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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

generation and reduction of the Page 3 of 21 VOC borehole due to creep closure of the salt (DOE 1996a), which might result in VOC emissions from the canister into the room. The...

2

ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

MARUSICH, R.M.

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

Center for Human Reliability Studies

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

TECHNICAL JUSTIFICATION FOR CHOOSING PROPANE AS A CALIBRATION AGENT FOR TOTAL FLAMMABLE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) DETERMINATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the technical justification for choosing and using propane as a calibration standard for estimating total flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an air matrix. A propane-in-nitrogen standard was selected based on a number of criteria: (1) has an analytical response similar to the VOCs of interest, (2) can be made with known accuracy and traceability, (3) is available with good purity, (4) has a matrix similar to the sample matrix, (5) is stable during storage and use, (6) is relatively non-hazardous, and (7) is a recognized standard for similar analytical applications. The Waste Retrieval Project (WRP) desires a fast, reliable, and inexpensive method for screening the flammable VOC content in the vapor-phase headspace of waste containers. Table 1 lists the flammable VOCs of interest to the WRP. The current method used to determine the VOC content of a container is to sample the container's headspace and submit the sample for gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The driver for the VOC measurement requirement is safety: potentially flammable atmospheres in the waste containers must be allowed to diffuse prior to processing the container. The proposed flammable VOC screening method is to inject an aliquot of the headspace sample into an argon-doped pulsed-discharge helium ionization detector (Ar-PDHID) contained within a gas chromatograph. No actual chromatography is performed; the sample is transferred directly from a sample loop to the detector through a short, inert transfer line. The peak area resulting from the injected sample is proportional to the flammable VOC content of the sample. However, because the Ar-PDHID has different response factors for different flammable VOCs, a fundamental assumption must be made that the agent used to calibrate the detector is representative of the flammable VOCs of interest that may be in the headspace samples. At worst, we desire that calibration with the selected calibrating agent overestimate the value of the VOCs in a sample. By overestimating the VOC content of a sample, we want to minimize false negatives. A false negative is defined as incorrectly estimating the VOC content of the sample to be below programmatic action limits when, in fact, the sample,exceeds the action limits. The disadvantage of overestimating the flammable VOC content of a sample is that additional cost may be incurred because additional sampling and GC-MS analysis may be required to confirm results over programmatic action limits. Therefore, choosing an appropriate calibration standard for the Ar-PDHID is critical to avoid false negatives and to minimize additional analytical costs.

DOUGLAS, J.G.

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

ARTIFACT FORMATION IN HIGH VOLUME SAMPLING OF VOC's AND SOLID ORGANIC COMPOUNDS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when sampling polluted air. Purified air containing 180 ppbv ozone seems to destroy PAH according Atmospheriques, Boite 7059, UNIVERSITE PARIS 7, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 PARIS Cedex 05 ABSTRACT Pollutants from well äs solid (SOC's) organic compounds. High volume samplers are commonly used m air quality

Boyer, Edmond

7

Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ethene toluene n-butane propane i-pentane i-butane propeneethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These fiveVOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Physics Vehicular emission of volatile organicY. , and Huang, Y. S. : Emission factors and characteristicslight-duty vehicle emissions, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 30,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer characterization samples: 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples were collected during the A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer Characterization (Phase I) Program. The samples were analyzed for chlorinated VOCs by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and MicroSeeps Ltd. All samples were sealed in the field immediately upon retrieval of the core and subsampling. A total of 113 samples locations were selected for analysis. The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of SRTC analyzed all locations in duplicate (226 samples). MicroSeeps Ltd was selected as the quality assurance (QA) check laboratory. MicroSeeps Ltd analyzed 40 locations with 4 duplicates (44 samples). The samples were collected from seven boreholes in A/M Area in the interval from 200 feet deep to the total depth of the boring (360 feet deep nominal); samples were collected every 10 feet within this interval. The sampling zone corresponds approximately to the Crouch Branch Aquifer in A/M Area. The overall A/M Area Crouch Branch Aquifer characterization objectives, a brief description of A/M Area geology and hydrology, and the sample locations, field notes, driller lithologic logs, and required procedural documentation are presented in WSRC (1993).

Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Keenan, M.A.; Van Pelt, R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Rossabi, J.; Simmons, J.L.

1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

10

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

11

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

Testoni, A. L.

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi...

You, Kehua

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electrospun Polyurethane Fibers for Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrospun polyurethane fibers for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air with rapid VOC absorption and desorption have been developed. Polyurethanes based on 4,4-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) (MDI) and ...

Scholten, Elke

16

Volatile organic compound sensor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Adsorption -capacity data for 283 organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on activated carbon is a widely used method for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gases and other exhaust streams. This article presents a compilation of adsorption-capacity data as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The results are useful in engineering and environmental studies, and in the design of carbon-based adsorption systems to remove unwanted organic pollutants from gases. For vapor control, carbon-based systems typically combine a carbon-adsorption unit with a secondary control method to reclaim or destroy the vapors desorbed during carbon-bed regeneration. To remove organics dissolved in wastewater, air stripping is typically used to transfer the organics to a vapor stream. Carbon adsorption is then used to separate the organics from the stripper exhaust. Collected vapors can be recovered for reuse or destroyed, depending on their value.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methyl tertiary- butyl ether (MTBE) and its effect on plasmaand three VOCs (propyne, furan, MTBE) remained below their 3Ethanol Acetone MEK MAC MVK MTBE Furan CH 3 OH C 2 H 5 OH C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Literature review of stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds and the implications for Hanford grouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted on the stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Based on this literature, it is likely that the limestone-containing grout will not permanently immobilize VOCs and that no presently available additives can guarantee permanent immobilization. The Westinghouse hanford company grout may be fairly effective at retarding aqueous leaching of VOCs, and commercial additives can improve this performance. Significant VOC losses do occur during stabilization/solidification, and the high temperatures of the Westinghouse Hanford Company waste and grout should exacerbate this problem. In fact, these high temperatures raise doubts about the presence of VOCs in the double-shell tanks supernates.

Spence, R.D.; Osborne, S.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

Fortner, E. C.

23

Investigations of release phenomenon of volatile organic compounds and particulates from residual storage chip piles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the method for estimating Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from wood handling and storage operations at a pulp mill. Fugitive particulate matter emissions from wood handling and storage operations are due to material load/dropout operations, wind erosion from storage piles and vehicular traffic on paved roads. The particulate matter emissions are a function of a number of variables like windspeed, surface moisture content, material silt content, and number of days of precipitation. Literature review attributes VOC emissions to biological, microbiological, chemical, and physical processes occurring in wood material storage pile. The VOC emissions are from the surface of these piles and the VOC released during retrieval of chips from the pile. VOC emissions are based on the chip throughput, number of turnovers, moisture content and surface area of the pile. The emission factors with the requisite calculation methodology to be utilized for quantifying VOC emissions from chip piles has been discussed in this paper.

Mohan, S.; Nagarkatti, M. [Trinity Consultants, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Modeling VOC sorption of building materials and its impact on indoor air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by building materials can have significant effect on the indoor VOC concentration levels and indoor air quality in buildings. The objective of this study was to investigate ...

Zhang, Jinsong, 1975-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Energy Saving System to Remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecondCareerFebruary 2005Energy Saver 101:SavingP R I

27

VOC transport in vented drums containing simulated waste sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model is developed to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement in a lab-scale vented waste drum containing simulated waste sludge. The VOC transport model estimates the concentration using the measured VOC concentration beneath the drum lid and model parameters defined or estimated from process knowledge of drum contents and waste drum configuration. Model parameters include the VOC diffusion characteristic across the filter vent, VOC diffusivity in air, size of opening in the drum liner lid, the type and number of layers of polymer bags surrounding the waste, VOC permeability across the polymer, and the permeable surface area of the polymer bags. Comparison of model and experimental results indicates that the model can accurately estimate VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement. The model may be useful in estimating the VOC concentration in actual waste drums.

Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning...

29

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH _______ ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from wastewater treatment plant waste air. The biofilter volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic air pollutants emitted from wastewater and solids handling

30

Thermal treatment for VOC control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic and thermal oxidation are well-established technologies for controlling volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Oxidation destroys pollutants, rather than capturing them. Oxidation units can destroy nearly 100% of VOC and toxic emissions targeted by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990--some systems attain destruction efficiencies over 99.99%. To assist in the design of these systems, an engineer will often look a/t the heat of combustion of the gas stream, along with the type of pollutant, to best determine the correct type of oxidation device to use. The paper discusses catalytic and thermal oxidation, energy recovery, and equipment for these processes.

Cloud, R.A. [Huntington Environmental Systems, Schaumburg, IL (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Use of sonication for in-well softening of semivolatile organic compounds. 1997 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'This project investigates the in-situ degradation of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using in-well sonication, in-well vapor stripping, and bioremediation. Pretreating groundwaters with sonication techniques in-situ would form VOCs that can be effectively removed by in-well vapor stripping and bioremediation. The mechanistic studies focus on the coupling of megasonics and ultrasonics to soften (i.e., partially degrade) the SVOCs; oxidative reaction mechanism studies; surface corrosion studies (on the reactor walls/well); enhancement due to addition of oxidants, quantification of the hydroxyl radical formation; identification/quantification of degradation products; volatility/degradability of the treated waters; development of a computer simulation model to describe combined in-well sonication/in-well vapor stripping/bioremediation; systems analysis/economic analysis; large laboratory-scale experiment verification; and field demonstration of the integrated technology. Benefits of this approach include: (1) Remediation is performed in-situ; (2) The treatment systems complement each other; their combination can drastically reduce or remove SVOCs and VOCs; (3) Ability to convert hard-to-degrade organics into more volatile organic compounds; (4) Ability to remove residual VOCs and softened SVOCs through the combined action of in-well vapor stripping and biodegradation; (5) Does not require handling or disposing of water at the ground surface; and (6) Cost-effective and improved efficiency, resulting in shortened clean-up times to remediate a site.'

Peters, R.W.; Manning, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Hoffman, M.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (US); Gorelick, S. [Stanford Univ., CA (US)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Diversity of the Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by 55 Species of Tropical Trees: a Survey in French Guiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in French Guiana Elodie A. Courtois & C. E. Timothy Paine & Pierre-Alain Blandinieres & Didier Stien & Jean, LLC 2009 Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are pro- duced by a broad range of organisms, from tropical tree species in a lowland rainforest of French Guiana. We discovered a remarkably high chemical

Chave, Jérôme

33

Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission to the atmosphere is of great concern to semiconductor manufacturing industries, research laboratories, the public, and regulatory agencies. Some industries are seeking ways to reduce emissions by reducing VOCs at the point of use (or generation). This paper discusses the requirements, design, calibration, and use of a sampling inlet/quadrupole mass spectrometer system for monitoring VOCs in a semiconductor manufacturing production line. The system uses chemical ionization to monitor compounds typically found in the lithography processes used to manufacture semiconductor devices (e.g., acetone, photoresist). The system was designed to be transportable from tool to tool in the production line and to give the operator real-time feedback so the process(es) can be adjusted to minimize VOC emissions. Detection limits ranging from the high ppb range for acetone to the low ppm range fore other lithography chemicals were achieved using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy at a data acquisition rate of approximately 1 mass spectral scan (30 to 200 daltons) per second. A demonstration of exhaust VOC monitoring was performed at a working semiconductor fabrication facility during actual wafer processing.

Thornberg, S.M.; Mowry, C.D.; Keenan, M.R.; Bender, S.F.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gas Analysis Lab.; Owen, T. [Intel Corp., Rio Rancho, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

MEMBRANE INTRODUCTION MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ON-LINE ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic compounds (VOCs) have been detected in urban waters across the United States, including gasoline was partially supported by the NSF-Chemistry CARREER award # CHE-0.34131. #12;v VITA November 4, 1974.S. Pharmaceutical Chemistry, National School of Biological Sciences (Mexico). 2002 ­ 2005

37

Origins of volatile organic compounds emerging from tank 241-C-106 during sluicing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unexpectedly high concentrations of inorganic gases and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were released from the ventilation stack of tank 241-C-106 during sluicing operations on November 18, 1998. Workers experienced serious discomfort. They reported an obnoxious acrid odor and the 450 ppm VOC in ventilation stack 296-C-006 exceeded the level approved in the air discharge permit. Consequently, the operation was terminated. Subsequent analyses of samples collected opportunistically from the stack indicated many organic compounds including heptenes, heptanones, and normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPH) and their remnants were present. Subsequently, a process test designed to avoid unnecessary worker exposure and enable collection of analytical samples from the stack, the breathing area, and the receiver tank was conducted on December 16, 1998. The samples obtained during that operation, in which the maximum VOC content of the stack was approximately 35 ppm, have been analyzed by teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Special Analytic Services (SAS). This report examines the results of these investigations. Future revisions of the report will examine the analytical results obtained for samples collected during sluicing operations in March. This report contains the available evidence about the source term for these emissions. Chapter 2 covers characterization work, including historical information about the layers of waste in the tank, the location of organic compounds in these layers, the total organic carbon (TOC) content and the speciation of organic compounds. Chapter 3 covers the data for the samples from the ventilation stack, which has the highest concentrations of organic compounds. Chapter 4 contains an interpretation of the information connecting the composition of the organic emissions with the composition of the original source term. Chapter 5 summarizes the characterization work, the sample data, and the interpretation of the results.

STAUFFER, L.A.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

VOCs and formaldehyde emissions from cleaning products and air Ccilia Solal1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOCs and formaldehyde emissions from cleaning products and air fresheners Cécilia Solal1: air fresheners, glass cleaners, furniture polishes, toilet products, carpet and floor cleaning Formaldehyde, Volatile organic compounds, Household products, Exposure INTRODUCTION Most indoor air pollutants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

39

Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

40

Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1608 Mt. View Road, Rapid City, South Dakota 57702 As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment from this ambient groundwater is uncertain because the quality of the finished drinking water with the largest releases to the environment are VOCs and that the total release for these 10 compounds was almost

42

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization...

45

Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Refinement of ptr-ms methodology and application to the measurement of (o)vocs from cattle slurry.   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygenated volatile organic compounds ((O)VOCs) contribute to ozone formation, affect the oxidising capacity of the troposphere and are sources of growth, and in some cases formation, of aerosols. It is therefore important ...

House, Emily

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCs ({Sigma}VOC{sub i})). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m{sup {minus}3}) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

Ten Brinke, JoAnn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A very important aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970's. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Micropatterned Polymeric Gratings as Chemoresponsive Volatile Organic Compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micropatterned Polymeric Gratings as Chemoresponsive Volatile Organic Compound Sensors, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 Micropatterned polymeric diffraction gratings have been

52

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 mu g/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to>500 mu g/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~;;15 mu g/m2/h while the new wood material emitted>100 mu g/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs.

Ortiz, Anna C.; Russell, Marion; Lee, Wen-Yee; Apte, Michael; Maddalena, Randy

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. Haszpra, L. and Szilagyi, I. : Non-methane hydrocarbonet al. , 1990; Haszpra and Szilagyi, 1994; Gertler et al. ,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Southern California Edison's (SCE) Research Program for Industrial Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Process Descriptions One of the polystyrene foam plants uses pentane as a blowing agent in the manufacturing process. while the other plant uses butane. Under the provisions, of AQMD Rule 1175, these plants will be I required to control 90 percent... by spray painting subject to AQ Rule 1124. Process Descriptions One of the polystyrene foam plants uses pentane as a blowing agent in the manufacturing process, while the other plant uses butane. Under the provisions of AQMD Rule 1175, these plants...

Sung, R. D.; Cascone, R.; Reese, J.

