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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Power from the Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power for Buildings Using Fuel-Cell Cars,” Proceedings ofwell as to drive down fuel-cell system costs through productis most likely to be the fuel-cell vehicle. Fuel cells are

Lipman, Timothy E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Fuel Cell Portable Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Power Department of Energy Workshop January 17, 2002 2 Portable Markets - Table of Contents 1. Opportunity Summary for Portable Markets 2. Commercialization Path and Resource Map 3. Value Chain Issues 4. Ballard "State of the Art" 5. Fuel Options and Issues 6. Where can the D.O.E. Help 3 Opportunity Summary - Portable Markets Infrequent Frequent Typical Applications Backup - Batteries & Gensets Peaking power and seasonal use; mobile power Preferred Fuels Hydrocarbon & Hydrogen Hydrocarbon (H2?) Total Available Market Large - But Fractured into many apps Moderate Price Target Low (Pockets willing to pay high $ for certain attributes) Moderate (Lifecycle) Environmental Impact Low Moderate Timing Short term Mid term 4 Technical Challenge Low High Micro Markets H2 Backup Power HC Frequent

4

Fuel processing for fuel cell powered vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of auto companies have announced plans to have fuel cell powered vehicles on the road by the year 2004. The low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells to be used in these vehicles require high quality hydrogen. Without a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, these vehicles need to convert the available hydrocarbon fuels into a hydrogen-rich gas on-board the vehicle. Earlier analysis has shown that fuel processors based on partial oxidation reforming are well suited to meet the size and weight targets and the other performance-related needs of on-board fuel processors for light-duty fuel cell vehicles (1).

Ahmed, S.; Wilkenhoener, R.; Lee, S. H. D.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Portable Power Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

6

Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Hydrogen Topics: Finance Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.hydrogen.energy.gov/fc_power_analysis.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Screenshot References: DOE Fuel Cell Power Analysis[1] Logo: Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model The Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model is a financial tool for analyzing high-temperature, fuel cell-based tri-generation systems. "The Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model is a financial tool for analyzing

7

Fuel Cell Power PlantsFuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Safety and Grid Interface Direct Fuel Cell Module: FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct Fuel generation of combined heat andcombined heat and power ­Clean Power with natural gas f lfuel ­Renewable Power with biofuels ·Grid connected power generationgeneration ­High Efficiency Grid support

8

Table Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power ... Form EIA?886, “Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicles”; ...

9

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system. [Conversion of methanol into hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; Springer, T.E.; Huff, J.R.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fuel Cell Power Electronics – Status & Challenges Tejinder ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fuel cell powered critical refrigeration loads, preventing ... Ref. CL&P Connecticut Outage Map for October 2011 Fuel Cells: Power Through the Storm ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Ha, Su (Champaign, IL); Adams, Brian (Savoy, IL)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Organic Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organic Power Place Ireland Sector Biomass, Hydro, Wind energy Product Irish project developer active in wind energy, combined heat and power from biomass and pumped hydro...

13

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Session - Fuel Cell Portable Power Perspectives End User Perspective - Industry Consumer Electronics Power (PDF 1.51 MB) Jerry Hallmark, Motorola Portable Power Sources (above...

14

Organic fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fuels fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Organic fuels Place Houston, Texas Zip 77056 Product Biodiesel producer and distributor Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clean clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy/ Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC March 29, 2011 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. *FuelCell Energy, Inc. *Renewable and Liquid Fuels Experience *HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack for Shipboard APU *Solid Oxide Experience and Applications DOE-ONR Workshop FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 power installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility

16

Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microtur

17

Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plants Power Plants Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels DOE-DOD Workshop Washington, DC. January 13, 2011 reliable, efficient, ultra-clean FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of stationary fuel Premier developer of stationary fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility products products * 300 KW to 50 MW and beyond FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. g Product Line Based on Stack Building Block Cell Package and Stack Four-Stack Module DFC3000 Two 4-Stack Modules 2.8 MW Single-Stack Module Single Stack Module DFC1500 One 4-Stack Module 1.4 MW DFC300

18

Fuel cell powered irrigation system  

SciTech Connect

Set out herein is a fuel cell power plant for use with irrigation systems wherein the fuel cell is utilized to generate electric current to drive a pump motor. This pump motor drives a first water pump which receives water for distribution through a traveling irrigation system, the output of the first pump first conveyed into a condenser heat exchanger connected to a steam engine or turbine cycle. The fuel cell itself is contained within a boiler assembly and the heat of production of the electric power is used to generate steam which is sent to the steam engine. In the course of cooling the condenser gases of the steam engine the irrigating water is passed through a second pump driven by the steam engine and it is through this second pump that the pressure is raised sufficiently to allow for the necessary spraying fans. To improve the condenser efficiency part of the condensate or the ullage thereof is connected to one of the spray heads on the irrigation system in a venturi nozzle which thereby lowers the back pressure thereof. The lower portion of the condenser or the liquid part thereof is fed back through yet another condenser pump to the boiler to be regenerated into steam.

Jacobi, E.F.; Madden, M.R.

1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a literature review of hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation is first given with an emphasis on system integration and evaluation. Hybrid systems are defined as those which use solar energy and fuel ...

Sheu, Elysia J. (Elysia Ja-Zeng)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation.

McElroy, James F. (Hamilton, MA); Chludzinski, Paul J. (Swampscott, MA); Dantowitz, Philip (Peabody, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation. 2 figs.

McElroy, J.F.; Chludzinski, P.J.; Dantowitz, P.

1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fuel Cells as Power Quality Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cell systems are advancing beyond conventional bulk power applications. Now, technological approaches are allowing dynamic responses that can solve short-term power quality problems, specifically voltage sags and momentary interruptions. In addition to solving short-term problems, fuel cells also can provide long-term back-up and stepped-load changes using traditional, clean, natural gas fuel. This report describes the need for and applications of advanced fuel cell systems for end-use customers.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Solar Power To Help Convert Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel : Renewable Energy News  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Power To Help Convert Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel : Renewable Energy News TUESDAY 25 MAY, 2010 | | Solar Power To Help Convert Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel by Energy Matters Microbiologist Derek Lovley dioxide into transportation fuels, with the help of special micro-organisms and solar power. The team

Lovley, Derek

24

Increasing Power Plant Efficiency: Lignite Fuel Enhancement ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing Power Plant Efficiency: Lignite Fuel Enhancement (Completed March 31, 2010) Project Description The objectives of this project are to demonstrate a unique system for...

25

Fuel Cell Backup Power Technology Validation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about fuel cell backup power technology validation activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

30

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells for Critical Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power Greg Moreland SENTECH, Inc. Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy August 6, 2008 APCO Annual Conference and Expo 2 2 Fuel cells use hydrogen to create electricity, with only water and heat as byproducts Fuel Cell Overview * An individual fuel cell produces about 1 volt * Hundreds of individual cells can comprise a fuel cell stack * Fuel cells can be used to power a variety of applications -Bibliographic Database * Laptop computers (50-100 W) * Distributed energy stationary systems (5-250 kW) * Passenger vehicles (80-150 kW) * Central power generators (1-200 MW) 3 3 Stationary/ Backup Power Transportation Specialty Markets Nuclear Natural Gas (for transition period only) Coal (with carbon sequestration) Renewable

33

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

34

Fuel cell electric power production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating electricity from a fuel cell includes generating a hydrogen-rich gas as the fuel for the fuel cell by treating a hydrocarbon feed, which may be a normally liquid feed, in an autothermal reformer utilizing a first monolithic catalyst zone having palladium and platinum catalytic components therein and a second, platinum group metal steam reforming catalyst. Air is used as the oxidant in the hydrocarbon reforming zone and a low oxygen to carbon ratio is maintained to control the amount of dilution of the hydrogen-rich gas with nitrogen of the air without sustaining an insupportable amount of carbon deposition on the catalyst. Anode vent gas may be utilized as the fuel to preheat the inlet stream to the reformer. The fuel cell and the reformer are preferably operated at elevated pressures, up to about a pressure of 150 psia for the fuel cell.

Hwang, Herng-Shinn (Livingston, NJ); Heck, Ronald M. (Frenchtown, NJ); Yarrington, Robert M. (Westfield, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing worldwide demand for premium power, emerging trend towards electric utility deregulation and distributed power generation, global environmental concerns and regulatory controls have accelerated the development of advanced fuel cell based power generation systems. Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy through electrochemical oxidation of gaseous and/or liquid fuels ranging from hydrogen to hydrocarbons. Electrochemical oxidation of fuels prevents the formation of Nox, while the higher efficiency of the systems reduces carbon dioxide emissions (kg/kWh). Among various fuel cell power generation systems currently being developed for stationary and mobile applications, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer higher efficiency (up to 80% overall efficiency in hybrid configurations), fuel flexibility, tolerance to CO poisoning, modularity, and use of non-noble construction materials of low strategic value. Tubular, planar, and monolithic cell and stack configurations are currently being developed for stationary and military applications. The current generation of fuel cells uses doped zirconia electrolyte, nickel cermet anode, doped Perovskite cathode electrodes and predominantly ceramic interconnection materials. Fuel cells and cell stacks operate in a temperature range of 800-1000 *C. Low cost ($400/kWe), modular (3-10kWe) SOFC technology development approach of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative of the USDOE will be presented and discussed. SOFC technology will be reviewed and future technology development needs will be addressed.

Singh, Prabhakar; Pederson, Larry R.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

Solar powered unitized regenerative fuel cell system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar hydrogen system is a unique power system that can meet the power requirement for the energy future demand, in such a system the hydrogen used to be the energy carrier which can produced through electrolysis by using the power from the PV during ... Keywords: electrolyzer, fuel cell, hydrogen, photovoltaic, regenerative, solar hydrogen system

Salwan S. Dihrab; , Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Nowshad Amin; M. M. Alghoul; Azami Zaharim

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development Electricity Policy Coordination and...

38

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program <...

39

AlumiFuel Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name AlumiFuel Power Inc. Place Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Philadelphia-based hydrogen gas generator. References AlumiFuel Power Inc.1...

40

Fuel Cells for Portable Power Workshop Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells for Portable Power Fuel Cells for Portable Power JoAnn Milliken Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-2480 JoAnn.Milliken@ee.doe.gov January 15-17, 2002 Phoenix, AZ Presentation Outline * Why are we here? * DOE Transportation Fuel Cell Program * Workshop Objectives * Guidelines for Workshop Product * What have past DOE workshops achieved? Why are we here? Goal 300 10,000 Cost in $/kW 50kW system Today's low volume cost (1 unit) 2002 2010 Gasoline System Cost 50 Today's high volume cost (500,000 units) 1990 3,000 Government: Cost - the primary barrier to commercialization of PEMFCs for automobiles Industry: Business plans include fuel cells or fuel cell powered products

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fuel-cell-powered golf cart  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The implementation of a battery/fuel-cell-powered golf cart test bed designed to verify computer simulations and to gain operational experience with a fuel cell in a vehicular environment is described. A technically untrained driver can easily operate the golf cart because the motor and fuel cell controllers automatically sense and execute the appropriate on/off sequencing. A voltage imbalance circuit and a throttle compress circuit were developed that are directly applicable to electric vehicles in general.

Bobbett, R.E.; McCormick, J.B.; Lynn, D.K.; Kerwin, W.J.; Derouin, C.R.; Salazar, P.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fuel and Power Price Volatilities and Convergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As more energy is traded in competitive markets, the financial performance of generation companies will be increasingly determined by how well they understand and exploit the price behavior of those markets. How volatile are fuel and power prices? How do they correlate with one another? This report addresses these questions in several wholesale electricity and fuel markets and discusses implications of changing patterns of price behavior to fuel and asset management.

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

Assessment of Fuel Gas Cleanup Systems for Waste Gas Fueled Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many industrial operations that have waste gas streams that are combustible. Chief among these is biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of organic wastes to produce a methane-rich biogas in landfills and anaerobic digesters. These gas streams are increasingly being used to fuel local power generators. The biogas streams, however, contain traces of a wide variety of contaminants. Removal of these contaminants may be required to either meet the manufacturer's requirements for fuel gas quality to...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

45

Power Ecalene Fuels Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecalene Fuels Inc Ecalene Fuels Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Power Ecalene Fuels Inc Name Power Ecalene Fuels Inc Address 18300 W Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Biofuels Product Mixed alcohol transportation fuel Website http://www.powerecalene.com/ Coordinates 39.862942°, -105.206509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.862942,"lon":-105.206509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Solid oxide fuel cell distributed power generation  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that oxidize fuel without combustion to convert directly the fuel`s chemical energy into electricity. The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is distinguished from other fuel cell types by its all solid state structure and its high operating temperature (1,000 C). The Westinghouse tubular SOFC stack is process air cooled and has integrated thermally and hydraulically within its structure a natural gas reformer that requires no fuel combustion and no externally supplied water. In addition, since the SOFC stack delivers high temperature exhaust gas and can be operated at elevated pressure, it can supplant the combustor in a gas turbine generator set yielding a dry (no steam) combined cycle power system of unprecedented electrical generation efficiency (greater 70% ac/LHV). Most remarkably, analysis indicates that efficiencies of 60 percent can be achieved at power plant capacities as low as 250 kWe, and that the 70 percent efficiency level should be achievable at the two MW capacity level. This paper describes the individual SOFC, the stack, and the power generation system and its suitability for distributed generation.

Veyo, S.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fuel availability in nuclear power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Nuclear power is in focus of attention due to several factors these days and the expression “nuclear renaissance” is getting well known. However, concerned… (more)

Söderlund, Karl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fuel cell and advanced turbine power cycle  

SciTech Connect

Solar has a vested interest in integration of gas turbines and high temperature fuels (particularly solid oxide fuel cells[SOFC]); this would be a backup for achieving efficiencies on the order of 60% with low exhaust emissions. Preferred cycle is with the fuel cell as a topping system to the gas turbine; bottoming arrangements (fuel cells using the gas turbine exhaust as air supply) would likely be both larger and less efficient unless complex steam bottoming systems are added. The combined SOFC and gas turbine will have an advantage because it will have lower NOx emissions than any heat engine system. Market niche for initial product entry will be the dispersed or distributed power market in nonattainment areas. First entry will be of 1-2 MW units between the years 2000 and 2004. Development requirements are outlined for both the fuel cell and the gas turbine.

White, D.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Fuel cell powered propulsion systems for highway vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Over the past thirty-five years, the transportation sector has accounted for approx.25% of the total gross energy consumption in the US. Transportation's share of petroleum use in this time frame has ranged from 50 to 55%. Therefore, the use of fuel cell power plants that could possibly operate more efficiently than internal combustion engines in this type of application has been examined. In addition, these fuel cell power plants can operate on methanol produced from indigenous, non-petroleum sources and thereby reduce US dependency on petroleum resources. Fuel cell power plant use in city buses and automobiles has been explored and feasibility determined from both performance and cost viewpoints. Fuel cell systems for transportation applications have been selected on the basis of state-of-development, performance (both present and projected), and fuel considerations. In the last 25 years, most of the development work by research organizations and industrial firms has focused on five types of fuel cells, classified according to the electrolyte used. In terms of the overall state-of-development of systems, the ranking is as follows: (1) phosphoric acid, (2) alkaline, (3) proton exchange membrane, (4) molten carbonate, and (5) solid oxide.

Huff, J.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Roach, J.F.; Murray, H.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit  

SciTech Connect

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is an attractive, efficient, clean source of power for transportation, military, and stationary applications. Delphi has pioneered its application as an auxiliary Power Unit (APU) for transportation. Delphi is also interested in marketing this technology for stationary applications. Its key advantages are high efficiency and compatibility with gasoline, natural gas and diesel fuel. It's consistent with mechanizations that support the trend to low emissions. Delphi is committed to working with customers and partners to bring this novel technology to market.

J. Weber

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

NETL: News Release - Fuel Cell-Powered Ice Resurfacer Smoothes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

power-generation system. Fuel cells have the potential to provide America with greater energy security, extend our fossil fuel reserves, and reduce our dependence on imported...

52

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold

53

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the system, was demonstrated. System analyses of 40 MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, were carried out using CHEMCAD simulation software. The analyses included systems for near-term and long-term deployment. A new concept was developed that was based on clusters of one-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant, including the key equipment layout and the site plan, was completed. The process information and operational data from the proof-of-concept tests were used in the design of 40 MW high efficiency DFC/T power plants. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant was also prepared. Pilot-scale tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were conducted. The tests demonstrated that the concept has the potential to offer higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output and fuel utilization capabilities were also evaluated. Detailed design of the packaged sub-MW DFC/T Alpha Unit was completed, including equipment and piping layouts, instrumentation, electrical, and structural drawings. The lessons learned from the proof-of-concept tests were incorporated in the design of the Alpha Unit. The sub-MW packaged unit was fabricated, including integration of the Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) stack module with the mechanical balance-of-plant and electrical balance-of-plant. Factory acceptance tests of the Alpha DFC/T power plant were conducted at Danbury, CT. The Alpha Unit achieved an unsurpassed electrical efficiency of 58% (LHV natural gas) during the factory tests. The resulting high efficiency in conversion of chemical energy to electricity far exceeded any sub-MW class power generation equipment presently in the market. After successful completion of the factory tests, the unit was shipped to the Billings Clinic in Billings, MT, for field demonstration tests. The DFC/T unit accomplished a major achievement by successfully completing 8000 hours of operation at the Billings site. The Alpha sub-MW DF

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fuel Cell Portable Power Workshop Attendees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Workshop Power Workshop January 15-17, 2002 Attendees NAME E-MAIL Anthony Androsky, US Fuel Cell Council androsky@usfcc.com Larry Blair, U.S. Department of Energy larry.blair@ee.doe.gov Adam Briggs, Millennium Cell, Inc. briggs@millenniumcell.com Linnea Brush, Darnell.com, Inc. linnea@darnell.com Richard Canepa, Donaldson Co. Inc. canepa@mail.donaldson.com Deryn Chu, U.S. Army Research Laboratory dchu@arl.army.mil Erin Cready, SENTECH, Inc. ecready@sentech.org Mark Daugherty, DCH Technology/Enable Fuel Cell mdaugherty@enablefuelcell.com Ken Davis, Motorola Labs ken.davis@motorola.com Patrick Davis, DOE, EE-32 patrick.davis@ee.doe.gov Gregory Dolan, Methanol Institute gdolan@methanol.org Nancy Dunlop, MTI MicroFuel Cells Inc. ndunlop@mechtech.com

55

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a milestone was achieved by commencement of testing and operation of the sub-scale hybrid direct fuel cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant. The operation was initiated subsequent to the completion of the construction of the balance-of-plant (BOP) and implementation of process and control tests of the BOP for the subscale DFC/T hybrid system. The construction efforts consisted of finishing the power plant insulation and completion of the plant instrumentation including the wiring and tubing required for process measurement and control. The preparation work also included the development of procedures for facility shake down, conditioning and load testing of the fuel cell, integration of the microturbine, and fuel cell/gas turbine load tests. At conclusion of the construction, the process and control (PAC) tests of BOP, including the microturbine, were initiated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

56

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

57

AN ANALYSIS OF POWER REACTOR FUEL REPROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the projected economies and processing capacity requirements for a power reactor fuel reprocessing industry based on the recovery of fertile and fissionable materials from presently proposed power reactors within tbe confines of the continental United 8tates for the next five to ten years. An analysis of the present general state of development of a technology required for such an Industry is given. A summary of results of power reactor reprocessing chemical and engineering development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from July 1955 through December 1956 is given. (auth)

Culler, F.L. Jr.; Blanco, R.E.; Goeller, H.E.; Watson, C.D.

1957-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

The design of high power density annular fuel for LWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel performance models have been developed to assess the performance of internally and externally cooled LWR annular fuel. Such fuel may be operated at 30-50% higher core power density than the current operating LWRs, and ...

Yuan, Yi, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of a Truck- mounted Fuel Cell APU System. Society ofEngine Idling Versus Fuel Cell APUs. ” Society of AutomotiveJr; 2003. Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Power, Status, and Learning in Organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the scholarly literature on the effects of social hierarchy---differences in power and status among organizational actors---on collective learning in organizations and groups. We begin with the observation that theories of organization ... Keywords: organizational and group learning, power and status, social hierarchy

J. Stuart Bunderson; Ray E. Reagans

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procuring Fuel Cells Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for

62

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back...

63

Overview of commercialization of stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, DOE`s efforts to assist private sector organizations to develop and commercialize stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States are discussed. The paper also provides a snapshot of the status of stationary power fuel cell development occurring in the US, addressing all fuel cell types. This paper discusses general characteristics, system configurations, and status of test units and demonstration projects. The US DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center is the lead center for implementing DOE`s program for fuel cells for stationary power.

Hooie, D.T.; Williams, M.C.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fuel Cells for Backup Power in Telecommunications Facilities (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Telecommunications providers rely on backup power to maintain a constant power supply, to prevent power outages, and to ensure the operability of cell towers, equipment, and networks. The backup power supply that best meets these objectives is fuel cell technology.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Partial oxidation fuel reforming for automotive power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For widespread use of fuel cells to power automobiles in the near future, it is necessary to convert gasoline or other transportation fuels to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. Partial oxidation reforming is particularly suited to this application as it eliminates the need for heat exchange at high temperatures. Such reformers offer rapid start and good dynamic performance. Lowering the temperature of the partial oxidation process, which requires the development of a suitable catalyst, can increase the reforming efficiency. Catalytic partial oxidation (or autothermal) reformers and non-catalytic partial oxidation reformers developed by various organizations are presently undergoing testing and demonstration. This paper summarizes the process chemistries as well as recent test data from several different reformers operating on gasoline, methanol, and other fuels.

Ahmed, S.; Chalk, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Kumar, R.; Milliken, J.

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transportation and Stationary Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop On October 27, 2008, more than 55 participants from industry, state and federal government, utilities, national laboratories, and other groups met to discuss the topic of integrating stationary fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) systems and hydrogen production infrastructure for vehicles. The workshop was co-hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Fuel Cell Council, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and was held in conjunction with the Fuel Cell Seminar in Phoenix, Arizona. Plenary presentations provided an overview of the integration concept and perspective on the opportunity from federal, state and industry organizations. Workshop participants met in breakout sessions to consider the potential to leverage early hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure requirements by co-producing hydrogen in stationary fuel cell CHP applications at select facilities (e.g., military bases, postal facilities, airports, hospitals, etc.). The efficiency, reliability, and emissions benefits of these CHP systems have the potential to offset the up-front capital costs and financial risks associated with producing hydrogen for early vehicle markets.

67

Fuel cell systems for personal and portable power applications  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert fuel, usually hydrogen gas, to directly produce electricity. Fuel cells were initially developed for use in the space program to provide electricity and drinking water for astronauts. Fuel cells are under development for use in the automobile industry to power cars and buses with the advantage of lower emissions and higher efficiency than internal combustion engines. Fuel cells also have great potential to be used in portable consumer products like cellular phones and laptop computers, as well as military applications. In fact, any products that use batteries can be powered by fuel cells. In this project, we examine fuel cell system trade-offs between fuel cell type and energy storage/hydrogen production for portable power generation. The types of fuel cells being examined include stored hydrogen PEM (polymer electrolyte), direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and indirect methanol fuel cells, where methanol is reformed producing hydrogen. These fuel cells systems can operate at or near ambient conditions, which make them potentially optimal for use in manned personal power applications. The expected power production for these systems is in the range of milliwatts to 500 watts of electrical power for either personal or soldier field use. The fuel cell system trade-offs examine hydrogen storage by metal hydrides, carbon nanotubes, and compressed hydrogen tanks. We examine the weights each system, volume, fuel storage, system costs, system peripherals, power output, and fuel cell feasibility in portable devices.

Fateen, S. A. (Shaheerah A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Design considerations for vehicular fuel cell power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells show great promise as an efficient, nonpolluting vehicular power source that can operate on nonpetroleum fuel. As with other power sources, design tradeoffs can be made that either improve vehicle performance or reduce the size and cost of the fuel cell power system. To evaluate some of these tradeoffs, a number of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant designs have been studied to determine the performance level they would provide, both for a compact passenger vehicle and a 40-ft city bus. The fuel is steam reformed methanol. The analyses indicate that 1978 fuel cell technology can provide a 22 to 50% improvement in fuel economy over the 1980 EPA estimate for the conventionally powered General Motors X car. With this technology the city bus can meet the DOT acceleration, gradability, and top speed requirements. A reasonable advance in fuel cell technology improves performance and fuel consumption of both vehicles substantially.

