performance. ... We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C60/bathocuproine/Al. ...

Cody W. Schlenker; Vincent S. Barlier; Stephanie W. Chin; Matthew T. Whited; R. Eric McAnally; Stephen R. Forrest; Mark E. Thompson

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

450

Water extraction kinetics of metals, arsenic and dissolved organic carbon from industrial contaminated poplar leaves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In industrial areas, tree leaves contaminated by metals and metalloids could constitute a secondary source of pollutants. In the present study, water extraction kinetics of inorganic elements (IE: Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Fe and Mn), dissolved organic carbon, pH and biological activity were studied for industrial contaminated poplar leaves. Moreover, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the associated top soil was measured. High quantities of Mn, Zn and As and polysaccharides were released in the solution from the strongly contaminated leaves. The kinetic of release varied with time and metal type. The solution pH decreased while dissolved organic contents increased with time after 30 days. Therefore, these contaminated leaves could constitute a source of more available organic metals and metalloids than the initial inorganic process particles. However, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the top soil suggested that a great part of the released IE was adsorbed, reducing in consequence their transfers and bioavailability. It's concluded that mobility/bioavailability and speciation of metals and metalloids released from the decomposition of polluted tree leaves depends on soil characteristics, pollutant type and litter composition, with consequences for environmental risk assessment.

Muhammad Shahid; Tiantian Xiong; Maryse Castrec-Rouelle; Tibo Leveque; Camille Dumat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Modern Organic Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to organic chemistry, tautomerism, glutaconic acids, the constitution of urea, the menthone chemistry, carene, hydroxymethylenecamphor, squalene, insulin, the production of acetic acid from cellulose by anaerobic fermentation ...

J. R.

1928-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

452

EMSL - soil organic matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soil-organic-matter en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

453

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series 71. Nitromethane with Water or Organic Solvents: Binary Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mutual solubilities and liquid–liquid equilibrium of nitromethane binary systems with liquidsolvents are reviewed. The solvents include water inorganic compounds and a variety of organic compounds as hydrocarbons halogenated hydrocarbons alcohols acids esters and nitrogen compounds. A total 474 systems published through 1993 are compiled. For 39 systems sufficient data were available to allow critical evaluation. All data are expressed as mass and mole fractions as well as the originally reported units. Similar reviews of gas liquid and solid solubilities for other systems were published in the frame of Solubility Data Series.

Valerii P. Sazonov; Kenneth N. Marsh; Glenn T. Hefter

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL's emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

Williams, C.H. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)); Eberhart, C.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL`s emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

Williams, C.H. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Eberhart, C.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Organic vapor jet printing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

Automation of organic elemental analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automation of organic elemental analysis ... Describes the development and design of an apparatus for automated organic elemental analysis. ...

Velmer B. Fish

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Method development for the simultaneous determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reports the method development for the simultaneous determination of methylmercury (MeHg+) and inorganic mercury (iHg) species in seafood samples. The study focused on the extraction and quantification of MeHg+ (the most toxic species) by liquid chromatography coupled to on-line UV irradiation and cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (LC-UV-CV-AFS), using \\{HCl\\} 4 mol L?1 as the extractant agent. Accuracy of the method has been verified by analysing three certified reference materials and different spiked samples. The values found for total Hg and MeHg+ for the \\{CRMs\\} did not differ significantly from certified values at a 95% confidence level, and recoveries between 85% and 97% for MeHg+, based on spikes, were achieved. The detection limits (LODs) obtained were 0.001 mg Hg kg?1 for total mercury, 0.0003 mg Hg kg?1 for MeHg+ and 0.0004 mg Hg kg?1 for iHg. The quantification limits (LOQs) established were 0.003 mg Hg kg?1 for total mercury, 0.0010 mg Hg kg?1 for MeHg+ and 0.0012 mg Hg kg?1 for iHg. Precision for each mercury species was established, being ? 12% in terms of RSD in all cases. Finally, the developed method was applied to 24 seafood samples from different origins and total mercury contents. The concentrations for Total Hg, MeHg+ and iHg ranged from 0.07 to 2.33, 0.003–2.23 and 0.006–0.085 mg Hg kg?1, respectively. The established analytical method allows to obtain results for mercury speciation in less than 1 one hour including both, sample pretreatment and measuring step.