55

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifAEnergy2014 SolidGold foil| Infrastructure

56

Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

Camaioni, Donald M. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Characterization of the Sources and Concentrations of Formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds in four new manufactured houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concentrations of formaldehyde, 52 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total VOCs (TVOC) were measured in four new manufactured houses on three occasions over a period of approximately nine months following completion of their construction. The houses were furnished, but unoccupied, model homes produced by a single U.S. manufacturer. Several of the houses incorporated interior finish materials with lower VOC emissions than standard materials. One house had a modified ventilation system. Ventilation rates were measured concurrently with the collection of air samples. A steady-state mass-balance model was used to calculate the area-specific emission rates of the target compounds and TVOC. The emissions of formaldehyde and VOCs from a specimen of plywood used as the floor sheeting were additionally quantified. The median formaldehyde concentration in the four houses was 37 parts-per-billion ( ppb). The formaldehyde concentrations were all less than the most restrictive guideline for this compound of 50 ppb. The concentrations of many of the target VOCs were low. Thirty-one of the VOCs had median concentrations that were at or below 1 ppb. Seven of the compounds were among the most abundant VOCs in all four houses. These compounds were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, ethylene glycol, hexanal, 2-butanone, and acetic acid. The concentrations of the aldehydes, hexanal, octanal and nonanal, in the four houses were either near or exceeded their respective odor thresholds. The concentrations of acetic acid increased with time. In the final sampling period, the odor threshold for acetic acid was exceeded in all of the houses. The range of TVOC concentrations in the four houses was 0.8 to 3 mg m{sup -3}, with a median value of 1.6 mg m{sup -3}. These concentrations were somewhat lower than TVOC concentrations previously measured in several new site-built houses, and the median concentration was only about twice the typical value for existing residences. The house with the modified ventilation system and several lower emitting materials had consistently low TVOC concentrations that were near 1 mg m{sup -3}. There were no large decreases with time in the emission rates of the individual VOCs or TVOC during the course of the study. However, the emission rates were often lowest in the final sampling with the notable exception of the acetic acid emission rate that increased with time. The source of the aldehydes was most likely engineered wood products, such as the plywood floor sheeting and possibly other structural or interior components. The source of the acetic acid was uncertain. The effects of the source substitution treatments were measurable but turned out to be relatively minor due to the predominance of other sources.

Hodgson, A.T.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater, Surface, Ground.W., Meyer, M.T., and Zaugg, S.D., 2004, Presence and distri- bution of organic wastewater compounds in wastewater, surface, ground, and drinking waters, Minnesota, 2000-02: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CAN SORBENT-BASED GAS PHASE AIR CLEANING FOR VOCS SUBSTITUTE FOR VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews current knowledge about the suitability of sorbent-based air cleaning for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air in commercial buildings, as needed to enable reductions in ventilation rates and associated energy savings. The principles of sorbent air cleaning are introduced, criteria are suggested for sorbent systems that can counteract indoor VOC concentration increases from reduced ventilation, major findings from research on sorbent performance for this application are summarized, and related priority research needs are identified. Major conclusions include: sorbent systems can remove a broad range of VOCs with moderate to high efficiency, sorbent technologies perform effectively when challenged with VOCs at the low concentrations present indoors, and there is a large uncertainty about the lifetime and associated costs of sorbent air cleaning systems when used in commercial buildings for indoor VOC control. Suggested priority research includes: experiments to determine sorbent system VOC removal efficiencies and lifetimes considering the broad range and low concentration of VOCs indoors; evaluations of in-situ regeneration of sorbents; and an updated analysis of the cost of sorbent air cleaning relative to the cost of ventilation.

Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Sorbent-Based Gas Phase Air Cleaning for VOCs in CommercialBuildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a review of current knowledge about the suitability of sorbent-based air cleaning for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air in commercial buildings as needed to enable reductions in ventilation rates and associated energy savings. The fundamental principles of sorbent air cleaning are introduced, criteria are suggested for sorbent systems that can counteract indoor VOC concentration increases from reduced ventilation, major findings from research on sorbent performance for this application are summarized, novel sorbent technologies are described, and related priority research needs are identified. Major conclusions include: sorbent systems can remove a broad range of VOCs with moderate to high efficiency, sorbent technologies perform effectively when challenged with VOCs at the low concentrations present indoors, and there is a large uncertainty about the lifetime and associated costs of sorbent air cleaning systems when used in commercial buildings for indoor VOC control. Suggested priority research includes: experiments to determine sorbent system VOC removal efficiencies and lifetimes considering the broad range and low concentration of VOCs indoors; evaluations of in-situ regeneration of sorbents; and an updated analysis of the cost of sorbent air cleaning relative to the cost of ventilation.

Fisk, William J.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM WOOD REMEDIAL TREATMENT: CHAMBER TESTS AND FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products on indoor air quality. The emissions of two wood remedial treatment products (water in real conditions during a roof renovation work in an old building. A petroleum-based solvent product of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from building products. Simple models can be applied to emission

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Sidheswaran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A Keywords: Activated carbon fiberVolatile organic compoundIndoor pollutantEnergy efficient ventilation a b s t r a c t This study explores the potential environmental and energy benefits of using activated

65

5, 90979126, 2005 VOC emissions from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation pyrolysis J. P. Greenberg et al. Title Page Discussions Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation J. P. Greenberg, H is licensed under a Creative Commons License. 9097 #12;ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

The Effect of Organic Compounds in Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 174 APRIL, 1915 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Effect of Organic Compounds in Pot Experiments POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS VON BOECK~UNN-JON&S CO ?? PRINTERS, AUSTIN, TEXAS... 19 15 BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL A116-715-10m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 174 APRIL,. 1915 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Effect of Organic Compounds In Pot Experiments BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist in Charge; State Chemist...

Fraps, G. S.

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Potential VOC Deflagrations in a Vented TRU Drum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the analysis is to examine the potential for lid ejection from a vented transuranic (TRU) waste drum due to pressure buildup caused by the deflagration of hydrogen and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the drum. In this analysis, the AICC pressure for a stoichiometric mixture of VOCs is calculated and then compared against the experimental peak pressure of stoichiometric combustion of propane and hexane in a combustion chamber. The experimental peak pressures of propane and hexane are about 12 percent lower than the calculated AICC pressure. Additional losses in the drum are calculated due to venting of the gases, drum bulging, waste compaction, and heat losses from the presence of waste in the drum. After accounting for these losses, the final pressures are compared to the minimum observed pressure that ejects the lid from a TRU drum. The ejection pressure of 105 psig is derived from data that was recorded for a series of tests where hydrogen-air mixtures were ignited inside sealed TRU drums. Since the calculated pressures are below the minimum lid ejection pressure, none of the VOCs and the hydrogen (up to 4 percent) mixtures present in the TRU waste drum is expected to cause lid ejection if ignited. The analysis of potential VOC deflagrations in a vented TRU drum can be applied across the DOE-Complex since TRU waste is stored in drums throughout the complex.

Mukesh, GUPTA

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

Volatile Organic Compound Discrimination using Nanostructured Polythiophene Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in determining response to specific VOCs. I. INTRODUCTION A low-cost, low-power, and portable device for volatile selectivity. While there has been limited success in sensor development for greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, NO and CO), the technology for detection of VOCs remains weak due to the similarity of chemical composition

Weiss, Lee E.

70

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

71

NICS report links VOCs to respiratory problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Children who live near the chemical plants of Kanawha Valley, WV, suffer more acute and chronic respiratory aliments than those farther away, says a Harvard University School of Public Health report. In the $1-million, five-year study commissioned by the National Institute for Chemical Studies (NICS:Charleston, WV) and funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, proximity to chemical plants that emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was linked to higher incidence of asthma, acute eye irritation, shortness of breath, and chronic cough. The researchers say they adjusted for most other factors, such as parental smoking and petroleum. {open_quotes}The research hypothesis was whether children in the valley had more symptoms,{close_quotes} says NICS president Paul Hill. {open_quotes}Yes, there is a difference.{close_quotes} The study showed that some ailments were up to 28% more prevalent in children in the valley than in other Kanawha County children.

Kirschner, E.

1992-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

72

The mechanisms and relative importance of abiotic and biological processes for VOC loss from sludge amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in sewage sludge has been a cause of increasing concern due to the possible risk to human health and the environment when sludge is applied to agricultural soils. Sludge application to agricultural land in the UK is expected to increase as a result of restrictions on alternative disposal routes and also increasingly stringent wastewater treatment requirements. Few studies have examined the fate and behavior of VOCs in sewage sludge amended soils and those reported have used spiked sludge rather than investigating the behavior of VOCs resident in the sludge itself. This study was designed to evaluate the behavior of aromatic VOCs (namely toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene) in unspiked sewage sludge amended soils and assess the relative importance and mechanisms of abiotic and biological loss processes. This was undertaken by adding sewage sludge to sterilized and unsterilized soil in closed and open systems. Results indicated that abiotic loss processes, primarily volatilization, were most important for the removal of VOCs. Initial rate of VOC loss was similar in all systems. After 65 days a residual VOC soil concentration remained which was apparently dependent on the conditions within the system.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Environmental and Biological Sciences

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Prediction of short-term and long-term VOC emissions from SBR bitumen-backed carpet under different temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents two models for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from carpet. One is a numerical model using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique for short-term predictions, the other an analytical model for long-term predictions. The numerical model can (1) deal with carpets that are not new, (2) calculate the time-dependent VOC distributions in a test chamber or room, and (3) consider the temperature effect on VOC emissions. Based on small-scale chamber data, both models were used to examine the VOC emissions under different temperatures from polypropene styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) bitumen-backed carpet. The short-term predictions show that the VOC emissions under different temperatures can be modeled solely by changing the carpet diffusion coefficients. A formulation of the Arrhenius relation was used to correlate the dependence of carpet diffusion coefficient with temperature. The long-term predictions show that it would take several years to bake out the VOCs, and temperature would have a major impact on the bake-out time.

Yang, S.; Chen, Q. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Building Technology Program; Bluyssen, P.M. [TNO Building and Construction Research, Delft (Netherlands)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions Kehua You a , Hongbin Zhan a,b, a Department of Geology

Zhan, Hongbin

75

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms. Environmental Health Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussng chemkal and geochemical aspects ofbiogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuckar aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of entering ecosystems, and their physical chemical forms are discussed. Important factors that influence bioavailability and disposition (e.g., organism-water partitioning, uptake via food, food meb transfer) are reviewed. These factors include solubilities of chemicals; partitioning of chemicals between solid surfaces, colloids, and soluble phases; variables rates of sorption, desorption; and physiological status of organism. It appears that more emphasis on considering food as a source of uptake and bioaccumulation is important in benthic and epibenthic ecosystems when sediment-associated pollutants are a nt source of input to an aquatic ecosystem. Progress with mathematical models for exposure and uptake of contaminant chemicals is discussed briefly.

John W. Farrington

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds and Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed by Photooxidation of Isoprene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI HR-MS) was used to probe molecular structures of oligomers in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated in laboratory experiments on isoprene photooxidation at low- and high-NOx conditions. Up to 80-90% of the observed products are oligomers and up to 33% are nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC). We observe oligomers with up to 8 monomer units in length. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) confirms NOC compounds are organic nitrates and elucidates plausible chemical building blocks contributing to oligomer formation. Most organic nitrates are comprised of methylglyceric acid units. Other important multifunctional C2-C5 monomer units are identified including methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, hydroxyacetic acid, glycolaldehyde, and 2-methyltetrols. The majority of the NOC oligomers contain only one nitrate moiety resulting in a low average N:C ratio of 0.019. Average O:C ratios of the detected SOA compounds are 0.54 under the low-NOx conditions and 0.83 under the high-NOx conditions. Our results underscore the importance of isoprene photooxidation as a source of NOC in organic particulate matter.

Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992, a chemical sensor was developed which showed almost perfect selectivity to vapors of chlorinated solvents. When interfaced to an instrument, a chemical analyzer will be produced that has near- absolute selectivity to vapors of volatile chlorinated organic compounds. TRI has just completed the second of a 2-phase program to develop this new instrument system, which is called the RCL MONITOR. In Phase II, this instrument was deployed in 5 EM40 operations. Phase II applications covered clean-up process monitoring, environmental modeling, routine monitoring, health and safety, and technology validation. Vapor levels between 0 and 100 ppM can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.5 ppM using the hand-portable instrument. Based on the favorable performance of the RCL MONITOR, the commercial instrument was released for commercial sales on Sept. 20, 1996.

Buttner, W.J.; Penrose, W.R.; Stetter, J.R.; Williams, R.D.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Neutral-ionic transitions in organic mixed-stack compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Torrance et al. have made the interesting observation that several mixed-stack organic compounds undergo transitions from neutral states to ionic states as the temperature or pressure is varied. We examine a simple model of such transitions including Coulomb interaction and hybridization of neutral and ionic states. In the limit of weak hybridization and long-range repulsive interaction between ionic planes, it is proven that there is a complete devil's staircase where the degree of ionicity assumes an infinity of rational values. For attractive interactions between ionic planes, the neutral-ionic transition is shown to be first order for weak hybridization. Comparison with experiment indicates that this situation applies to tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) chloranil. For strong hybridization the transition is continuous but goes through a metallic phase. It is shown, for the first time, that the spectrum of the charge-transfer Hamiltonian contains both a bound spectrum, the observed charge-transfer excitations, and a continuum.

Bruinsma, R.; Bak, P.; Torrance, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

82

LOW TEMPERATURE VOC COMBUSTION OVER MANGANESE, COBALT AND ZINC ALPO4 MOLECULAR SIEVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to prepare microporous aluminophosphates containing magnesium, manganese, cobalt and zinc (MeAPOs) and to evaluate their performance as oxidation catalysts for the removal of low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gas streams. The tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) To develop reliable synthesis methods for metal aluminophosphates containing manganese, cobalt and zinc in their framework; (2) To characterize these materials for crystallinity, phase purity, the location and nature of the incorporated metal in the framework; and (3) To evaluate the materials for their catalytic activities in the oxidation of volatile organic environmental pollutants.

Rosemarie Szostak

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic organic compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

84

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Refined conceptual model for the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a refined geohydrologic and geochemical conceptual model of the host site (Hanford Reservation) for the Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) Expedited Response Action (ERA), based on the results from fiscal year 1992 site characterization activities. The ERA was initiated in December 1990 to minimize or stabilize CCl{sub 4} migration within the unsaturated (vadose) zone in the vicinity of three CCl{sub 4} disposal sites in the 200 West Area (216-Z-1A tile field, 216-Z-9 trench, and 216-Z-18 crib). Implementation of this ERA was based on concerns that CCl{sub 4} residing in the soils was continuing to spread to the groundwater and, if left unchecked, would significantly increase the area of groundwater contamination. A soil-vapor-extraction system began operating at the site in February 1992.

Last, G.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rohay, V.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Assessment of subsurface VOCs using a chemical microsensor array. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of laboratory investigations of several performance parameters relevant to surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) chemical sensor arrays for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated soil and groundwater. The small size, low cost, sensitivity and selectivity of such instruments promise improvements in the quality and quantity of data used to guide site assessment and restoration efforts. In this investigation, calibrations were performed for 15 different coated SAW sensors. Each sensor was exposed to six VOCs selected to represent three chemical classes of contaminants that are commonly found at waste sites (i.e., aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons). A new pattern recognition method was developed for determining which coated sensors would maximize the selectivity and accuracy of quantitation for a given set of vapor contaminants. Using this method, an optimal subwet of four coated sensors was selected for testing in a prototype microsensor instrument. Additional laboratory experiments were performed with this optimized array to assess the limits of detection and linear response ranges for the representative vapors, as well as the additivity of responses to vapors in binary mixtures, temperature and humidity effects, aging effects, and other performance parameters related to the application of this technology to soil and groundwater VOC monitoring. Results demonstrate that SAW microsensor arrays can identify and quantify specific VOCs at concentrations in the {mu}g/L to mg/L range when present alone or in simple (e.g., binary) mixtures. SAW sensor technology offers a potentially effective alternative to existing field instrumentation for headspace analysis, soil vapor monitoring, and vacuum extraction process monitoring of VOCs in subsurface media.

Batterman, S.A.; Zellers, E.T. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Public Health

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Impacts of nitrogen fertilization on volatile organic compound emissions from decomposing plant litter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decomposing litter from 12 plant species over 125 days, measuring both CO2 and VOC emissions throughout with C emissions as VOCs ranging from 0% to 88% of C emissions as CO2. Methanol was the dominant VOC was occasionally large enough to account for the increased CO2 emissions on a per unit C basis, suggesting that N

Fierer, Noah

90

Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Cows and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, acetone + propanal, dimethylsulfide, and m/z 109 (likely 4-methyl-phenol). The compounds with highest. Agricultural pro- cesses, notably animal operations, are no longer exempt from emission controls as a result with a pro

Goldstein, Allen

91

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

Subtask 1.15-Passive Diffusion Sample Bags Made from Expanded Polytetrafluorethylene (ePTFE) to Measure VOC Concentrations in Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With laboratory testing of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membranes complete, collected data support that volatile organic compound (VOC) molecules will readily diffuse across ePTFE membranes. Membrane samples, supplied by BHA Technologies (GE Osmonics), were tested to determine diffusion rates for VOCs in groundwater. Tests were conducted using membranes with two different pore sizes, with and without thermally laminated spun bond backing, and multiple concentrations of contaminated groundwater. Results suggest that typical residence times associated with traditional samplers constructed of polyethylene (2 weeks) can be reduced by 1 week using ePTFE membranes (reducing project costs) and that VOCs will diffuse more readily at lower temperatures (2.2-3.3 C) across ePTFE materials.