Lynn, D.K.; McCormick, J.B.; Bobbett, R.E.; Srinivasan, S.; Huff, J.R.

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Powers Airport Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on AddThis.com... Feb. 19, 2011 Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans D iscover how the New Orleans airport displaced over 139,000 gallons of

70

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project activities were focused on the design and construction the sub-scale hybrid Direct Fuel Cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant and modification of a Capstone Simple Cycle Model 330 microturbine. The power plant design work included preparation of system flow sheet and performing computer simulations based on conservation of mass and energy. The results of the simulation analyses were utilized to prepare data sheets and specifications for balance-of-plant equipment. Process flow diagram (PFD) and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID) were also completed. The steady state simulation results were used to develop design information for modifying the control functions, and for sizing the heat exchangers required for recuperating the waste heat from the power plant. Line and valve sizes for the interconnecting pipes between the microturbine and the heat recuperators were also identified.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on AddThis.com... June 4, 2011 Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut

72

Fuel Cell Powers Up Festivities at Secretary Chu's Holiday Party |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Powers Up Festivities at Secretary Chu's Holiday Party Fuel Cell Powers Up Festivities at Secretary Chu's Holiday Party Fuel Cell Powers Up Festivities at Secretary Chu's Holiday Party December 16, 2011 - 11:25am Addthis A clean, efficient fuel cell powered the tree lights at the 2011 Energy Department holiday party. | Energy Department file photo. A clean, efficient fuel cell powered the tree lights at the 2011 Energy Department holiday party. | Energy Department file photo. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program How does it work? Fuel cells work like batteries, but they do not run down or need recharging. They produce electricity and heat as long as fuel is supplied. Employees at the Energy Department's annual holiday party were greeted with many familiar sights - festive decorations, sugar cookies, and a

73

Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power April 9, 2010 - 3:43pm Addthis Customers of AT&T Wireless and Pacific Gas & Electric Company will enjoy service that's both cleaner and more reliable, thanks to backup power provided by about 200 hydrogen fuel cells. The two companies are becoming early adopters of hydrogen fuel cells as backups for the main power grid. Both projects are funded by an $8.5 million Recovery Act grant to ReliOn, Inc. of Spokane, Wash., which specializes in hydrogen fuel-cell backups for businesses that need to stay functional during power failures. For utilities like PG&E, which serves about 15 million people in California, backup power is critical because it helps them locate problems at

74

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Natural Gas Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on AddThis.com... April 13, 2013

75

Fuel Cell Powered Vehicles Using Supercapacitors: Device Characteristics, Control Strategies, and Simulation Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fuel cell/battery/supercapacitor hybrid power source for479 7. Soonil Jeon, Hyundai Supercapacitor Fuel Cell Hybridtechnology, fuel cell/supercapacitor hybrid fuel cell

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

No more electrical infrastructure: towards fuel cell powered data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the use of fuel cells for powering data centers, based on benefits in reliability, capital and operational costs, and reduced environmental emissions. Using fuel cells effectively in data centers introduces several challenges and we highlight ...

Ana Carolina Riekstin, Sean James, Aman Kansal, Jie Liu, Eric Peterson

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

78

DOE-DOD Emergency Backup Power Fuel Cell Installations  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Ths fact sheet describes a collaboration between the departments of Energy and Defense to install and operate 18 fuel cell backup power systems across the United States.

79

Light-Powered Microbial Fuel Cell Offering Clean, Renewable ...  

Light-Powered Microbial Fuel Cell Offering Clean, Renewable Hydrogen-Based Alternative Energy Source Inventors: Daniel Noguera, Timothy Donohue, Marc Anderson ...

80

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil fuels—coal, natural gas, and petroleum—supplied 70% of total electric power generation in 1950, with that share rising to 82% in 1970, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fuel Cell Power Plants Biofuel Case Study - Tulare, CA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clean clean Fuel Cell Power Plants Biofuel Case Study - Tulare, CA DOE-NREL Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13, 2012 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Integrated Fuel Cell Company 2 Manufacture Sell (direct & via partners) Install Services 1.4 MW plant at a municipal building 2.4 MW plant owned by an Independent power producer 600 kW plant at a food processor 11.2 MW plant - largest fuel cell park in the world Delivering ultra-clean baseload distributed generation globally Growing Market Presence 180 MW installed and in backlog Over 80 Direct FuelCell® plants generating power at more than 50 sites globally Providing:

82

Innovative fuel designs for high power density pressurized water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the ways to lower the cost of nuclear energy is to increase the power density of the reactor core. Features of fuel design that enhance the potential for high power density are derived based on characteristics of ...

Feng, Dandong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Liquid-fueled SOFC power sources for transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Traditionally, fuel cells have been developed for space or stationary terrestrial applications. As the first commercial 200-kW systems were being introduced by ONSI and Fuji Electric, the potentially much larger, but also more challenging, application in transportation was beginning to be addressed. As a result, fuel cell-powered buses have been designed and built, and R&D programs for fuel cell-powered passenger cars have been initiated. The engineering challenge of eventually replacing the internal combustion engine in buses, trucks, and passenger cars with fuel cell systems is to achieve much higher power densities and much lower costs than obtainable in systems designed for stationary applications. At present, the leading fuel cell candidate for transportation applications is, without question, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Offering ambient temperature start-up and the potential for a relatively high power density, the polymer technology has attracted the interest of automotive manufacturers worldwide. But the difficulties of fuel handling for the PEFC have led to a growing interest in exploring the prospects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating on liquid fuels for transportation applications. Solid oxide fuel cells are much more compatible with liquid fuels (methanol or other hydrocarbons) and are potentially capable of power densities high enough for vehicular use. Two SOFC options for such use are discussed in this report.

Myles, K.M.; Doshi, R.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fuel Cell Backup Power Geographical Visualization Map (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes a time-lapse geographical visualization map of early market use of fuel cells for telecommunications backup power. The map synthesizes data being analyzed by NREL's Technology Validation team for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with DOE's publicly available annual summaries of electric disturbance events.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO2 Removal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO 2 Removal Technical Report EPRI Project Manager N. A. H. Holt EPRI * 3412 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 * PO Box 10412, Palo Alto, California 94303 * USA 800.313.3774 * 650.855.2121 * askepri@epri.com * www.epri.com Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO 2 Removal 1000316 Interim Report, December 2000 Cosponsors U. S. Department of Energy - Office of Fossil Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, Maryland 20874 U.S. Department of Energy/NETL 626 Cochrans Mill Road PO Box 10940 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15236-0940 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH

86

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diesel via hydrogenation Coalbiomass co-feeding for FT diesel production Various corn ethanol plant types with different process fuels * Hydrogen-powered FC systems (not...

87

Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

Misage, Robert (Manchester, CT); Scheffler, Glenn W. (Tolland, CT); Setzer, Herbert J. (Ellington, CT); Margiott, Paul R. (Manchester, CT); Parenti, Jr., Edmund K. (Manchester, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Contact Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power CFL Bulbs: Up to 10 CFL bulbs at reduced cost Water Heater: $75 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Incentives are available for home energy audits, CFL light bulbs, tank water heaters and refrigerator recycling. Water heater purchases and

90

Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel & Power Co Fuel & Power Co (Redirected from Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co Place Cheyenne, Wyoming Utility Id 3461 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project was awarded $5,033,441 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $10,066,882.

91

Biogas - future fuel for power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current fuel cells mix natural gas with steam to release hydrogen, which enters the fuel cell and combines with oxygen in the air. This formation of water is a chemical reaction which releases energy and heat. SMUD already has two 200 kw fuel cells in operation. SMUD`s desire to use alternative and renewable fuel sources is prompting research into using biogas as a cogenerator.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fuel-cell based power generating system having power conditioning apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power conditioner includes power converters for supplying power to a load, a set of selection switches corresponding to the power converters for selectively connecting the fuel-cell stack to the power converters, and another set of selection switches corresponding to the power converters for selectively connecting the battery to the power converters. The power conveners output combined power that substantially optimally meets a present demand of the load.

Mazumder, Sudip K. (Chicago, IL); Pradhan, Sanjaya K. (Des Plaines, IL)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.), provides that no new baseload electric powerplant may be constructed or operated without the capability to use coal or another alternate fuel as a primary energy source. In order to meet the requirement of coal capability, the owner or operator of such facilities proposing to use natural gas or petroleum as its primary energy source shall certify, pursuant to FUA section 201(d), and Section 501.60(a)(2) of DOE's regulations to the Secretary of Energy prior to construction, or prior to operation as a base load powerplant, that such powerplant has the capability to use coal or another alternate fuel.

94

Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 01 - 1959 - 01 - 1959 Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability Tony Markel and Keith Wipke National Renewable Energy Laboratory Doug Nelson Virginia Polytechnic University and State Institute Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The impacts of fuel cell system power response capability on optimal hybrid and neat fuel cell vehicle configurations have been explored. Vehicle system optimization was performed with the goal of maximizing fuel economy over a drive cycle. Optimal hybrid vehicle design scenarios were derived for fuel cell systems with 10 to 90% power transient response times of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 40 seconds. Optimal neat fuel cell vehicles where generated for responses times of 0, 2, 5, and 7

95

Proceedings: Impacts of Fuel Quality on Power Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conference on the Impacts of Fuel Quality on Power Production highlighted the challenges facing power producers using such established power technologies as fluidized bed, sub-critical boilers, and incinerations as well as emerging technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), super- and ultrasuper-critical boilers, and oxy-fuel systems. Presentations reported industry experience in the United States and Europe with an emphasis on minim...

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fuel Preprocessor (FPP) for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Auxiliary Power Units (APUs), driven by truck engines, consume over 800 million gallon of diesel fuel while idling. Use of separate SOFC based APUs are an excellent choice to reduce the cost and pollution associated with producing auxiliary power. However, diesel fuel is a challenging fuel to use in fuel cell systems because it has heavy hydrocarbons that can transform into carbon deposits and gums that can block passages and deactivate fuel reformer and fuel cell reactor elements. The work reported herein addresses the challenges associated with the diesel fuel sulfur and carbon producing contaminants in a Fuel Preprocessor (FPP). FPP processes the diesel fuel onboard and ahead of the reformer to reduce its carbon deposition tendency and its sulfur content, thus producing a fuel suitable for SOFC APU systems. The goal of this DOE supported Invention and Innovation program was to design, develop and test a prototype Fuel Preprocessor (FPP) that efficiently and safely converts the diesel fuel into a clean fuel suitable for a SOFC APU system. The goals were achieved. A 5 kWe FPP was designed, developed and tested. It was demonstrated that FPP removes over 80% of the fuel sulfur and over 90% of its carbon residues and it was demonstrated that FPP performance exceeds the original project goals.

M. Namazian, S. Sethuraman and G. Venkataraman

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. , Gottesfeld, S. , 1999. Direct methanol fuel cells.Fuel cells for transportation. 1999 Annual Progress Report.Auxiliary power units; Fuel cells 1. Introduction A large

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells for transportation. 1999 Annual Progress Report.J. , Gottesfeld, S. , 1999. Direct methanol fuel cells.Auxiliary power units; Fuel cells 1. Introduction A large

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fuel Production Fuel producers operate refineries and power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and if to enter the hydrogen market and how to respond to an increasing demand for electricity from PHEVs and BEVs for vehicle and fuel. Consumers have two goals: firstly, to keep their cars and secondly to own the best

California at Davis, University of

100

Fuel processing requirements and techniques for fuel cell propulsion power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuels for fuel cells in transportation systems are likely to be methanol, natural gas, hydrogen, propane, or ethanol. Fuels other than hydrogen wig need to be reformed to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. The fuel reformer must meet stringent requirements for weight and volume, product quality, and transient operation. It must be compact and lightweight, must produce low levels of CO and other byproducts, and must have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Catalytic steam reforming, catalytic or noncatalytic partial oxidation reforming, or some combination of these processes may be used. This paper discusses salient features of the different kinds of reformers and describes the catalysts and processes being examined for the oxidation reforming of methanol and the steam reforming of ethanol. Effective catalysts and reaction conditions for the former have been identified; promising catalysts and reaction conditions for the latter are being investigated.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Yu, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Viscosity virtual sensor to control combustion in fossil fuel power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermo-electrical power plants utilize fossil fuel oil to transform the calorific power of fuel into electric power. An optimal combustion in the boiler requires the fuel oil to be in its best conditions. One of fuel's most important properties to consider ... Keywords: Automatic learning, Bayesian networks, Fuel oil, Power plants, Virtual sensors

Pablo H. Ibargüengoytia, Miguel Angel Delgadillo, Uriel A. García, Alberto Reyes

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Insulation (Wall/Ceiling/Floor): $750 Insulation (Duct): $170 Infiltration Control: $200 Duct Sealing: $285 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Required for Infiltration Control, Insulation, Duct Sealing, and Window Rebates

103

Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of a lithium hydride powered hydrogen generator for use in long life, low power PEM fuel cell power supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies a hybrid PEM fuel cell system for use in low power, long life sensor networks. PEM fuel cells offer high efficiency and environmental friendliness but have not been widely adopted due to cost, reliability, ...

Strawser, Daniel DeWitt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

PROCESSING OF MOLTEN SALT POWER REACTOR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

ABS> Fuel reprocessing methods are being investigated for molten salt nuclear reactors which use LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt as a solvent for UF/sub 4/ and ThF/sub 4/. A liquid HF dissolution procedure coupled with fluorination has been developed for recovery of the uranium and LiF- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt which is highly enriched in Li/sup 7/. The recovered salt is decontaminated in the process from the major reactor poisons; namely, rare earths and neptunium. A brief investigation of alternate methods, including oxide precipitation, partial freezing, and metal reduction, indicated that such methods may give some separation of the solvent salt from reactor poisons, but they do not appear to be sufficiently quantitative for a simple processing operation. Solubilities of LiF and BeF/sub 2/ in aqueous 70t0 100% HF are presented. The BeF/sub 2/ solubility is appreciably increased in the presence of water and large amounts of LiF. Salt solubilities of 150 g/liter are attainable. Tracer experiments indicate that rare earth solubilities, relative to LiF-- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt solubility, increase from about 10/sup -4/ mole% in 98% HF to 0.003 mole% in 80% HF. Fluorination of uranium from LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt was demonstrated. This appears feasible also for the recovery of the relatively small ccncentration of uranium produced in the LiF- BeF/sub 2/ThF/sub 4/ blanket. A proposed chemical flowsheet is presented on the basis of this exploratory work as applied to the semicontinuous processing of a 600 Mw power reactor. (auth)

Campbell, D.O.; Cathers, G.I.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11009: Revised Portable Power Fuel Cell Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1009 Date: May 26, 2011 1009 Date: May 26, 2011 Title: Revised Portable Power Fuel Cell Targets Originator: Jacob Spendelow, Donna Ho, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: July 18, 2011 Research and development targets for fuel cells deployed in portable power applications have been updated to the values listed in Tables 1-3. Table 1. Fuel cell system targets for portable power applications under 2 W 1 Units 2011 Status 2013 2015 Specific Power 2 W/kg 5 8 10 Power Density 2 W/L 7 10 13 Specific Energy 2,3 Wh/kg 110 200 230 Energy Density 2,3 Wh/L 150 250 300 Cost 4 $/system 150 130 70 Durability 5,6 hours 1500 3000 5000 Mean Time Between Failures 6,7 hours 500 1500 5000 Table 2. Fuel cell system targets for 10 - 50 W portable power applications

107

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Powering Cell Phones with Fuel Cells Running on Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major goals of this project were to increase lifetime, increase energy density, and reduce material costs. The combination of identifying corrosion resistant materials and changing catalysts increased lifetimes. Work to increase the energy density included increasing the concentration of the formic acid fuel from 12M (ca. 50 wt%) to 22M (ca. 85 wt%) and decreasing the amount of fuel crossing over. The largest expense of the device is the cathode catalyst. At the beginning of the project Pt loading was over 8 mg/cm2 on our cathodes. Through optimization work we managed to bring down the cathode loading to approximately half of what we started with.

Dr. Ruiming Zhang

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to an integrated fuel cell power plant, and more specifically to a combination of cycles wherein a first fuel cell cycle tops an indirect-fired gas turbine cycle and a second fuel cell cycle bottoms the gas turbine cycle so that the cycles are thermally integrated in a tandem operating arrangement. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to the employer-employee relationship between the United States Department of Energy and the inventors.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Sudhoff, F.A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fuel Cells for Portable Power: 1. Introduction to DMFCs; 2. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thanks to generally less stringent cost constraints, portable power fuel cells, the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) in particular, promise earlier market penetration than higher power polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) for the automotive and stationary applications. However, a large-scale commercialization of DMFC-based power systems beyond niche applications already targeted by developers will depend on improvements to fuel cell performance and performance durability as well as on the reduction in cost, especially of the portable systems on the higher end of the power spectrum (100-250 W). In this part of the webinar, we will focus on the development of advanced materials (catalysts, membranes, electrode structures, and membrane electrode assemblies) and fuel cell operating concepts capable of fulfilling two key targets for portable power systems: the system cost of $5/W and overall fuel conversion efficiency of 2.0-2.5 kWh/L. Presented research will concentrate on the development of new methanol oxidation catalysts, hydrocarbon membranes with reduced methanol crossover, and improvements to component durability. Time permitted, we will also present a few highlights from the development of electrocatalysts for the oxidation of two alternative fuels for the direct-feed fuel cells: ethanol and dimethyl ether.

Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co Place Cheyenne, Wyoming Utility Id 3461 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project was awarded $5,033,441 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $10,066,882. Utility Rate Schedules

112

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes September 6, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use.

113

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council NYC-Westchester This dataset comes...

114

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool South This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

115

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Northeast This dataset comes from...

116

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Long Island This dataset comes from...

117

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Upstate New York This dataset comes...

118

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool North This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

119

Doing better with less energy [fuel-efficient power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe how many fuel-efficient coal-fired power generation technologies can be adopted at reduced net cost, but argue that, unless barriers to innovation are removed, their adoption will be far from automatic

J. Sathbye; J. Sinton; T. Heller

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

reliable, efficient, ultra-clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shore Capacity - Low Profile, Easy Siting Connects to existing electricity and fuel infrastructure System Operation · Over 300 Hours of Operation on Load with Water Recovery · Power Output up to 125 k

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An evolutionary fuel assembly design for high power density BWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An evolutionary BWR fuel assembly design was studied as a means to increase the power density of current and future BWR cores. The new assembly concept is based on replacing four traditional assemblies and large water gap ...

Karahan, Aydin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

DOE-DOD Emergency Backup Power Fuel Cell Installations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE-DOD Emergency Backup Power Fuel Cell Installations On July 19, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that, as part of an interagency partnership with the U.S....

123

Fuel cell systems program for stationary power, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the fuel cell systems program of the Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, in partnership with its customers and stakeholders, is to foster the creation of a new domestic fuel cell industry. This industry should be capable of commercialization of new, improved fuel cell power generation systems and thereby provide significant economic and environmental benefits. This program is aligned with the Department of Energy`s core mission (business line) of energy resources. The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, is participating with the private sector in sponsoring the development of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technologies for application in the utility, commercial and industrial sectors. Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) development was sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy in previous years and is now being commercialized by the private sector. This document describes the fuel cell activities of the DOE Office of Fossil Energy.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Parabolic Trough Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arizona Public Service (APS) is required to generate a portion of its electricity from solar resources in order to satisfy its obligation under the Arizona Environmental Portfolio Standard (EPS). In recent years, APS has installed and operates over 4.5 MWe of fixed, tracking, and concentrating photovoltaic systems to help meet the solar portion of this obligation and to develop an understanding of which solar technologies provide the best cost and performance to meet utility needs. During FY04, APS began construction of a 1-MWe parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant. This plant represents the first parabolic trough plant to begin construction since 1991. The plant will also be the first commercial deployment of the Solargenix parabolic trough collector technology developed under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The plant will use an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant, provided by Ormat. The ORC power plant is much simpler than a conventional steam Rankine cycle power plant and allows unattended operation of the facility.

Canada, S.; Cohen, G.; Cable, R.; Brosseau, D.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Water Power Program Contacts and Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Power Program Contacts and Organization Water Power Program Contacts and Organization Water Power Program Contacts and Organization The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) supports the development, deployment, and commercialization of wind and water power technologies. The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office is one Office that contains two distinct Programs: wind and water. The Wind Program and the Water Power Program operate as integrated, but separate entities within the office. Organization This organization chart shows the management structure for the Water Power Program. This organization chart shows the management structure for the Water Power Program. General Information U.S. Department of Energy - Water Power Program

126

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

the Fuels and Power Systems Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

403.9 million to research, develop, and deploy technologies that use the Nation's fossil fuels more cleanly and efficiently. The core research and development (R&D) efforts...

128

WORKING PARK-FUEL CELL COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the aims and objectives of the project which was to design, install and operate a fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) system in Woking Park, the first fuel cell CHP system in the United Kingdom. The report also covers the benefits that were expected to accrue from the work in an understanding of the full technology procurement process (including planning, design, installation, operation and maintenance), the economic and environmental performance in comparison with both conventional UK fuel supply and conventional CHP and the commercial viability of fuel cell CHP energy supply in the new deregulated energy markets.

Allan Jones

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SMALL SCALE FUEL CELL AND REFORMER SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New developments in fuel cell technologies offer the promise of clean, reliable affordable power, resulting in reduced environmental impacts and reduced dependence on foreign oil. These developments are of particular interest to the people of Alaska, where many residents live in remote villages, with no roads or electrical grids and a very high cost of energy, where small residential power systems could replace diesel generators. Fuel cells require hydrogen for efficient electrical production, however. Hydrogen purchased through conventional compressed gas suppliers is very expensive and not a viable option for use in remote villages, so hydrogen production is a critical piece of making fuel cells work in these areas. While some have proposed generating hydrogen from renewable resources such as wind, this does not appear to be an economically viable alternative at this time. Hydrogen can also be produced from hydrocarbon feed stocks, in a process known as reforming. This program is interested in testing and evaluating currently available reformers using transportable fuels: methanol, propane, gasoline, and diesel fuels. Of these, diesel fuels are of most interest, since the existing energy infrastructure of rural Alaska is based primarily on diesel fuels, but this is also the most difficult fuel to reform, due to the propensity for coke formation, due to both the high vaporization temperature and to the high sulfur content in these fuels. There are several competing fuel cell technologies being developed in industry today. Prior work at UAF focused on the use of PEM fuel cells and diesel reformers, with significant barriers identified to their use for power in remote areas, including stack lifetime, system efficiency, and cost. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells have demonstrated better stack lifetime and efficiency in demonstrations elsewhere (though cost still remains an issue), and procuring a system for testing was pursued. The primary function of UAF in the fuel cell industry is in the role of third party independent testing. In order for tests to be conducted, hardware must be purchased and delivered. The fuel cell industry is still in a pre-commercial state, however. Commercial products are defined as having a fixed set of specifications, fixed price, fixed delivery date, and a warrantee. Negotiations with fuel cell companies over these issues are often complex, and the results of these discussions often reveal much about the state of development of the technology. This work includes some of the results of these procurement experiments. Fuel cells may one day replace heat engines as the source of electrical power in remote areas. However, the results of this program to date indicate that currently available hardware is not developed sufficiently for these environments, and that significant time and resources will need to be committed for this to occur.

Dennis Witmer

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Power Generation from Solid Fuels in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Gorte vohs@seas.upenn.edu, 215-898-6318 Abstract In this study we demonstrate the generation of electricity at high power densities, >300 mWcm 2 at 973 K, from a solid...