Ariane V. Zmozinski; Sergio Carneado; Carmen Ibáńez-Palomino; Ŕngels Sahuquillo; José Fermín López-Sánchez; Márcia M. da Silva

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry—A fast and reliable screening procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic in fish and seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GF AAS) was investigated initially with the intention of developing a method for the determination of total As in fish and other seafood. A mixture of 0.1% Pd+0.06% Mg+0.06% Triton X-100 was used as the chemical modifier, added in solution over the solid samples, making possible the use of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. The sample mass had to be limited to 0.25 mg, as the integrated absorbance did not increase further with increasing sample mass. Nevertheless, the recovery of As from several certified reference materials was of the order of 50% lower than the certified value. Strong molecular absorption due to the phosphorus monoxide molecule (PO) was observed with high-resolution continuum source AAS (HR CS AAS), which, however, did not cause any spectral interference. A microwave-assisted digestion with HNO3/H2O2 was also investigated to solve the problem; however, the results obtained for several certified reference materials were statistically not different from those found with direct SS-GF AAS. Accurate values were obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to analyze the digested samples, which suggested that organic As compounds are responsible for the low recoveries. HPLC–ICP-MS was used to determine the arsenobetaine (AB) concentration. Accurate results that were not different from the certified values were obtained when the AB concentration was added to the As concentration found by SS-GF AAS for most certified reference materials (CRM) and samples, suggesting that SS-GF AAS could be used as a fast screening procedure for inorganic As determination in fish and seafood.

Ariane V. Zmozinski; Toni Llorente-Mirandes; Isabel C.F. Damin; José F. López-Sánchez; Maria Goreti R. Vale; Bernhard Welz; Márcia M. Silva

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Use of a unique mode switch test for the measurement of nonlinear viscoelastic shear properties of HDPE programmed-parison blow molding resins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USK OF A UNIQUE MODE SWITCH TEST FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF NONLINEAR VISCOKLASTIC SHEAR PROPERTIES OF HDPE PROGRAMMED-PARISON BLOW MOLDING RESINS A Thesis by KAREN ANNE OWENS STANFILL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...~W-PARISON BLOW MOLDING RESINS A Thesis by KAREN ANNE OWENS STANFILL Approved as to style and content by: A. Ieffrey Giacomin (Chair of Committee) g tJ Alan Wolfe den (Member) Ronald Darby (Member) +z Walter L. Bradley (Head of Department) May 1992...

Stanfill, Karen Anne Owens

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Selective Conversion of D-Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Ion-Exchange Resin in Acetone/Dimethyl sulfoxide Solvent Mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selective Conversion of D-Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Ion-Exchange Resin in Acetone/Dimethyl sulfoxide Solvent Mixtures ... Catalytic dehydration of D-fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in acetone/dimethyl sulfoxide solvent mixtures was studied in the presence of a strong acidic cation-exchange resin catalyst (DOWEX 50WX8?100) by microwave heating. ... For example, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), which is used in plastics, pharmaceuticals, and fine chemicals, is presently derived from petrochemicals but could be substituted by its biomass-derived counterpart. ...

Xinhua Qi; Masaru Watanabe; Taku M. Aida; Richard Lee Smith, Jr.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Selling body organs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selling body organs Selling body organs Name: Betty A Laliberte Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If a tissue donor dies and some of his/her tissue is donated, should the family be given money or some other benefit? I am a freshman at York HS and am doing a bioethics project. Replies: An interesting question. In my opinion, a family should not receive payment for organ donation. That would introduce an economic element into the decision, which does not seem appropriate. One problem is: Who will pay? The recipient? What if he can't afford it? Who gets the organ? The highest bidder? I guess part of my problem with selling organs and tissues is religious in nature. To me, my life and my body were given freely to me and they are not mine to sell to someone else. They certainly do not belong to my family to profit from.