Barry W. Botnen

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

1. PRECONCENTRATION, THERMAL DESORPTION & ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: peltier, liq. N?.. Heated transfer line 2) Desorption & transfer by fastheatlng Cooled & heated trap jas trap. The trap is then quickly heated, under a low flow of hélium, to desorb and inject thé compounds. This highly concentrated plug of sample is transferred via a heated transfer line, to a capillary

Boyer, Edmond

94

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: A review of current understanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: (1) polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides; (2) carbamate and organophosphorus; (3) herbicides; (4) phenols; (5) halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (6) phthalate esters; (7) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and (8) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Process that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate process are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the US are discussed. 699 refs., 26 figs., 47 tabs.

Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, P.J.; Fusillo, T.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. Sublimation, Vaporization and Fusion Enthalpies From  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. Sublimation, Vaporization and Fusion Enthalpies From 1880 to 2010 William Acree, Jr. Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 James S. Chickosa... Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Chickos, James S.

96

Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

Hudson, Rondall James

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Progress in Understanding Low-Temperature Organic Compound Oxidation Using a Jet-Stirred Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Progress in Understanding Low-Temperature Organic Compound Oxidation Using a Jet-Stirred Reactor Lorraine, CNRS, ENSIC, BP 20451, 1 rue Grandville, 54000 Nancy, France Abstract The jet-stirred reactor compounds that can be found in fuels and biofuels. Such an improvement in understanding requires

98

Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds; Groundwater management; Drinking water. Introduction Approximately one-half of the U and Hitt 2006 , or more complex process-based analyses utilizing groundwater models Eberts et al. 2005Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater: Use in Vulnerability

99

Concentration of light organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions by adsorption on bound silicalite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONCENTRATION OF LIGHT ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM DILUTE AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY ADSORPTION ON BOUND SILICALITE A Thesis KATHRYN LOUISE FLORES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering CONCENTRATION OF LIGHT ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM DILUTE AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY ADSORPTION ON BOUND SILICALITE A Thesis by KATHRYN LOUISE FLORES Approved...

Flores, Kathryn Louise

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Supercritical CO2 extraction of organic compounds from soil-water slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPERCRITICAL COi EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering SUPERCRITICAL COz FXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Carter, Brian Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Implementation of VOC source reduction practices in a manufactured house and in school classrooms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed studies of a new manufactured house and four new industrialized relocatable school classrooms were conducted to determine the emission sources of formaldehyde and other VOCs and to identify and implement source reduction practices. Procedures were developed to generate VOC emission factors that allowed reasonably accurate predictions of indoor air VOC concentrations. Based on the identified sources of formaldehyde and other aldehydes, practices were developed to reduce the concentrations of these compounds in new house construction. An alternate ceiling panel reduced formaldehyde concentrations in the classrooms. Overall, the classrooms had relatively low VOC concentrations.

Hodgson, A.T.; Apte, M.G.; Shendell, D.G.; Beal, D.; McIlvaine, J.E.R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Tree's Response to Herbivory: Quantification of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Tree's Response to Herbivory: Quantification of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions an abundant source of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). These emissions are known to vary in quantity and composition due to both biogenic and anthropogenic stressors. In this study, BVOC emissions from bristlecone

Collins, Gary S.

104

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

105

Composites for removing metals and volatile organic compounds and method thereof  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Functionalized hydrophobic aerogel/solid support structure composites have been developed to remove metals and organic compounds from aqueous and vapor media. The targeted metals and organics are removed by passing the aqueous or vapor phase through the composite which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The composites adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous or vapor stream. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific functionalization of the aerogels tailored towards specific metals and/or organics. After adsorption, the composites can be disposed of or the targeted metals and/or organics can be reclaimed or removed and the composites recycled.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

Removal of hydrophobic Volatile Organic Compounds1 in an integrated process coupling Absorption and2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology like photochemical oxidation shows high efficiency70 but is also high energy-consuming; moreover processes involve water as absorbent, they appear not always really efficient for the treatment of24 of the process, hydrophobic VOC27 absorption in a gas-liquid contactor, and biodegradation in the TPPB. VOC

Boyer, Edmond

107

Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)] [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sources of organic aerosol investigated using organic compounds as tracers measured during CalNex in Bakersfield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be mainly through gas-to-particle condensation of gas-phase oxidation products during the day. Our results) and provide insights into secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, positive matrix factorization analysis in the afternoon. Although contributions to SOA from oxidation of biogenic gas-phase compounds were less

Cohen, Ronald C.

109

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M. [Yuan Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Deuterium enrichment by selective photoinduced dissociation of a multihalogenated organic compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for deuterium enrichment by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the deuterium source a multihalogenated organic compound selected from the group consisting of a dihalomethane, a trihalomethane, a 1,2-dihaloethene, a trihaloethene, a tetrahaloethane and a pentahaloethane. The multihalogenated organic compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of substantially only those molecules containing deuterium to provide a deuterium enriched dissociation product. The deuterium enriched product may be combusted with oxygen to provide deuterium enriched water. The deuterium depleted undissociated molecules may be redeuterated by treatment with a deuterium source such as water.

Marling, John B. (Livermore, CA); Herman, Irving P. (Oakland, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Thermal engine driven heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for separating volatile organic compounds from a stream of process gas. An internal combustion engine drives a plurality of refrigeration systems, an electrical generator and an air compressor. The exhaust of the internal combustion engine drives an inert gas subsystem and a heater for the gas. A water jacket captures waste heat from the internal combustion engine and drives a second heater for the gas and possibly an additional refrigeration system for the supply of chilled water. The refrigeration systems mechanically driven by the internal combustion engine effect the precipitation of volatile organic compounds from the stream of gas.

Drake, Richard L. (Schenectady, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The removal kinetics of industrial organic compounds in natural and synthetic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE REMOVAL KINETICS OF INDUSTRIAL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by ALBERT C. PETRASEK, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1970 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE REMOVAL, KINETICS OF INDUSTRIAL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by ALBERT C. PETRASEK? dR ~ Approved as to style and content by a rman o omm t ee em er...

Petrasek, Albert Charles

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The solubilities of significant organic compounds in HLW tank supernate solutions -- FY 1995 progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Hanford Site organic compounds were measured in tank supernate simulant solutions during FY 1995. This solubility information will be used to determine if these organic salts could exist in solid phases (saltcake or sludges) in the waste where they might react violently with the nitrate or nitrite salts present in the tanks. Solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, and caproate salts; iron and aluminum and butylphosphate salts; and aluminum oxalate were measured in simulated waste supernate solutions at 25 {degree}C, 30 {degree}C, 40 {degree}C, and 50 {degree}C. The organic compounds were selected because they are expected to exist in relatively high concentrations in the tanks. The solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, caproate, and butylphosphate in HLW tank supernate solutions were high over the temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration ranges expected in the tanks. High solubilities will prevent solid sodium salts of these organic acids from precipitating from tank supernate solutions. The total organic carbon concentrations (YOC) of actual tank supernates are generally much lower than the TOC ranges for simulated supernate solutions saturated (at the solubility limit) with the organic salts. This is so even if all the dissolved carbon in a given tank and supernate is due to only one of these eight soluble compounds (an unlikely situation). Metal ion complexes of and butylphosphate and oxalate in supernate solutions were not stable in the presence of the hydroxide concentrations expected in most tanks. Iron and aluminum dibutylphosphate compounds reacted with hydroxide to form soluble sodium dibutylphosphate and precipitated iron and aluminum hydroxides. Aluminum oxalate complexes were also not stable in the basic simulated supernate solutions. Solubilities of all the organic salts decrease with increasing sodium hydroxide concentration because of the common ion effect of Na+. Increasing temperatures raised the solubilities of the organic salts, especially the succinate and caproate salts.

Barney, G.S.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

115

VOC recovery using microwave regeneration of adsorbents: Pilot-column studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale column was constructed to evaluate the technical feasibility of microwave (MW) heating as a means of regenerating adsorbents for recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The 6 inch diameter moving-bed column, which has a throughput capacity of 200 lb/hr of adsorbent, is representative of a full-scale component of a small-capacity recovery system or a single element of a large-capacity system. Regeneration experiments were conducted to study the effects of key process variables, including adsorbent and stripping gas feed rates, initial adsorbent coverage and microwave power input, on column performance. Two adsorbents with contrasting dielectric loss characteristics were studied, Dowex Optipore L502 (low dielectric loss styrene-based) and Rohm and Haas Ambersorb 600 (moderate dielectric loss carbonaceous). Adsorbates included polar and nonpolar compounds: isopropyl alcohol (iPA), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and toluene. Solvent recovery rates of 20--30 lbs/hr were achieved. The results of the pilot-column experiments demonstrate that axial temperature and desorption profiles are dependent on the dielectric characteristics of the adsorbent/sorbate pair, and that final regeneration coverage can be correlated with a dimensionless stripping gas ratio and final adsorbent temperature. Implications for design of microwave-regenerated VOC recovery systems are discussed.

Salinas, M.J.; Price, D.W.; Schmidt, P.S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Determination of Migration Parameters for Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Terephthalate and Nylon 6 by Dynamic Permeation Cell Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Migration Parameters for Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Terephthalate, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP); however

Heller, Barbara

117

Supporting Information1 Condensational Uptake of Semivolatile Organic Compounds in Gasoline3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting Information1 2 Condensational Uptake of Semivolatile Organic Compounds in Gasoline31A 0H3 Canada (now at Department of Chemistry,13 University of Christchurch, Canterbury 8041, New Zealand)14 15 For submission to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics16 17 Revised Version: May 31, 201118 19

Meskhidze, Nicholas

118

Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

Ho, Cliff

119

Enthalpies of Sublimation of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. James S. Chickosa...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enthalpies of Sublimation of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. 1910­2001 James S. Chickosa... Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri 63121 William E. Acree, Jr.b... Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 Received 22 October 2001; accepted 11

Chickos, James S.

120

Detection and Differentiation of Neutral Organic Compounds by [superscript 19]F NMR with a Tungsten Calix[4]arene Imido Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluorinated tungsten calix[4]arene imido complexes were synthesized and used as receptors to detect and differentiate neutral organic compounds. It was found that the binding of specific neutral organic molecules to the ...

Zhao, Yanchuan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

4, 66916718, 2004 VOC emissions of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Temperature and light dependence of the VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen 1 , H. Hakola 1.tarvainen@fmi.fi) 6691 #12;ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

122

Laboratory and field investigation of the adsorption of gaseous organic compounds onto quartz filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common method for measuring the mass of organic carbon in airborne particulate matter involves collection on a quartz filter and subsequent thermal analysis. If unaccounted for, the adsorption of organic gases onto quartz filters will lead to the overestimation of aerosol organic carbon concentrations (positive artifact). A recommended method of correction for the positive artifact involves sampling with a backup filter. Placed behind either the primary quartz filter, or behind a Teflon filter and collected in parallel with the primary quartz filter, the carbon content of the quartz backup filter is a measure of the adsorbed organic material on the primary quartz filter. In this paper, we illustrate the application of this technique to samples collected in Berkeley, California. While the tandem quartz filter method can be successfully applied to correct for the positive artifact, we discuss two cases when this method will fail. We have found that the capacity for adsorption of organic gases is not uniform for all filters. Instead, filters manufactured by the same company, but having different lot numbers, exhibit variable adsorption capacity. Thus, a filter pair composed of filters from different lots may lead to significant under- or overestimation of particulate organic carbon concentration. Additionally, we have observed that the tandem filter method under-corrects for the positive artifact if the sampling time is short (few hours). Laboratory experiments with vapors of single organic compounds corroborate results based on ambient samples. The evolution of adsorbed organic gases, particularly polar compounds, during thermal analysis indicates that a single compound may experience two distinct adsorbent-adsorbate binding energies. Adsorbed gases may co-evolve with particles at temperatures in excess of 250-degree C.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Novakov, T.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

124

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Golden, Jeffry

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

125

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cancer risks from soil emissions of volatile organic compounds at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission isolation flux chamber (EIFC) methodology was applied to Superfund investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 to determine if on-site workers were exposed to VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface and what, if any, health risks could be attributed to the inhalation of the VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface. During July and August of 1996, twenty, eighteen, and twenty six VOC soil vapor flux samples were collected in the Building 830, 832, and 854 areas, respectively using EIFCS. The VOC concentrations in the vapor samples were used to calculate soil flux rates which were used as input into an air dispersion model to calculate ambient air exposure-point concentrations. The exposure-point concentrations were compared to EPA Region IX Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). Buildings 830 and 832 exposure-point concentrations were less then the PRGs therefore no cancer risks were calculated. The cancer risks for Building 854 ranged from 1.6 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -6}. The resultant inhalation cancer risks were all within the acceptable range, implying that on-site workers were not exposed to VOC vapors volatilizing from the subsurface soil that could have significant cancer risks. Therefore remediation in these areas would not be necessary.

Dibley, V. R., LLNL

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Performance specifications for technology development: Application for characterization of volatile organic compounds in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information about technology development for the monitoring and remediation of environmental pollution caused by the release of volatile organic compounds. Topics discussed include: performance specification processes, gas chromatography, mass spectrometer, fiber-optic chemical sensors, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, piezoelectric sensors and electrochemical sensors. These methods are analyzed for their cost efficiency, accuracy, and the ability to meet the needs of the customer.

Carpenter, S.E.; Doskey, P.V.; Erickson, M.D.; Lindahl, P.C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasoline samples collected at Sacramento area service stations. Vapor-liquid equilibrium relationships were summer 2001. Additional gasoline- related VOC emissions not shown in Figure 1 occur at service stations gasoline permeation through rubber and plastic components of the fuel system. [3] EMFAC [California Air

Silver, Whendee

129

Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

Herndon, S. C.

131

Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Electrocatalytic Materials and Techniques for the Anodic Oxidation of Various Organic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this thesis was first to characterize and improve the applicability of Fe(III) and Bi(V) doped PbO{sub 2} film electrodes for use in anodic O-transfer reactions of toxic and waste organic compounds, e.g. phenol, aniline, benzene, and naphthalene. Further, they investigated the use of alternative solution/electrode interfacial excitation techniques to enhance the performance of these electrodes for remediation and electrosynthetic applications. Finally, they have attempted to identify a less toxic metal oxide film that may hold promise for future studies in the electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis of O-transfer reactions using metal oxide film electrodes.

Stephen Everett Treimer

2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

Evans, Gordon Barcus

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Chemical oxidation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface contamination with fuel hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is prevalent throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and in many sites managed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program. The most commonly reported chlorinated hydrocarbons (occurring > 50% of DOE contaminated sites) were trichloroethylene (TCE), 1, 1, 1,-trichloroethane (TCA), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with concentrations in the range of 0.2 {mu}g/kg to 12,000 mg/kg. The fuel hydrocarbons most frequently reported as being present at DOE sites include aromatic compounds and polyaromatic compounds such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and naphthalene. The primary sources of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are coal waste from coal fired electric power plants used at many of these facilities in the past and gasoline spills and leaks. Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) can migrate within the subsurface for long periods of time along a variety of pathways including fractures, macropores, and micropores. Diffusion of contaminants in the non-aqueous, aqueous, and vapor phase can occur from the fractures and macropores into the matrix of fine-textured media. As a result of these contamination processes, removal of contaminants from the subsurface and the delivery of treatment agents into and throughout contaminated regions are often hindered, making rapid and extensive remediation difficult.

Gates, D.D.; Siegrist, R.L.; Cline, S.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Geobacter strains that use alternate organic compounds, methods of making, and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides new isolated strains of Geobacter species that are capable of using a carbon source that is selected from C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds selected from pyruvate or metabolic precursors of pyruvate as an electron donor in metabolism and in subsequent energy production. In other aspects, other preferred embodiments of the present invention include methods of making such strains and methods of using such strains. In general, the wild type strain of the microorganisms has been shown to be unable to use these C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds as electron donors in metabolic steps such as the reduction of metallic ions. The inventive strains of microorganisms are useful improving bioremediation applications, including in situ bioremediation (including uranium bioremediation and halogenated solvent bioremediation), microbial fuel cells, power generation from small and large-scale waste facilities (e.g., biomass waste from dairy, agriculture, food processing, brewery, or vintner industries, etc.) using microbial fuel cells, and other applications of microbial fuel cells, including, but not limited to, improved electrical power supplies for environmental sensors, electronic sensors, and electric vehicles.