131

Five Kilowatt Fuel Cell Demonstration for Remote Power Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While most areas of the US are serviced by inexpensive, dependable grid connected electrical power, many areas of Alaska are not. In these areas, electrical power is provided with Diesel Electric Generators (DEGs), at much higher cost than in grid connected areas. The reasons for the high cost of power are many, including the high relative cost of diesel fuel delivered to the villages, the high operational effort required to maintain DEGs, and the reverse benefits of scale for small utilities. Recent progress in fuel cell technologies have lead to the hope that the DEGs could be replaced with a more efficient, reliable, environmentally friendly source of power in the form of fuel cells. To this end, the University of Alaska Fairbanks has been engaged in testing early fuel cell systems since 1998. Early tests were conducted on PEM fuel cells, but since 2001, the focus has been on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. In this work, a 5 kW fuel cell was delivered to UAF from Fuel Cell Technologies of Kingston, Ontario. The cell stack is of a tubular design, and was built by Siemens Westinghouse Fuel Cell division. This stack achieved a run of more than 1 year while delivering grid quality electricity from natural gas with virtually no degradation and at an electrical efficiency of nearly 40%. The project was ended after two control system failures resulted in system damage. While this demonstration was successful, considerable additional product development is required before this technology is able to provide electrical energy in remote Alaska. The major issue is cost, and the largest component of system cost currently is the fuel cell stack cost, although the cost of the balance of plant is not insignificant. While several manufactures are working on schemes for significant cost reduction, these systems do not as yet provide the same level of performance and reliability as the larger scale Siemens systems, or levels that would justify commercial deployment.

Dennis Witmer; Tom Johnson; Jack Schmid

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycles  

SciTech Connect

Carbonate fuel cells developed in commercial 2.85 MW size, have an efficiency of 57.9%. Studies of higher efficiency hybrid power cycles were conducted to identify an economically competitive system and an efficiency over 65%. A hybrid power cycle was identified that includes a direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle, which generates power at a LHV efficiency over 70%; it is called a Tandem Technology Cycle (TTC). In a TTC operating on natural gas fuel, 95% of the fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming the fuel, and flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell system which generates 72% of the power. The portion of fuel cell anode exhaust not recycled, is burned and heat is transferred to compressed air from a gas turbine, heating it to 1800 F. The stream is then heated to 2000 F in gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 13% of the power. Half the gas turbine exhaust flows to anode exhaust burner and the rest flows to the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Studies of the TTC for 200 and 20 MW size plants quantified performance, emissions and cost-of-electricity, and compared the TTC to gas turbine combined cycles. A 200-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 72.6%; estimated cost of electricity is 45.8 mills/kWhr. A 20-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 65.2% and a cost of electricity of 50 mills/kWhr.

Steinfeld, G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

Dwyer, O.E.

1958-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Fuel Cell Power Supply for Long Duration Balloon Flights Using Stored Cryogens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-40618 A FUEL CELL POWER SUPPLY FOR LONG DURATIONCA, (1966) LBNL-40618 A FUEL CELL POWER SUPPLY FOR LONG21 days. A hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell is an attractive option

Green, Michael A.; Manikowski, A.; Noland, G.; Golden, R.L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHP and CHHP Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the fuel cell power model for CHP and CHHP economics and performance analysis.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Advanced Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map The electric drive system is the technology foundation for hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. That's why NREL's Advanced Power Electronics project supports and promotes the design, development, and demonstration of power electronic components and systems that will overcome major technical barriers to the commercialization of hybrid, advanced internal combustion, and fuel cell vehicle technologies. In support of DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office, our researchers focus on developing advanced power electronics and electric machinery technologies that improve reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness, and dramatically decrease systems costs for advanced vehicles. Key components for these vehicles include the motor controller, DC to DC converters, and inverters

137

Prospects on fuel economy improvements for hydrogen powered vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell vehicles are the subject of extensive research and development because of their potential for high efficiency and low emissions. Because fuel cell vehicles remain expensive and the demand for hydrogen is therefore limited, very few fueling stations are being built. To try to accelerate the development of a hydrogen economy, some original equipment manufacturers (OEM) in the automotive industry have been working on a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine (ICE) as an intermediate step. Despite its lower cost, the hydrogen-fueled ICE offers, for a similar amount of onboard hydrogen, a lower driving range because of its lower efficiency. This paper compares the fuel economy potential of hydrogen-fueled vehicles to their conventional gasoline counterparts. To take uncertainties into account, the current and future status of both technologies were considered. Although complete data related to port fuel injection were provided from engine testing, the map for the direct-injection engine was developed from single-cylinder data. The fuel cell system data represent the status of the current technology and the goals of FreedomCAR. For both port-injected and direct-injected hydrogen engine technologies, power split and series Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) configurations were considered. For the fuel cell system, only a series HEV configuration was simulated.

Rousseau, A.; Wallner, T.; Pagerit, S.; Lohse-Bush, H. (Energy Systems)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

New DOE program to advance fuel cell central power stations  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in technology have precipitated movement of fuel cells into the central power area in support of FutureGen (coal-based power plants with near-zero emissions). The idea is being implemented under the Fuel Cell Coal-Based Systems (FCCBS) programs. The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) programme has identified solid oxide fuel cell designs with the most promise for scale-up to central power applications. These could be aggregated into modules, and serve as building blocks for greater than 100 MW FutureGen-type plants. The FCCBS objective is to have a SECA SOFC-based power island that costs $400 kW and can enable 50% efficiency and 90% CO{sub 2} capture in a FutureGen plant by 2015. The project teams have been selected and the three phases of the FCCBS project identified. 3 figs.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Phantom Power: The Status of Fuel Cell Technology Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been touted as one of the most reliable and environmentally sound methods of producing high-quality electricity for use in the industrial sector. Fuel cell developers are racing to produce larger quantities of fuel cells at lower prices. While the power densities of fuel-cell stacks have been increasing, fuel cell technologies have unfortunately remained uneconomical for the majority of industrial customers. The growth of the fuel cell market has not increased at the rate at which developers and marketers would like us to believe. With stricter federal air regulations coming into effect in 2007 and more urban/industrial areas falling into non-attainment for pollutants such as NOx operators of distributed generation systems may begin to consider fuel cells a more viable option. In this paper we will explore the potential of various fuel cell technologies for providing on-site generation at industrial facilities. Our analysis will include brief technical descriptions of the various fuel cell technologies as well as a description of applicable end-use applications for the various technologies. We will determine which technologies hold the most potential for providing reliable power and heat for processes as well as estimates of technically and economically feasible industrial fuel cell capacity between now and 2020. The manufacturing service infrastructure, technical and market barriers to increased demand, and regulatory, permitting, and siting issues will be explored. We will outline the various factors that play in the technical and economic diffusion and offer sample diffusion curves for the various fuel cell technologies.

Shipley, A. M.; Elliott, R. N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fossil fuel combined cycle power generation method  

SciTech Connect

A method for converting fuel energy to electricity includes the steps of converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one mixed gas stream of lower average molecular weight including at least a first lower molecular weight gas and a second gas, the first and second gases being different gases, wherein the first lower molecular weight gas comprises H.sub.2 and the second gas comprises CO. The mixed gas is supplied to at least one turbine to produce electricity. The mixed gas stream is divided after the turbine into a first gas stream mainly comprising H.sub.2 and a second gas stream mainly comprising CO. The first and second gas streams are then electrochemically oxidized in separate fuel cells to produce electricity. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

Labinov, Solomon D. (Knoxville, TN); Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power generation cycles are: (1) increased efficiency by a factor of up to 2 over many conventional fossil fuel steam plants, (2) reduced power generation cost, especially for increasing fossil fuel cost, (3) reduced CO2 emission per kWh, and (4) direct sequestration or reuse (e.g., in enhanced oil or NG recovery) of the CO{sub 2} product.

Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

145

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $75 - $300 Furnaces: $250 - $400 Boilers: $150 - $400 Setback Thermostat: $25 - $50 Convection Oven: $100 High Efficiency Range/Oven: $500 Conveyor Oven: $500 Fryer: $500 Broiler: $100 Steam Cooker: $500 Vent Dampers for Boilers: $125 Custom: Two year buy down or 50% of project cost, whichever is less

146

A 48-month extended fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small, rail-shippable pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and an electric power output of 150 MW, which is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height, but otherwise standard, PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array on a 21.5 cm inter-assembly pitch. The B and W mPower core design and cycle management plan, which were performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, follow the pattern of a typical nuclear reactor fuel cycle design and analysis performed by most nuclear fuel management organizations, such as fuel vendors and utilities. However, B and W is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for four years of continuous power operations without refueling and without the hurdles of chemical shim. (authors)

Erighin, M. A. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Methanol reformers for fuel cell powered vehicles: Some design considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are being developed for use in automotive propulsion systems as alternatives for the internal combustion engine in buses, vans, passenger cars. The two most important operational requirements for a stand-alone fuel cell power system for a vehicle are the ability to start up quickly and the ability to supply the necessary power on demand for the dynamically fluctuating load. Methanol is a likely fuel for use in fuel cells for transportation applications. It is a commodity chemical that is manufactured from coal, natural gas, and other feedstocks. For use in a fuel cell, however, the methanol must first be converted (reformed) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture. The desired features for a methanol reformer include rapid start-up, good dynamic response, high fuel conversion, small size and weight, simple construction and operation, and low cost. In this paper the present the design considerations that are important for developing such a reformer, namely: (1) a small catalyst bed for quick starting, small size, and low weight; (2) multiple catalysts for optimum operation of the dissociation and reforming reactions; (3) reforming by direct heat transfer partial oxidation for rapid response to fluctuating loads; and (4) thermal independence from the rest of the fuel cell system. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

power with stationary andmotor vehicle PEM fuel cell systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigation examines the economics of producing electricity from proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems under various conditions, including the possibility of using fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) to produce power when they are parked at office buildings and residences. The analysis shows that the economics of both stationary fuel cell and FCV-based power vary significantly with variations in key input variables such as the price of natural gas, electricity prices, fuel cell andreformer system costs, andfuel cell system durability levels. The ‘‘central case’ ’ results show that stationary PEM fuel cell systems can supply electricity for offices andhomes in California at a net savings when fuel cell system costs reach about $6000 for a 5 kW home system ($1200/kW) and $175,000 for a 250 kW commercial system ($700/kW) andassuming somewhat favorable natural gas costs of $6/GJ at residences and $4/GJ at commercial buildings. Grid-connected FCVs in commercial settings can also potentially supply electricity at competitive rates, in some cases producing significant annual benefits. Particularly attractive is the combination of net metering along with timeof-use electricity rates that allow power to be suppliedto the utility gridat the avoidedcost of central power plant generation. FCVbased power at individual residences does not appear to be as attractive, at least where FCV power can only be used directly or banked with the utility for net metering and not sold in greater quantity, due to the low load levels at these locations that provide a

Timothy Lipman; Jennifer L. Edwards; Daniel M. Kammen; Timothy E. Lipman; Jennifer L. Edwards; Daniel M. Kammen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fuel Cell/Turbine Ultra High Efficiency Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FuelCell Energy, INC. (FCE) is currently involved in the design of ultra high efficiency power plants under a cooperative agreement (DE-FC26-00NT40) managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the DOE's Vision 21 program. Under this project, FCE is developing a fuel cell/turbine hybrid system that integrates the atmospheric pressure Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) with an unfired Brayton cycle utilizing indirect heat recovery from the power plant. Features of the DFC/T{trademark} system include: high efficiency, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, no pressurization of the fuel cell, independent operating pressure of the fuel cell and turbine, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants at much smaller sizes. Objectives of the Vision 21 Program include developing power plants that will generate electricity with net efficiencies approaching 75 percent (with natural gas), while producing sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions of less than 0.01 lb/million BTU. These goals are significant improvements over conventional power plants, which are 35-60 percent efficient and produce emissions of 0.07 to 0.3 lb/million BTU of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. The nitrogen oxide and sulfur emissions from the DFC/T system are anticipated to be better than the Vision 21 goals due to the non-combustion features of the DFC/T power plant. The expected high efficiency of the DFC/T will also result in a 40-50 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions compared to conventional power plants. To date, the R&D efforts have resulted in significant progress including proof-of-concept tests of a sub-scale power plant built around a state-of-the-art DFC stack integrated with a modified Capstone Model 330 Microturbine. The objectives of this effort are to investigate the integration aspects of the fuel cell and turbine and to obtain design information and operational data that will be utilized in the design of a 40-MW high efficiency Vision 21 power plant. Additionally, these tests are providing the valuable insight for DFC/Turbine power plant potential for load following, increased reliability, and enhanced operability.

Hossein, Ghezel-Ayagh

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

dc-to-ac power converter for fuel cell system  

SciTech Connect

As the interface between fuel cells and the utility line, a self-commutated inverter is preferred to a line-commutated inverter because of its easy controllability. Using the gate turn off (GTO) thyristors, this inverter can have high efficiency and simple circuit configurations. This paper describes the design features and test results of the dc-to-ac power converter, which is principally composed of four-phase transistor chopper and 12-pulse GTO inverter, for a 50kW experimental fuel cell power system. Furthermore, new GTO inverter which improves the circuit efficiency is presented. Special emphasis is placed on a detailed analysis and evaluation of this GTO inverter.

Kawabata, T.; Asaeda, T.; Hamasaki, Y.; Yutani, T.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Solid State Research CenterDOE Fuel Cell Portable Power Workshop End User Perspective Industrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portable Power Workshop Fuel Cell Cost · Desktop/Travel/Vehicle Charger ­ Current battery chargers: $25) · Fuel Cell System ­ Total cost "comparable" to charger/battery ­ Includes both fuel cell and battery Power Workshop Outline · Energy & Power of Portable Devices · Fuel Cell Applications & Cost · Key

152

Growth of fuel cell applications for specialty vehicles, portable power, auxiliary power, backup power, and stationary power are expected to generate a range of new jobs in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth of fuel cell applications for specialty vehicles, portable power, auxiliary power, backup engineers · Power plant operators · Power plant maintenance staff · Bus, truck and other fleet drivers power, and stationary power are expected to generate a range of new jobs in the near term

153

Fuel Cell Powered Vehicles Using Supercapacitors: Device Characteristics, Control Strategies, and Simulation Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16, Appendix I Fuel cell hybrid vehicles with load levelingfuel cell/battery hybrid vehicles, Journal of Power Sourcesfor a PEM Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle, Transactions of the

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Power Surge: Uranium alloy fuel for TerraPower | Y-12 National Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Surge: Uranium alloy ... Power Surge: Uranium alloy ... Power Surge: Uranium alloy fuel for TerraPower Posted: July 18, 2012 - 9:45am | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 1 | 2012 Since 2010, Y-12 has provided TerraPower with technical support in the fabrication methods for uranium alloy fuel to be used in a new traveling wave nuclear reactor that can run for more than 30 years without refueling. Image of reactor power concept, used with permission of TerraPower, LLC. Y-12's nuclear expertise, expanding since the site's integral role in the Manhattan Project, is positioning the Y-12 Complex at the forefront of what Sen. Lamar Alexander repeatedly asserts is needed - "a new Manhattan Project for clean energy independence." TerraPower, a private company backed by Microsoft founder Bill Gates, is

155

Decommissioning Process for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a staged process for the decommissioning and possible demolition of fossil-fueled power generating facilities. Drawn from experience with power and major industrial facilities, the report provides the owner/operator of a plant that is approaching the end of its useful life with an overview of the key elements necessary to successfully implement decommissioning. The process is applicable to full decommissioning, demolition, and closure; to partial scenarios (that is, partial dismantl...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R&D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the January to June 2004 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Nguyen Minh

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the January to June 2004 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Nguyen Minh

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Stationary power applications for polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The benefits provided by Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (PEFC) for power generation (e.g. low operating temperatures, and non-corrosive and stable electrolyte), as well as advances in recent years in lowering their cost and improving anode poisoning tolerance, are stimulating interest in the system for stationary power applications. A significant market potentially exists for PEFCs in certain stationary applications where PEFC technology is a more attractive alternative to other fuel cell technologies. A difficulty with the PEFC is its operation on reformed fuels containing CO, which poisons the anode catalyst. This difficulty can be alleviated in several ways. One possible approach is described whereby the product reformate is purified using a relatively low cost, high-throughput hydrogen permselective separator. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the utility of the concept.

Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Landgrebe, A.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 1 DOE Kick-off Meeting, Washington, DC September 28, 2010 Fuel Cell Projects Kick-off Meeting Washington, DC - September 28, 2010 Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells for Portable Power Fuel Cells Piotr Zelenay Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information - t t Overview Timeline * Start date: September 2010 * End date: Four-year duration Budget Budget * Total funding estimate: - DOE share: $3,825K Contractor share: $342K $342K - Contractor share: * FY10 funding received: $250K * FY11 funding estimate: $1,000K Barriers * A. Durability (catalyst; electrode) (catalyst; electrode)

164

Fuel for thought: the hydrogen-powered automobile  

SciTech Connect

A new clean and nondepletable fuel must be found to power automobiles if they are to survive as an economically viable mode of transportation. One such fuel is hydrogen, which was first proposed for internal combustion in 1820. The disadvantages of a hydrogen economy stem from its low boiling points, its not being a primary energy source, and the cost of present conversion technology. Its merits include having the highest energy per unit mass of the chemical fuels, water as its only product, and suitability for a range of applications. New interest in hydrogen buses and passenger cars has prompted some experimentation, but economics will ultimately determine their future. Considerations of safety have already led to guidelines and codes. Production methods include catalytic destruction of hydrocarbon fuels, coal gasification, steam-reforming of natural gas, and splitting the water molecule by electrolysis, thermolysis, or photolysis. 60 references. (DCK)

El-Mallakh, R.S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Adaptable Inverter for Injection of Fuel Cell and Photovoltaic Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important to apply renewable energies and efficient technologies. For power injection of photovoltaic with different energy sources such as photovoltaic, fuel cell and battery. It is possible to adjust active inverter. These inverters for injection of photovoltaic energy are developed only for this purpose

Kulig, Stefan

166

Zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the design and operation of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cells based on yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. The functional requirements of the various cell components are presented; and the materials and fabrication processes used for different cell components are described. Finally, the recent progress made toward commercialization of these cells for clean and efficient power generation is discussed.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the design and operation of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cells based on yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. The functional requirements of the various cell components are presented; and the materials and fabrication processes used for different cell components are described. Finally, the recent progress made toward commercialization of these cells for clean and efficient power generation is discussed.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for significant reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. We examine the break-even value for CCS adoptions, that ... Keywords: accounting, cost--benefit analysis, energy, energy policies, environment, government, natural resources, pollution

Özge ??legen; Stefan Reichelstein

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Bicarbonate Buffer and Proton Transfer) isolation and selection of electricity- generating bacteria (3­5), (ii) selection and modification studies (11­21) to maintain a suitable pH for electricity- generating bacteria and/or to increase

Tullos, Desiree

170

Use power factor correction to cut SCR rig fuel bills  

SciTech Connect

When drilling with SCR-powered drilling rigs, there are specific instances on every well when the kVA capacity of the AC generators prohibits efficient engine loading. It then becomes necessary to run another engine-generator set to provide sufficient kVA to power the load, even though the kW required by the load can be furnished by existing engine(s) on line. The practice of running one more engine than can be fully loaded causes all engines on line to run at a less efficient point on the brake specific fuel consumption curve (BSFC) and therefore costs more in terms of engine hours, fuel and maintenance costs. This article presents a study of the load represented by the mud pump and drawworks along with a graphical representation that shows the effect of these loads on the engine generator system both with and without a power factor correction device.

Logan, R.T.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Feasibility and economics of existing PWR transition to a higher power core using annular fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The internally and externally cooled annular fuel is a new type of fuel for PWRs that enables an increase in core power density by 50% within the same or better safety margins as the traditional solid fuel. Each annular ...

Beccherle, Julien

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fuel Cell Powered Vehicles Using Supercapacitors: Device Characteristics, Control Strategies, and Simulation Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 13 - 16, Appendix I Fuel cell hybrid vehicles with load510 cm 2 ) Appendix II Fuel cell vehicles with power assistcm 2 ) Appendix III Fuel cell vehicles with load leveling

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could benefit, in terms of efficien

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz (Rolls-Royce Allison); S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann (Consultant)

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fuel Management for Competitive Power Generation--A Guide to Managing Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel management is a vital competitive function that affects profitability. This report addresses strategic aspects of fuel management where change is occurring rapidly. It offers practical information on business change and fuel topics, bringing an integrative perspective, aimed at building understanding between power production, fuel procurement, and power marketing.

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

177

Santa Clara 2MW Fuel Cell Demonstration Power Plant: Interim Acceptance Test Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation testing of the world's largest carbonate fuel cell power system began in Spring 1996. Lessons learned will enable developers to advance the commercialization of megawatt- scale, carbonate fuel cell systems for distributed generation applications.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Diesel-fueled solid oxide fuel cell auxiliary power units for heavy-duty vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCS) as 3--10 kW auxiliary power units for trucks and military vehicles operating on diesel fuel. It discusses the requirements and specifications for such units, and the advantages, challenges, and development issues for SOFCS used in this application. Based on system design and analysis, such systems should achieve efficiencies approaching 40% (lower heating value), with a relatively simple system configuration. The major components of such a system are the fuel cell stack, a catalytic autothermal reformer, and a spent gas burner/air preheater. Building an SOFC-based auxiliary power unit is not straightforward, however, and the tasks needed to develop a 3--10 kW brassboard demonstration unit are outlined.

Krause, T.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model used to analyze the economics and performance of combined heat, hydrogen, and power (CHHP) systems.

Steward, D.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

Design of a power management model for a solar/fuel cell hybrid energy system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis proposes a Power Management Model (PMM) for optimization of several green power generation systems. A Photovoltaic/Fuel cell Hybrid Energy System (PFHES) consisting of… (more)

Melendez, Rosana.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Power Ecalene Fuels Inc PEF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PEF PEF Jump to: navigation, search Name Power Ecalene Fuels Inc (PEF) Place Denver, Colorado Product PEF owns patented technologis to convert syngas from different feedstock to fuels like jet fuel and ethanol. Coordinates 39.74001°, -104.992259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.74001,"lon":-104.992259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Competitiveness of Biomass-Fueled Electrical Power Plants Bruce A. McCarl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competitiveness of Biomass-Fueled Electrical Power Plants Bruce A. McCarl Professor Department with suggested rollbacks in greenhouse gas emissions is by employing power plant fueled with biomass. We examine the competitiveness of biomass-based fuel for electrical power as opposed to coal using a mathematical programming

McCarl, Bruce A.

183

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the January 2003 to June 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. This report summarizes the results obtained to date on: System performance analysis and model optimization; Reliability and cost model development; System control including dynamic model development; Heat exchanger material tests and life analysis; Pressurized SOFC evaluation; and Pre-baseline system definition for coal gasification fuel cell system concept.

Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Crop residues as a fuel for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crop residues could serve as an alternative energy source for producing electric power and heat in agricultural regions of the United States. Nearly 2 quads of residues are estimated to be available as a sustainable annual yield. These can substitute for up to one quad of conventional fuels used to generate electricity and up to an additional quad of petroleum and natural gas currently used for producing heat. The most promising routes to residue conversion appear to be regional generators sized in the megawatt range, and the mixing of residues with coal for burning in coal power plants. Costing farmers from $0.70 to $1.25 per million Btu, to harvest and prepare for use as a fuel, residues can be a competitive renewable energy supply.

Bhagat, N.; Davitian, H.; Pouder, R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the October 2002 to December 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The following activities have been carried out during this reporting period: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} Part-load performance analysis was conducted {lg_bullet} Primary system concept was down-selected {lg_bullet} Dynamic control model has been developed {lg_bullet} Preliminary heat exchanger designs were prepared {lg_bullet} Pressurized SOFC endurance testing was performed

Nguyen Minh; Faress Rahman

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Shale oil: potential for electric power fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the status of the oil shale industry and the impact it will have on the electric power industry in the years 1990 to 2000. The nontechnical problems are not addressed in detail as they have been suitably dealt with elsewhere. The available technologies for producing shale oil are reviewed. The major problem most processes face today is scale-up to commercial size. An industry of nearly 400,000 BPD is anticipated for 1990. The industry could grow to 1,000,000 BPD by the year 2000 with the introduction of second generation processes in the 1990s. The availability of shale oil may have a direct impact on the electric power industry initially. As the refineries improve their ability to handle shale oil, the availability of this fuel to the electric power industry for direct firing will decrease. The offgas from the oil shale industry could be of major importance to the electric power industry. One-quarter to one-third of the energy produced by the oil shale industry will be in the form of offgas (the gas produced in the retorting process). This will usually be a low Btu gas and therefore likely to be utilized on site to make electricity. The high yield of distillate fuels from shale oil could be important to the utility industry's demand for distillate fuels in peak shaving power generation. In addition to the potential supply implications, a shale oil industry and the people to support it will represent a substantial increase in power generation required in the shale oil region.