463

Assessing the recycling potential of industrial wastewater to replace fresh water in concrete mixes: application of polyvinyl acetate resin wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents the use of industrial wastewater released from polyvinyl acetate resin manufacturing plant to totally replace the fresh water in concrete composites. Seventy-two laboratory prepared concrete composites were tested to investigate the effect of using various PVAW/C ratios of 0.30, 0.35, 0.40, and 0.45 on the slump, compressive strength, flexural strength, and dry density of the concrete mixes. Results indicated a slight to moderate increase in compressive strength and hard density values compared to those of the control concrete made with fresh water at 7 and 28 day curing. On the contrary, a reduction in the slump values of the PVAW–concrete was observed compared to the slump of the control mixes. However, the slump values increased with increasing the PVAW/C ratios. On the other hand, the waste material leaching test revealed that none of the PVAW toxic constituents was detected. The findings of this work would form basic information for recycling PVAW in concrete mixes and indicate a potential alternative for diminution the adverse effects on the environment posed by the hazardous effluent of the polyvinyl acetate resin industry.

Zainab Z. Ismail; Enas A. Al-Hashmi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Characterization of paint and varnish on a medieval Coptic-Byzantine icon: Novel usage of dammar resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive study has been undertaken into a 13th century Coptic-Byzantine icon from the St. Mercurius Church, St. Mercurius monastery, Old Cairo, Egypt. The layered structure, pigment composition and varnish identification were revealed by means of optical and Raman microscopy and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The structure of the icon comprised six layers; wooden panel, canvas, white ground, two bole layers and a single paint layer. Azurite (2CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), cinnabar (mercuric (II) sulfide ?-HgS), yellow ochre (Fe2O3·H2O), hydromagnesite Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O and lamp black (carbon, C) are the pigments identified in the icon. The green paint area is of interest as it is applied neither with a green pigment nor with a mixture of a blue and yellow pigment. Instead, a yellow layer of dammar resin was applied on top of blue azurite to obtain the green colour. Pinaceae sp. resin mixed with drying oil was used as a protective varnish.

M. Abdel-Ghani; H.G.M. Edwards; B. Stern; R. Janaway

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig 644 Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed facility is being designed for the immobilization of Hanford high-level radioactive waste. One unit process in the facility is designed to remove radioactive cesium by ion-exchange from the strongly alkaline aqueous phase. A resin specifically designed with high selectivity of cesium under alkaline conditions is being investigated. The resin also is elutable under more acidic conditions. The proposed design of the facility consists of two sets of two packed columns placed in series (i.e., a lead column followed by a lag (guard) column configuration). During operation, upon reaching a specified cesium concentration criterion at the exit of the lag column, operation is switched to the second set of lead and lag columns. The cesium-loaded lead column is processed (i.e., washed and eluted) and switched to the lag position. the previous lag column is then placed in the lead position (without eluting) and the system is ready for use in the next cycle. For a well designed process, the loading and elution processes result in significant volume reductions in aqueous high-level waste.

Hamm, L.L.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

466

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

467

Inorganic-modified semiconductor TiO2 nanotube arrays for photocatalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or photoelectrochemical degradation of organic pollutants, the splitting of water into H2, and solar cells holds promise for meeting the global challenge of supplying clean energy. In this context, semiconductor TiO2 stands out and depletion of fossil fuel resources have emerged as two major obstacles for the sustainable development

Lin, Zhiqun

468

Production of Hydrogen Gas from Light and the Inorganic Electron Donor Thiosulfate by Rhodopseudomonas palustris  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...control rates of H2 production. The possibility...compounds for H2 production by PNSBs beyond...with hydrogen fuel cells because it has a...potential for H2 production because they can...water along with solar energy to drive...studies with PNSBs, organic compounds are typically...