Lovley, Derek R; Summers, Zarath Morgan; Haveman, Shelley Annette; Izallalen, Mounir

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

137

Capillary electrophoresis separation of neutral organic compounds, pharmaceutical drugs, proteins and peptides, enantiomers, and anions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Addition of a novel anionic surfactant, namely lauryl polyoxyethylene sulfate, to an aqueous-acetonitrile electrolyte makes it possible to separate nonionic organic compounds by capillary electrophoresis. Separation is based on differences in the association between analytes and the surfactant. Highly hydrophobic compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons are well separated by this new surfactant. Migration times of analytes can be readily changed over an unusually large range by varying the additive concentration and the proportion of acetonitrile in the electrolyte. Several examples are given, including the separation of four methylbenz[a]anthracene isomers and the separation of normal and deuterated acetophenone. The effect of adding this new surfactant to the acidic electrolyte was also investigated. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide in the electrolyte is shown to dynamically coat the capillary and reverse electroosmotic flow. Chiral recognition mechanism is studied using novel synthetic surfactants as chiral selectors, which are made from amino acids reacting with alkyl chloroformates. A satisfactory separation of both inorganic and organic anions is obtained using electrolyte solutions as high as 5 M sodium chloride using direct photometric detection. The effect of various salts on electrophoretic and electroosmotic mobility is further discussed. Several examples are given under high-salt conditions.

Ding, W.L.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

138

Determination of iodine in organic compounds using low-temperature ammoniacal plasma of high-frequency discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a method for the determination of iodine in organic compounds, based on the use of a low-temperature ammonial plasma of an electrodeless high frequency discharge. The method was tested on a large number of compounds, and is distinguished by simplicity of operation, rapidity, accuracy and applicability for simultaneous determination of iodine and palladium. The results of the simultaneous determination of iodine and palladium in organic compounds are shown. The relative standard deviation does not exceed 0.011. The duration of each determination is 15-20 min.

Volodina, M.A.; Kutseva, N.K.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The plants used in the rooftop greenhouse and on the floors were made up of a number of species selected for the following functions: daytime metabolic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absorption, nighttime metabolic CO{sub 2} absorption, and volatile organic compound (VOC) and inorganic gas absorption/removal for air cleaning. The building contains a reported 910 indoor plants. Daytime metabolic species reported by the PBC include Areca Palm, Oxycardium, Rubber Plant, and Ficus alii totaling 188 plants (21%). The single nighttime metabolic species is the Sansevieria with a total of 28 plants (3%). The 'air cleaning' plant species reported by the PBC include the Money Plant, Aglaonema, Dracaena Warneckii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm with a total of 694 plants (76%). The plants in the greenhouse (Areca Palm, Rubber Plant, Ficus alii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm) numbering 161 (18%) of those in the building are grown hydroponically, with the room air blown by fan across the plant root zones. The plants on the building floors are grown in pots and are located on floors 1-6. We conducted a one-day monitoring session in the PBC on January 1, 2010. The date of the study was based on availability of the measurement equipment that the researchers had shipped from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in the U.S.A. The study date was not optimal because a large proportion of the regular building occupants were not present being New Year's Day. An estimated 40 people were present in the building all day during January 1. This being said, the building systems were in normal operations, including the air handlers and other HVAC components. The study was focused primarily on measurements in the Greenhouse and 3rd and 5th floor environments as well as rooftop outdoors. Measurements included a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes, with a more limited set of observations of indoor and outdoor particulate and carbon dioxide concentrations. Continuous measurements of Temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) were made selected indoor and outdoor locations.

Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

The relation of certain organic phosphorus compounds to blood cholinesterase activity and their value as parasiticides in swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RELATION OF CERTAIN ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS TO BLOOD CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY AND THEIR VALUE AS PARASFIICIDES IN SWINE A Thesis By DELFIN DANCEL de LEON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College... of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1960 Major Subject: Animal Husbandry THE RELATION OF CERTAIN ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS CON/EXPOUNDS TO BLOOD CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITT AND THEIR VALUE...

Leon, Delfin Dancel de

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organoarsenic compounds in oi.l shale process waters using aPresented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Response threshold levels of selected organic compounds for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The responses of 27 organic compounds, mainly chloromethanes, -ethanes, -ethenes, and -phenols, were investigated by exposing rainbow trout fingerlings to low microgram-per-liter concentrations in a darkened flow-through system for up to 1 h. Responses by the fish were followed continuously by observing ventilation rates (frequency and amplitude), swimming patterns, and general activity using the low-voltage electric fields generated by the fishes` activity. The lowest level of response was found for trichloroethylene at 5 {micro}g/L. Dichloromethane, 1,1- and 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1- and 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,3-dichloropropene, and allyl acetate were responded to at concentrations of 10 {micro}g/L, carbon tetrachloride at 15 {micro}g/L, and 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol at levels of 30 {micro}g/L. Unsubstituted phenol was not responded to at levels of up to 50 {micro}g/L.

Kaiser, K.L.E.; McKinnon, M.B. [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Stendahl, D.H.; Pett, W.B. [Regional Municipality of Waterloo, Kitchener, Ontario (Canada)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Atmospheric outflow of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds from East Asia in Spring 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To estimate the emissions of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) from East Asia and to identify unique SOC molecular markers in Asian air masses, high-volume air samples were collected on the island of Okinawa, Japan between 22 March and 2 May 2004. Contributions from different source regions (China, Japan, the Koreas, Russia, and ocean/local) were estimated by use of source region impact factors (SRIFs). Elevated concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorcyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and particulate-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were attributed to air masses from China. A large proportion of the variation in the current-use pesticides, gas-phase PAHs, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations was explained by meteorology. Chlordanes showed a technical mixture profile and similar concentrations regardless of source region. {alpha}/{gamma} HCH and trans/cis chlordane ratios did not vary significantly with different source regions and had regional averages of 2.5 {+-} 1.0 and 1.2 {+-} 0.3, respectively. Particulate-phase PAH concentrations were significantly correlated (p value {lt} 0.05) with other incomplete combustion byproduct concentrations, including elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}), CO, NOx{asterisk}, black carbon, submicrometer aerosols, and SO{sub 2}. By use of measured PAH, CO, and black carbon concentrations and estimated CO and black carbon emission inventories, the emission of six carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs was estimated to be 1518-4179 metric tons/year for Asia and 778-1728 metric tons/year for China, respectively. These results confirm that East Asian outflow contains significant emissions of carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs. 39 refs., 3 figs.

Toby Primbs; Staci Simonich; David Schmedding; Glenn Wilson; Dan Jaffe; Akinori Takami; Shungo Kato; Shiro Hatakeyama; Yoshizumi Kajii [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States). Departments of Chemistry and Environmental and Molecular Toxicology

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cellular uptake of lipoproteins and persistent organic compounds-An update and new data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are a number of interactions related to the transport of lipophilic xenobiotic compounds in the blood stream of mammals. This paper will focus on the interactions between lipoproteins and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and how these particles are taken up by cells. A number of POPs including the pesticide p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and especially its metabolite p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), interacts with nuclear hormone receptors causing these to malfunction, which in turn results in a range of deleterious health effects in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of lipoprotein receptors in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells in conjunction with uptake of DDT-lipoprotein complexes from supplemented media in vitro. Uptake of DDT by MEF cells was investigated using MEF1 cells carrying the receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) present and MEF4 cells with no LRP and LDLR expression. Cells were incubated together with the complex of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and [{sup 14}C]DDT. The receptor function was further evaluated by adding the 40 kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) which blocks receptor activity. The results showed that [{sup 14}C]DDT uptake was decreasing when the LDL concentration was increasing. There was no strong evidence for a receptor-mediated uptake of the [{sup 14}C]DDT-lipoprotein complex. To conclude, DDT travels in the blood stream and can cross cell membranes while being transported as a DDT-lipoprotein complex. The lipoproteins do not need receptors to cross cell membranes since passive diffusion constitutes a major passageway.

Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian [Department of Environmental and Occupational medicine, Unit of Cellular and Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, Bygn 1260, 8000 Aarhus C, DK (Denmark); Andreassen, Thomas Kjaergaard [Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark); Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva Cecilie [Department of Environmental and Occupational medicine, Unit of Cellular and Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, Bygn 1260, 8000 Aarhus C, DK (Denmark)], E-mail: ebj@mil.au.dk

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The effect of mean cell residence time on the adsorbability of dissolved organic compounds found in petrochemical wastewaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, each with a different mean cell residence time, biologically treated the waste- water. Follow1ng biolog1cal treatment, the wastewater was subjected to activated carbon adsorption treatment. The Freundlich isotherm, non-adsorbable organic compound... residence time on adsorbability is the same for petrochemical wastewater as it is for municipal wastewater. The purpose of this thesis is to determine if the mean cell residence time in a biological treatment process can af'feet the ad- sorbability...

Johnson, Timothy Loring

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Brayton Cycle Heat Pump for VOC Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first full size continuous operation Brayton Cycle Heat Pump (1)(2)(3) application for VOC recovery occurred in 1988. The mixed solvent recovery system was designed and supplied by NUCON for the 3M facility in Weatherford, OK (4). This first...

Kovach, J. L.

150

Isotopic constraints on the sources and associations of organic compounds in marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To provide a new perspective on the fate of both natural organic matter and hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in marine sediments, we have investigated the relationship between radiocarbon (14C) age and the different ...

White, Helen K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

An Assessment of the Stability and the Potential for In-Situ Synthesis of Regulated Organic Compounds in High Level Radioactive Waste Stored at Hanford, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability assessment examined 269 non-detected regulated compounds, first seeking literature references of the stability of the compounds, then evaluating each compound based upon the presence of functional groups using professional judgment. Compounds that could potentially survive for significant periods in the tanks (>1 year) were designated as stable. Most of the functional groups associated with the regulated organic compounds were considered unstable under tank waste conditions. The general exceptions with respect to functional group stability are some simple substituted aromatic and polycyclic aromatic compounds that resist oxidation and the multiple substituted aliphatic and aromatic halides that hydrolyze or dehydrohalogenate slowly under tank waste conditions. One-hundred and eighty-one (181) regulated, organic compounds were determined as likely unstable in the tank waste environment.

Wiemers, K.D.; Babad, H.; Hallen, R.T.; Jackson, L.P.; Lerchen, M.E.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Observations of nonmethane hydrocarbons and oxygenated volatile organic compounds at a rural site in the southeastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of an extensive range of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) including alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics, and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) including alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes were conducted for several weeks during the summer of 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) at a rural experimental site (Youth, Inc.) 32 km southeast of Nashville, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. These measurements were conducted to (1) determine the absolute magnitude and variability of oxygenated compounds found in a contemporary rural region; (2) assess the importance of the measured ambient levels of OVOCs on a photochemical reactivity basis relative to the more commonly determined NMHCs; and (3) to evaluate our ability to accurately measure oxygenates by the current techniques employed under a field study scenario. Several other physical (temperature, insolation, etc.), meteorological (wind velocity, wind direction, atmospheric structure, and boundary layer height), and chemical (criterion pollutants, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 3}, etc.) parameters were measured concurrently with the NMHC and OVOC measurements. During the study period, OVOCs were consistently the dominant compounds present, and methanol and acetone had the highest mixing ratios. Although OVOCs made up the majority of the volatile organic compound component on a mass basis, a substantial sink for OH was isoprene and its immediate oxidation products, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone. In combination with CO and formaldehyde, these compounds comprised about 85{percent} of the observed OH reactivity at the site. Acetaldehyde and methanol were responsible for an additional 10{percent}, with the NMHCs and remaining OVOCs making up the final 5{percent} of the measured OH reactivity at the site. These observed patterns reinforce recent studies which find OVOCs to be an important component of the rural troposphere. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

Riemer, Daniel; Pos, Willer; Milne, Peter; Farmer, Charlesk; Zika, Rod [Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Atmospheric Sciences, Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, Alabama (United States)] Apel, Eric [Atmospheric Chemistry Group, Mantech Environmental Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Olszyna, Ken [National Environmental Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA. Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Kliendienst, Tad [Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States)] Lonneman, William [Departments of Chemistry, and Earth and Atmospheric Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (United States); Shepson, Paul; Starn, Tim

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A study of the Reaction Between Antimony (III) Bromide and Organic Amine Hydrobromide Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paper"s knew that antimony tetra- bromide and antimony penta'Lx'omide could not be pr cpa~ ed in the solid state bu. postulated the existence of these hypo- . :netioal compou; ds as in' ermediates in their reactions t. o form stable complex compounds... . Pet zold also assumed the existence of antimo~y nexabr omide and antimony heptabrom'de wh'ch ne characserized as perbromic compounds. Hays (=, ) reported the preparation of CsHsN SbBrs - gHBr by the rea- ion of pyridine hydrobromide and ant...

Yeakley, Richard Lee

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Carbon isotope ratios of organic compound fractions in oceanic suspended particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiocarbon evidence of fossil-carbon cycling in sediments1968), Metabolic fractionation of carbon isotopes in marineof particulate organic carbon using bomb 14 C, Nature,

Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction.

Schilling, J.B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Volatilization of selected organic compounds from a creosote-waste land-treatment facility. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to evaluate the emissions of volatile and semi-volatile compounds which are constituents of a complex creosote waste from laboratory simulations of a land treatment system to assess the potential human exposure to hazardous compounds from this source. In addition, the Thibodeaux-Hwang Air Emission Release Rate (AERR) model was evaluated for its use in predicting emission rates of hazardous constituents of creosote wood preservative waste from land treatment facilities. A group of hazardous volatile and semi-volatile constituents present in the creosote waste was selected for evaluation in this study and included a variety of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA's), phenol, and chlorinated and substituted phenols.

Scott, E.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Radionuclides, Trace Metals, and Organic Compounds in Shells of Native Freshwater Mussels Along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River: 6000 Years Before Present to Current Times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents concentrations of radionuclides, trace metals, and semivolatile organic compounds measured in shell samples of the western pearl shell mussel collected along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

B. L. Tiller; T. E. Marceau

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Our planet is becoming increasingly polluted with inorganic and organic compounds, primarily as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced or expected to be present in organ- isms). Many of them are toxic and/or carcinogenic. Sources cleanup in the US, and $25­50 billion per year worldwide (Glass 1999; Tsao 2003). Most remediation that use plants to remove, reduce, degrade, or immobilize environmental pollutants from soil and water

160

"The disintegration of organic compounds by microorganisms is accompanied by the liberation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that of the better- known abiotic hydrogen- and methanol-driven fuel cells. For example, abiotic fuel cells require in a cost-effective manner. Over the past 40 years it has been suggested that microbial fuel cells might convert organic matter into electricity in devices known as microbial fuel cells. However, interest

Lovley, Derek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary 5 layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/800 OD tube 150m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the 10 tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect 15 from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

Mak, J. E.; Su, L.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effects of solar radiation on manganese oxide reactions with selected organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of sunlight on aqueous redox reactions between manganese oxides (MnO{sub x}) and selected organic substances are reported. No sunlight-induced rate enhancement was observed for the MnO{sub x} oxidation of substituted phenols, anisole, o-dichlorobenzene, or p-chloroaniline. On the other hand, solar radiation did accelerate the reduction of manganese oxides by dissolved organic matter (DOM) from aquatic environments. The photoreduction of MnO{sub x} by DOM was little affected by molecular oxygen in air-saturated water (250 {mu}M), but was inhibited by 2,6-dichloroindophenol (0.5-6 {mu}M), and excellent electron acceptor. MnO{sub x} reduction also was photosensitized by anthraquinone-2-sulfonate. These results indicate that the photoreduction probably involves electron transfer from excited states of sorbed DOM to the oxide surface. Wavelength studies indicated that ultraviolet-B radiation (280-320 nm) plays an important role in this photoreduction.

Bertino, D.J.; Zepp, R.G. (Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Polyphenoloxidases immobilized in organic gels: Properties and applications in the detoxification of aromatic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelatine gels originate from water in oil microemulsions in which the ternary system consists of isooctane/sulfosuccinic acid bis [2-ethyl hexyl] ester/water; the solubilization of gelatin in the water pool of these microemulsions transforms them into viscous gels in which it is possible to cosolubilize various reactive molecules. These gels were used to immobilize two phenoloxidases, a laccase from Trametes versicolor and a tyrosinase from mushroom. The best balance between gel retention and catalytic activity was reached at a gelatine concentration of 2.5% (w/v) in the case of tyrosinase, while laccase immobilization was independent of gelatine concentration. Both enzymes kept the same optimum pH as the corresponding soluble controls, while a partial loss of activity was observed when they were immobilized. Immobilized enzymes showed an increased stability when incubated for several days at 4 C with a very low release from the gels in the incubation solutions. The immobilization of tyrosinase and of laccase enhanced stability to thermal inactivation. Furthermore, gel-entrapped tyrosinase was almost completely preserved from proteolysis: more than 80% of the activity was maintained, while only 25% of the soluble control activity was detected after the same proteolytic treatments. A column packed with gel-immobilized tyrosinase was used to demonstrate that enzymes immobilized with this technique may be reused several times in the same reaction without loosing their efficiency. Finally, gel-entrapped tyrosinase and laccase were capable of removing naturally occurring and xenobiotic aromatic compounds from aqueous suspensions with different degrees of efficiency.