Gragg, M.; Lumpkin, R.E.; Guthrie, H.D.; Woinsky, S.G.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Justification of Simulators for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cost benefit analysis of simulator use at fossil fuel power plants identifies benefits in four categories: availability savings, thermal performance savings, component life savings, and environmental compliance savings. The study shows that a 500 MW plant, over 15 years, can realize a total present value saving of over $24 million, easily justifying the purchase of a simulator that typically costs about $600,000.

1993-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Power load forecasting Organization: Huizhou Electric Power, P. R. China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, regression, artificial intelligence. 1. Introduction Accurate models for electric power load forecasting are essential to the operation and planning of a utility company. Load forecasting helps an electric utility as electric load forecasting. In particular, ARMA (autoregressive moving average), ARIMA (autore- gressive

191

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Powers Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on AddThis.com... Aug. 20, 2011 Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana

192

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Students Power Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With Biodiesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With Biodiesel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With Biodiesel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With Biodiesel on AddThis.com... April 14, 2012 Students Power Remote-Controlled Cars With Biodiesel

193

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Organization Chart and Contacts  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

194

Evaluation of Plug Power Gensys 5C Fuel Cell System in Mesa, AZ: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pre-commercial Plug Power Gensys 5C fuel cell was installed at the Arizona State University - Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory (ASU-PTL). The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is fueled with natural gas and exports up to 5 kW to the local electrical grid. The overall performance and maintenance history over 18 months of operation is chronicled. PEM fuel cells are being positioned by Plug Power and other vendors as residential power generators.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Analysis and design of high frequency link power conversion systems for fuel cell power conditioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, new high frequency link power conversion systems for the fuel cell power conditioning are proposed to improve the performance and optimize the cost, size, and weight of the power conversion systems. The first study proposes a new soft switching technique for the phase-shift controlled bi-directional dc-dc converter. The described dc-dc converter employs a low profile high frequency transformer and two active full-bridge converters for bidirectional power flow capability. The proposed new soft switching technique guarantees soft switching over wide range from no load to full load without any additional circuit components. The load range for proposed soft switching technique is analyzed by mathematical approach with equivalent circuits and verified by experiments. The second study describes a boost converter cascaded high frequency link direct dc-ac converter suitable for fuel cell power sources. A new multi-loop control for a boost converter to reduce the low frequency input current harmonics drawn from the fuel cell is proposed, and a new PWM technique for the cycloconverter at the secondary to reject the low order harmonics in the output voltages is presented. The performance of the proposed scheme is verified by the various simulations and experiments, and their trade-offs are described in detail using mathematical evaluation approach. The third study proposes a current-fed high frequency link direct dc-ac converter suitable for residential fuel cell power systems. The high frequency full-bridge inverter at the primary generates sinusoidally PWM modulated current pulses with zero current switching (ZCS), and the cycloconverter at the secondary which consists of only two bidirectional switches and output filter capacitors produces sinusoidally modulated 60Hz split single phase output voltage waveforms with near zero current switching. The active harmonic filter connected to the input terminal compensates the low order input current harmonics drawn from the fuel cell without long-term energy storage devices such as batteries and super capacitors.

Song, Yu Jin

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Reducing CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Emissions From Fossil Fuel Power Plants Scott M. Klara - National Energy Technology Laboratory EPGA's 3 rd Annual Power Generation Conference October 16-17, 2002 Hershey, Pennsylvania EPGA - SMK - 10/17/02 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned/operated * Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY 02 budget of $750 million National Energy Technology Laboratory EPGA - SMK - 10/17/02 * Diverse research portfolio - 60 external projects - Onsite focus area * Strong industry support - 40% cost share * Portfolio funding $100M 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2003 2003 Budget (Million $) Fiscal Year Senate House Administration Request Carbon Sequestration: A Dynamic Program Separation & Capture From Power Plants Plays Key Role

197

Application of self-organizing systems in power systems control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European electrical transmission network is operated increasingly close to its operational limits due to market integration and increased feed-in by renewable energies. For this reason, innovative solutions for a reliable, secure and efficient network ... Keywords: FACTS, multiagent systems, power flow control, power system control, self-organizing systems, smart grids

Sven C. Müller; Ulf Häger; Christian Rehtanz; Horst F. Wedde

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

EDF Nuclear Power Plants Operating Experience with MOX fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EDF started Plutonium recycling in PWR in 1987 and progressively all the 20 reactors, licensed in using MOX fuel, have been loaded with MOX assemblies. At the origin of MOX introduction, these plants operated at full power in base load and the core management limited the irradiation time of MOX fuel assemblies to 3 annual cycles. Since 1995 all these reactors can operate in load follow mode. Since that time, a large amount of experience has been accumulated. This experience is very positive considering: - Receipt, handling, in core behaviour, pool storage and shipment of MOX fuel; - Operation of the various systems of the plant; - Environment impact; - Radioprotection; - Safety file requirements; - Availability for the grid. In order to reduce the fuel cost and to reach a better adequacy between UO{sub 2} fuel reprocessing flow and plutonium consumption, EDF had decided to improve the core management of MOX plants. This new core management call 'MOX Parity' achieves parity for MOX and UO{sub 2} assemblies in term of discharge burn-up. Compared to the current MOX assembly the Plutonium content is increased from 7,08% to 8,65% (equivalent to natural uranium enriched to respectively 3,25% and 3,7%) and the maximum MOX assembly burn-up moves from 42 to 52 GWd/t. This amount of burn-up is obtained from loading MOX assemblies for one additional annual cycle. Some, but limited, adaptations of the plant are necessary. In addition a new MOX fuel assembly has been designed to comply with the safety criteria taking into account the core management performances. These design improvements are based on the results of an important R and D program including numerous experimental tests and post-irradiated fuel examinations. In particular, envelope conditions compared to MOX Parity neutronic solicitations has been extensively investigated in order to get a full knowledge of the in reactor fuel behavior. Moreover, the operating conditions of the plant have been evaluated in many details and finally no important impact is anticipated. The industrial maturity of plutonium recycling activities is fully demonstrated and a new progress can be done with a complete confidence. The licensing process of 'MOX Parity' core management is in progress and its implementation on the 20 PWR is now expected at mid 2007. (author)

Thibault, Xavier [EDF Generation, Tour EDF Part Dieu - 9 rue des Cuirassiers B.P.3181 - 69402 Lyon Cedex 03 (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than...

200

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Glacier-Waterton Park Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on AddThis.com... Dec. 31, 2004 Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane F ind out how Glacier-Waterton International Peace Park uses propane buses.

203

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the January 2002 to March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. For this reporting period the following activities have been carried out: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} System-level performance model was created {lg_bullet} Dynamic control models are being developed {lg_bullet} Mechanical properties of candidate heat exchanger materials were investigated {lg_bullet} SOFC performance mapping as a function of flow rate and pressure was completed

Nguyen Minh

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the October 2001 to December 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The conceptual and demonstration system designs were proposed and analyzed, and these systems have been modeled in Aspen Plus. Work has also started on the assembly of dynamic component models and the development of the top-level controls requirements for the system. SOFC stacks have been fabricated and performance mapping initiated.

Kurt Montgomery; Nguyen Minh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the July 2001 to September 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. An internal program kickoff was held at Honeywell in Torrance, CA. The program structure was outlined and the overall technical approach for the program was presented to the team members. Detail program schedules were developed and detailed objectives were defined. Initial work has begun on the system design and pressurized SOFC operation.

Unknown

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

207

Strategic Analysis of Biomass and Waste Fuels for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, waste fuels, and power technologies based on advanced combustion and gasification show promise for renewable baseload generation. Utilities can use the results of this study to evaluate the potential performance and cost of biomass and waste fuel-fired power plants in their systems and examine fuel use in integrated resource plans.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Performance Study on Multilevel Hybrid Power System of Pneumatic-fuel Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Put forward the concept of multilevel hybrid power system of pneumatic-Fuel Vehicle, composed of the gasoline engine and pneumatic motor which is droved by the admixture of compressed air and engine exhaust gas so as to improve the dynamics. The dynamics ... Keywords: fuel-pneumatic, multilevel hybrid power vehicle, dynamics, fuel consumption

Wang Guo-ye; Zhang Juan-li; Chou Xiao-gang; Wang Jun; Zheng Chang-song

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Impact study on the use of biomass-derived fuels in gas turbines for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the properties of fuels derived from biomass, both gaseous and liquid, against the fuel requirements of gas turbine systems for gernating electrical power. The report attempts to be quantitative rather than merely qualitative to establish the significant variations in the properties of biomass fuels from those of conventional fuels. Three general categories are covered: performance, durability, and storage and handling.

Moses, C.A.; Bernstein, H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/bioenergyatlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/biomass Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

Scarangella, M. J. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles as Resources for Distributed Electric Power in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32 B.1 Electrical power capacity: BatteryB.1 Electrical power capacity: Battery EDVs For the battery-and/or generation capacity of battery, hybrid and fuel cell

Kempton, Willett; Tomic, Jasna; Letendre, Steven; Brooks, Alec; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.; Bentley, C. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Date: 09/05/2013 7 Date: 09/05/2013 Title: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) Originators: Pete Devlin, Jim Alkire, Sara Dillich, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Rick Farmer and Sunita Satyapal Date: 09/09/13 Item: Table 1: Number of fuel cells deployments (current and planned) for applications in backup power. The funding of 903 Department of Energy (DOE) fuel cell backup power systems has led to over 3,500 industry installations and on-order backup power units with no DOE funding. Data/Assumptions/Calculations: The manufacturers providing the fuel cells for the deployments (current and planned) mentioned in Table 1 above are: Altergy Ballard / Ida Tech Hydrogenics ReliOn, Inc. Total DOE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) investment for these fuel cell

215

Assessment of helical-cruciform fuel rods for high power density LWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to significantly increase the power density of Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the helical-cruciform (HC) fuel rod assembly has been proposed as an alternative to traditional fuel geometry. The HC assembly is a ...

Conboy, Thomas M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ROBUST CONTROL ANALYSIS USING REAL-TIME IMPLEMENTATION OF A HYBRID FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is performed for a hybrid Fuel Cell/Supercapacitor generation system with power management, realized through converters interfacing the Fuel Cell (FC) and the Supercapacitor (SC) with the system electrical load

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

217

NEUTRONIC AND THERMAL HYDRAULIC DESIGNS OF ANNULAR FUEL FOR HIGH POWER DENSITY BWRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a promising new fuel for high power density light water reactors, the feasibility of using annular fuel for BWR services is explored from both thermal hydraulic and neutronic points of view. Keeping the bundle size ...

Morra, P.

218

Evaluation of high power density annular fuel application in the Korean OPR-1000 reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compared to the traditional solid fuel geometry for PWRs, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel offers the potential to increase the core power density while maintaining or increasing safety margins. It is ...

Zhang, Liang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

How much spent (used) fuel is stored at U.S. nuclear power plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much spent (used) fuel is stored at U.S. nuclear power plants? In 2002, the most recent year for which EIA has data, there were 161,662 fuel assemblies, or 46,268 ...

220

Coal-fueled diesels for modular power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interest in coal-fueled heat engines revived after the sharp increase in the prices of natural gas and petroleum in the 1970`s. Based on the success of micronized coal water slurry combustion tests in an engine in the 1980`s, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy. initiated several programs for the development of advanced coal-fueled diesel and gas turbine engines for use in cogeneration, small utilities, industrial applications and transportation. Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have been developing technology since 1985, under the sponsor of METC, to enable coal water slurry (CWS) to be utilized in large bore, medium-speed diesel engines. Modular power generation applications in the 10--100 MW size (each plant typically using from two to eight engines) are the target applications for the late 1990`s and beyond when, according to the US DOE and other projections, oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate much more rapidly compared to the price of coal. As part of this program over 7.50 hours of prototype engine operation has been achieved on coal water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder full scale engine with Integrated Emissions Control System in 1993. In this paper, the authors described the project cost of the CWS fuel used, the heat rate of the engine operating on CWS, the projected maintenance cost for various engine components, and the demonstrated low emissions characteristics of the coal diesel system.

Wilson, R.P. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rao, A.K. [Cooper-Bessemer Reciprocating, Grove City, PA (United States); Smith, W.C. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The origin of organic pollutants from the combustion of alternative fuels: Phase 5/6 report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory program on alternative automotive fuels, the subcontractor has been conducting studies on the origin and fate of organic pollutants from the combustion of alternative fuels. Laboratory experiments were conducted simulating cold start of four alterative fuels (compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol-gasoline mix, and ethanol-gasoline mix) using a commercial three-way catalyst under fuel-lean conditions. This report summarizes the results of these experiments. It appears that temperature of the catalyst is a more important parameter for fuel conversion and pollutant formation than oxygen concentration or fuel composition.

Sidhu, S.; Graham, J.; Taylor, P.; Dellinger, B. [Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States). Research Inst.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Refractory failure in IGCC fossil fuel power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current generation refractory materials used in slagging gasifiers employed in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) fossil fuel power systems have unacceptably short service lives, limiting the reliability and cost effectiveness of gasification as a means to generate power. The short service life of the refractory lining results from exposure to the extreme environment inside the operating gasifier, where the materials challenges include temperatures to 1650 C, thermal cycling, alternating reducing and oxidizing conditions, and the presence of corrosive slags and gases. Compounding these challenges is the current push within the industry for fuel flexibility, which results in slag chemistries and operating conditions that can vary widely as the feedstock for the gasifier is supplemented with alternative sources of carbon, such as petroleum coke and biomass. As a step toward our goal of developing improved refractory materials for this application, we have characterized refractory-slag interactions, under a variety of simulated gasifier conditions, utilizing laboratory exposure tests such as the static cup test and a gravimetric test. Combining this information with that gained from the post-mortem analyses of spent refractories removed from working gasifiers, we have developed a better understanding of refractory failure in gasifier environments. In this paper, we discuss refractory failures in slagging gasifiers and possible strategies to reduce them. Emphasis focuses on the refractories employed in gasifier systems which utilize coal as the primary feedstock.

Dogan, Cynthia P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Air-breathing fuel cell stacks for portable power applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing attention is being directed towards polymer electrolyte fuel cells as battery replacements because of their potentially superior energy densities and the possibility of `mechanical` refueling. On the low end of the power requirement scale (ca. 10 W), fuel cells can compete with primary and secondary batteries only if the fuel cell systems are simple, inexpensive, and reliable. Considerations of cost and simplicity (and minimal parasitic power) discourage the use of conventional performance enhancing subsystems (e.g., humidification, cooling, or forced-reactant flow). We are developing a stack design that is inherently self-regulating to allow effective operation without the benefit of such auxiliary components. The air cathode does not use forced flow to replenish the depleted oxygen. Instead, the oxygen in the air must diffuse into the stack from the periphery of the unit cells. For this reason the stack is described as `air-breathing.` This configuration limits the ability of water to escape which prevents the polymer electrolyte membranes from drying out, even at relatively high continuous operation temperatures (+60 degrees C). This results in stacks with reliable and stable performance. This air-breathing configuration assumes a unique stack geometry that utilizes circular flow-field plates with an annular hydrogen feed manifold and the single tie-bolt extending up through the central axis of the stack. With this geometry, the hydrogen supply to the unit cells is radially outward, and the air supply is from the periphery inward. This configuration has several advantages. The entire periphery is free to air access and allows greater heat conduction to enhance cooling. Furthermore, all of the components in the stack (e.g., the flow-fields, seals and membrane/electrode assemblies), are radially symmetrical, so part fabrication is simple and the entire system is potentially low-cost. Lastly, this configuration is compact and lightweight.

Wilson, M.S.; DeCaro, D.; Neutzler, J.K.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessment of Biogas-Fueled Electric Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an assessment of technologies, opportunities, and markets for generation of electricity from biogas sources. Topics covered include sources of biogas; typical characteristics of biogas as produced from various waste products; engines and associated equipment to convert biogas to electricity; electrical design and connection issues; and markets for heat and power produced by biogas to electricity systems. The report describes the process of anaerobic digestion for converting organic w...

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Proceedings: Conference on Coal Gasification Systems and Synthetic Fuels for Power Generation, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international effort to develop synthetic fuels and advanced power systems for the commercial generation of electric power from coal, oil shale, and tar sands has been an outstanding technical success. This conference highlighted the work that brought new fuels and power generation systems to reality.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method of locating a leaking fuel element in a fast breeder power reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Leaking fuel elements in a fast reactor are identified by measuring the ratio of .sup.134 Xe to .sup.133 Xe in the reactor cover gas following detection of a fuel element leak, this ratio being indicative of the power and burnup of the failed fuel element. This procedure can be used to identify leaking fuel elements in a power breeder reactor while continuing operation of the reactor since the ratio measured is that of the gases stored in the plenum of the failed fuel element. Thus, use of a cleanup system for the cover gas makes it possible to identify sequentially a multiplicity of leaking fuel elements without shutting the reactor down.

Honekamp, John R. (Downers Grove, IL); Fryer, Richard M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ohio's fuel mix for power generation is changing - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Although coal remains the dominant fuel for Ohio's electric power generation, accounting for 81% of total statewide generation during the first 9 months of 2011, the ...

230

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell Persistent power supply for in-water ...  

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell Persistent power supply for in-water sensors ... and high-density sensor arrays where the cost of battery replacement is high.

231

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast Introduction................................................................................................................................. 3 Price Forecasts............................................................................................................................... 12 Oil Price Forecast Range

232

Strategic power plant investment planning under fuel and carbon price uncertainty.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The profitability of power plant investments depends strongly on uncertain fuel and carbon prices. In this doctoral thesis, we combine fundamental electricity market models with… (more)

Geiger, Ansgar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012: America's Partner in Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012 The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012 America's Partner in Power The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012 Fuel Cells 2000 | Page i Authors and Acknowledgements This report was written and compiled by Sandra Curtin, Jennifer Gangi, and Ryan Skukowski of Fuel Cells 2000, an activity of Breakthrough Technologies Institute in Washington, D.C. Support was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program. About This Report This report profiles a select group of nationally recognizable companies and corporations that are deploying or demonstrating fuel cells. These businesses are taking advantage of a fuel cell's unique benefits, especially for powering lift trucks and providing combined heat and power to their stores and

234

Catalysts and materials development for fuel cell power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic processing of fuels was explored in this thesis for both low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell as well as high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Novel catalysts were ...

Weiss, Steven E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC2601NT40779 for the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a gas turbine. A conceptual hybrid system design was selected for analysis and evaluation. The selected system is estimated to have over 65% system efficiency, a first cost of approximately $650/kW, and a cost of electricity of 8.4 cents/kW-hr. A control strategy and conceptual control design have been developed for the system. A number of SOFC module tests have been completed to evaluate the pressure impact to performance stability. The results show that the operating pressure accelerates the performance degradation. Several experiments were conducted to explore the effects of pressure on carbon formation. Experimental observations on a functioning cell have verified that carbon deposition does not occur in the cell at steam-to-carbon ratios lower than the steady-state design point for hybrid systems. Heat exchanger design, fabrication and performance testing as well as oxidation testing to support heat exchanger life analysis were also conducted. Performance tests of the prototype heat exchanger yielded heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics consistent with the heat exchanger specification. Multicell stacks have been tested and performance maps were obtained under hybrid operating conditions. Successful and repeatable fabrication of large (>12-inch diameter) planar SOFC cells was demonstrated using the tape calendering process. A number of large area cells and stacks were successfully performance tested at ambient and pressurized conditions. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Integrated gasification fuel cell systems or IGFCs were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems.

Nguyen Minh

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Challenges of Electric Power Industry Restructuring for Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Restructuring for Fuel Suppliers ... Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels Office of Oil and Gas ... Risk management will become an ...

237

MEMS Fuel Cells – Low Temp – High Power Density  

The miniature fuel-cell technology uses thin-film fuel ... Reduced life cycle cost in comparison to ... for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security ...

238

ANALYSIS OF POWER BALANCING WITH FUEL CELLS & HYDROGEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.....................................................................................17 B.2 Costs of fuels, fuel handling, electricity and CO2 quotas.........................................................................................................35 D. ­ TANK-TO-ELECTRICITY AND TANK...........................................................................................................36 D.2 Reference Car

239

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Michael Wang Argonne National Laboratory June 10, 2008 Project ID # AN2 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Overview * Project start date: Oct. 2002 * Project end date: Continuous * Percent complete: N/A * Inconsistent data, assumptions, and guidelines * Suite of models and tools * Unplanned studies and analyses * Total project funding from DOE: $2.04 million through FY08 * Funding received in FY07: $450k * Funding for FY08: $840k Budget * H2A team * PSAT team * NREL * Industry stakeholders Partners Timeline Barriers to Address 3 Objectives * Expand and update the GREET model for hydrogen production pathways and for applications of FCVs and other FC systems

240

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 104, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Long Island Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

242

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 102, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Northeast Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

243

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Commercial Energy Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T8 Fixtures: $5 - $18 /system or $0.50 /lamp Fluorescents: $4 - $125 CFLs: $8 - $25 Indirect Lighting: $16 - $24 Pulse Start Metal Halide Fixtures: $25 - $65 Lighting Controls: $12 - $35 Variable Frequency Drive: $30 /hp Totally Enclosed Fan-Cooled: $10 - $600 Open Drip-Proof: $10 - $600 Custom: Buy down to 2 year pay back or 50% of cost, whichever is less

244

Configuration Of Wärtsilä Diesel Power Plant's Fuel System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trend in modern production is to produce more tailored products with less design effort. Automation of design process is a modern way to increase effectiveness of the order/delivery process. This paper describes a methodology for configuration design of one-of-a-kind products. This methodology has been implemented with the cooperation of knowledge-based engineering software, an object-oriented database management system and, a CAD system. The methodology has been applied to two industrial test cases. This paper describes the application of the methodology in the configuration of diesel power plants' fuel systems. The experiences gained from the test cases show that knowledge automation can be realized with the efficient co-operation of the different tools. INHALTSANGABE Der Trend in der modernen Fertigung ist, mehr maßgeschneiderte Produkte mit weniger Design Aufwand herzustellen. Die Automatisierung des Konstruktionsprozesses ist ein modernes Mittel, die Effektivität des Bestell- ...

Anne Aaltonen; Pasi Paasiala; Kari Tanskanen; M. Sc; M. Sc; M. Sc; Asko Riitahuhta

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Co-Production Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Initiative (CCPI) Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Co-ProduCtion ProjeCt Description WMPI PTY., LLC of Gilberton, Pennsylvania has assembled a leading technology and...

246

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Economic and Environmental Analysis of Fuel Cell Powered Materials Handling Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes an analysis of the economic and environmental attributes of forklift fleets powered by battery and fuel cell power plants. The report first provides background on the fuel cell forklift technology. The fuel cell forklift is then compared to three other technology options: conventional battery-powered forklifts, fast-charge forklifts at 15 kW of charging power, and fast-charge forklifts at 20 kW of charging power. This study develops models of the infrastructure and equipme...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fuel cells: providing heat and power in the urban environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for CHP systems include Proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) and solid oxide (SOFC), however both require which operate at high temperatures, such as the MCFC and SOFC, reforming can take place within the fuel applications. PAFC Phospheric acid fuel cell MCFC Molten carbonate fuel cell SOFC Solid oxide fuel cell PEMFC

Watson, Andrew

249

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and standardized. Hydrogen fuel filling stations generallyat local hydrogen fill stations it was decided that filling

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Spent Fuel Pool Cooling and Cleanup During Decommissioning: Experience at Trojan Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operation of original in-plant spent fuel pool facilities at shutdown power plants is expensive compared to available alternatives and can interfere with the decommissioning process. This report describes the approach taken in the Trojan Decommissioning Project to establish independent cooling and cleanup services for the fuel pool until the spent fuel is placed in dry storage.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

FUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during many months of the year). * Similarly, use of PEM fuel cell waste heat for hot water heating wouldFUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY AND MOTOR VEHICLE PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEMS UCD-ITS-RP-04-21 April 2004 by Timothy Lipman University of California

Kammen, Daniel M.