Jean J. Huang; Erin K. Heiniger; James B. McKinlay; Caroline S. Harwood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organization Organization Organization View Office of Management Organization Chart in PDF format. Office of Resource Management and Planning The Office of Resource Management and Planning provides the leadership and centralized management and direction of the Office of Management (MA) planning, budgeting, financial, human resources, and program execution processes; ensures that these processes are effective, and fully integrated and consistent with the Department-wide processes and requirements. Office of Aviation Management The Department of Energy, Aviation Program is the management function for all fleet aircraft and contracted aviation services for the Department. The program and its management personnel operate world-wide. To take advantage of the best communications and information services available, we have

470

Organic solar cell optimizations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents recent experimental and theoretical approaches for optimizing organic solar cell efficiencies in both space and energy/time...D/A...) blend film, a corresponding –DBAB- block copolymer film ex...

S. Sun; Z. Fan; Y. Wang; J. Haliburton

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Us » Organization Us » Organization Organization The organizational structure of the Office of Policy and International Affairs is as follows: *Office of Resource Management (PI-10) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Eurasia, Africa and the Middle East (PI-20) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia, Europe, and the Americas (PI-30) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy Analysis (PI-40) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change Policy and Technology (PI-50) The organizational chart can be found here. A brief synopsis of each sub-organization follows. Office of Resource Management (PI-10) The mission of the Office of Resource Management is to support the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI) by: (1) minimizing the

472

Geothermal Drilling Organization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5d. Economic and Physical Indicators for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5d Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5d. Economic and Physical Indicators for Basic Chemicals (NAICS 325), 1998, 2002, and 2006 Indicators MECS Survey Years 1998 2002 2006 Production1 (Million Short Tons) Inorganic Chemicals 179 163 170 Bulk Petrochemical 69 73 80 Organic Intermediate 73 73 64 Plastic Resins 40 48 50 Synthetic Rubber 2 2 NA Synthetic Fibers 5 5 4 Value of Shipments (Current Billion Dollars) Inorganic Chemicals 25 25 34 Bulk Petrochemicals & Intermediates 39 45 90 Plastic Resins 45 47 78 Synthetic Rubber 5 5 7 Synthetic Fibers 13 8 9 Value of Shipments2 (Billion 2000 Dollars) Inorganic Chemicals 27 25 26

474

Degradation of plastics from the ResinKit as a model for the selection of polymers for artworks. Assessment by nonisothermal thermogravimetric analysis and chemiluminometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Non-isothermal chemiluminescence and thermogravimetric analysis in oxygen and nitrogen, of 50 polymers from the ResinKit™ were performed in order to obtain a more detailed view of their possible applicability in museum artifacts. The tests provide a snapshot of the current state of the material and explore the oxidisability and degradability of the plastics.

Jozef Rychlý; Lyda Matisová-Rychlá; Katarína Csomorová

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Reprint of Degradation of plastics from the ResinKit as a model for the selection of polymers for artworks. Assessment by nonisothermal thermogravimetric analysis and chemiluminometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Non-isothermal chemiluminescence and thermogravimetric analysis in oxygen and nitrogen, of 50 polymers from the ResinKit™ were performed in order to obtain a more detailed view of their possible applicability in museum artifacts. The tests provide a snapshot of the current state of the material and explore the oxidisability and degradability of the plastics.