Crecchio, C.; Ruggiero, P.; Pizzigallo, M.D.R. [Univ. di Bari (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Agraria

1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

164

Single-reactor process for producing liquid-phase organic compounds from biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for preparing liquid fuel and chemical intermediates from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons. The method includes the steps of reacting in a single reactor an aqueous solution of a biomass-derived, water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon reactant, in the presence of a catalyst comprising a metal selected from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au, at a temperature, and a pressure, and for a time sufficient to yield a self-separating, three-phase product stream comprising a vapor phase, an organic phase containing linear and/or cyclic mono-oxygenated hydrocarbons, and an aqueous phase.

Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Simonetti, Dante A. (Middleton, WI); Kunkes, Edward L. (Madison, WI)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

165

Identification of organic compounds contained in the bitumen of Chattanooga oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bitumen of Chattanooga Oil Shale has been extracted with benzene. The benzene-soluble material was separated into acid base and neutral fractions with ion exchange chromatography. This separation scheme has been used extensively to separate the organic material in Green River Oil Shale. The acid fraction was esterified with BF/sub 3//MeOH. A large portion of the acid fraction was not esterified and this material was considered to be phenolic. The bases were separated into two fractions using alumina. The esters, the two base fractions and the total neutral fraction were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Two series constituting the methyl esters of normal and isoprenoid acids were identified. Several homologous series were indicated in the base fraction. The major components in the neutral fractions were two series constituting normal and isoprenoid alkanes. The analysis scheme apparently does a good job of separating and identifying aliphatic materials.

Mc Gowan, C.W.; Greenwell, B.E.; Markuszewski, R.; Richard, J.J.; Sepaniak, M.J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Emissions of volatile organic compounds from stationary combustion sources: Numerical modeling capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A collaborative research program initiated to study the emissions of a wide variety of chemical species from stationary combustion systems. These product species have been included in the Clean Air act legislation and their emissions must be rigidly controlled, but there is a need for much better understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms that produce and consume them. We are using numerical modeling study the chemical reactions and fluid mechanical factors that occur in industrial processes: we are examining systems including premixed and diffusion flames, stirred reactors and plug flow reactors in these modeling studies to establish the major factors leading to emissions of these chemicals. In addition, we are applying advanced laser diagnostic techniques to validate the model predictions and to study the possibilities of developing sophisticated sensors to detect emissions of undesirable species in real time. This paper will discuss the organization of this collaborative effort and its results to date.

Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States); Kee, R.J.; Lutz, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Senkan, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K. : Atmospheric chemistry of gasoline-related emissions:chemistry. Methyl tert-butyl ether is a solvent and gasoline

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil sands comprise 30% of the world’s oil reserves andthe crude oil reserves in Canada’s oil sands deposits are30% of total world oil reserves (Alboudwarej et al. , 2006)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Fehsenfeld, F. C. : Emission sources and ocean uptake ofand No- vakov, T. : Emissions of trace gases and particlesGroot, W. J. : Future emissions from Canadian boreal forest

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

propene, acetone, benzene, propane and ?-pinene (Table 1).cyanide Acetonitrile Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-= Ethane Ethane Ethane Ethane Propane Propane Propane ARCTAS

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 VOCsVOCs,, PAHsPAHs, soot, tar, CO, soot, tar, CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incinerator EU (2000) Power plant Germany (1999) MSW incinerator Germany (1999) Hazardou s waste incinerator EU (1996) Waste incinerator USA (1995) CO no limit 50 50 250 50 50 76.31 THC no limit 10 10 20 10 10.153 VOC emissions from waste incineration plants,VOC emissions from waste incineration plants, in mg

Zevenhoven, Ron

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - air voc flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences 28 ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT Summary: of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from...

175

Estimated monthly emissions of sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and volatile organic compounds for the 48 contiguous states, 1985-1986: Volume 2, Sectoral emissions by month for states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A listing by source of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds emitted in 48 states of the US is provided. (CBS)

Kohout, E.J.; Knudson, D.A.; Saricks, C.L.; Miller, D.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

177

The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process that includes electron transport and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process would cause severe problems if special mechanisms did not protect the photosynthetic system from energy or photon units. Irradiance is the amount of energy that falls on a flat sensor of known area per

Ehleringer, Jim

178

Analysis of C1, C2, and C10 through C33 particle-phase and semi-volatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from heavy-duty diesel engines Z. Gerald Liu a,*, Devin R. Berg a , Victoria N. Vasys a , Melissa E 18 November 2009 Keywords: Organic compound emissions Particulate matter emissions Heavy-duty diesel engines Aftertreatment technology Diesel particulate filter Chemical speciation a b s t r a c t To meet

Wu, Mingshen

179

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Confronted with contaminated land from the world wars and the postwar industrialization period, German researchers and practicing professionals have worked to develop processes for effective environmental restoration. This presentation documents efforts by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers to (1) identify collaborators and German technologies exhibiting near-term potential for clean-up of volatile organic contaminated soil and groundwater at Department of Energy sites, (2) critically assess performance, and (3) inform interested agencies. The project was limited to identification and preliminary evaluation and included engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. Two processes were identified: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well (PP/HW). Both technologies induce a recirculation flow field in the aquifer and enable simultaneous down hole treatment of the aquifer and vadose zone. University of Karlsruhe researchers have demonstrated the UVB/GZB technology in shallow aquifers with moderately high saturated thickness and hydraulic conductivities. The PP/HW technology offers potential for VOC treatment in sites with thin aquifers or heterogeneities. This paper describes identified German technologies and includes critical evaluations of well performance, associated treatment processes, operating variables, and aquifer-well interactions.

Webb, O.F.; Siegrist, R.L.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Environmental Science Div.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

8, 1182111851, 2008 VOCs during 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Texas 77843, TX, USA 2 Molina Center for Energy and the Environment, La Jolla, California, CA, USA * now Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of the Megacity Initiative ­ Local and Global Research the probability of significant industrial sources of the two compounds in the15 region. Wind fields during those

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

182

Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.

Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was initiated by an Institute of Paper Science and Technology finding that heating softwood in a low-headspace environment removed much of the VOCs without removing the water. This offered the possibility of removing VOCs from wet wood, capturing them as a product, and then drying the VOC-depleted wood conventionally with little or no VOC controls. Two means of low-headspace heating were explored: steam and radiofrequency (RF). It was found in the previous year, that while both steam and RF were able to drive out VOCs, steam was impracticably slow for lumber. Hence the effect of RF or microwave on wood was the principal focus of the work reported here. Finally, in order to understand the mechanism of VOC release, the transport of the VOCs in wood was studied, together with the seasonal effects that influence VOC concentration in trees.

Su, W.; Yan, H.; Hooda, U.; Wild, M.P.; Banerjee, S. [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shmulsky, R.; Thompson, A.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)] [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

Enneking, J. C.

185

ORIGINAL PAPER L. Voc adlo K. S. Knight G. D. Price I. G. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER L. VocÏ adlo á K. S. Knight á G. D. Price á I. G. Wood Thermal expansion and crystal discussed by Wood et al. (1996), VocÏ adlo et al. (1999, 2000) and Mattheiss and Hamann (1993002690100202 L. VocÏ adlo (&) á G. D. Price á I. G. Wood Department of Geological Sciences, University College

Vocadlo, Lidunka

186

Identification and separation of the organic compounds in coal-gasification condensate waters. [5,5 dimethyl hydantoin, dihydroxy benzenes, acetonitrile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A substantial fraction of the organic solutes in condensate waters from low-temperature coal-gasification processes are not identified by commonly employed analytical techniques, have low distriution coefficients (K/sub C/) into diisopropyl ether (DIPE) or methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and are resistant to biological oxidation. These compounds represent an important wastewater-treatment problem. Analytical techniques were developed to detect these polar compounds, and the liquid-liquid phase equilibria were measured with several solvents. A high-performance liquid - chromatography (HPLC) technique was employed to analyze four condensate-water samples from a slagging fixed-bed gasifier. A novel sample-preparation technique, consisting of an azeotropic distillation with isopropanol, allowed identification of compounds in the HPLC eluant by combined gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. 5,5-dimethyl hydantoin and related compounds were identified in condensate waters for the first time, and they account for 1 to 6% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). Dimethyl hydatoin has a K/sub D/ of 2.6 into tributyl phosphate (TBP) and much lower K/sub D/ values into six other solvents. It is also resistant to biological oxidation. Phenols (59 to 76% of the COD), dihydroxy benzenes (0.02 to 9.5% of the COD), and methanol, acetonitrile, and acetone (15% of the COD in one sample) were also detected. Extraction with MIBK removed about 90% of the COD. MIBK has much higher K/sub D/ values than DIPE for dihydroxy benzenes. Chemical reactions occurred during storage of condensate-water samples. The reaction products had low K/sub D/ values into MIBK. About 10% of the COD had a K/sub D/ of nearly zero into MIBK. These compounds were not extracted by MIBK over a wide range of pH. 73 references, 6 figures, 35 tables.

Mohr, D.H. Jr.; King, C.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Quarterly report 3, January--March, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress during this quarter is described on four tasks. The first task involves the recovery of organic matter from bleach effluents and black liquors, separation of carbohydrates and lignin degradation products, analysis of functional groups, and characterization of carbohydrate polymers. Progress in the second task was made in the selection of model compounds. Several subtasks are complete in Task 3, but the paper summarizes progress made in the determination of the residual hemicellulose content in the pulp samples. Finally, results are given for the measurement of metal adsorption isotherms on wood pulp. Goals for the next quarter are listed.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

O3-NOx-VOC sensitivity and NOx-VOC indicators in Paris: Results from models and Atmospheric Pollution Over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Atmospheric Pollution Over the Paris Area campaign near Paris, with special attention Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Structure-VOC indicators in Paris: Results from models and Atmospheric Pollution Over the Paris Area (ESQUIF) measurements

Menut, Laurent

189

Three Essays in Business Management, the Natural Environment, and Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain GHG Emissions -0.762 Controls Water Abstraction General Waste VOCs HeavySupply Chain GHG Emissions Water Abstraction General Waste Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Heavy

Nairn-Birch, Nicholas Simon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Carbon tetrachloride contamination, 200 West Area, Hanford Site: Arid Site Integrated Demonstration for remediation of volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arid State Integrated Demonstration is a US Department of Energy (DOE) program targeted at the acquisition, development, demonstration, and deployment of technologies for evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic and associated contaminants in soils and ground waters. Several DOE laboratories, universities, and industry will participate in the program. Candidate technologies will be demonstrated in the areas of site characterization; performance prediction, monitoring, and evaluations; contaminant extraction and ex situ treatment; in situ remediations; and site closure and monitoring. The performance of these demonstrated technologies will be compared to baseline technologies and documented to promote the transfer of new technologies to industry for use at DOE facilities. The initial host site is the Hanford Site's 200 West Area. The location of the demonstration contains primarily carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), chloroform, and a variety of associated mixed waste contaminants. Chemical processes used to recover and purify plutonium at Hanford's plutonium finishing plant (Z Plant) resulted in the production of actinide-bearing waste liquid. Both aqueous and organic liquid wastes were generated, and were routinely discharged to subsurface disposal facilities. The primary radionuclide in the waste streams was plutonium, and the primary organic was CCl{sub 4}. This paper contains brief descriptions of the principal CCl{sub 4} waste disposal facilities in Hanford's 200 West Area, associated hydrogeology, existing information on the extent of soil and ground-water contamination, and a conceptual outline of suspected subsurface CCl{sub 4} distributions.

Last, G.V. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rohay, V.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

Carbon tetrachloride contamination, 200 West Area, Hanford Site: Arid Site Integrated Demonstration for remediation of volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arid State Integrated Demonstration is a US Department of Energy (DOE) program targeted at the acquisition, development, demonstration, and deployment of technologies for evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic and associated contaminants in soils and ground waters. Several DOE laboratories, universities, and industry will participate in the program. Candidate technologies will be demonstrated in the areas of site characterization; performance prediction, monitoring, and evaluations; contaminant extraction and ex situ treatment; in situ remediations; and site closure and monitoring. The performance of these demonstrated technologies will be compared to baseline technologies and documented to promote the transfer of new technologies to industry for use at DOE facilities. The initial host site is the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area. The location of the demonstration contains primarily carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), chloroform, and a variety of associated mixed waste contaminants. Chemical processes used to recover and purify plutonium at Hanford`s plutonium finishing plant (Z Plant) resulted in the production of actinide-bearing waste liquid. Both aqueous and organic liquid wastes were generated, and were routinely discharged to subsurface disposal facilities. The primary radionuclide in the waste streams was plutonium, and the primary organic was CCl{sub 4}. This paper contains brief descriptions of the principal CCl{sub 4} waste disposal facilities in Hanford`s 200 West Area, associated hydrogeology, existing information on the extent of soil and ground-water contamination, and a conceptual outline of suspected subsurface CCl{sub 4} distributions.

Last, G.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rohay, V.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

Mechanisms of synfuel degradation 1. Effects of organic nitrogen compounds on the stability of a shale derived diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable accelerated fuel stability test regimen has been developed and applied to the study of the storage stability of a shale derived diesel fuel marine (DFM). The results of a survey of nitrogen compounds as dopants in a stable shale DFM base fuel indicate that some pyrroles and indoles may play significant roles in storage stability. A complete stability test matrix has been developed for the temperatures of 43, 65 and 80/sup 0/C, for time periods between 4 and 179 days, and for a ten-fold concentration range of a model dopant, 2,5-dimethylpyrrole (DMP). Stability was defined by the amount of total insoluble material (filterable sediment and adherent gum) produced after stress, and also by the amount of titratable peroxide present in the filtrates of stressed fuel samples. A very regular pattern for insolubles formation was found within the test matrix. Deposit formation rates exhibited a first-order dependence on DMP concentration, with an apparent activation energy of 11-12 kcal/mol. The sediment was found to contain 12% nitrogen and 18-20% oxygen irrespective of the stress conditions employed.

Cooney, J.V.; Beal, E.J.; Huzlett, R.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Comparative evaluation of several small mammal species as monitors of heavy metals, radionuclides, and selected organic compounds in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate which small mammal species are the best monitors of specific environmental contaminants. The evaluation is based on the published literature and on an analysis of small mammals trapped at several sites on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Studies on the uptake of heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic chemicals are reviewed in Chapter II to evaluate several small mammal species for their capacity to serve as sentinels for the presence, accumulation, and effects of various contaminants. Where several species were present at a site, a comparative evaluation was made and species are ranked for their capacity to serve as monitors of specific contaminants. Food chain accumulation and food habits of the species are used to establish a relationship with suitability as a biomonitor. Tissue-specific concentration factors were noted in order to establish target tissues. Life histories, habitat, and food habits are reviewed in order to make generalizations concerning the ability of similar taxa to serve as biomonitor. Finally, the usefulness of several small mammal species as monitors of three contaminants -- benzo(a)pyrene, mercury, and strontium-90 -- present on or near the ORNL facilities was investigated. 133 refs., 5 figs., 20 tabs.

Talmage, S.S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sheet, 2014 Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2014 The Gas Technology Institute, in collaboration with Cannon Boiler Works, Integrated CHP...