252

Thermodynamic analysis and comparison on oxy-fuel power generation process - article no. 053001  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, pressurized oxy-fuel combustion power generation processes are modeled and analyzed based on a 350 MW subcritical reheat boiler associated with a condensing steam turbine. The performance results are obtained. Furthermore, the influences of slurry concentration and coal properties on power plant performance are investigated. An oxy-fuel configuration operating at ambient pressure is studied to compare the performance with pressurized oxy-fuel configuration. Thermodynamic analysis reveals the true potentials of the pressurized oxy-fuel process. Based on the system integration, an improved configuration is proposed in which plant efficiency of pressurized oxy-fuel process is increased by 1.36%.

Deng, S.M.; Hynes, R. [Hatch Energy, Oakville, ON (Canada)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Commerce study looks at cost of pollution control for fossil-fuel power industry  

SciTech Connect

Environmental controls for fossil-fuel power plants consumed 1.3 percent of the national fuel used in 1974, with the largest demand going for sulfur dioxide emission control. Projections for power plant consumption to meet environmental standards range as high as eight percent in the 1980s. Less-energy-consuming systems include coal blending, tall stacks, and supplementary control systems; while high consumers are using coal washing operations in place of scrubbers, fuel transportation, conversion to acceptable fuels, waste heat disposal, and particulate controls. A summary table presents sulfur dioxide regulations in terms of their goals and their anticipated minimum and maximum fuel consumption. (DCK)

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Toward a Common Method of Cost Estimation for CO2 Capture and Storage at Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are significant differences in the methods employed by various organizations to estimate the cost of carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems for fossil fuel power plants. Such differences often are not readily apparent in publicly reported CCS cost estimates. As a consequence, there is a significant degree of misunderstanding, confusion, and mis-representation of CCS cost information, especially among audiences not familiar with the details of CCS costing. Given the international importance ...

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Noise impact evaluation of a power generating station and a refuse?derived fuel facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Community noiseimpact assessment of a planned addition of refuse?derived fuel (RDF) facility adjacent to a fossil?fueled power plant was conducted using a computerized atmospheric sound propagation model. Close?in measurements of power plant operation and coal handling system were used for station input

V. M. Lee; W. L. Knoll

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell - CellTech Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell-CellTech Power Background Direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a theoretical efficiency advantage over traditional SOFCs operating on gasified carbon (syngas). CellTech Power LLC (CellTech) has been developing a liquid tin anode (LTA) SOFC that can directly convert carbonaceous fuels including coal into electricity without gasification. One of the most significant impediments

259

Power Ramp Testing of Additive Fuel Rods in the Halden Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additive fuel provides an effective remedy against pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) failure and a means of mitigating severe secondary degradation in the form of long axial splits in the cladding after fuel failure. This report—part of EPRI's Fuel Reliability Program—summarizes five years worth of data on additive fuel properties, pre-irradiation corrosion and creep tests, microstructure characterization, and subsequent in-core power ramp tests performed on segments retrieved after two cycle...

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test March 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --In a test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a Delphi auxiliary power unit employing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) successfully operated the electrical system and air conditioning of a Peterbilt Model 386 truck under conditions simulating idling conditions for 10 hours. The device provides an alternative to running a truck's main diesel engine, or using a truck's batteries, to power auxiliary electrical loads during rest periods, thereby lowering emissions, reducing noise, and saving fuel. In testing at Peterbilt Motors Company Texas head-quarters, a Delphi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 1/22 National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 1/22 High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H 2 from Biogas Jack Brouwer, Ph.D. June 19, 2012 DOE/ NREL Biogas Workshop - Golden, CO © National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 2/22 Outline * Introduction and Background * Tri-Generation/Poly-Generation Analyses * OCSD Project Introduction © National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 3/22 Introduction and Background * Hydrogen fuel cell vehicle performance is outstanding * Energy density of H 2 is much greater than batteries * Rapid fueling, long range ZEV * H 2 must be produced * energy intensive, may have emissions, fossil fuels, economies of scale * Low volumetric energy density of H 2 compared to current infrastructure fuels (@ STP)

262

EPRI Ergonomics Handbook for the Electric Power Industry: Ergonomic Interventions for Electrical Workers in Fossil-Fueled Power Plan ts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Research Program has provided ergonomic information to the electric energy industry workforce since 1999. This is the fourth EPRI ergonomics handbook; it specifically focuses on tasks performed by electricians who work in fossil-fueled electric power plants. Fossil-fueled power plant electrical work is physically strenuous and can expose workers to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), such as carpal tunnel syndrome, low-back pain, or shoulder tendonitis. In an e...

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

263

COMBINED FUEL AND AIR STAGED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM - Energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

264

Fuel Management for Competitive Power Generation: Selected Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel management is increasingly recognized as a vital competitive function in an electric utility. Drawing on a recent industry conference, this report summarizes new thinking and recommendations on fuel management from electric utility fuel managers, consultants, law firms, and a coal supplier.

1997-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Organization of bulk power markets: A concept paper  

SciTech Connect

The electricity industry in the US today is at a crossroads. The restructuring debate going on in most regions has made it clear that the traditional model of vertically integrated firms serving defined franchise areas and regulated by state commissions may not be the pattern for the future. The demands of large customers seeking direct access to power markets, the entry of new participants, and proposed reforms of the regulatory process all signify a momentum for fundamental change in the organization of the industry. This paper addresses electricity restructuring from the perspective of bulk power markets. The authors focus attention on the organization of electricity trade and the various ways it has been and might be conducted. Their approach concentrates on conceptual models and empirical case studies, not on specific proposals made by particular utilities or commissions. They review literature in economics and power system engineering that is relevant to the major questions. The objective is to provide conceptual background to industry participants, e.g. utility staff, regulatory staff, new entrants, who are working on specific proposals. While they formulate many questions, they do not provide definitive answers on most issues. They attempt to put the industry restructuring dialogue in a neutral setting, translating the language of economists for engineers and vice versa. Towards this end they begin with a review of the basic economic institutions in the US bulk power markets and a summary of the engineering practices that dominate trade today.

Kahn, E.; Stoft, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations July 19, 2011 - 4:56pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that as part of an interagency partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to strengthen American energy security and develop new clean energy technologies, DOD will be installing and operating 18 fuel cell backup power systems at eight military installations across the country. The Departments will test how the fuel cells perform in real world operations, identify any technical improvements manufacturers could make to enhance performance, and highlight the benefits of fuel cells for emergency backup

268

Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations July 19, 2011 - 4:56pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that as part of an interagency partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to strengthen American energy security and develop new clean energy technologies, DOD will be installing and operating 18 fuel cell backup power systems at eight military installations across the country. The Departments will test how the fuel cells perform in real world operations, identify any technical improvements manufacturers could make to enhance performance, and highlight the benefits of fuel cells for emergency backup

269

Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations July 19, 2011 - 11:46am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that as part of an interagency partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to strengthen American energy security and develop new clean energy technologies, DOD will be installing and operating 18 fuel cell backup power systems at eight military installations across the country. The Departments will test how the fuel cells perform in real world operations, identify any technical improvements manufacturers could make to enhance performance, and highlight the benefits of fuel cells for emergency backup

270

Design of a Control Strategy for a Fuel Cell/Battery Hybrid Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to design hardware and a control strategy for a fuel cell/battery hybrid power supply. Modern fuel cell/battery hybrid power supplies can have 2 DC/DC converters: one converter for the battery and one for the fuel cell. The hardware for the power supply proposed in this thesis consists of a single DC/DC buck converter at the output terminals of the fuel cell. The battery does not have a DC/DC converter, and it is therefore passive in the system. The use of one single converter is attractive, because it reduces the cost of this power supply. This thesis proposes a method of controlling the fuel cell's DC/DC buck converter to act as a current source instead of a voltage source. This thesis will explain why using the fuel cell's buck converter to act as a current source is most appropriate. The proposed design techniques for the buck converter are also based on stiff systems theory. Combining a fuel cell and a battery in one power supply allows exploitation of the advantages of both devices and undermines their disadvantages. The fuel cell has a slow dynamic response time, and the battery has a fast dynamic response time to fluctuations in a load. A fuel cell has high energy density, and a battery has high power density. And the performance of the hybrid power supply exploits these advantages of the fuel cell and the battery. The controller designed in this thesis allows the fuel cell to operate in its most efficient region: even under dynamic load conditions. The passive battery inherits all load dynamic behavior, and it is therefore used for peaking power delivery, while the fuel cell delivers base or average power. Simulations will be provided using MATLAB/Simulink based models. And the results conclude that one can successfully control a hybrid fuel cell/battery power supply that decouples fluctuations in a load from the fuel cell with extremely limited hardware. The results also show that one can successfully control the fuel cell to operate in its most efficient region.

Smith, Richard C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Enhanced Power Stability for Proton Conducting Solid Oxides Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to provide the basis for a rational approach to improving the performance of Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} electrolytes for proton conducting ceramic fuel cells, we carried out a series of coupled computational and experimental studies to arrive at a consensus view of the characteristics affecting the proton conductivity of these systems. The computational part of the project developed a practical first principles approach to predicting the proton mobility as a function of temperature and doping for polycrystalline systems. This is a significant breakthrough representing the first time that first principles methods have been used to study diffusion across grain boundaries in such systems. The basis for this breakthrough was the development of the ReaxFF reactive force field that accurately describes the structure and energetics of Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} as the proton hops from site to site. The ReaxFF parameters are all derived from an extensive set of quantum mechanics calculations on various clusters, two dimensionally infinite slabs, and three dimensionally infinite periodic systems for combinations of metals, metal alloys, metal oxides, pure and Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}, including chemical reaction pathways and proton transport pathways, structures. The ReaxFF force field enables molecular dynamics simulations to be carried out quickly for systems with {approx} 10,000 atoms rather than the {approx}100 or so practical for QM. The first 2.5 years were spent on developing and validating the ReaxFF and we have only had an opportunity to apply these methods to only a few test cases. However these simulations lead to transport properties (diffusion coefficients and activation energy) for multi-granular systems in good agreement with current experimental results. Now that we have validated the ReaxFF for diffusion across grain boundaries, we are in the position of being able to use computation to explore strategies to improve the diffusion of protons across grain boundaries, which both theory and experiment agree is the cause of the low conductivity of multi-granular systems. Our plan for a future project is to use the theory to optimize the additives and processing conditions and following this with experiment on the most promising systems. The experimental part of this project focused on improving the synthetic techniques for controlling the grain size and making measurements on the properties of these systems as a function of doping of impurities and of process conditions. A significant attention was paid to screening potential cathode materials (transition metal perovskites) and anode electrocatalysts (metals) for reactivity with Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}, fabrication compatibility, and chemical stability in fuel cell environment. A robust method for fabricating crack-free thin membranes, as well as methods for sealing anode and cathode chambers, have been successfully developed. Our Pt|BYZ|Pt fuel cell, with a 100 {micro}m thick Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} electrolyte layer, demonstrates the peak power density and short circuit current density of 28 mW/cm{sup 2} and 130mA/cm{sup 2}, respectively. These are the highest values of this type of fuel cell. All of these provide the basis for a future project in which theory and computation are combined to develop modified ceramic electrolytes capable of both high proton conductivity and excellent mechanical and chemical stability.

Boris Merinov; William A. Goddard III; Sossina Haile; Adri van Duin; Peter Babilo; Sang Soo Han

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

272

EIS-0357 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in 7 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA EIS-0357 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA Summary This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project was selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

273

NETL: News Release - World's First Coal Mine Methane Fuel Cell Powers Up in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2003 22, 2003 World's First Coal Mine Methane Fuel Cell Powers Up in Ohio New Technology Mitigates Coal Mine Methane Emissions, Produces Electricity HOPEDALE, OH - In a novel pairing of old and new, FuelCell Energy of Danbury, Conn., has begun operating the world's first fuel cell powered by coal mine methane. Funded by the Department of Energy, the demonstration harnesses the power of a pollutant - methane emissions from coal mines - to produce electricity in a new, 21st Century fuel cell. MORE INFO Remarks by DOE's James Slutz FuelCell Energy Web Site "We believe this technology can reduce coal mine methane emissions significantly while producing clean, efficient, and reliable high-quality power," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "This has the dual

274

Simulated coal-gas fueled carbonate fuel cell power plant system verification. Final report, September 1990--June 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed under U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) Contract DE-AC-90MC27168 for September 1990 through March 1995. Energy Research Corporation (ERC), with support from DOE, EPRI, and utilities, has been developing a carbonate fuel cell technology. ERC`s design is a unique direct fuel cell (DFC) which does not need an external fuel reformer. An alliance was formed with a representative group of utilities and, with their input, a commercial entry product was chosen. The first 2 MW demonstration unit was planned and construction begun at Santa Clara, CA. A conceptual design of a 10OMW-Class dual fuel power plant was developed; economics of natural gas versus coal gas use were analyzed. A facility was set up to manufacture 2 MW/yr of carbonate fuel cell stacks. A 100kW-Class subscale power plant was built and several stacks were tested. This power plant has achieved an efficiency of {approximately}50% (LHV) from pipeline natural gas to direct current electricity conversion. Over 6,000 hours of operation including 5,000 cumulative hours of stack operation were demonstrated. One stack was operated on natural gas at 130 kW, which is the highest carbonate fuel cell power produced to date, at 74% fuel utilization, with excellent performance distribution across the stack. In parallel, carbonate fuel cell performance has been improved, component materials have been proven stable with lifetimes projected to 40,000 hours. Matrix strength, electrolyte distribution, and cell decay rate have been improved. Major progress has been achieved in lowering stack cost.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Organization Chart and Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mission and Goals Organization Chart and Contacts Background Budget Timeline Program Activities Advisory Panels External Coordination U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home >...

276

New improved standard for electron probe determination of organic sulfur in fossil fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on petroleum coke that is stable under an electron beam and contains a uniform sulfur content. Hence, it is a suitable standard for analysis of organic sulfur content of coal. It should be as applicable for analysis of organic sulfur in other fossil fuels. This standard is available for distribution.

Harris, L.A.; Raymond, R. Jr.; Gooley, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

New approaches to improve the performance of the PEM based fuel cell power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells are expected to play an important role in future power generation. However, significant technical challenges remain and the commercial breakthrough of fuel cells is hindered by the high price of fuel cell components. As is well known, the fuel cells do not provide the robust source characteristics required to effectively follow the load during significant load steps and they have limited overload-handling capability. Further, the performance of the fuel cell is significantly degraded when the CO (Carbon Monoxide) is contained in the hydrogen fuel. In this thesis several new approaches to improve the performance of PEM based fuel cell power systems are discussed. In the first section an impedance model of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack (PEMFCS) is first proposed. This equivalent circuit model of the fuel cell stack is derived by a frequency response analysis (FRA) technique to evaluate the effects of the ripple current generated by the power-conditioning unit. Experimental results are presented to show the effects of the ripple currents. In the second section, a fuel cell powered UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) system is proposed. In this approach, two PEM Fuel Cell modules along with suitable DC/DC and DC/AC power electronic converter modules are employed. A Supercapacitor module is also employed to compensate for instantaneous power fluctuations including overload and to overcome the slow dynamics of the fuel processor such as reformers. A complete design example for a 1-kVA system is presented. In the third section, an advanced power converter topology is proposed to significantly improve the CO tolerance on PEM based fuel cell power systems. An additional two-stage dc-dc converter with a supercapacitor module is connected to the fuel cell to draw a low frequency (0.5Hz) pulsating current of the specific amplitude (20-30[A]) from the fuel cell stack. CO on the catalyst surface can be electro-oxidized by using this technique, and thereby the CO tolerance of the system can be significantly improved. Simulation and experimental results show the validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme.

Choi, Woojin

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Structural changes between models of fossil-fuel demand by steam-electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

A consumption function for multi-fuel steam-electric power plants is used to investigate fossil-fuel demand behavior. The input consumption equations for a plant's primary and alternate fossil fuels are derived by Shepard's lemma from a generalized Cobb-Douglas cost function reflecting average variable cost minimization constrained by technology and the demand for electricity. These equations are estimated by primary and alternate fuel subsets with ordinary least squares and seemingly unrelated regression techniques for 1974, 1977, and 1980. The results of the regression analysis show the importance of consumer demand in the fossil fuel consumption decision; it has the only significant parameter in all of the estimated equations. The estimated own- and cross-price elasticities are small, when they are statistically significant. The results for the primary fuel equations are better than those for the alternate fuel equations in all of the fuel pair subsets.

Gerring, L.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NETL: News Release - Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test DOE, Delphi, Peterbilt Join to Test Auxiliary Power Unit for Commercial Trucks Washington, DC -In a test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a Delphi auxiliary power unit employing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) successfully operated the electrical system and air conditioning of a Peterbilt Model 386 truck under conditions simulating idling conditions for 10 hours. The device provides an alternative to running a truck's main diesel engine, or using a truck's batteries, to power auxiliary electrical loads during rest periods, thereby lowering emissions, reducing noise, and saving fuel. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test

280

Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The indirect methanol cell fuel concept actively pursued by the USDOE and General Motors Corporation proposes the development of an electrochemical engine'' (e.c.e.), an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electrical power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen, are under active development. Transportation applications present design challenges that are distinctly different from utility requirements, the thrust of most of previous fuel cell programs. In both cases, high conversion efficiency (fuel to electricity) is essential. However, transportation requirements dictate as well designs for high power densities, rapid transients including short times for system start up, and consumer safety. The e.c.e. system is formed from four interacting components: (1) the fuel processor; (2) the fuel cell stack; (3) the air compression and decompression device; and (4) the condensing cross flow heat exchange device. 2 figs.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; McFarland, R.D.; Huff, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

The indirect methanol cell fuel concept actively pursued by the USDOE and General Motors Corporation proposes the development of an electrochemical engine'' (e.c.e.), an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electrical power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen, are under active development. Transportation applications present design challenges that are distinctly different from utility requirements, the thrust of most of previous fuel cell programs. In both cases, high conversion efficiency (fuel to electricity) is essential. However, transportation requirements dictate as well designs for high power densities, rapid transients including short times for system start up, and consumer safety. The e.c.e. system is formed from four interacting components: (1) the fuel processor; (2) the fuel cell stack; (3) the air compression and decompression device; and (4) the condensing cross flow heat exchange device. 2 figs.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; McFarland, R.D.; Huff, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a proof of concept SOFC APU. [9] This demonstration wasof which was to demonstrate SOFC technology was chosen forthe ability of the SOFC to utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels,

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Durability of Low Platinum Fuel Cells Operating at High Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cells, 2nd International Workshop on Degradation Issues in Fuel Cells, Thessaloniki, Greece, September 21-23, 2011. 9. R. Subbaraman, Ex-situ Potentiostatic and Potentiodynamic...

284

Organic nonlinear crystals and high power frequency conversion  

SciTech Connect

We are searching for a new second- and third-harmonic generators among the salts of chiral organic acids and bases. We discuss the relevant properties of crystals from this group of compounds, including their nonlinear and phasematching characteristics, linear absorption, damage threshold and crystal growth. In addition, we summarize what is known concerning other nonlinear optical properties of these crystals, such as two-photon absorption, nonlinear refractive index, and stimulated Raman thresholds. A preliminary assessment is made of the potential of these materials for use in future high power, large aperture lasers such as those used for inertial confinement fusion experiments. 14 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Velsko, S.P.; Davis, L.; Wang, F.; Monaco, S.; Eimerl, D.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Combined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden Central Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Study: Fuel Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Com- bined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden City Central Office With more than 67 million customers nationwide, Verizon Communications is one of the largest telecommunica- tions providers in the U.S. Power inter- ruptions can severely impact network operations and could result in losses in excess of $1 million/minute. 1 In 2005, Verizon Communications installed a 1.4 MW phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system, consisting of seven 200 kW units, at its Central Office in Garden City, New York. This fuel cell power plant, the largest in the United States at the time, is reaping environmental benefits and demonstrating the viabil- ity of fuel cells in a commercial, critical telecommunications setting. Background Verizon's Central Office in Garden City,

287

Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations July 19, 2011 - 11:46am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that as part of an interagency partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to strengthen American energy security and develop new clean energy technologies, DOD will be installing and operating 18 fuel cell backup power systems at eight military installations across the country. The Departments will test how the fuel cells perform in real world operations, identify any technical improvements manufacturers could make to enhance

288

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate control and electrical power necessary in order to°C (°F) Table 5 – Stock Heating Performance Electrical PowerThe electrical power needed for an APU system can be broken

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Long-Haul Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOFC Technology R& D Needs Steven Shaffer Chief Engineer ­ Fuel Cell Development DOE Pre) to define system level requirements for a Fuel Cell (SOFC) based Auxiliary Power Unit (APU SOFC X #12;9 DOE Pre-Solicitation Workshop, Golden CO Field Office SOFC Stack Development Key Stack

290

Direct Use of Natural Gas: Economic Fuel Choices from the Regional Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Use of Natural Gas: Economic Fuel Choices from the Regional Power System and Consumer's Perspective Council document 2012-01 Background Is it better to use natural gas directly in water heaters; total-energy efficiency, fuel switching, direct use of gas, and others. The natural gas companies

291

Influence of electrode stress on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance : experimental characterization and power optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressive stress applied to the electrode area of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is known to significantly affect power output. In practice, electrode stress arises during operation due to the clamping force ...

Gallant, Betar M. (Betar Maurkah)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Techno-economic analysis of pressurized oxy-fuel combustion power cycle for CO? capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing concerns over greenhouse gas emissions have driven extensive research into new power generation cycles that enable carbon dioxide capture and sequestration. In this regard, oxy-fuel combustion is a promising new ...

Hong, Jongsup

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Country United States Headquarters Location Cheyenne, Wyoming Recovery Act Funding $5,033,441.00 Total Project Value $10,066,882.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project Coordinates 41.1399814°, -104.8202462° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

294

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

295

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Project Number: FE0011958 Project Description Proof-of-concept of a metal-polymeric...

296

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Journal of Power Sources 140 (2005) 331339 Numerical study of a flat-tube high power density solid oxide fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Research and development in MCFC, SOFC, PEM and Fuels #12;FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct Electrolyte Anode Cathode Electrolyte FCE SOFC Systems Background SOFC MW Module FCE utilizes VPS (Versa Power Systems) fuel cell technology in FCEs SOFC stack modules and systems. FCE/VPS team is engaged

298

Ukraine Loads U.S. Nuclear Fuel into Power Plant as Part of DOE-Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

fficials from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy today (April 8, 2010) participated in a ceremony in Ukraine to mark the insertion of Westinghouse-produced nuclear fuel into a nuclear power plant in Ukraine.

299

Test of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell / Uninterruptible Power Supply for Electric Utility Battery Replacement Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sub-scale polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell/capacitor uninterruptible power supply (UPS) was designed and constructed based on previous research. Testing of this sub-scale UPS as a replacement for existing battery systems is documented in this report. The project verified that the PEM fuel cells, coupled with an ultracapacitor, could functionally replace batteries used for emergency power at electric generating stations. Remaining steps to commercialization include continuing market research...

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

RADIOISOTOPE FUELED AUXILIARY POWER UNIT. Quarterly Progress Report No. 7, July-September 1958  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in the development of SNAP-1 and -3 is reported. SNAP-1 development reported includes: boiler development, fuel development, properties of cerium dioxide, materials corrosion, power conversion system development, shielding analysis, hazards evaluation, and ground test development. SNAP-3 development includes: power conversion analysis, thermoelectric generator development, and fuel element development. Information is given on the handling and transportation equipment for SNAP-1. (N.W.R.)