Jozef Rychlý; Lyda Matisová-Rychlá; Katarína Csomorová

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Effects of polymerization and briquetting parameters on the tensile strength of briquettes formed from coal coke and aniline-formaldehyde resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the utilization of aniline (C{sub 6}H{sub 7}N) formaldehyde (HCHO) resins as a binding agent of coke briquetting was investigated. Aniline (AN) formaldehyde (F) resins are a family of thermoplastics synthesized by condensing AN and F in an acid solution exhibiting high dielectric strength. The tensile strength sharply increases as the ratio of F to AN from 0.5 to 1.6, and it reaches the highest values between 1.6 and 2.2 F/AN ratio; it then slightly decreases. The highest tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette (23.66 MN/m{sup 2}) was obtained from the run with 1.5 of F/AN ratio by using (NH4){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} catalyst at 310 K briquetting temperature. The tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette slightly decreased with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.10%, and then it sharply decreased to zero with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.2%. The effect of pH on the tensile strength is irregular. As the pH of the mixture increases from 9.0 to 9.2, the tensile strength shows a sharp increase, and the curve reaches a plateau value between pH 9.3 and 9.9; then the tensile strength shows a slight increase after pH = 9.9.

Demirbas, A.; Simsek, T. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Online YPA4 Resin Microcolumn Separation/Preconcentration Coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) for the Speciation Analysis of Mercury in Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Online YPA4 Resin Microcolumn Separation/Preconcentration Coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) for the Speciation Analysis of Mercury in Seafood ... The developed method was applied to the determination of mercury species in real seafoods with satisfactory results. ...

Chaomei Xiong; Bin Hu

2007-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

478

Studies on rejuvenation of spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts by leaching of foulant metals: influence of inorganic salt additives on the leaching efficiency of organic acids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparative study has been made on the efficiency of oxalic, malonic and acetic acids for selective removal of metal foulants (e.g. vanadium) from spent residue hydrotreating catalysts in the presence and ab...

M. Marafi; A. Stanislaus; C. J. Mumford

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Further studies on the properties of organic and inorganic growth promoting substances in distillers dried solubles for the chick and poult  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efiaited the sama growth response as did the d1stillcrs dried sol'ubles contx ol, Combs et. ~, (1950) obtained four unidentified, , substances which promoted x. apid gxowth in chicks ~ These fractiCQ were separated from ref1ned liver paste dialysate.... 6, HC s tract oi dls 11 s ubas a x Dis? tillars dried solublaa ash was prepared by ignition over an open flame followed by aching in a muffle furnace at 600 C ~ un til a constant weight vas obtained, The distillsrs dx iad sol ublas ash...

Svacha, Richard Lincoln

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The role of a LiF layer on the performance of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/Si organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report an ultra-thin layer of lithium fluoride (LiF) between silicon (Si) and aluminum (Al) in a Si/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hybrid solar cell which resulted in a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 11.09%. The insertion of a thin layer of LiF improved the contact between Si and Al, which decreased the contact resistance from 5.4?×?10{sup ?1} ? cm{sup 2} to 2.6?×?10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}. Also, the electron transport from Si to Al was improved and charge carrier recombination was suppressed. As a result, the short circuit current density, the open circuit voltage, and the fill factor were all improved with the presence of the LiF layer. The solar cell with the LiF/Al bilayer as a cathode displayed a 14.45% enhancement on PCE when compared with the device using pristine Al as a cathode.

Zhang, Yunfang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren'ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Department of Mathematics and Physics, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Liu, Ruiyuan; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Sun, Baoquan, E-mail: bqsun@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren'ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic inorganic resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Long-Range Balanced Electron- and Hole-Transport Lengths in Organic-Inorganic CH3NH3PbI3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...e = 130 nm and L D h = 110 nm , where L D = D {tau} TA . As expected, the L D h (majority carrier diffusion...Kim Y. Choulis S. A. Nelson J. Bradley D. D. C. Cook S. Durrant J. R. , Composition...Kirkpatrick J. Nelson J. Durrant J. R. Bradley D. D. C. Giles M. Heeney M. Hamilton R. McCulloch...

Guichuan Xing; Nripan Mathews; Shuangyong Sun; Swee Sien Lim; Yeng Ming Lam; Michael Grätzel; Subodh Mhaisalkar; Tze Chien Sum

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

482

Development of Pillared M(IV) Phosphate Phosphonate Inorganic Organic Hybrid Ion Exchange Materials for Applications in Separations found in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on key intergroup and intragroup separations found in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, specifically americium from lanthanides and americium from other actinides, most importantly americium from curium. Our goal...