195

Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4 Federal6Clean Energy | DepartmentBrandonYoungHFBRIII VOC

196

Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC) Laboratories »OrganicOrganization

197

IS THE TAIL WAGGING THE DOG? AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE CARBON FOOTPRINTS AND FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain GHG Emissions Controls Water Abstraction General Waste VOCs HeavySupply Chain GHG Emissions Controls Water Abstraction General Waste VOCs HeavySupply Chain GHG Emissions Water Abstraction General Waste Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Heavy

Delmas, Magali A; Nairn-Birch, Nicholas S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Photocatalytic Degradation of VOC's by TOTO's Hydrotect (TiO2 Impregnated) Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Photocatalytic Degradation of VOC's by TOTO's Hydrotect (TiO2 Impregnated) Surfaces Eva Land. This report describes the photocatalytic degradation of formaldehyde and methanol, two common VOC's, by TiO2 to produce measurable gas phase concentrations. The extended UV illumination of the tiles resulted in a 50

Bergin, Mike

199

ARM - Measurement - Volatile organic compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARMgovMeasurementsVisibility

200

Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Surface acoustic wave sensing of VOCs in harsh chemical environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of VOC concentrations in harsh chemical and physical environments is a formidable task. A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor has been designed for this purpose and its construction and testing are described in this paper. Included is a detailed description of the design elements specific to operation in 300{degree}C steam and HCl environments including temperature control, gas handling, and signal processing component descriptions. In addition, laboratory temperature stability was studied and a minimum detection limit was defined for operation in industrial environments. Finally, a description of field tests performed on steam reforming equipment at Synthetica Technologies Inc. of Richmond, CA is given including a report on destruction efficiency of CCl{sub 4} in the Synthetica moving bed evaporator. Design improvements based on the field tests are proposed.

Pfeifer, K.B.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Process for preparing a deuterated or tritiated compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for labeling organic compounds with deuterium and tritium is described using specific catalysts.

Klei, Steven R.; Bergman, Robert C.

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

Process for preparing a deuterated or tritiated compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for labeling organic compounds with deuterium and tritium is described using specific catalysts.

Bergman, Robert C.; Klei, Steven R.

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Process for preparing a deuterated or tritiated compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for labeling organic compounds with deuterium and tritium is described using specific catalysts.

Bergman, Robert C.; Klei, Steven R.

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Compounds (VOCs) Water heater repair/replacementfireplaces Pipe insulation Water heater insulation Asbestosboilers woodstoves water heaters ranges clothes dryers

Stratton, Chris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Chicago VOC trading system : the consequences of market design for performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Chicago cap-and-trade approach to regulating stationary source VOC emissions in the Chicago ozone non-attainment area is a pioneering program that could set a precedent for other urban areas troubled by high ozone ...

Kosobud, Richard F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Detecting odorous compounds emitted from building and consumer products within the European Project SysPAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detecting odorous compounds emitted from building and consumer products within the European Project.horn@bam.de Keywords: Olfactory detection port, VOC analysis, Thermal extraction, Building material, Consumer products Introduction In 2006 the European research project Innovative Sensor System for Measuring Perceived Air Quality

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was the only one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 mu g m-2 h 1 in the morning and 257 to 347 mu g m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 mu g m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 mu g/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 mu g/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (material surface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde.

Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

2008-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

209

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Novel New Approach to VOC and HAP Emission Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

211

Method for lowering the VOCS emitted during drying of wood products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for removal of VOCs from wood products prior to drying the wood products. The method of the invention includes the steps of providing a chamber having an opening for receiving wood and loading the chamber with green wood. The wood is loaded to an extent sufficient to provide a limited headspace in the chamber. The chamber is then closed and the wood is heated in the chamber for a time and at a temperature sufficient to saturate the headspace with moisture and to substantially transfer VOCs from the wood product to the moisture in the headspace.

Banerjee, Sujit (1832 Jacksons Creek Point, Marietta, GA 30068); Boerner, James Robert (154 Junedale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45218); Su, Wei (2262 Orleans Ave., Marietta, GA 30062)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and Aerosol Phase at a Sub-Urban Site Near Mexico City in March 2006 During the MILAGRO Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonaceous aerosol were measured at a sub-urban site near Mexico City in March of 2006 during the MILAGRO study (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Objectives). Diurnal variations of hydrocarbons, elemental carbon (EC) and hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) were dominated by a high peak in the early morning when local emissions accumulated in a shallow boundary layer, and a minimum in the afternoon when the emissions were diluted in a significantly expanded boundary layer and, in case of the reactive gases, removed by OH. In comparison, diurnal variations of species with secondary sources such as the aldehydes, ketones, oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) stayed relatively high in the afternoon indicating strong photochemical formation. Emission ratios of many hydrocarbon species relative to CO were higher in Mexico City than in the U.S., but we found similar emission ratios for most oxygenated VOCs and organic aerosol. Secondary formation of acetone may be more efficient in Mexico City than in the U.S., due to higher emissions of alkane precursors from the use of liquefied petroleum gas. Secondary formation of organic aerosol was similar between Mexico City and the U.S. Combining the data for all measured gas and aerosol species, we describe the budget of total observed organic carbon (TOOC), and find that the enhancement ratio of TOOC relative to CO is conserved between the early morning and mid afternoon despite large compositional changes. Finally, the influence of biomass burning is investigated using the measurements of acetonitrile, which was found to correlate with levoglucosan in the particle phase. Diurnal variations of acetonitrile indicate a contribution from local burning sources. Scatter plots of acetonitrile versus CO suggest that the contribution of biomass burning to the enhancement of most gas and aerosol species was not dominant and perhaps not dissimilar from observations in the U.S.

de Gouw, Joost A.; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; Warneke, Carsten; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, Angela K.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Blake, D. R.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Celada, A. T.; Huey, L. G.; Junkermann, W.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Salcido, A.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Sullivan, Amy; Tanner, David J.; Vargas-Ortiz, Leroy; Weber, R. J.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

TMVOC, simulator for multiple volatile organic chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TMVOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase non-isothermal flow of water, soil gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. It is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. TMVOC is designed for applications to contamination problems that involve hydrocarbon fuel or organic solvent spills in saturated and unsaturated zones. It can model contaminant behavior under ''natural'' environmental conditions, as well as for engineered systems, such as soil vapor extraction, groundwater pumping, or steam-assisted source remediation. TMVOC is upwards compatible with T2VOC (Falta et al., 1995) and can be initialized from T2VOC-style initial conditions. The main enhancements in TMVOC relative to T2VOC are as follows: a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals can be modeled; any and all combinations of the three phases water-oil-gas are treated; several non-condensible gases may be present; diffusion is treated in all phases in a manner that is fully coupled with phase partitioning. This paper gives a brief summary of the methodology used in TMVOC as well as highlighting some implementation issues. Simulation of a NAPL spill and subsequent remediation is discussed for a 2-D vertical section of a saturated-unsaturated flow problem.

Pruess, Karsten; Battistelli, Alfredo

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

214

Communication accepte: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997Communication accepte: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997 DISCRIMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication acceptée: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997Communication acceptée: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997 DISCRIMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC manuscript, published in "4th International Conference on Healthy Buildings'97, Washington : United States

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

Determination of VOC emissions from French wood products Christophe YRIEIX *, Franois MAUPETIT **, Olivier RAMALHO **  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building products. Introduction Today, it is well known that building products may influence indoor air1/10 Determination of VOC emissions from French wood products Christophe YRIEIX *, François air quality (IAQ), it appears necessary to have analytical protocol for the measurement and health

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

216

Carbide-Derived Carbons for Adsorptive Removal of VOCs from Air Streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbide-Derived Carbons for Adsorptive Removal of VOCs from Air Streams References 1. USEPA Literature Results Carbide-Derived Carbons Motivation Future Research · The effect of pore size and pore size decreasing removal cost is an advancement for the industry and the environment. Carbide-derived carbons (CDCs

Das, Suman

217

Photoconductive Decay Lifetime and Suns-Voc Diagnostics of Efficient Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report results of minority carrier lifetime measurements for double-sided p-type Si heterojunction devices and compare Suns-Voc results to Light I-V measurements on 1 cm2 solar cell devices measured on an AM1.5 calibrated XT-10 solar simulator.

Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal L.; Bauer, R.; Yan, H.-C.; Wang, Q.; Meier, D. L.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ambient air measurements related to traffic : volution of VOCs over three years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hours. The major VOC are : benzène and toluène, MTBE, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, phénol, naphtalene, but will not be discussed hère. Aromatic hydrocarbons and MTBE are sampled b

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

219

Alternative current conduction mechanisms of organic-inorganic compound [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

[N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} has been studied by X-ray powder diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and impedance spectroscopy. The [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} hybrid compound is crystallized at room temperature (T ? 300?K) in the orthorhombic system with Pnma space group. Five phase transitions (T{sub 1}?=?255?K, T{sub 2}?=?282?K, T{sub 3}?=?302?K, T{sub 4}?=?320?K, and T{sub 5}?=?346?K) have been proved by DSC measurements. The electrical technique was measured in the 10{sup ?1}-10{sup 7}?Hz frequency range and 233–363?K temperature interval. The frequency dependence of alternative current (AC) conductivity is interpreted in terms of Jonscher's law. The AC electrical conduction in [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} is analyzed by different processes, which can be attributed to several models: the correlated barrier hopping model in phase I, the overlapping large polaron tunneling model in phase II, the quantum mechanical tunneling model in phase IV, and the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in phases III, V, and VI. The conduction mechanism is studied with the help of Elliot's theory, and the Elliot's parameters are determined.

Ben Bechir, M., E-mail: mohamedbenbechir@hotmail.fr; Karoui, K.; Guidara, K.; Ben Rhaiem, A. [Laboratory of Condensed Matter, Faculty of Sciences, University of Sfax, BP1171, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Tabellout, M. [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, CNRS UMR 6283, Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans (IMMM), Avenue Olivier Messiaen, F-72085, Le Mans Cedex 09 (France)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Alternative current conduction mechanisms of organic-inorganic compound [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} single crystal has been analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and electrical impedance spectroscopy. [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} crystallizes at room temperature in the monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/{sub C} space group. Three phase transitions at T{sub 1}?=?226?K, T{sub 2}?=?264?K, and T{sub 3}?=?297?K have been evidenced by DSC measurements. The electrical technique was measured in the 10{sup ?1}–10{sup 7}?Hz frequency range and 203–313?K temperature intervals. The frequency dependence of alternative current (AC) conductivity is interpreted in terms of Jonscher's law (developed). The AC electrical conduction in [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} compound is studied by two processes which can be attributed to a hopping transport mechanism: the correlated barrier hopping model in phases I, II, and III, the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in phase IV. The conduction mechanism is interpreted with the help of Elliot's theory, and the Elliot's parameters are found.

Ben Bechir, M., E-mail: mohamedbenbechir@hotmail.fr; Karoui, K.; Guidara, K.; Ben Rhaiem, A. [Laboratory of Condensed Matter, Faculty of Sciences, University of Sfax, BP1171, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Tabellout, M. [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, CNRS UMR 6283, Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans (IMMM), Avenue Olivier Messiaen, F-72085 Le Mans Cedex 09 (France)

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from forest emissions measured at mid-mountain and high- elevation mountain sites in Whistler, BC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FTIR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques for organicPTR-MS SOA SP2 STXM-NEXAFS VOC XRF Aerosol Mass SpectrometerPTR-MS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), single particle soot

Schwartz, Rachel E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Treatability test of a stacked-tray air stripper for VOC in water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common strategy for hydraulic containment and mass removal at VOC contaminated sites is `pump and treat (P&T)`. In P&T operations, contaminated ground water is pumped from wells, treated above ground, and discharged. Many P&T remediation systems at VOC sites rely on air stripping technology because VOCs are easily transferred to the vapor phase. In stacked-tray air strippers, contaminated water is aerated while it flows down through a series of trays. System operations at LLNL are strictly regulated by the California and federal Environmental Protection Agencies (Cal/EPA and EPA), the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). These agencies set discharge limits, require performance monitoring, and assess penalties for non-compliance. National laboratories are also subject to scrutiny by the public and other government agencies. This extensive oversight makes it necessary to accurately predict field treatment performance at new extraction locations to ensure compliance with all requirements prior to facility activation. This paper presents treatability test results for a stacked- tray air stripper conducted at LLNL and compares them to the vendor`s modeling software results.

Pico, T., LLNL

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Services Initiatives | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and is very low in Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) which evaporate little and cause no air pollution, whereas petroleum-based inks are high in VOCs and cause air pollution when...

224

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - aniline compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Halogenated Compounds Allyl chloride Carbon tetrachloride... Nitrates and Acids Ammoniated Compounds and Hypochlorites and Bleach Organic Nitrates Source: Oliver, Douglas L. -...

226

Adsorptive Partitioning of an Organic Compound onto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

remediation (1). For example, pump-and-treat meth- ods entail pumping out pollutant-containing water from with micelle only. The aspect of the treatment procedure producing the most significant effect on Orange OT that travels with groundwater flow within an aquifer (1). This contaminated subsurface water can travel

Dubin, Paul D.

227

Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................... ltudy by Means of Carbon Dioxide Formed 8 ............................... lomparison of . Various Materials 9 ...................................... lffect of Nature of Soil 14 ..................................... Ixidation of Soil Carbon 18... was drawn to take out the carbon dioxide. Althongl~ such experi- ments are well adapted to estimate carbon cliosicle, obviously, such con- ditions do not prevail in the soil, and while it is possible that Wollnp's conclusions may appl~r to the soil uncler...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Volatile Organic Compound Detection Using Nanostructured Copolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a lot of success in sensor development for greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, NO, and CO), technology sensing mechanisms are at play simultaneously, and we briefly discuss some of them. The demand for low-cost, PennsylVania 15213, and National Personal ProtectiVe Technology Laboratory, National Institute

Weiss, Lee E.

229

Pilot-scale study of the solar detoxification of VOC-contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Detoxification Field Experiment was designed to investigate the photocatalytic decomposition of organic contaminants in groundwater at a Superfund site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The process uses ultraviolet (UV) energy, available in sunlight, in conjunction with the photocatalyst, titanium dioxide, to decompose organic chemicals into nontoxic compounds. The field experiment was developed by three federal laboratories: the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNLA), and LLNL. The US Department of Energy funded the experiment. The objectives of the pilot-scale study included the advancement of the solar technology into a nonlaboratory waste-remediation environment the compilation of test data to help guide laboratory research and future demonstrations and the development of safe operational procedures. Results of the pilot study are discussed, emphasizing the effect of several process variables on the system performance. These variables include alkalinity, catalyst loading, flow velocity through the reactor, and incident solar UV radiation. The performance of the solar detoxification process are discussed as it relates to concentrating and nonconcentrating collectors.

Mehos, M.; Turchi, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Pacheco, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boegel, A.J.; Merrill, T.; Stanley, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

269 Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis, in organic geochemistry cases highlighting subtle yet important details not revealed by bulk analyses alone. For example

Long, Bernard

231

Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report number 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is based on the finding that brief microwave or RF-treatment of wood under low-headspace conditions leads to the release of VOCs. On occasion the authors have found that prolonged irradiation increases turpentine yield much more than anticipated from a simple mass balance; i.e., more pinene appeared to be released than was present in the wood in the first place. If taken at face value, this suggests that brief low-headspace irradiation removes VOCs, while prolonged exposure creates it. While seemingly improbable, this could follow if dielectric heating exposed regions of wood that were otherwise inaccessible to the solvent used for extraction (unlikely), or if the irradiation induced depolymerization of terpene dimers or higher polymers. In this report the authors attempt to identify the conditions that lead to this apparent enhancement of terpene yield, by constructing relationships between yield and irradiation parameters. The tentative conclusions are that this enhancement only occurs with relatively wet heartwood, and only under prolonged irradiation. An additional conclusion is that continuing analyses of twelve trees in the MSU forest confirm that the absence of a significant seasonal influence on turpentine content. An apparatus for permeability testing has been constructed, and work is underway.

Hooda, U.; Banerjee, S. [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ingram, L.; Conners, T. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - active compounds emitted Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on white light emitting diodes. (b... EMITTING DIODE.-The term "organic white light emitting diode" means an organic semiconducting compound... -state lighting technologies based...

233

North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas, Electric, Ethanol, and Biodiesel Project Benefits* Pollutant Annual Reductions Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) 63.7 Tons Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) 1.6 Tons Particulate...

234

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds and Oligomers in Secondary Organic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewport NewsWayne Hurlbert!M-22UJefferson Lab on

235

Volatile organic chemical emissions from carpets. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research, was to measure the emission rates of selected individual VOC, including low molecular-weight aldehydes, released by samples of four new carpets that are typical of the major types of carpets used in residences, schools and offices. The carpet samples were collected directly from the manufacturers` mills and packaged to preserve their chemical integrity. The measurements of the concentrations and emission rates of these compounds were made under simulated indoor conditions in a 20-M{sup 3} environmental chamber designed specifically for investigations of VOC. The measurements were conducted over a period of one week following the installation of the carpet samples in the chamber. Duplicate experiments were conducted for one carpet. In addition, the concentrations and emission rates of VOC resulting from the installation of a new carpet in a residence were measured over a period of seven weeks. The stabilities of the week-long ventilation rates and temperatures were one percent relative standard deviation. The four carpets emitted a variety of VOC, 40 of which were positively identified. Eight of these were considered to be dominant. They were (in order of chromatographic retention time) formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane), 1,2-propanediol (propylene glycol), styrene, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), and 2,6 di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). With the exception of formaldehyde, only limited data are available on the toxicity and irritancy of these compounds at low concentrations. Therefore, it is difficult to determine at this time the potential magnitude of the health and comfort effects that may occur among the population from exposures to emissions from new carpets. The concentrations and emission rates of most compounds decreased rapidly over the first 12 h of the experiments.

Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mixed crystal organic scintillators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

237

Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12 #12;First shell Second shell Third shell Hydrogen 1H Lithium 3Li Sodium 11Na Beryllium 4Be Magnesium energy Higher energy (a) A ball bouncing down a flight of stairs provides an analogy for energy levels

Frey, Terry

238

APPENDIX E. AIRNOVA, INC. EMISSION EVALUATION TEST REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.6 Specific Volatile Organic Compounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 4.7 Dioxins, Furans, and PCBs)* · Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)* · Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)* · Dioxins and Furans · Toxic Metals

Brookhaven National Laboratory

239

Mapping isoprene emissions over North America using formaldehyde column observations from space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping isoprene emissions over North America using formaldehyde column observations from space. [1] We present a methodology for deriving emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) using space to local VOC emissions, with a spatial smearing that increases with the VOC lifetime. Isoprene

Chance, Kelly

240

Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbo Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk Electric Turbo Compounding Highlights Electric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Exhaust Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in...

242

XAFS Model Compound Library  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

Newville, Matthew

243

Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.

Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Preparation of uranium compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modeling kinetic partitioning of secondary organic aerosol and size distribution dynamics: representing effects of volatility, phase state, and particle-phase reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence is mounting that the majority of the climatically active aerosols are produced through the growth of smaller particles via secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gas-to-particle conversion of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The timescale of SOA partitioning and the associated size distribution dynamics are expected to depend on the gas-phase oxidation of the precursor VOCs and their products, volatility of these organic solutes, composition and phase state of the pre-existing particles, and diffusivity and reactivity of the solute within the particle phase. This paper describes a new framework for modeling kinetic gas-particle partitioning of SOA, with an analytical treatment for the diffusion-reaction process within the particle phase. The formulation is amenable for eventual use in regional and global climate models, although it currently awaits implementation of the actual particle-phase reactions that are important for SOA formation. In the present work, the model is applied to investigate the competitive growth dynamics of the Aitken and accumulation mode particles while the Kelvin effect and coagulation are neglected for simplicity. The timescale of SOA partitioning and evolution of number and composition size distributions are evaluated for a range of solute volatilities (C*), particle-phase bulk diffusivities (Db), and particle-phase reactivity, as exemplified by a pseudo-first-order rate constant (kc). Results show that irreversible condensation of non-volatile organic vapors (equivalent to ) produces significant narrowing of the size distribution. At the other extreme, non-reactive partitioning of semi-volatile organic vapors is volume-controlled in which the final (equilibrium) size distribution simply shifts to the right on the diameter axis while its shape remains unchanged. However, appreciable narrowing of the size distribution may occur when the pre-existing particles are highly viscous semi-solids such that small particles reach quasi-equilibrium much faster than the large ones. In the case of reactive partitioning (finite ), the size distribution experiences permanent narrowing, which is especially pronounced for Db < 10-13 cm2 s-1 and kc > 0.01 s-1. As a result, both number and composition size distributions are needed to effectively constrain and evaluate the next generation of SOA models that treat phase state thermodynamics, particle-phase diffusion and particle-phase chemical reactions.

Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Shilling, John E.; Seinfeld, J. H.

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

248

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

1983-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic chemical compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... in burn pits include, but...

254

CSTB / CTBA Wood Preservation -Cannes 2001 MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM CURATIVE TREATED WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee for Standardization (CEN) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO of International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has prepared the draft international standard ISO/DIS 16000 analytical methods are needed. The aim of this paper is to present the new standards prepared by the European

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Microoptical compound lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, David D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

256

Aminopropyl thiophene compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Milestones and progress, Quarter 9 (July 1--September 30, 1998)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two approach changes that were discussed and recommended in the Quarter 8 (April 1--June 30, 1998) progress report have been implemented in the current project plan. The OLI software has been used to develop a preliminary process model for predicting the distribution of NPE`s in a two stage brownstock washer, and the OLI database has been upgraded to include improved chemical equilibrium data for metal-organic interactions. This exercise served as a tool to evaluate the data and methods developed in this study, and to demonstrate its utility to industry. The Weyerhaeuser-NAELS software has also been applied to predicting inorganic solubility behavior. Task C-1.2, Estimation of unavailable thermodynamic parameters (scheduled completion date: 12/97), has been combined with Task D-2.1, Evaluation of the estimation procedure (scheduled completion date: 3/99) with a new scheduled completion date of 8/99. A model for the adsorption of metal ions on wood pulp fibers will include transport effects as well as adsorption equilibrium, and will be combined with a brownstock washer model to evaluate its predictive capability in comparison with mill data, and to demonstrate the applicability of the results obtained in this project. Three tasks are behind schedule: Task A-2.3, Measurement of stability constants for wood organics with metal ions (scheduled completion date: 6/98), Task B-2.1, Measure metal adsorption isotherms on wood pulp (scheduled completion date: 9/97), and Task B-2.3, Measure metal ion adsorption kinetics for strongly adsorbing metal species (scheduled completion date: 3/98). The reasons and expected completion dates are discussed in the Performance Variances and Open Items section. All other tasks are either completed, on, or ahead of schedule.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, W.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Milestones and progress, Quarter 8 (April 1--June 30, 1998)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overall, this project is on schedule and proceeding as planned. Two approach changes are recommended. One is to rely on commercially developed software, in particular that developed by OLI Systems, Inc., and now being expanded in a collaborative effort between OLI Systems, Inc. and IPST to provide a simulation package for the pulp and paper industry and to integrate it with existing process simulation tools used by that industry. The second is the development of a detailed brownstock/bleached fiber washer model as a tool to evaluate the data and methods developed in this study, and to demonstrate its utility to industry. Both of these are discussed in more detail in the Approach Changes section of this report. Two tasks are behind schedule. They are Task A-2.3, Measurement of stability constants for wood organics with metal ions (scheduled completion date: 6/98), and Task C-1.2, Estimation of unavailable thermodynamic parameters (scheduled completion date: 12/97). The reasons and expected completion dates for these tasks are discussed in the Performance Variances and Open Items section of this report. All other tasks are either completed, or on or ahead of schedule.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, W.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Estimating monthly and state-level NO sub x , SO sub 2 , VOC and CO sub 2 emissions using the MSCET database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Month and State Current Emission Trends (MSCET) database. It describes the methodology used to estimate NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC, and CO{sub 2} emissions and the data sources used by the methodology. Selected emissions results from the database are presented. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Cilek, C.M.; Kohout, E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Estimating monthly and state-level NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC and CO{sub 2} emissions using the MSCET database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Month and State Current Emission Trends (MSCET) database. It describes the methodology used to estimate NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC, and CO{sub 2} emissions and the data sources used by the methodology. Selected emissions results from the database are presented. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Cilek, C.M.; Kohout, E.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

Gallegos, María V., E-mail: plapimu@yahoo.com.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Falco, Lorena R., E-mail: mlfalco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Peluso, Miguel A., E-mail: apelu@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sambeth, Jorge E., E-mail: sambeth@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomas, Horacio J. [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Polybenzimidazole Compounds, Polymeric Media, and Methods of Post-Polymerization Modifications  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

INL has developed a patented process to handle and process polybenzimdazole (PBI) compounds that previously could only be handled in very heavy low vapor pressure organic solvents. With the new process the resulting compounds are modified to provide increased solubility in higher vapor pressure solvents and at significantly greater concentrations. These compounds may be utilized in a wide array of applications where high temperature and polymeric materials are utilized. Compounds made with...

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

CHARACTERISTICS Nitrated compounds constitute a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds. If there is a chance of an explosive reaction, conduct the operation behind a blast shield

Wilcock, William

265

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, Stephen B. (Portola Valley, CA); Koo, Myoung-Seo (San Francisco, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.

1992-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a full-scale implementation. The SVE well, monitoring point arrays and four fracturing wells were installed and the well testing has been completed. Four fractures were successfully created the week of July 25, 2005. The fractures were created in an open area at the bottom of steel well casing by using a water jet to create a notch in the soil and then injecting a guar-sand slurry into the formation. The sand-filled fractures increase the effective air permeability of the subsurface formation diffusion path lengths for contaminant removal. The primary metrics for evaluation were an increase in SVE flow rates in the zone of contamination and an increase in the zone of influence. Sufficient testing has been performed to show that fracturing in the Upland Unit accelerates SVE solvent remediation and fracturing can increase flow rates in the Upland Unit by at least one order of magnitude.

Riha, B

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds Ethylbenzene Carbon tetrachloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Ethylbenzene Ethylbenzene is a colorless, flammable liquid found in natural products such as coal tar and petroleum. It is also found in manufactured products such as inks, insecticides, and paints. Ethylbenzene in the air. In surface water, ethylbenzene breaks down by reacting with other chemicals found naturally

271

Volatile organic compounds in some urban locations in United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Air samples were collected and analyzed in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency, an increased awareness of air pollutants and new potential sources of airborne toxic chemicals have raised to the immune and nervous systems, and other fatal diseases (Singh et al., 1982; Kao, 1994). Recently, a number

Aneja, Viney P.

272

Nanoparticle Formation of Organic Compounds With Retained Biological Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Pediatric, Radiology, Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive

Zare, Richard N.

273

Three-Dimensional Simulation of Volatile Organic Compound Mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulations using data from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, where carbon tetrachloride is present in a low permeability zone about 30 m above the...

274

2 Extracting and trapping biogenic 3 volatile organic compounds stored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Subcritical water extraction; UAE, Ultrasound-assisted extraction 36 1. Introduction Plants release

Goldstein, Allen

275

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr.presentationsParticipantParticles

276

Control of spider mites on cotton by organic sulphur compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toxicity tests ............. .................. . 23 Ovicidal t e sts...................................... 25 Residual toxicity tests............................... 26 Calculation of dosage-mortality curves ......... ? ? ? ? ? 28 Results... and Discussions . . . . ........... . . . . . . . . . 38 Toxicity tests 1950-1951.............. ...............38 Toxicity tests 1951-1952 .............. ............... 51 Ovicidal tests ............ ......................... 52 Residual t e...

King, Charles Edward

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification and Application of aGluskin of

278

Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubbles andof theCoal toAn Alternative

279

An approach toward quantification of organic compounds in complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail ShareRed CrossAn Iridate with Fermi

280

Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission dataset of biogenic VOCs available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980 - 2010. This dataset is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg(C) yr1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2 %. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of * 17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene in ventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the datasets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene and*-pinene showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements in the Amazon andthe model was able to capture the seasonal variation of emissions in this region.

Sindelarova, K.; Granier, Claire; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, Alex B.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The design of new ligands and transition metal compounds for the oxidation of organic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dehydrated by heating under dynamic vacuum at 150?C for 3 hours. The anhydrous materials were stored in a dry box under nitrogen. (R)-binaphthol was obtained from ABCR Chemical and 3,5-di-tert-butyl salicylaldehyde was obtained from Advanced Asymmetrics.... All other reagents were used as received. All NMR chemical shifts are given in ppm and were recorded on a Mercury-300BB spectrometer ( 1 H, 299.91 MHz; 13 C { 1 H} 75.41 MHz) using the solvent as an internal standard (CDCl 3 (or residual CHCl 3...

Grill, Joseph Michael

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

282

Highly efficient inverted organic solar cells using amino acid modified indium tin oxide as cathode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report that highly efficient inverted organic solar cells were achieved by modifying the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) using an amino acid, Serine (Ser). With the modification of the ITO surface, device efficiency was significantly enhanced from 0.63% to 4.17%, accompanied with an open circuit voltage (Voc) that was enhanced from 0.30?V to 0.55?V. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the work function reduction induced by the amino acid modification resulting in the decreased barrier height at the ITO/organic interface played a crucial role in the enhanced performances.

Li, Aiyuan; Nie, Riming; Deng, Xianyu, E-mail: xydeng@hitsz.edu.cn [Research Center for Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Wei, Huaixin; Li, Yanqing; Tang, Jianxin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zheng, Shizhao; Wong, King-Young [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Devices for collecting chemical compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

WearAir: Expressive T-shirts for Air Quality Sensing Sunyoung Kim and Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are less proactively concerned with air quality. AIR POLLUTANT: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS Different types of air pollutants contribute to air quality in different locations: Ozone, CO, NOx and VOCs are major contributors to outdoor air pollution; and particulate matters, VOCs, carbon monoxide and lead are common air

Mankoff, Jennifer

286

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 58715891, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/5871/2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inventories by measurements of ambient volatile organic compounds in Beijing, China M. Wang1, M. Shao1, W inventories to eval- uate the spatial distribution, species-specific emissions, and source structure of VOCs, whereas current emission inventories suggested that VOC emissions were concentrated in downtown areas. Com

Pierce, Jeffrey

287

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 1097710988, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/10977/2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

side. In addition, there are also about 1000 coal bed methane wells and conventional wells located in emissions of greenhouse gases (mostly methane), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx

Pierce, Jeffrey

288

North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sites: Natural Gas, Electric, Ethanol, and Biodiesel Project Benefits* 67.7 Tons Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) Reduced 4.5 Tons Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Reduced 0.8 Tons...

289

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Base VOC Volatile Organic Compound XRF X-ray Fluorescence ?mFluorescence spectrometry (XRF) (Na through Pb), inorganicby X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The USFS samples were analyzed

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

EnviroDB: Applied Database Systems Design for the National Environmental Assessment Toolkit (NEAT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOC), particulates (PM), air velocity (AIR_VEL), light levels at 3 locations (LGH), and a photometric camera that analyzes brightness/contrast and glare. The sensor outputs are recorded...

Kim, S. H.; Srivastava, V.; Aziz, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Vapor intrusion modeling : limitations, improvements, and value of information analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vapor intrusion is the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subsurface source into the indoor air of an overlying building. Vapor intrusion models, including the Johnson and Ettinger (J&E) model, can be ...

Friscia, Jessica M. (Jessica Marie)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006 and their impact on aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by diesel-fueled mobile sources and from the numerous coal- fired industries and power generation stations and power plants, with emissions rich in reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and NOX [Ryerson et al

293

A cost-effectiveness analysis of alternative ozone control strategies : flexible nitrogen oxide (NOx) abatement from power plants in the eastern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ozone formation is a complex, non-linear process that depends on the atmospheric concentrations of its precursors, nitrogen oxide (NOx) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), as well as on temperature and the available ...

Sun, Lin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Climate change, ambient ozone, and health in 50 US cities Michelle L. Bell & Richard Goldberg & Christian Hogrefe &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change, ambient ozone, and health in 50 US cities Michelle L. Bell & Richard Goldberg Haven, CT 06511, USA e-mail: michelle.bell@yale.edu R. Goldberg Center for Climate Systems Research emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs),

295

Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

Corsello, Joseph William

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

Yang, Xudong, 1966-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nez Perce Tribe Formaldehyde Study 2011 Kayla Warden and Etta Axtell-Northwest Indian College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR Acknowledgements: This research was funded by EPA/FaST DOE and NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). I

Collins, Gary S.

298

Mr. John Kieling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the receipt of va lidated analytical results for a vo latile organic compound (VOC), carbon tetrachloride , which exceeded the 50 percent action level listed in Part 4, Table...

299

Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research strands which contribute to the scientific and pedagogical understanding of complex Earth systems. In the first strand, a method that characterizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as ecological proxies of soil microbial ecosystems was validated...

McNeal, Karen Sue

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

 COMPOUND-SPECIFIC RADIOCARBON ANALYSES OF PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACIDS AND n -ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Analyses of Phospholipid Fatty Acids and n-Alkanes in Ocean Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Possible explosive compounds in the Savannah River Site waste tank farm facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report will be revised upon completion of current testing investigating the radiolytic stability of additional energetic materials and the analysis of tank farm samples for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds.

Hobbs, D.T.

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Pajarito Canyon Watershed LA-UR-10-1362 1 March 2010 Summary: organic compounds, dioxins, and furans should be added to the analytical suite for each sample (NMED 2009... in...

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Pajarito Canyon Watershed LA-UR-10-1362 1 March 2010 Summary: organic compounds, dioxins, and furans should be added to the analytical suite for each sample (NMED 2009......