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Validation of ATR Fission Power Deposition Fraction in HEU and LEU Fuel Plates  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power (250 MW), high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. Because of its high power and large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR full core model has been developed and validated for the low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel conversion feasibility study. Using this model, an analysis has been performed to determine the LEU density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield equivalent K-eff versus effective full power days (EFPDs) between the HEU and LEU cores. This model has also been used to optimize U-235 content of the LEU core, minimizing the differences in K-eff and heat flux profile between the HEU and LEU cores at 115 MW total core power for 125 EFPDs. The LEU core conversion feasibility study evaluated foil type (U-10Mo) fuel with the LEU reference design of 19.7 wt% U-235 enrichment. The LEU reference design has a fixed fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm and can sustain the same operating cycle length as the HEU fuel. Heat flux and fission power density are parameters that are proportional to the fraction of fission power deposited in fuel. Thus, the accurate determination of the fraction of fission power deposited in the fuel is important to ATR nuclear safety. In this work, a new approach was developed and validated, the Tally Fuel Cells Only (TFCO) method. This method calculates and compares the fission power deposition fraction between HEU and LEU fuel plates. Due to the high density of the U-10Mo LEU fuel, the fission ?-energy deposition fraction is 37.12%, which is larger than the HEU’s ?-energy deposition fraction of 19.7%. As a result, the fuel decay heat cooling will need to be improved. During the power operation, the total fission energy (200 MeV per fission) deposition fraction of LEU and HEU are 90.9% and 89.1%, respectively.

G. S. Chang

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012_summer_fuels.pptx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summer Transportation Fuels Summer Transportation Fuels O tl k Outlook April 10, 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * Recovery in Libyan production but lower crude oil exports from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over the level and security of supply from Iran and other countries in the Middle East and North Africa region. * Decline in consumption in OECD countries including the United States but continuing consumption growth in emerging economies. economies. * Continuing discount for West Texas Intermediate crude oil relative to other world crudes. 2 2012 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook World liquid fuels consumption is projected to increase by 0.9

303

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power System Development at PNNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology echnology Hydro- -Desulfurization T Funded by y Arm y y TARDEC Brass board, transportable system Ran 10 kW PEM fuel cell Demonstrated on JP-8 with...

304

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat production (assuming 75% total efficiency for fuel cell) kWhdaycow 4 Finished compost Cubic yardsyear cow 3.32 Electricity required for digester operation kWhcowday 1...

305

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 PM)" "Idaho" "Fuel, Quality",2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)","-","-","-","-","-","-",251,255,295 " Average heat value (Btu per...

306

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 PM)" "Vermont" "Fuel, Quality",1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1","-","-",485,453,412,...

307

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013-Winter Fuels.pptx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DC www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Overview Wi t F l O tl k f h h ld * Winter Fuels Outlook focuses on households. * EIA...

308

Increased power production through enhancements to the Organic ...  

beyond conventional fossil fuels will become inevitably necessary in order to meet increasing global energy demands. Ef?cient and

309

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature MarketProjected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2013 Prepared by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

310

SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Design of annular fuel for high power density BWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enabling high power density in the core of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is economically profitable for existing or new reactors. In this work, we examine the potential for increasing the power density in BWR plants by ...

Morra, Paolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Draft report: application of organic Rankine cycle heat recovery systems to diesel powered marine vessels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis and results of an investigation of the application of organic Rankine cycle heat recovery systems to diesel-powered marine vessels are described. The program under which this study was conducted was sponsored jointly by the US Energy Research and Development Administration, the US Navy, and the US Maritime Administration. The overall objective of this study was to investigate diesel bottoming energy recovery systems, currently under development by three US concerns, to determine the potential for application to marine diesel propulsion and auxiliary systems. The study primarily focused on identifying the most promising vessel applications (considering vessel type, size, population density, operational duty cycle, etc.) so the relative economic and fuel conservation merits of energy recovery systems could be determined and assessed. Vessels in the current fleet and the projected 1985 fleet rated at 1000 BHP class and above were investigated.

Not Available

1977-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electricity Price Formation -- Lessons from the Western U.S.: Report Series on Fuel and Power Market Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western United States is a laboratory for observing the operation of competitive wholesale power markets. Combining a review of the fuel and power infrastructure with observations on market behavior and contractual practices, this report provides evidence of growing interdependence of fuel and power prices. This relationship is expected to strengthen and become more volatile as the fuel and power industries move toward ever higher levels of capacity utilization.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

315

LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND POWER FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is currently one of the most active electric utility companies in deploying fuel cell technology. Fuel cells offer many benefits and are now used as an alternative to traditional internal combustion engines in power generation. In continuing it's role as the leader in fuel cell deploying, LADWP installed a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) in February 2002 at its Main Street service center. The goal of this project is to evaluate the PAFC's performance and cost benefits. This will provide LADWP an insight for future deployment of fuel cell technology. The fuel cell ran smoothly through the first year of operation with very high efficiency and availability, and only with some minor setbacks. The Main street fuel cell project is funded by LADWP with partial grant funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. The technical evaluation and the benefit-cost evaluation of the Main Street fuel cell are both examined in this report.

William W. Glauz

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

Abstract--Environmentally friendly technologies such as photovoltaics and fuel cells are DC sources. In the current power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Environmentally friendly technologies such as photovoltaics and fuel cells are DC sources, fuel cells and photovoltaics, produce direct current (DC). Currently, power system infrastructures that wish to incorporate fuel cells and photovoltaics must first convert the DC power produced

Tolbert, Leon M.

317

Testing and Evaluation of Batteries for a Fuel Cell Powered Hybrid Bus  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory conducted performance characterization and life-cycle tests on various batteries to qualify them for use in a fuel cell/battery hybrid bus. On this bus, methanol-fueled, phosphoric acid fuel cells provide routine power needs, while batteries are used to store energy recovered during bus braking and to produce short-duration power during acceleration. Argonne carried out evaluation and endurance testing on several lead-acid and nickel/cadmium batteries selected by the bus developer as potential candidates for the bus application. Argonne conducted over 10,000 hours of testing, simulating more than 80,000 miles of fuel cell bus operation, for the nickel/cadmium battery, which was ultimately selected for use in the three hybrid buses built under the direction of H-Power Corp.

Miller, J.F.; Webster, C.E.; Tummillo, A.F.; DeLuca, W.H.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Powered by a Renewable U.S. Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clean Cities fact sheet describing aspects of flexible fuel vehicles such as use of E85, special features, benefits of use, costs, and fueling locations. It includes discussion on performance and how to identify these vehicles as well as listing additional resources.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Fuel cell power systems for remote applications. Phase 1 final report and business plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Fuel Cell Power Systems for Remote Applications project is to commercialize a 0.1--5 kW integrated fuel cell power system (FCPS). The project targets high value niche markets, including natural gas and oil pipelines, off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Phase 1 includes the market research, technical and financial analysis of the fuel cell power system, technical and financial requirements to establish manufacturing capability, the business plan, and teaming arrangements. Phase 1 also includes project planning, scope of work, and budgets for Phases 2--4. The project is a cooperative effort of Teledyne Brown Engineering--Energy Systems, Schatz Energy Research Center, Hydrogen Burner Technology, and the City of Palm Desert. Phases 2 through 4 are designed to utilize the results of Phase 1, to further the commercial potential of the fuel cell power system. Phase 2 focuses on research and development of the reformer and fuel cell and is divided into three related, but potentially separate tasks. Budgets and timelines for Phase 2 can be found in section 4 of this report. Phase 2 includes: Task A--Develop a reformate tolerant fuel cell stack and 5 kW reformer; Task B--Assemble and deliver a fuel cell that operates on pure hydrogen to the University of Alaska or another site in Alaska; Task C--Provide support and training to the University of Alaska in the setting up and operating a fuel cell test lab. The Phase 1 research examined the market for power systems for off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Also included in this report are summaries of the previously conducted market reports that examined power needs for remote locations along natural gas and oil pipelines. A list of highlights from the research can be found in the executive summary of the business plan.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013_summer_fuels.pptx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S F l O tl k 2013 Summer Fuels Outlook April 9, 2013 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, pp y g , p y , expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption growth and contribute to modest declines in world crude oil prices. prices. * Brent crude oil prices fall gradually over the forecast, averaging, from $112 per barrel in 2012 to $108 per barrel in g g, $ p $ p 2013 and $101 per barrel in 2014. The discount for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil relative to other world

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a fuel in solid oxide fuel cells,” J. Power Sources 118:L. and Bloomfield, D.P. , “Ammonia Cracker for Fuel Cells”,1998 Fuel Cell Seminar Abstracts, November 16-19, Palm

Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

“Gastrobots”—Benefits and Challenges of Microbial Fuel Cells in FoodPowered Robot Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper introduces the concept of i>Gastrobots, a class of intelligent machines that derive their operational power by exploiting the digestion of real food. Robots of this type could potentially be made self sufficient with just an input ... Keywords: bio-machines, food powered, microbial fuel cells, self-sufficient robots

Stuart Wilkinson

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Effect of radial power distribution on MITR-II fuel element and control blade worth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This summary has been prepared to document and discuss several effects on fuel element and control blade reactivity worths that occur due to changes in the radial power distribution of the 5-MW(t) Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). These results were obtained from reactor physics measurements and core power distribution calculations made during the past decade.

Bernard, J.A.; Kwok, K.S.; Lanning, D.D.; Clark, L.L. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Evaluation of 450-MWe BGL GCC Power Plants Fueled With Pittsburgh No. 8 Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed design and cost estimates have been developed for conventionally and highly integrated 450-MWe, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants employing two General Electric (GE) MS-7001F gas turbines and fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal. The plants have attractive heat rates and capital costs that are competitive with conventional coal-based power technology.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluation of a 510-MWe Destec GCC Power Plant Fueled with Illinois No. 6 Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed design and cost estimate has been developed for a 510-MWe, conventionally integrated, Destec gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plant employing two General Electric (GE) MS-7001F gas turbines and fueled with Illinois no. 6 coal. The plant has an attractive heat rate and a capital cost that is competitive with conventional coal-based power technology.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Large Hybrid Energy Systems for Making Low CO2 Load-Following Power and Synthetic Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid energy systems using nuclear heat sources can economically produce load-following electrical power by exploiting the surplus generation capacity available at night or seasonally to make synthetic fuel. Vehicle fuel is the only current energy use large enough to absorb all the energy capacity that might be diverted from the power industry, and its ease of storage obviates problems with discontinuous synfuel production. The potential benefits and challenges of synfuels integration are illustrated by the production of methanol from natural gas (as a source of carbon) using steam from a light water nuclear power reactor which is assumed to be available in accord with a year's worth of power demand data. Methanol's synthesis process is easily adapted to using 300 C heat from a light water reactor and this simple compound can be further processed into gasoline, biodiesel, or dimethyl ether, fuels which can be used with the current vehicle fleet. A supplemental feed to the methanol process of natural gas (for energy) allows operation at constant full rate when the nuclear heat is being used to produce electrical power. The higher capital costs of such a system are offset by a lower cost of heat and power production from a large base load type of plant and by reduced costs associated with much lower CO2 emissions. Other less tangible economic benefits of this and similar hybrid systems include better use of natural resource for fuels and greater energy services security from the domestic production of vehicle fuel.

Robert S. Cherry; Richard D. Boardman; Steven Aumeier

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Outline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

billion annual sales, 40% of domestic primary energy (Energy Information Administration (2000, 2005 An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England Zugang Liu and Anna Nagurney§ Isenberg School of Management University

Nagurney, Anna

328

Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary energy (Energy Information Administration (2000, 2005)) Deregulation Wholesale market Bilateral Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England Zugang Liu and Anna Nagurney§ Penn State University Hazleton § John F

Nagurney, Anna

329

Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of net assets, $220 billion annual sales, 40% of domestic primary energy (Energy Information Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England Forthcoming in Naval Research Logistics Zugang Liu and Anna Nagurney

Nagurney, Anna

330

Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of net assets, $220 billion annual sales, 40% of domestic primary energy (Energy Information Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England Zugang Liu and Anna Nagurney§ Isenberg School of Management University

Nagurney, Anna

331

Outline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary energy (Energy Information Administration (2000, 2005)) Deregulation Wholesale market Bilateral An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England Zugang Liu Isenberg School of Management University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Nagurney, Anna

332

1 MW Fuel Cell Project: Test and Evaluation of Five 200 kW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Units Configured as a 1 MW Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cell technology can play a potentially significant role as a distributed generation resource at customer facilities. This report describes a demonstration of the new technology that is needed for utility management and control of multiple fuel cell power plants at a single location in an assured power application.

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

333

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Most recently, a number of factors have led to a continuing electric power industry trend of substituting coal-fired generation with natural gas-fired generation: ...

334

High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following figures are included: Westinghouse (W.) SOFC pilot manufacturing facility; cell scale-up plan; W. 25 kW SOFC unit at the utility`s facility on Rokko Island; pressure effect on SOFC power and efficiency; SureCELL{trademark} vs conventional gas turbine plants; SureCELL{trademark} product line for distributed power applications; 20 MW pressurized SOFC/gas turbine power plant; 10 MW SOFT/CT power plant; SureCELL{trademark} plant concept design requirements; and W. SOFC market entry.

Morehead, H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies * Substantial greenhouse gas reduction potential, with or without the cogeneration efficiency * U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Combined Heat and Power...

336

Assessment of the status of fuel cell/battery vehicle power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the status of the integrated fuel cell/battery power system concept for electric vehicle propulsion is reported. The fuel cell, operating on hydrogen or methanol (indirectly), acts as a very high capacity energy battery for vehicle sustaining operation, while a special power battery provides over-capacity transient power on demand, being recharged by the fuel cell, e.g., during cruising. A focused literature search and a set of industrial and Government contacts were carried out to establish views, outlooks, and general status concerning the concept. It is evident that, although vehicle battery R and D is being actively pursued, little of today's fuel cell work is directed to transportation usage. Only very limited attention has been, and is being, given to the fuel cell/battery power system concept itself. However, judging largely from computer-simulated driving cycle results, the concept can provide needed range capabilities and general operating flexibility to electric vehicles. New transportation applications, conventionally viewed as beyond the capability of electric vehicles, may thereby be practical, e.g., rail, trucks. In view of these potential and important benefits, and the absence of any comprehensive research, development, and demonstration activities which are supportive of the fuel cell/battery system concept, the initiation of an appropriate effort is recommended by the Assessment Team. This general recommendation is supported by applicable findings, observations, and conclusions.

Escher, W.J.D.; Foster, R.W.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Assessment of the status of fuel cell/battery vehicle power systems  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the status of the integrated fuel cell/battery power system concept for electric vehicle propulsion is reported. The fuel cell, operating on hydrogen or methanol (indirectly), acts as a very high capacity energy battery for vehicle sustaining operation, while a special power battery provides over-capacity transient power on demand, being recharged by the fuel cell, e.g., during cruising. A focused literature search and a set of industrial and Government contacts were carried out to establish views, outlooks, and general status concerning the concept. It is evident that, although vehicle battery R and D is being actively pursued, little of today's fuel cell work is directed to transportation usage. Only very limited attention has been, and is being, given to the fuel cell/battery power system concept itself. However, judging largely from computer-simulated driving cycle results, the concept can provide needed range capabilities and general operating flexibility to electric vehicles. New transportation applications, conventionally viewed as beyond the capability of electric vehicles, may thereby be practical, e.g., rail, trucks. In view of these potential and important benefits, and the absence of any comprehensive research, development, and demonstration activities which are supportive of the fuel cell/battery system concept, the initiation of an appropriate effort is recommended by the Assessment Team. This general recommendation is supported by applicable findings, observations, and conclusions.

Escher, W.J.D.; Foster, R.W.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Accelerating Acceptance of Fuel Cell Backup Power Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Petrecky Plug Power 968 Albany Shaker Road Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 782-7700 ext: 1799 Email: james_petrecky@plugpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Subcontractor: IdaTech LLC, Bend, OR Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 15, 2013 Objectives Quantify the performance of 20 low-temperature fuel * cell systems at two locations Optimize the maintenance of the systems and data * collection practices The project is intended to increase distributed power * generation, improve reliability and efficiency of

340

Challenges of electric power industry restructuring for fuel suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry. This report is prepared for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public. 28 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fuel Cycle Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as well as for coal and natural gas grid-generation technologies, are provided as baseline cases Cycle Power Plants 14.9 33.1 Natural Gas Turbine, Combined Cycle Power Plants 18.3 46.0 Coal comparable to the total energy use associated with the natural gas and coal grid-generation technologies

Argonne National Laboratory

342

Load Sharing in a Hybrid Power System with a PV Panel and a PEM Fuel-Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

varies with the time of the day. In order to improve the reliability of PV energy and at the same timeLoad Sharing in a Hybrid Power System with a PV Panel and a PEM Fuel-Cell Dachuan Yu S. Yuvarajan power system with PV panels and a PEM fuel cell is described. The system draws the maximum power

Yuvarajan, Subbaraya

343

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The origin of organic pollutants from the combustion of alternative fuels: Phase IV report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US-DOE`s on-going interest in the use of alternative automotive fuels, the University of Dayton Research Institute has been conducting research on pollutant emissions resulting from the combustion of candidate fuels. This research, under the direction and sponsorship of the NREL, has been concerned primarily with the combustion of compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol, and ethanol. In the first 24 months of this program, studies of the oxygen rich, stoichiometric, and fuel-rich thermal degradation of these fuels in the temperature range of 300 to 1100{degrees}C at atmospheric pressure and for reaction times of 1.0 and 2.0 s were completed. Trace organic products were identified and quantified for each fuel as a function of temperature. The results of these studies agreed well with the results of tail-pipe emission studies in that the types and quantity of emissions measured in both the laboratory and engine tests were shown to be very similar under certain operating conditions. However, some chemicals were observed in the laboratory studies that were not observed in the engine studies and vice versa. This result is important in that it has implications concerning the origin of these emissions. Experiments concerning the NO perturbed oxidation of methanol, M85, ethanol, and E85 indicated the presence of complex oxidation chemistry. At mild temperatures, NO addition resulted in enhanced fuel conversion. At elevated temperatures, an inhibitory effect was observed through increased yields of both partial oxidation and pyrolysis-type reaction products. Comparison of flow reactor product distributions with engine test results generally indicated improved comparisons when NO was added to the fuel. Analysis of secondary components of alcohol fuels resulted in some unexpected observations. Several previously unidentified species were observed in these experiments which may impact atmospheric reactivity assessments of these fuels.

Taylor, P.H.; Dellinger, B. [Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States). Research Institute; Sidhu, S.K. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources such as wind generation.

Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Conversion of residual organics in corn stover-derived biorefinery stream to bioenergy via microbial fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

A biorefinery process typically uses about 4-10 times as much water as the amount of biofuel generated. The wastewater produced in a biorefinery process contains residual sugars, 5-furfural, phenolics, and other pretreatment and fermentation byproducts. Treatment of the wastewater can reduce the need for fresh water and potentially add to the environmental benefits of the process. Use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for conversion of the various organics present in a post-fermentation biorefinery stream is reported here. The organic loading was varied over a wide range to assess removal efficiency, coulombic efficiency and power production. A coulombic efficiency of 40% was observed for a low loading of 1% (0.66 g/L) and decreased to 1.8% for the undiluted process stream (66.4 g/L organic loading). A maximum power density of 1180 mW/m2 was observed at a loading of 8%. Excessive loading was found to result in poor electrogenic performance. The results indicate that operation of an MFC at an intermediate loading using dilution and recirculation of the process stream can enable effective treatment with bioenergy recovery.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Schell, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Mid-summer heat pushes up natural gas use at electric power plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, ... four Regional Transmission Organizations—Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the PJM Interconnection ...

349

Ergonomic Design Handbook for Fossil-Fueled Electric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workers in power plants are exposed to numerous risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). This report addresses those issues of accessibility and maintainability affecting MSDs that can best be addressed in the design phase of power plant construction. The report will interface with two other reports that pertain to existing plants and describe what can be done from a retrofitting or work practices change perspective.

2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply s  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be forced to embrace energy efficiencies - those that are within our reach today, and those that will be developed tomorrow. Precisely when they come lo grips with that reality - this year, 10 years from now, or 20 years from now - will determine bow smooth the transition will be for consumers and industry alike.

351

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

Yusibani, Elin [Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage, AIST (Japan); Department of Physics, Universitas Syiah Kuala (Indonesia); Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

MELCOR simulation of the PBF (Power Burst Facility) severe fuel damage test 1-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a MELCOR version 1.7.1 simulation of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) 1-1 test. The input data for the simulation was obtained from the SFD 1-1 Test Results Report and from SCDAP input. Results are presented for the transient two-phase interface level in the core, fuel and clad temperatures at various elevations in the fuel bundle, clad oxidation, hydrogen generation, fission product release, and heat transfer to the surrounding structures. Comparisons are made with experimental data and predictions from STCP and the NRC's mechanistic code SCDAP (version 18). 6 refs., 12 figs.

Madni, I.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Multidisciplinary Modeling, Control, and Optimization of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Power System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes a systematical study, including multidisciplinary modeling, simulation, control, and optimization, of a fuel cell - gas turbine hybrid power system that aims… (more)

Abbassi Baharanchi, Atid

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance in the Key Early Markets of Material Handling Equipment and Backup Power (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes the results of NREL's analysis of hydrogen fuel cell performance in the key early markets of material handling equipment (MHE) and backup power.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Effect of DC to DC converters on organic solar cell arrays for powering DC loads .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this research is to determine if it is possible to reduce the number of organic solar cells required to power a load… (more)

Trotter, Matthew S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Combined Power Generation and Carbon Sequestration Using Direct FuelCell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unique chemistry of carbonate fuel cell offers an innovative approach for separation of carbon dioxide from greenhouse gases (GHG). The carbonate fuel cell system also produces electric power at high efficiency. The simultaneous generation of power and sequestration of greenhouse gases offer an attractive scenario for re-powering the existing coal-fueled power plants, in which the carbonate fuel cell would separate the carbon dioxide from the flue gas and would generate additional pollutant-free electric power. Development of this system is concurrent with emergence of Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) technology for generation of electric power from fossil fuels. DFC is based on carbonate fuel cell featuring internal reforming. This technology has been deployed in MW-scale power plants and is readily available as a manufactured product. This final report describes the results of the conceptualization study conducted to assess the DFC-based system concept for separation of CO2 from GHG. Design and development studies were focused on integration of the DFC systems with coal-based power plants, which emit large amounts of GHG. In parallel to the system design and simulation activities, operation of laboratory scale DFC verified the technical concept and provided input to the design activity. The system was studied to determine its effectiveness in capturing more than ninety percent of CO2 from the flue gases. Cost analysis was performed to estimate the change in cost of electricity for a 200 MW pulverized coal boiler steam cycle plant retrofitted with the DFC-based CO2 separation system producing an additional 127 MW of electric power. The cost increments as percentage of levelized cost of electricity were estimated for a range of separation plant installations per year and a range of natural gas cost. The parametric envelope meeting the goal (<20% increase in COE) was identified. Results of this feasibility study indicated that DFC-based separation systems have the potential for capturing at least 90% of the emissions from the greenhouse gases generated by power plants and other industrial exhaust streams, and yet entail in less than 20% increase in the cost of energy services for long-term deployment (beyond 2012). The anticipated cost of energy increase is in line with DOE's goal for post-combustion systems as outlined in the ''Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines'', published by NETL, April 2005. During the course of this study certain enabling technologies were identified and the needs for further research and development were discussed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fuel from the Sky: Solar Power's Potential for Western Energy Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reliable and affordable supply of electricity is essential to protect public health and safety and to sustain a vigorous economy in the West. Renewable energy in the form of wind or solar provides one of the means of meeting the demand for power while minimizing adverse impacts on the environment, increasing fuel diversity, and hedging against fuel price volatility. Concentrating solar power (CSP) is the most efficient and cost-effective way to generate electricity from the sun. Hundreds of megawatts of CSP solar-generating capacity could be brought on-line within a few years and make a meaningful contribution to the energy needs of the West.

Leitner, A.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W gasoline SOFC technology development program APU applications can provide entry markets for fuel cell & Select APU Systems 2 · Summarize PEM and SOFC performance parameters · Determine most promising future Task 3: Develop design concepts · Truck Cab/SOFC/diesel · Transit bus/SOFC/CNG or diesel · Police

359

Generator module architecture for a large solid oxide fuel cell power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell module contains a plurality of integral bundle assemblies, the module containing a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion receiving air inlet feed and containing a base support, the base supports dense, ceramic exhaust manifolds which are below and connect to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the fuel cells comprise a fuel cell stack bundle all surrounded within an outer module enclosure having top power leads to provide electrical output from the stack bundle, where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all 100% of the weight of the stack, and each bundle assembly has its own control for vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control.