Burns, Jonathan

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

483

New Inorganic/Organic Coordination Polymers Generated from Bidentate Schiff-Base Yu-Bin Dong, Mark D. Smith, and Hans-Conrad zur Loye*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Bin Dong, Mark D. Smith, and Hans-Conrad zur Loye* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University

zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

484

Use of Inorganic and Organic Nitrogen by Synechococcus spp. and Diatoms on the West Florida Shelf as Measured Using Stable Isotope Probing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of N nutrition in marine phytoplankton communities...photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) () and salinity...support, C. Heil for ship access, M. Garrett...phycoerythrin in a marine cyanobacterium...isotope probing. | The marine nitrogen (N) cycle...technique that allows detection of uptake of individual...

Boris Wawrik; Amy V. Callaghan; Deborah A. Bronk

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

485

Temperature-Stable and Optically Transparent Thin-Film Zinc Oxide Aerogel Electrodes As Model Systems for 3D Interpenetrating Organic–Inorganic Heterojunction Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(49) Since the formation of the ZnO aerogel in liquid dispersion involves a mechanism with temporally distinctive sol and gelation steps,(39) there is a narrow time window to yield homogeneous coating of the substrate with a thin aerogel film via dip-coating. ... Figure 2. Different materials coated with 200 nm thin ZnO aerogel-film. ... The material presented here is thus unique and superior to other reported ZnO electrode coatings. ...

Michael Krumm; Fabian Pawlitzek; Jonas Weickert; Lukas Schmidt-Mende; Sebastian Polarz

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

486

Effects of reduced dimensionality on the electronic structure and defect chemistry of semiconducting hybrid organic–inorganic PbS solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...spectroscopic methods, such as...acidic or basic functional...these design principles is currently...Using first-principles electronic...engineered for photovoltaic and optoelectronic...and Se) photovoltaic absorbers:first-principles insightsAppl...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

PRELIMINARY REPORT ON EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. Studies are ongoing to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. The next phase of testing for this work will focus on the following down selected eluants: Ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide. The next testing phase is a confirmation of the elution ability of the selected eluants. It will mimic a typical sRF cesium ion exchange process i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. Due to corrosion concerns, calcium acetate and magnesium acetate will be tested instead of calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively. Nitric acid is for benchmarking since it is the baseline sRF eluant. The information at hand indicates ammonium hydroxide, while a weak base, may hold promise as an effective eluant. Hence, its inclusion among the eluants to be studied despite the fact that it was not tested as a stand-alone eluant earlier.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Organic modification of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed ... and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects: organic covalent modificat...

Luqi Liu; Zhixin Guo; Liming Dai; Daoben Zhu

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Carbon Sequestration in Organic Farming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic farming has been developed as a new mode of farming vs. conventional farming. Evidence showed that organic farming management can well maintain the soil carbon up to 2–3 times higher in organic matter ...

Raymond Liu; Jianming M. Xu; C. Edward Clapp

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Use of resin-bearing wastes from coke and coal chemicals production at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coke and coal chemicals plant at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine is making trial use of a technology that recycles waste products in 'tar ponds.' Specialists from the Ekomash company have installed a recycling unit in one area of the plant's dump, the unit including an inclined conveyor with a steam heater and a receiving hopper The coal preparation shop receives the wastes in a heated bin, where a screw mixes the wastes with pail of the charge for the coking ovens. The mixture subsequently travels along a moving conveyor belt together with the rest of the charge materials. The addition of up to 2% resin-bearing waste materials to the coal charge has not had any significant effect on the strength properties of the coke.

Kul'kova, T.N.; Yablochkin, N.V.; Gal'chenko, A.I.; Karyakina, E.A.; Litvinova, V.A.; Gorbach, D.A.

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z