Gillett, James E.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Riggle, Matthew W.; Litzinger, Kevin P.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power: A Fuel Cell System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ambient conditions * System simplicity, i.e., air breathing mode of operation * Complete power system including sensing and control * Competitive cost Twin cell DMFC, 10cm 2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

PBF (Power Burst Facility) severe fuel damage test 1--3 test results report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--3 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1--3 was the third test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel rod behavior, hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (38,000 MWd/tU) pressurized water reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 empty zircaloy guide tubes, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1-h transient at a nominal coolant pressure of 6.85 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 1340-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of online instrumentation, analysis of fission product data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 34 refs., 241 figs., 51 tabs.

Martinson, Z.R.; Gasparini, M.; Hobbins, R.R.; Petti, D.A.; Allison, C.M.; Hohorst, J.K.; Hagrman, D.L.; Vinjamuri, K. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Water rocket - Electrolysis propulsion and fuel cell power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water Rocket is the collective name for an integrated set of technologies that offer new options for spacecraft propulsion, power, energy storage, and structure. Low pressure water stored on the spacecraft is electrolyzed to generate, separate, and pressurize gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. These gases, stored in lightweight pressure tanks, can be burned to generate thrust or recombined to produce electric power. As a rocket propulsion system, Water Rocket provides the highest feasible chemical specific impulse (-400 seconds). Even higher specific impulse propulsion can be achieved by combining Water Rocket with other advanced propulsion technologies, such as arcjet or electric thrusters. With innovative pressure tank technology, Water Rocket's specific energy [Wh/kg] can exceed that of the best foreseeable batteries by an order of magnitude, and the tanks can often serve as vehicle structural elements. For pulsed power applications, Water Rocket propellants can be used to drive very high power density generators, such as MHD devices or detonation-driven pulse generators. A space vehicle using Water Rocket propulsion can be totally inert and non-hazardous during assembly and launch. These features are particularly important for the timely development and flight qualification of new classes of spacecraft, such as microsats, nanosats, and refuelable spacecraft.

Carter, P H; Dittman, M D; Kare, J T; Militsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

1999-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

366

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capabilities. Our analysis takes explicitly into account that the supply of electricity at the wholesale level an alternative scenario in which utilities procure electric power in a competitive wholesale market, biofuels and afforestation. The overall marginal cost of achieving a particular level of emission

Silver, Whendee

367

Risk Assessment of Toxic Pollutants From Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities operating coal-fired power plants must weigh the cost of controlling toxic releases against the risk of adverse human health effects. An EPRI-developed analytic framework offers guidance for such assessments, outlining mathematical modeling procedures for tracking pollutants in the environment and for estimating potential health risks to nearby populations.

1987-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

368

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL POWER PLANT LOCATED AT TERMINAL ISLAND WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) has developed one of the most recognized fuel cell demonstration programs in the United States. In addition to their high efficiencies and superior environmental performance, fuel cells and other generating technologies that can be located at or near the load, offers several electric utility benefits. Fuel cells can help further reduce costs by reducing peak electricity demand, thereby deferring or avoiding expenses for additional electric utility infrastructure. By locating generators near the load, higher reliability of service is possible and the losses that occur during delivery of electricity from remote generators are avoided. The potential to use renewable and locally available fuels, such as landfill or sewage treatment waste gases, provides another attractive outlook. In Los Angeles, there are also many oil producing areas where the gas by-product can be utilized. In June 2000, the LADWP contracted with FCE to install and commission the precommercial 250kW MCFC power plant. The plant was delivered, installed, and began power production at the JFB in August 2001. The plant underwent manufacturer's field trials up for 18 months and was replace with a commercial plant in January 2003. In January 2001, the LADWP contracted with FCE to provide two additional 250kW MCFC power plants. These commercial plants began operations during mid-2003. The locations of these plants are at the Terminal Island Sewage Treatment Plant at the Los Angeles Harbor (for eventual operation on digester gas) and at the LADWP Main Street Service Center east of downtown Los Angeles. All three carbonate fuel cell plants received partial funding through the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. This report covers the technical evaluation and benefit-cost evaluation of the Terminal Island 250kW MCFC power plant during its first year of operation from June 2003 to July 2004.

William W. Glauz

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this work can be summed into two major categories. Firstly, the fundamentals of the combustion of glycerol (in both a refined and unrefined form) were to be investigated, with emphasis of the development of a system capable of reliably and repeatedly combusting glycerol as well as an analysis of the emissions produced during glycerol combustion. Focus was placed on quantifying common emissions in comparison to more traditional fuels and this work showed that the burner developed was able to completely combust glycerol within a relatively wide range of operating conditions. Additionally, focus was placed on examining specific emissions in more detail, namely interesting NOx emissions observed in initial trials, acrolein and other volatile organic emissions, and particulate and ash emissions. This work showed that the combustion of crude glycerol could result in significantly reduced NOx emissions as a function of the high fuel bound oxygen content within the glycerol fuel. It also showed that when burned properly, the combustion of crude glycerol did not result in excessive emissions of acrolein or any other VOC compared to the combustion from more traditional fuels. Lastly however, this work has shown that in any practical application in which glycerol is being burned, it will be necessary to explore ash mitigation techniques due to the very high particulate matter concentrations produced during glycerol combustion. These emissions are comparable to unfiltered coal combustion and are directly tied to the biodiesel production method. The second focus of this work was directed to developing a commercialization strategy for the use of glycerol as a fuel replacement. This strategy has identified a 30 month plan for the scaling up of the laboratory scale burner into a pre-pilot scale system. Additionally, financing options were explored and an assessment was made of the economics of replacing a traditional fuel (namely natural gas) with crude glycerol from biodiesel production. This analysis showed that the cost of replacing natural gas with crude glycerol requires a strong function of the market price per unit of energy for the traditional fuel. However, the economics can be improved through the inclusion of a federal tax credit for the use of a renewable fuel. The conclusion of this analysis also shows that the ideal customer for energy replacement via crude glycerol is biodiesel producers who are located in remote regions, where the cost of energy is higher and the cost of crude glycerol is lowest. Lastly, the commercialization strategy analyzed competing technologies, namely traditional natural gas and electric heaters, as well as competing glycerol burners, and concludes with a discussion of the requirements for a pilot demonstration.

William L. ROberts

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fuel cell power plant coolant cleaning system and method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a process for deaerating and purifying both the water which is recirculated in a coolant loop through a stack of fuel cells and the make-up water for the coolant loop, a portion of the water from the coolant loop is blown down into a deaerator water reservoir to which make-up water is added as required by the coolant loop. Water is withdrawn from the reservoir, purified, and then introduced into the coolant loop at a rate sufficient to maintain the desired amount of water circulating in the coolant loop. The blowdown provides some of the heat for deaerating the water; and the rate of blowdown flow into the reservoir is sufficient to maintain an acceptable level of impurities in the recirculating coolant loop water. Preferably, the blowdown flow rate is controlled as a function of the amount of make-up water required to be added to the coolant loop.

Grasso, A.P.

1982-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

METAL INTERCONNECTS FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL POWER SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interconnect development is identified by the U.S. Department of Energy as a key technical area requiring focused research to meet the performance and cost goals under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance initiative. In the Phase I SECA Core Technology Program, Ceramatec investigated a commercial ferritic stainless steel composition for oxidation resistance properties by measuring the weight gain when exposed to air at the fuel cell operating temperature. A pre-treatment process that results in a dense, adherent scale was found to reduce the oxide scale growth rate significantly. A process for coating the surface of the alloy in order to reduce the in-plane resistance and potentially inhibit chromium oxide evaporation was also identified. The combination of treatments provided a very low resistance through the scale. The resistance measured was as low as 10 milliohm-cm{sup 2} at 750 C in air. The oxide scale was found to be stable in humidified air at 750 C. The resistance value was stable over several thermal cycles. A similar treatment and coating for the fuel side of the interconnect also showed an exceptionally low resistance of one milliohm-cm{sup 2} in humidified hydrogen at 750 C, and was stable through multiple thermal cycles. Analysis of the scale after exposure to various atmospheres showed the presence of a stable composition. When exposed to a dual (air and hydrogen) atmosphere however, the scale composition contains a mixture of phases. Based on results to-date, the alloy selection and the treatment processes appear to be well suited for SOFC interconnect application.

S. Elangovan; S. Balagopal; M. Timper; I. Bay; D. Larsen; J. Hartvigsen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prices of fuels at energy markets and the transportation/distribution costs in making their economic the fuel price at each energy fuel market am. Since this paper focuses on the electric power supply chain markets that captures both the economic network transactions in energy supply markets and the physical

Nagurney, Anna

373

Technical Assessment: Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrids for Distributed Power Market Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFCs) are under intense development in the U.S., Japan, and Europe. The U.S. DOE solid energy convergence alliance (SECA) has invested in SOFC technology for distributed power markets and for future applications involving integrated coal gasification. SOFC hybrid systems which incorporate the use of small turbines or turbo-charging have potentially high efficiencies near 60% LHV. Rolls Royce, GE Power Systems, Siemens, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries are developin...

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

374

Adaptation of a commercially available 200 kW natural gas fuel cell power plant for operation on a hydrogen rich gas stream  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

International Fuel Cells (IFC) has designed a hydrogen fueled fuel cell power plant based on a modification of its standard natural gas fueled PC25{trademark} C fuel cell power plant. The natural gas fueled PC25 C is a 200 kW, fuel cell power plant that is commercially available. The program to accomplish the fuel change involved deleting the natural gas processing elements, designing a new fuel pretreatment subsystem, modifying the water and thermal management subsystem, developing a hydrogen burner to combust unconsumed hydrogen, and modifying the control system. Additionally, the required modifications to the manufacturing and assembly procedures necessary to allow the hydrogen fueled power plant to be manufactured in conjunction with the on-going production of the standard PC25 C power plants were identified. This work establishes the design and manufacturing plan for the 200 kW hydrogen fueled PC25 power plant.

Maston, V.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology Stationary Power Application Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were to: (1) Develop a reliable, cost-effective, and production-friendly technique to apply the power-enhancing layer at the interface of the air electrode and electrolyte of the Siemens SOFC; (2) Design, build, install, and operate in the field two 5 kWe SOFC systems fabricated with the state-of-the-art cylindrical, tubular cell and bundle technology and incorporating advanced module design features. Siemens successfully demonstrated, first in a number of single cell tests and subsequently in a 48-cell bundle test, a significant power enhancement by employing a power-enhancing composite interlayer at the interface between the air electrode and electrolyte. While successful from a cell power enhancement perspective, the interlayer application process was not suitable for mass manufacturing. The application process was of inconsistent quality, labor intensive, and did not have an acceptable yield. This program evaluated the technical feasibility of four interlayer application techniques. The candidate techniques were selected based on their potential to achieve the technical requirements of the interlayer, to minimize costs (both labor and material), and suitably for large-scale manufacturing. Preliminary screening, utilizing lessons learned in manufacturing tubular cells, narrowed the candidate processes to two, ink-roller coating (IRC) and dip coating (DC). Prototype fixtures were successfully built and utilized to further evaluate the two candidate processes for applying the interlayer to the high power density Delta8 cell geometry. The electrical performance of interlayer cells manufactured via the candidate processes was validated. Dip coating was eventually selected as the application technique of choice for applying the interlayer to the high power Delta8 cell. The technical readiness of the DC process and product quality was successfully and repeatedly demonstrated, and its throughput and cost are amenable to large scale manufacturing. Two 5 kWe-class SOFC power systems were built and installed for the purpose of testing and evaluating state-of-the-art tubular cell and bundle technologies, advanced generator and module design features, balance-of-plant components, and cost reduction measures. Installed at the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, a system operated for more than 17,500 hrs, delivering electrical power to the on-site grid and thermal energy in form of hot water for onsite utilization. Operation was typically autonomous, requiring minimal operator intervention, and achieved an overall availability of greater than 85%. Outages were primarily due to an unstable local grid, two weather related outages were experienced, and very few reliability issues were encountered despite harsh operating conditions. No repairs to the stack, module, or balance-of-plant were required. A second system was designed, built, delivered, and installed at a Siemens facility in Charlotte, North Carolina. Operational issues associated with the balance-of-plant were encountered during startup and prevented the system from operating.

Joseph Pierre

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the commercial steam and power generation industry, deposits on heat transfer surfaces of the steam-water cycle equipment in fossil plant units have been a challenge. Deposits form at nearly all locations within the steam-water cycle, particularly in boiler tubes where failures can have substantial negative impacts on unit availability and reliability. Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-wat...

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

Outage Milestone Manual for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of an outage program and the correctness of the outage process are important to the continuous improvement and long-term success of a utility and plant. This report--based on collective industry experience; Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) publications; and outage conference, meeting, and workshop data--provides guidance for utility and plant management and staff involved in outage planning, execution, and post-outage operations and in restarting the planning cycle in preparation f...

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

Outage Management Guidelines for Fossil- Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of an outage program and the correctness of the outage process are important to the continuous improvement and the long-term success of a utility and plant. This report, based on collective industry experience, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) publications, and outage conference, meeting, and workshop data, provides guidance for utility/plant management and staff involved in outage planning, execution, and post-outage operations and in restarting the planning cycle in preparation f...

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

Correlating Cycle Duty with Cost at Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report is part of the ongoing EPRI Cycling Impacts Program to develop a range of analysis and simulation-capable planning tools. The objectives are to better determine cycling impacts (including incremental costs), reliability impact, component level effects, and impacts and other elements needed to better plan and manage operational and financial aspects of power generation. This report documents early efforts to establish strong correlations between the cycle duty of a produc...

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

380

Turning Bacteria into Fuel: Cyanobacteria Designed for Solar-Powered Highly Efficient Production of Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: ASU is engineering a type of photosynthetic bacteria that efficiently produce fatty acids—a fuel precursor for biofuels. This type of bacteria, called Synechocystis, is already good at converting solar energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) into a type of fatty acid called lauric acid. ASU has modified the organism so it continuously converts sunlight and CO2 into fatty acids—overriding its natural tendency to use solar energy solely for cell growth and maximizing the solar-to-fuel conversion process. ASU’s approach is different because most biofuels research focuses on increasing cellular biomass and not on excreting fatty acids. The project has also identified a unique way to convert the harvested lauric acid into a fuel that can be easily blended with existing transportation fuels.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Durability of Low Pt Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPIRE Program Kickoff SPIRE Program Kickoff Topic 3A. Cell Degradation Studies / Degradation Studies Durability of Low Pt Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density US DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting DOE Award: DE-EE0000469 October 1 st , 2009 Program Objectives The objective of this program is to study and identify strategies to assure durability of fuel cells designed to meet DOE cost targets. Technical Barriers Barrier Approach Strategy A. Durability Reinforced, Stabilized Membrane MEA Partner Durability-Enhanced Electrodes Electrocatalyst/MEA Partner Optimized Operating Conditions Parametric model & experimental studies B. Cost Low Pt Loadings (0.2 mg/cm 2 ) Electrocatalyst/MEA Partner High Power Density (>1.0W/cm 2 ) Open Flowfield Stack Metallic Stack Architecture Incumbent Derivative

382

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers OCTOBER 2011 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

383

Recent progress in zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide fuel cells based upon yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte offer a clean, pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. This paper reviews the designs, materials and fabrication processes used for such fuel cells. Most progress to date has been achieved with tubular geometry cells. A large number of tubular cells have been electrically tested, some to times up to 30,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. In addition, successively larger size electric generators utilizing these cells have been designed, built and operated since 1984. Two 25 kW power generation field test units have recently been fabricated; these units represent a major milestone in the commercialization of zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Recent progress in zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide fuel cells based upon yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte offer a clean, pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. This paper reviews the designs, materials and fabrication processes used for such fuel cells. Most progress to date has been achieved with tubular geometry cells. A large number of tubular cells have been electrically tested, some to times up to 30,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. In addition, successively larger size electric generators utilizing these cells have been designed, built and operated since 1984. Two 25 kW power generation field test units have recently been fabricated; these units represent a major milestone in the commercialization of zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A STUDY OF CORE FUEL SYSTEMS FOR A FAST BREEDER POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of a program aimed toward the development of materials and a core-subassembly design for the second core of the Fermi Reactor is outlined. The ground rules established by APDA for the study were based upon the performance requirements of the reactor plant with some modification to permit hlgher power generation and upon a value of Pu produced of about per g. Consideratlons of various factors led to the selection of the dispersion or cermet fuel as havlng the most potential for the Core II application. The fuel selected was a 30 vol. % dispersion of UO/sub 2/ in U--10 wt. % Mo or gamma- phasetype alloy, zirconium clad, in a flat-plate-subassembly design. The plant economics for subassembly designs of the fuel systems were evaluated at a core power level of 616 Mw. (W.D.M.)

Fawcett, S.L. ed.

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fuel Cell/Battery Powered Bus System. Final Report for period August 1987 - December 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today, fuel cell systems are getting much attention from the automotive industry as a future replacement for the internal combustion engine (ICE). Every US automobile manufacturer and most foreign firms have major programs underway to develop fuel cell engines for transportation. The objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of using fuel cells as an alternative to the ICE. Three such vehicles (30-foot buses) were introduced beginning in 1994. Extensive development and operational testing of fuel cell systems as a vehicle power source has been accomplished under this program. The development activity investigated total systems configuration and effectiveness for vehicle operations. Operational testing included vehicle performance testing, road operations, and extensive dynamometer emissions testing.

Wimmer, R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Drum type fossil fueled power plant control based on fuzzy inverse MIMO model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new fuzzy controller is proposed based on inverse model of boiler-turbine system. Gain scheduling scheme is used to keep feedback rule as close as possible to optimal condition while generating plant Input/Output data. Interaction between ... Keywords: ANFIS, drum type fossil fueled power plant (FFPP), interaction, inverse model control, nonlinear model, robustness

Ali Ghaffari; Mansour Nikkhah Bahrami; Hesam Parsa

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Use of plasma fuel systems at thermal power plants in Russia, Kazakhstan, China, and Turkey  

SciTech Connect

The technology of plasma ignition of solid fuels is described, as well as its creation and development steps, the technoeconomic characteristics of plasma igniter systems, schemes of their installation in pulverized-coal boilers, and results of their application at pulverized coal-fired power plants.

Karpenko, E.I.; Karpenko, Y.E.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulan Ude (Russian Federation). Institute of Thermal Physics

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Analysis of using fuel cell technology for autonomous underwater vehicle power supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays underwater robotics aims at semi or whole autonomous underwater vehicles. Autonomy of underwater robots depends on their control systems usually based on artificial intelligence methods and capacity of supply sources mounted on their boards. ... Keywords: fuel cell, underwater vehicle power supply

Grzegorz Grzeczka; Piotr Szymak

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

PRELIMINARY SAFEGUARDS REPORT BASED ON URANIUM-MOLYBDENUM FUEL FOR THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Hallam Power Reactor is described relative to site, buildings, reactor and associated heat-transfer system, instrumentation and control, auxiliary systems, and fuel and component handling facilities. The potential hazards of radioactivity and safeguards for confinement are discussed. Radiation levels and accidental effluent release are considered. Transients with and without protective system action are discussed. (B.O.G.)

Gershun, T.L. ed.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

State-of-the-Art Assessment of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells for Distributed Power Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell technology targeted for transportation markets has been rapidly advancing the past few years. This technology represents a potentially strategic retail access technology that could be useful in a variety of utility, commercial, and residential distributed power and retail energy service applications.

1997-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Flying on Hydrogen GeorgiaTech researchers use fuel cells to power unmanned aerial vehicle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the GeorgiaTech Research Institute (GTRI), the project was attractive as energy sources because of their high energy density. Higher energy density translates into longer endurance. Though fuel cells don't produce: Researchers have developed a hydro- gen-powered unmanned aircraft believed to be the largest to fly

Sherrill, David

393

Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Program Webinar Technologies Program Webinar July 17, 2012 1 Introduction to DMFCs Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Piotr Zelenay Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, U.S.A. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - July 17, 2012 - The Fuel Choice P. Piela and P. Zelenay, Fuel Cell Review, 1, 17, 2004 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - July 17, 2012 2 Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode: Pt-Ru Cathode: Pt Membrane: e.g. Nafion ® 115 e - CH 3 OH H + H 2 O CH 3 OH Electroosmotic drag MEMBRANE 1.5 O 2 (air) H 2 O CO 2 + 3 H 2 O 6 H + + 6 e - ANODE CATHODE CH 3 OH (l) + 1.5 O 2  2 H 2 O (l) + CO 2  V = 1.21 V; G° = 6.1 kWh kg -1 = 4.8 kWh L -1 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - July 17, 2012 3 ______________________ O 2 H 

394

Low-temperature fuel cell systems for commercial airplane auxiliary power.  

SciTech Connect

This presentation briefly describes the ongoing study of fuel cell systems on-board a commercial airplane. Sandia's current project is focused on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells applied to specific on-board electrical power needs. They are trying to understand how having a fuel cell on an airplane would affect overall performance. The fuel required to accomplish a mission is used to quantify the performance. Our analysis shows the differences between the base airplane and the airplane with the fuel cell. There are many ways of designing a system, depending on what you do with the waste heat. A system that requires ram air cooling has a large mass penalty due to increased drag. The bottom-line impact can be expressed as additional fuel required to complete the mission. Early results suggest PEM fuel cells can be used on airplanes with manageable performance impact if heat is rejected properly. For PEMs on aircraft, we are continuing to perform: (1) thermodynamic analysis (investigate configurations); (2) integrated electrical design (with dynamic modeling of the micro grid); (3) hardware assessment (performance, weight, and volume); and (4) galley and peaker application.

Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Biogas-Fueled Electric Power: An Assessment of Systems and Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the practice of generating electric power from biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide with trace contaminants, produced as a byproduct of biological treatment of organic waste under anaerobic (no oxygen) conditions. Biogas is commonly produced during treatment of municipal solid waste in sealed landfills and anaerobic digestion of wastewater treatment plant sludge, animal manure, and organic industrial waste. Power generation from biogas is distributed generation as it is ...

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Coordinating Fuel Inventory and Electric Power Generation Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the problem of hedging between the natural gas and electric power markets. Based on multiple forecasts for natural gas prices, natural gas demand, and electricity prices, a stochastic optimization model advises a decision maker on when to buy or sell natural gas and when to transform gas into electricity. For relatively small models, branch-and-bound solves the problem to optimality. Larger models are solved using Benders decomposition and Lagrangian relaxation. We apply our approach to the system of an electric utility and succeed in solving problems with 50,000 binary variables in less than 4 minutes to within 1.16% of the optimal value.

Samer Takriti; Chonawee Supatgiat; Lilian S.-Y. Wu

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Industrial Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kriston P. Brooks (Primary Contact), Siva P. Pilli, Dale A. King Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 372-4343 Email: kriston.brooks@pnnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Subcontractor: ClearEdge Power, Portland, OR Project Start Date: May 2010 Project End Date: September 2012

398

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Sector Fred Joseck U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Transportation and Stationary Power Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Integration Workshop (TSPI) Phoenix, Arizona October 27, 2008 2 Why Integration? * Move away from conventional thinking...fuel and power generation/supply separate * Make dramatic change, use economies of scale,

399

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act: Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Packs and Hydrogen Refueling for Lift Trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEB Grocery Company, Inc. (H-E-B) is a privately-held supermarket chain with 310 stores throughout Texas and northern Mexico. H-E-B converted 14 of its lift reach trucks to fuel cell power using Nuvera Fuel Cells’ PowerEdge™ units to verify the value proposition and environmental benefits associated with the technology. Issues associated with the increasing power requirements of the distribution center operation, along with high ambient temperature in the summer and other operating conditions (such as air quality and floor surface condition), surfaced opportunities for improving Nuvera’s PowerEdge fuel cell system design in high-throughput forklift environments. The project included on-site generation of hydrogen from a steam methane reformer, called PowerTap™ manufactured by Nuvera. The hydrogen was generated, compressed and stored in equipment located outside H-E-B’s facility, and provided to the forklifts by hydrogen dispensers located in high forklift traffic areas. The PowerEdge fuel cell units logged over 25,300 operating hours over the course of the two-year project period. The PowerTap hydrogen generator produced more than 11,100 kg of hydrogen over the same period. Hydrogen availability at the pump was 99.9%. H-E-B management has determined that fuel cell forklifts help alleviate several issues in its distribution centers, including truck operator downtime associated with battery changing, truck and battery maintenance costs, and reduction of grid electricity usage. Data collected from this initial installation demonstrated a 10% productivity improvement, which enabled H-E-B to make economic decisions on expanding the fleet of PowerEdge and PowerTap units in the fleet, which it plans to undertake upon successful demonstration of the new PowerEdge reach truck product. H-E-B has also expressed interst in other uses of hydrogen produced on site in the future, such as for APUs used in tractor trailers and refrigerated transport trucks in its fleet.

Block, Gus

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ontario Power Generation's 250 kWe Class Atmospheric Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC): Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the demonstration experiences and lessons learned from a 250 kW solid oxide fuel cell system in a combined heat and power demonstration operating on natural gas. The project was a collaboration initiative between Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) and Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to install and test a first-of-a-kind SOFC system at OPG site in Toronto, Canada. This test and evaluation case study is one of several distributed generation project case studies under res...

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL POWER PLANT LOCATED AT LADWP MAIN STREET SERVICE CENTER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) has developed one of the most recognized fuel cell demonstration programs in the United States. In addition to their high efficiencies and superior environmental performance, fuel cells and other generating technologies that can be located at or near the load, offers several electric utility benefits. Fuel cells can help further reduce costs by reducing peak electricity demand, thereby deferring or avoiding expenses for additional electric utility infrastructure. By locating generators near the load, higher reliability of service is possible and the losses that occur during delivery of electricity from remote generators are avoided. The potential to use renewable and locally available fuels, such as landfill or sewage treatment waste gases, provides another attractive outlook. In Los Angeles, there are also many oil producing areas where the gas by-product can be utilized. In June 2000, the LADWP contracted with FCE to install and commission the precommercial 250kW MCFC power plant. The plant was delivered, installed, and began power production at the JFB in August 2001. The plant underwent manufacturer's field trials up for 18 months and was replace with a commercial plant in January 2003. In January 2001, the LADWP contracted with FCE to provide two additional 250kW MCFC power plants. These commercial plants began operations during mid-2003. The locations of these plants are at the Terminal Island Sewage Treatment Plant at the Los Angeles Harbor (for eventual operation on digester gas) and at the LADWP Main Street Service Center east of downtown Los Angeles. All three carbonate fuel cell plants received partial funding through the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. This report covers the technical evaluation and benefit-cost evaluation of the Main Street 250kW MCFC power plant during its first year of operation from September 2003 to August 2004. The data for the month of September 2004 was not available at the time this report was prepared. An addendum to this report will be prepared and transmitted to the Department of Energy once this data becomes available. This fuel cell power plant was originally intended to be installed at an American Airlines facility located at Los Angeles International Airport, however, due to difficulties in obtaining a site, the plant was ultimately installed at the LADWP's Distributed Generation Test Facility at it's Main Street Service Center.

William W. Glauz

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power (SOFC APU) development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14318. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner development leading to successful demonstration of the SOFC APU objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant SOFC APU Milestones: Demonstrated: Operation meeting SOFC APU requirements on commercial Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel. SOFC systems operating on dry CPOX reformate. Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC APU system without inert gas purge. Developed: Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. Demonstrated efficient SOFC output power conditioning. Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods.

Vesely, Charles John-Paul [Cummins Power Generation; Fuchs, Benjamin S. [Cummins Power Generation; Booten, Chuck W. [Protonex Technology, LLC

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report determines cost and performance requirements for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles carrying pure H{sub 2} fuel, to achieve parity with internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. A conceptual design of a near term FCEV (fuel cell electric vehicle) is presented. Complete power system weight and cost breakdowns are presented for baseline design. Near term FCEV power system weight is 6% higher than ICE system, mid-term FCEV projected weights are 29% lower than ICE`s. There are no inherently high-cost components in FCE, and at automotive production volumes, near term FCEV cost viability is closer at hand than at first thought. PEM current vs voltage performance is presented for leading PEM manufacturers and researchers. 5 current and proposed onboard hydrogen storage techniques are critically compared: pressurized gas, cryogenic liquid, combined pressurized/cryogenic, rechargeable hydride, adsorption. Battery, capacitor, and motor/controller performance is summarized. Fuel cell power system component weight and cost densities (threshold and goal) are tabulated.

James, B.D.; Baum, G.N.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Develop and test fuel cell powered on-site integrated total energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication and testing of a 25kW phosphoric acid fuel cell system aimed at stationary applications, and the technology development underlying that system. The 25kW fuel cell ran at rated power in both the open and closed loop mode in the summer of 1988. Problems encountered and solved include acid replenishment leakage, gas cross-leakage and edge-leakage in bipolar plates, corrosion of metallic cooling plates and current collectors, cooling groove depth variations, coolant connection leaks, etc. 84 figs., 7 tabs.

Kaufman, A.; Werth, J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Duba, Alfred G. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Ching-I (Danville, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Zero Emission Power Plants Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Oxygen Transport Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. (SWPC) is engaged in the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stationary power systems. SWPC has combined DOE Developmental funds with commercial customer funding to establish a record of successful SOFC field demonstration power systems of increasing size. SWPC will soon deploy the first unit of a newly developed 250 kWe Combined Heat Power System. It will generate electrical power at greater than 45% electrical efficiency. The SWPC SOFC power systems are equipped to operate on lower number hydrocarbon fuels such as pipeline natural gas, which is desulfurized within the SOFC power system. Because the system operates with a relatively high electrical efficiency, the CO2 emissions, {approx}1.0 lb CO2/ kW-hr, are low. Within the SOFC module the desulfurized fuel is utilized electrochemically and oxidized below the temperature for NOx generation. Therefore the NOx and SOx emissions for the SOFC power generation system are near negligible. The byproducts of the power generation from hydrocarbon fuels that are released into the environment are CO2 and water vapor. This forward looking DOE sponsored Vision 21 program is supporting the development of methods to capture and sequester the CO2, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system. To accomplish this, SWPC is developing a SOFC module design, to be demonstrated in operating hardware, that will maintain separation of the fuel cell anode gas, consisting of H2, CO, H2O and CO2, from the vitiated air. That anode gas, the depleted fuel stream, containing less than 18% (H2 + CO), will be directed to an Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) Afterburner that is being developed by Praxair, Inc.. The OTM is supplied air and the depleted fuel. The OTM will selectively transport oxygen across the membrane to oxidize the remaining H2 and CO. The water vapor is then condensed from the totally 1.5.DOC oxidized fuel stream exiting the afterburner, leaving only the CO2 in gaseous form. That CO2 can then be compressed and sequestered, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system operating on hydrocarbon fuel that adds only water vapor to the environment. Praxair has been developing oxygen separation systems based on dense walled, mixed electronic, oxygen ion conducting ceramics for a number of years. The oxygen separation membranes find applications in syngas production, high purity oxygen production and gas purification. In the SOFC afterburner application the chemical potential difference between the high temperature SOFC depleted fuel gas and the supplied air provides the driving force for oxygen transport. This permeated oxygen subsequently combusts the residual fuel in the SOFC exhaust. A number of experiments have been carried out in which simulated SOFC depleted fuel gas compositions and air have been supplied to either side of single OTM tubes in laboratory-scale reactors. The ceramic tubes are sealed into high temperature metallic housings which precludes mixing of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel and air streams. In early tests, although complete oxidation of the residual CO and H2 in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel was achieved, membrane performance degraded over time. The source of degradation was found to be contaminants in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream. Following removal of the contaminants, stable membrane performance has subsequently been demonstrated. In an ongoing test, the dried afterburner exhaust composition has been found to be stable at 99.2% CO2, 0.4% N2 and 0.6%O2 after 350 hours online. Discussion of these results is presented. A test of a longer, commercial demonstration size tube was performed in the SWPC test facility. A similar contamination of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream occurred and the performance degraded over time. A second test is being prepared. Siemens Westinghouse and Praxair are collaborating on the preliminary design of an OTM equipped Afterburner demonstration unit. The intent is to test the afterburner in conjunction with a reduced size SOFC test module that has the anode gas separati

Shockling, Larry A.; Huang, Keqin; Gilboy, Thomas E. (Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation); Christie, G. Maxwell; Raybold, Troy M. (Praxair, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Use of Incremental Pricing in Coal Supply and Transportation Agreements to Achieve Power Sales: Report Series of Fuel and Power Market Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased power market competition is transforming into increased fuel supply competition. This report examines the role that "incremental pricing" for coal supply and transportation services plays in permitting power generators to achieve greater power sales. Surprisingly, the outlook for using such mechanisms for this purpose is more restricted than one might expect.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

Case Study of a 250-kW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell: LADWP Demonstration of a FuelCell Energy Power Plant: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 2001, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) installed a 250-kW pre-commercial molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system manufactured by FuelCell Energy (FCE) at its headquarters building in downtown Los Angeles. At the time, the FCE Direct FuelCell 300A was only the second such system deployed in the United States, although several DFC systems had been deployed in Europe by FCE's partner, MTU. The purpose of the field trial was to gain experience with emerging fuel cell technolog...

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

411

Power management strategy based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for fuel cell-battery hybrid vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A power management strategy based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is proposed to enhance the fuel economy of fuel cell-battery hybrid vehicle and increase the mileage of continuation of journey. The model of hybrid vehicle for fuel cell-battery structure is developed by electric vehicle simulation software advisor. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can satisfy the power requirement of four standard drive cycles and achieve the power distribution between fuel cell system and battery. The comprehensive comparisons with a power tracking control strategy which is widely adopted in advisor verify that the proposed strategy has better validity in terms of fuel economy in four standard drive cycles. Hence

Qi Li; Weirong Chen; Shukui Liu; Zhiyu You; Shiyong Tao; Yankun Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fuel Cell Backup Power Geographical Visualization Map (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6740 * December 2012 6740 * December 2012 Fuel Cell Backup Power Geographical Visualization Map Team: Genevieve Saur, Jennifer Kurtz, Sam Sprik, Todd Ramsden Accomplishment: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a time-lapse geographical visualization map of early market use of fuel cells for telecommunications backup power. This map synthesizes data being analyzed by NREL's Technology Validation team for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with DOE's publically available annual summaries of electric disturbance events. 1 Context: Correlating fuel cell operation with grid outages enhances knowledge of backup system requirements and backup power operation strategies that may advance how systems are designed and how best to utilize their capabilities. NREL's

413

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

A. Vaudrey; P. Baucour; F. Lanzetta; R. Glises

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

414

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

Vaudrey, A; Lanzetta, F; Glises, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fuel cells provide a revenue-generating solution to power quality problems  

SciTech Connect

Electric power quality and reliability are becoming increasingly important as computers and microprocessors assume a larger role in commercial, health care and industrial buildings and processes. At the same time, constraints on transmission and distribution of power from central stations are making local areas vulnerable to low voltage, load addition limitations, power quality and power reliability problems. Many customers currently utilize some form of premium power in the form of standby generators and/or UPS systems. These include customers where continuous power is required because of health and safety or security reasons (hospitals, nursing homes, places of public assembly, air traffic control, military installations, telecommunications, etc.) These also include customers with industrial or commercial processes which can`t tolerance an interruption of power because of product loss or equipment damage. The paper discusses the use of the PC25 fuel cell power plant for backup and parallel power supplies for critical industrial applications. Several PC25 installations are described: the use of propane in a PC25; the use by rural cooperatives; and a demonstration of PC25 technology using landfill gas.

King, J.M. Jr.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO 2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants Edward S. Rubin (rubin@cmu.edu; 412-268-5897) Anand B. Rao (abr@andrew.cmu.edu; 412-268-5605) Michael B. Berkenpas (mikeb@cmu.edu; 412-268-1088) Carnegie Mellon University EPP Department, Baker Hall 128A Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract As part of DOE/NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program, we are developing an integrated, multi-pollutant modeling framework to evaluate the costs and performance of alternative carbon capture and sequestration technologies for fossil-fueled power plants. The model calculates emissions, costs, and efficiency on a systematic basis at the level of an individual plant or facility. Both new and existing facilities can be modeled, including coal-based or natural gas-based combustion or gasification systems using air or oxygen.

417

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Total Cost Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. HT12.8610 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408

418

Fuel Reliability Guidelines: BWR Fuel Cladding Corrosion and Crud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developed in collaboration with utilities, industry organizations, and fuel vendors, a series of new EPRI guidelines capture state-of-the-art knowledge and describe best practices for eliminating fuel failures at nuclear power plants. The guidelines provide mandatory, needed, and best practice recommendations based on a thorough review of operating experience, fuel failure analyses, and fuel design and manufacturing procedures. More than 200 industry experts reviewed the guidelines to ensure accuracy and...

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fuel Reliability Guidelines: PWR Fuel Cladding Corrosion and Crud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developed in collaboration with utilities, industry organizations, and fuel vendors, a series of new EPRI guidelines capture state-of-the-art knowledge and describe best practices for eliminating fuel failures at nuclear power plants. The guidelines provide mandatory, needed, and best practice recommendations based on a thorough review of operating experience, fuel failure analyses, and fuel design and manufacturing procedures. More than 200 industry experts reviewed the guidelines to ensure accuracy and...

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Investigation of an integrated switchgrass gasification/fuel cell power plant. Final report for Phase 1 of the Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy Biomass Power Program, has the goal of converting switchgrass grown on marginal farmland in southern Iowa into electric power. Two energy conversion options are under evaluation: co-firing switchgrass with coal in an existing utility boiler and gasification of switchgrass for use in a carbonate fuel cell. This paper describes the second option under investigation. The gasification study includes both experimental testing in a pilot-scale gasifier and computer simulation of carbonate fuel cell performance when operated on gas derived from switchgrass. Options for comprehensive system integration between a carbonate fuel cell and the gasification system are being evaluated. Use of waste heat from the carbonate fuel cell to maximize overall integrated plant efficiency is being examined. Existing fuel cell power plant design elements will be used, as appropriate, in the integration of the gasifier and fuel cell power plant to minimize cost complexity and risk. The gasification experiments are being performed by Iowa State University and the fuel cell evaluations are being performed by Energy Research Corporation.

Brown, R.C.; Smeenk, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic fuels power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO2 Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents initial results of an ongoing study of the potential cost of electricity (COE) produced in both conventional and innovative fossil fueled power plants that incorporate carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for subsequent sequestration or use. The baseline cases are natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and ultra-supercritical pulverized coal (PC) plants, with and without post combustion CO2 removal, and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants, with and without pre-combustion ...

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Zhu, Yimin (Urbana, IL); Kahn, Zakia (Palatine, IL); Man, Malcolm (Vancouver, CA)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

423

Generating capacity of the united power system of Russia and conditions of fuel supply to electric power plants for the period up to 2020  

SciTech Connect

Prospects of development of the energy economy in Russia are considered up to 2020. The proportion of thermal power plants (TPP) in the structure of the generating capacity of Russia amounts to about 70% (147 mln kW). The proportion of gas in the structure of fuel consumed by TPP amounts to 64%. It is predicted that the fraction of high-quality kinds of fuel (gas and fuel oil) will decrease in the considered period due to maximum involvement of coal in the fuel balance and wider use of combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies that provide a lower specific consumption of fuel. It is planned to resort to advanced technologies both for reconstructing existing plants and erecting new ones. This paper deals with problems of fuel supply of fossil-fuel-fired thermal power plants in the light of the evolution of the energy economy of Russia. The demand of TPP for different kinds of fossil fuel, i.e., gas, coal, and fuel oil, is estimated for the whole of the country and for its regions according to two variants of development of the generating capacity with planned commissioning of combined-cycle plants with a total output of 32 mln kW and gas-turbine plants with a total output of 61 mln kW in the period of up to 2020. The tasks of the fuel policy to be solved in the considered period are presented.

V.I. Chemodanov; N.V. Bobyleva; N.G. Chelnokova; N.Yu. Sokolova [Energoset'proekt Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Trade Study on Aggregation of Multiple 10-KW Solid Ozide Fuel Cell Power Modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

According to the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program guidelines, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) will be produced in the form of 3-10 kW modules for residential use. In addition to residential use, these modules can also be used in apartment buildings, hospitals, etc., where a higher power rating would be required. For example, a hospital might require a 250 kW power generating capacity. To provide this power using the SECA SOFC modules, 25 of the 10 kW modules would be required. These modules can be aggregated in different architectures to yield the necessary power. This report will show different approaches for aggregating numerous SOFC modules and will evaluate and compare each one with respect to cost, control complexity, ease of modularity, and fault tolerance.

Ozpineci, B.

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine power plant cycles and performance estimates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SOFC pressurization enhances SOFC efficiency and power performance. It enables the direct integration of the SOFC and gas turbine technologies which can form the basis for very efficient combined- cycle power plants. PSOFC/GT cogeneration systems, producing steam and/or hot water in addition to electric power, can be designed to achieve high fuel effectiveness values. A wide range of steam pressures and temperatures are possible owing to system component arrangement flexibility. It is anticipated that Westinghouse will offer small PSOFC/GT power plants for sale early in the next decade. These plants will have capacities less than 10 MW net ac, and they will operate with efficiencies in the 60-65% (net ac/LHV) range.

Lundberg, W.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel Digital upside in view of the power generation growth potential in Asia and the environmental friendly, cost's energy and farming centers in North America as an alternative to coal-fired power plants and a solution

Columbia University

427

Abstract --The simulation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) may work as a powerful tool in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load profile; and, evaluation of the needs for hydrogen and additional storage systems. Also, in power a computer-controlled, ac-to-dc power converter to supply power to electrical loads, in a way similar an adequate PEMFC model, (which could be used in the analysis of fuel cell generation systems

Simões, Marcelo Godoy

428

Coproduction of peaking fuels in IGCC power plants: a process-screening study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated and compared various options for processing a portion of the medium BTU gas (MBG) produced in a coal gasification combined cycle (GCC) power plant to produce a fuel which might be suitable for peaking or intermediate load use. Two alternate objectives were investigated in separate phases of the study. The first phase examined options for processing and storing a fuel which could be withdrawn and used in absorbing daily load swings in power generation demand. The second phase investigated options for meeting the seasonal peaks in gas demand of a joint gas/electric utility by converting a portion of the MBG to substitute natural gas (SNG) during the months of peak gas demand. For each phase, process designs and cost estimates were completed for several cases, based on both Texaco and BGC-Lurgi Slagging Gasification Technology. For the purposes of this screening study, it was assumed that the peaking fuel production facilities are incremental to the base GCC plant. The costs to produce and store the peaking fuel, excluding the cost of the MBG feed, were calculated by the revenue requirement method. Various sensitivities were evaluated on case assumptions, including a sensitivity to MBG feed value. For daily peaking use, the co-production of methanol and electricity by the ''once-through'' scheme (as studied in EPRI Report AP-2212) proved the most attractive option. Other options which produced gaseous fuels (hydrogen or SNG) for on-site storage were at least 30% more costly. Storage of SNG in an existing natural gas pipeline system was at least 10% higher, excluding pipeline charges. For seasonal SNG production there was little difference between the options studied, within the accuracy of the estimates. 13 refs., 72 tabs.

Shenoy, T.A.; Solomon, J.; O'Brien, V.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Low Voltage, Low Power Organic Light Emitting Transistors for AMOLED Displays  

SciTech Connect

Low voltage, low power dissipation, high aperture ratio organic light emitting transistors are demonstrated. The high level of performance is enabled by a carbon nanotube source electrode that permits integration of the drive transistor and the organic light emitting diode into an efficient single stacked device. Given the demonstrated performance, this technology could break the technical logjam holding back widespread deployment of active matrix organic light emitting displays at flat panel screen sizes.

McCarthy, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Liu, B. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Donoghue, E. P. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Kim, D. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Reynolds, J. R. [University of Florida, Gainesville; So, Franky [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rinzler, A. G. [University of Florida, Gainesville

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Z .Journal of Power Sources 76 1998 6980 Optimal fuel cell system design considering functional performance and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a semi-permeable Zmembrane, generating DC electricity, some heat at about .808C , and water of Victoria to develop the next generation fuel Z .cells for transportation NGFT , in collaborationZ .Journal of Power Sources 76 1998 69­80 Optimal fuel cell system design considering functional

Xue, Deyi

431

1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

SNAP I RADIOISOTOPE-FUELED TURBOELECTRIC POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM SUMMARY, JANUARY 1957 TO JUNE 1959  

SciTech Connect

The SNAP I development program was initiated to develop a 500-watt turboelectric power conversion system for space applications, Superheated mercury vapor was used as the heat conversion working fluid. The conversion system was to obtain thermal energy from the decay of a radioisotope fuel such as Ce/sup 144/ . Each of the major components and systems is summarized with respect to initial design objectives, development progress to the point of program termination, results obtained from tests and, where indicated, future growth potential. Reference is made to 10 other reports which describe, in detail, the major components of this power generating system. Also included is a bibliography of documented reports that are related to the power conversion system design criteria or system integration into a flight vehicle. (auth)

Dick, P.J.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Method of Fabrication of High Power Density Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O(LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

435

Supplemental information for a notice of construction for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This ''Notice of Construction'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 402-80-070, for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State (Figure 1). The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS) the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) will be located in one facility, the Fuels and materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post- irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies to be used in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, to the extent possible, these systems will be dealt with separately. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Prevention of significant deterioration permit application for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area  

SciTech Connect

This New Source Review'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (PO Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 173-403-050 and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing A Prevention Of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies for use in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A solid oxide fuel cell power system: 1992--1993 field operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has deployed fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems in order to obtain useful customer feedback. Recently, Westinghouse has deployed 20 kW class natural gas fueled SOFC generator modules integrated into two 25 kW SOFC systems, the first with The UTILITIES, a Japanese consortium. The UTILITIES 25 kW SOFC system is the focus of this paper. The unit was shipped to the Rokko Island Test Center for Advanced Energy Systems (near Kobe, Japan) operated by Kansai Electric Power Co.; testing was initiated February 1992. Module A operated for 2601 hours at an ave output 16.6 kW dc; final shutdown was induced by current stability problems with dissipator (restart not possible because of damaged cells). Module B operated for 1579 hours at ave output 17.8 kWdc. The unit was damaged by operation at excessively high fuel utilization > 91%. It was rebuilt and returned to Rokko Island. This module B2 operated for 1843 hours on PNG; shutdown was cuased by air supply failure. After a new blower and motor were installed July 1993, the system was restarted August 5, 1993 and operated continuously until November 10, 1993, when an automatic shutdown was induced as part of a MITI licensing inspection. After restart, the unit passed 6000 hours of operation on desulfurized PNG on January 25, 1994. Westinghouse`s future plans are outlined.

Veyo, S.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Kusunoki, A.; Takeuchi, S. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Kaneko, S. [Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan); Yokoyama, H. [Osaka Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Thorium-Fueled Underground Power Plant Based on Molten Salt Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problems posed by running out of oil and gas supplies and the environmental problems that are due to greenhouse gases by suggesting the use of the energy available in the resource thorium, which is much more plentiful than the conventional nuclear fuel uranium. We propose the burning of this thorium dissolved as a fluoride in molten salt in the minimum viscosity mixture of LiF and BeF{sub 2} together with a small amount of {sup 235}U or plutonium fluoride to initiate the process to be located at least 10 m underground. The fission products could be stored at the same underground location. With graphite replacement or new cores and with the liquid fuel transferred to the new cores periodically, the power plant could operate for up to 200 yr with no transport of fissile material to the reactor or of wastes from the reactor during this period. Advantages that include utilization of an abundant fuel, inaccessibility of that fuel to terrorists or for diversion to weapons use, together with good economics and safety features such as an underground location will diminish public concerns. We call for the construction of a small prototype thorium-burning reactor.

Moir, Ralph W.; Teller, Edward [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z