305

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

Stowell, M.S.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Aza compounds as anion receptors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

313

Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Process for production of a borohydride compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for production of a borohydride compound. The process comprises combining a compound comprising boron and oxygen with an adduct of alane.

Chin, Arthur Achhing; Jain, Puja; Linehan, Suzanne; Lipiecki, Francis Joseph; Maroldo, Stephen Gerard; November, Samuel J; Yamamoto, John Hiroshi

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

315

Syntheses and studies of organosilicon compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The syntheses of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as silicon carbide ceramic precursors have been active research areas in the Barton Research Group. In this thesis, the work is focused on the preparation of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as stoichiometric silicon carbide precursor polymers. The syntheses of the precursor polymers are discussed and the conversions of these precursors to silicon carbide via pyrolysis are reported. The XRD pattern and elemental analyses of the resulting silicon carbide ceramics are presented. Silicon monoxide is an important intermediate in the production of silicon metal. The existence of silicon monoxide in gap phase has been widely accepted. In the second part of this thesis, the generation of gaseous silicon monoxide in four different reactors and the reactions of gaseous silicon monoxide towards organic compounds are discussed.

Xie, R.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Method of increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble vapors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a bioreactor is disclosed. The method comprises dissolving in the aqueous phase of the bioreactor a water soluble, nontoxic, non-biodegradable polymer having a molecular weight of at least 500 and operable for decreasing the distribution coefficient of the VOCs. Polyoxyalkylene alkanols are preferred polymers. A method of increasing the growth rate of VOC-degrading microorganisms in the bioreactor and a method of increasing the solubility of sparingly soluble VOCs in aqueous solution are also disclosed.

Cherry, Robert S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Polybenzimidazole compounds, polymeric media, and methods of post-polymerization modifications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about 15.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Supporting Information:1 Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System Laboratory, National Center for22 Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO USA23 Now at: Air Pollution 8 Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France16 9 �cole des Mines de Douai, Douai, France17 10

Meskhidze, Nicholas

322

Organic Superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

Charles Mielke

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

323

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic energy organization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6. A common trait of simple organic compounds is to have Lewis... in a certain organic molecule absorbs radiation that has a frequency of 6.0 x 1013 s1. a. What... is the...

327

The temporal dynamics of terrestrial organic matter transfer to the oceans : initial assessment and application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis employs compound-specific stable carbon and radiocarbon isotopic analysis of organic biomarkers to (a) resolve petrogenic from pre-aged vascular plant organic carbon (OC) in continental margin sediments, (b) ...

Drenzek, Nicholas J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Prediction of crystal densities of organic explosives by group additivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molar volume of crystalline organic compound is assumed to be a linear combination of its constituent volumes. Compounds consisting only of the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine are considered. The constituent volumes are taken to be the volumes of atoms in particular bonding environments and are evaluated from a large set of crystallographic data. The predicted density has an expected error of about 3%. These results are applied to a large number of explosives compounds.

Stine, J R

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Exhaust Materails from a Set of Gasoline and a Set of Diesel Engine Vehicles Operated at 30F In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate...

330

STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS OF ORGANIC ANION TRANSPORTING POLYPEPTIDE MEDIATED TRANSPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATP; other: Oatp) form a mammalian transporter superfamily that mediates the transport of structurally unrelated compounds across the cell membrane. Members in this ...

Weaver, Yi Miao

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

331

Muon-spin spectroscopy of the organometallic spin-1/2 kagome-lattice compound Cu(1,3-benzenedicarboxylate)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using muon-spin resonance, we examine the organometallic hybrid compound Cu(1,3-benzenedicarboxylate) [Cu(1,3-bdc)], which has structurally perfect spin-1/2 copper kagome planes separated by pure organic linkers. This ...

Marcipar, Lital

332

Feedback Capacity of the Compound Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we find the capacity of a compound finite-state channel (FSC) with time-invariant deterministic feedback. We consider the use of fixed length block codes over the compound channel. Our achievability result ...

Shrader, Brooke E.

333

Red Balloon, Green Balloon, Sensors in the Sky Stacey Kuznetsov1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

color based on input from attached air quality sensors (exhaust, diesel, or volatile organic compounds). The balloons change color in response to one of exhaust gas, diesel, or VOC's (volatile organic compounds]. Diesel exhaust consists of fine particulate matter emitted by engines and industrial processes [44

Paulos, Eric

334

Equation calculates activated carbon's capacity for adsorbing pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on activated carbon is an effective method for removing volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants from gases. A new, simple equation has been developed for calculating activated carbon's adsorption capacity as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The correlation shows good agreement with experimental results. Results from the equation are applicable for conditions commonly encountered in air pollution control techniques (25 C, 1 atm). The only input parameters needed are VOC concentrations and a table of correlation coefficients for 292 C[sub 8]-C[sub 14] compounds. The table is suitable for rapid engineering usage with a personal computer or hand calculator.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The oxidative addition of simple selenium molecules to an unsaturated iridium (I) compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addition reactions of Lewis acids such as hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen selenide, selenols and thiols to Vaska's compound (trans-chlorocarbonylbis(triphenylphosphine)- iridium'(I)) have been described. The addition products, which have a metal-hydrogen... for the organization of transition metal chemistry. Compounds which possess either polar or nonpolar bonds csn 8 react with unsaturated d complexes to form "oxidized" addition products. Examples of "additive oxidizing agents" include 5 6 7 6 8 8 hydrogen, ' oxygen...

Hsieh, Mel-Lin Mary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Bibliography of work on the photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a bibliography of information in the open literature on work that has been done to date on the photocatalytic oxidation of compounds, principally organic compounds. The goal of the listing is removing hazardous oompounds from water or air. It contains lists of substances and literature citations. The bibliography includes information obtained through the middle of 1993 and some selected references for the balance of that year.

Blake, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Organic chemical contaminants in Biosolids Sally Brown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the general classification "dioxins." Dioxins are one of the well known dangerous organic chemicals. Dioxins had commercial uses, primarily in the pulp and paper industry, but have been outlawed due. There are many types of dioxins. "Dioxin" is actually a general term for a large number of compounds that contain

Brown, Sally

339

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report gives the second year`s findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Chlorine-resistant composite membranes with high organic rejection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making a chlorine-resistant composite polyamide membrane having high organic rejection, the essential step of which comprises treating a conventional composite membrane with an acyl halide. The novel membrane is especially suitable for the treatment of water containing chlorine or lower molecular weight organic compounds.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Barss, Robert P. (Bend, OR); Nelson, Leslie D. (The Dalles, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Da Costa, Andre R. (Menlo Park, CA); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA); Amo, Karl D. (Mountain View, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

Oxygen stabilized zirconium vanadium intermetallic compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula Zr.sub.x OV.sub.y where x=0.7 to 2.0 and y=0.18 to 0.33. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from -196.degree. C. to 450.degree. C. at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 Torr. The compound is also capable of selectively sorbing hydrogen from gaseous mixtures in the presence of CO and CO.sub.2.

Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Organization Chart - Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LSD Logo About Us People & Organization Research News & Events Safety Internal Resources Organization Chart Departments Scientific Staff Directory Committees Organization Chart...

346

8, 1190911965, 2008 Reactive Trace Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds (VOC) in the boundary layer over French Guyana and Suriname during the October 2005 GABRIEL

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

Hydrodesulfurization catalyst by Chevrel phase compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M/sub x/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS/sub 2/ catalysts. The most active catalysts were the ''large'' cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the ''small'' cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

McCarty, K.F.; Schrader, G.L.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gas and Particulate Sampling of Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The denuder surfaces of the gas and particle (GAP) sampler (developed at the Atmospheric Environment Service of Environment Canada) have been modified by coating with XAD-4 resin, using techniques developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the lower capacity integrated organic vapor/particle sampler (IOVPS). The resulting high capacity integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS) has been operated in ambient air at 16.7 L min{sup -1} for a 24-hour period in Berkeley, California, USA. Simultaneous measurements were made at the same collection rate with a conventional sampler that used a filter followed by two sorbent beds. Gas and particle partition measurements were determined for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from 2-ring to 6-ring species. The IOGAPS indicated a higher particle fraction of these compounds than did the conventional sampler, suggesting that the conventional sampler suffered from 'blow-off' losses from the particles collected on the filter.

Lane, D.A.; Gundel, L.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

350

Research Article Decomposition of Epoxy Model Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-critical water (NCW) or subcritical water, i.e., water at 250­300 °C [20], turn out to be alternative candidatesResearch Article Decomposition of Epoxy Model Compounds in Near-Critical Water Two tpyes of epoxy water (NCW). In the case of model compound I, at low temperatures the water molecules behave

Guo, John Zhanhu

351

The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

Labushev, Mikhail M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Flameless thermal oxidation. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (PICs).

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Flameless Thermal Oxidation. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (Plcs ).

None

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

Sklarew, D.S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Publications Daniel Kost 1. D. Kost, "Principles of Organic Chemistry" a study unit textbook. Open University, Tel Aviv,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Publications Daniel Kost (A) Books 1. D. Kost, "Principles of Organic Chemistry" a study unit, "Hypervalent Silicon Compounds", Invited chapter in "The Chemistry of Organic Silicon Compounds", Z. Rappoport and Chiroptical Properties", Invited chapter in "The Chemistry of Sulfenic Acids and Their Derivatives", S. Patai

Vardi, Amichay

356

Partitioning Behavior of Organic Contaminants in Carbon Storage Environments: A Critical Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon capture and storage is a promising strategy for mitigating the CO{sub 2} contribution to global climate change. The large scale implementation of the technology mandates better understanding of the risks associated with CO{sub 2} injection into geologic formations and the subsequent interactions with groundwater resources. The injected supercritical CO{sub 2} (sc-CO{sub 2}) is a nonpolar solvent that can potentially mobilize organic compounds that exist at residual saturation in the formation. Here, we review the partitioning behavior of selected organic compounds typically found in depleted oil reservoirs in the residual oil–brine–sc-CO{sub 2} system under carbon storage conditions. The solubility of pure phase organic compounds in sc-CO{sub 2} and partitioning of organic compounds between water and sc-CO{sub 2} follow trends predicted based on thermodynamics. Compounds with high volatility and low aqueous solubility have the highest potential to partition to sc-CO{sub 2}. The partitioning of low volatility compounds to sc-CO{sub 2} can be enhanced by co-solvency due to the presence of higher volatility compounds in the sc-CO{sub 2}. The effect of temperature, pressure, salinity, pH, and dissolution of water molecules into sc-CO{sub 2} on the partitioning behavior of organic compounds in the residual oil-brine-sc-CO{sub 2} system is discussed. Data gaps and research needs for models to predict the partitioning of organic compounds in brines and from complex mixtures of oils are presented. Models need to be able to better incorporate the effect of salinity and co-solvency, which will require more experimental data from key classes of organic compounds.

Burant, Aniela; Lowry, Gregory V.; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Organic materials for fusion-reactor applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic materials requirements for fusion-reactor magnets are described with reference to the temperature, radiation, and electrical and mechanical stress environment expected in these magnets. A review is presented of the response to gamma-ray and neutron irradiation at low temperatures of candidate organic materials; i.e. laminates, thin films, and potting compounds. Lifetime-limiting features of this response as well as needed testing under magnet operating conditions not yet adequately investigated are identified and recomendations for future work are made.

Hurley, G.F.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty perform research in molecular machines, exotic CHEMISTRY FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS Anne M. Andrews, Professor-in-Residence: Understanding how areas of interest include cross- coupling reactions, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and natural

Levine, Alex J.

359

Cyclic membrane separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

Nemser, Stuart M.

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

360

Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1994, well point water and bucket samples were collected for tritium and volatile organic compounds in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). The well point samples were collected from seven locations and the bucket samples from four locations. Results support that T and VOCs originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near this ditch. Based on differences in tritium contents at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths; however, when VOCs were normalized, based on differences in T, resulting well point and bucket VOCs were comparable in most cases.

Dixon, K.L.; cummins, C.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Production method for making rare earth compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

al. have taken just this tack in their study of a europium (the rare earth)-nickel-phosphorous intermetallic compound. Thirty years ago, the discovery of superconductivity in the...

363

Digital Construction Platform: A Compound Arm Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel large-scale Digital Construction Platform (DCP) for on-site sensing, analysis, and fabrication. The DCP is an in-progress research project consisting of a compound robotic arm system comprised of a ...

Spielberg, Nathan A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Production method for making rare earth compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

365

Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

366

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

Williams, M

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

367

Excitonic effects in oxyhalide scintillating host compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to study the electronic, optical, mechanical, and vibrational properties of scintillator host compounds YOX (X?=?F, Cl, Br, and I). Semiempirical dispersion correction schemes are used to find the effect of van der Waals forces on these layered compounds and we found this effect to be negligible except for YOBr. Calculations of phonons and elastic constants showed that all the compounds studied here are both dynamically and mechanically stable. YOF and YOI are found to be indirect band gap insulators while YOCl and YOBr are direct band gap insulators. The band gap is found to decrease as we move from fluorine to iodine, while the calculated refractive index shows the opposite trend. As the band gap decreases on going down the periodic table from YOF to YOI, the luminescence increases. The excitonic binding energy calculated, within the effective mass approximation, is found to be more for YOF than the remaining compounds, suggesting that the excitonic effect to be more in YOF than the other compounds. The optical properties are calculated within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and compared with results obtained within the random phase approximation. The TDDFT calculations, using the newly developed bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel, showed significant excitonic effects in all the compounds studied here.

Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V., E-mail: kanchana@iith.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailaram 502 205, Telangana (India); Valsakumar, M. C. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology (SEST), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500 046, Telangana (India)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNH) compounds: recent developments in hydrogen storage, applications in hydrogenation and catalysis, and new syntheses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The strong efforts devoted to the exploration of BNH compounds for hydrogen storage have led to impressive advances in the field of boron chemistry. This review summarizes progress in this field from three aspects. It starts with the most recent developments in using BNH compounds for hydrogen storage, covering NH3BH3, B3H8¯ containing compounds, and CBN compounds. The following section then highlights interesting applications of BNH compounds in hydrogenation and catalysis. The last part is focused on breakthroughs in the syntheses and discovery of new BNH organic analogues. The role of N?H?+•••H?-?B dihydrogen interactions in molecule packing, thermal hydrogen evolution, and syntheses is also discussed within the review. Part of this research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle.

Huang, Zhenguo; Autrey, Thomas

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Apparatus for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil in a manner adapted to decompose the organic compounds; one embodiment of the apparatus comprises a means to supply ozone as a gas-ozone mixture, a stability means to treat ozone obtained from the supply and distribution means to apply the stabilized gas-ozone to soil. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Columbus, OH)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

371

ORGANIC CONTENT OF LAKE WATER By EDWARD A. BIRGE and CHANCEY JUDAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the nature of the organic compounds. Thus it furnishes the beginnings of an inventory of the primary food was based Oil the same samples as those employed in the present paper; it is the source of the nitrogen

372

Variations in organic aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties upon heterogeneous OH oxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the evolution of organic aerosol extinction cross sections (?[subscript ext]) and subsaturated hygroscopicity upon heterogeneous OH oxidation are reported for two model compounds, squalane (a C30 saturated ...

Cappa, Christopher D.

373

Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater : structure, cycling, and the role of biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this thesis is to investigate three different areas relating to the characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): further determination of the chemical compounds present in high molecular weight DOM ...

Quan, Tracy M. (Tracy Michelle), 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Targeting Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides in Cancer to Improve Diagnostics and Therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides (OATPs) are multispecific transport proteins that mediate the uptake of numerous endogenous and exogenous compounds into cells. Recently, OATPs have been shown to have altered ...

Hays, Amanda Lynne

2012-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

375

Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells 2010 DOE Vehicle...

376

Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade-Offs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies has highlighted the need for high- density energy storage.1 In the case of fuel cell vehicles (FCVTheoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade predict the hydrogen storage properties of these compounds. Approximately 20 000 candidate compounds were

Cafarella, Michael J.

377

Process for production of a borohydride compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

Firestone, Jeremy

380

Departmental Organization and Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

1993-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

Agblevor, F.A.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Beta cell device using icosahedral boride compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A beta cell for converting beta-particle energies into electrical energy having a semiconductor junction that incorporates an icosahedral boride compound selected from B.sub.12 As.sub.2, B.sub.12 P.sub.2, elemental boron having an .alpha.-rhombohedral structure, elemental boron having a .beta.-rhombohedral structure, and boron carbides of the chemical formula B.sub.12-x C.sub.3-x, where 0.15compound self-heals, resisting degradation from radiation damage.

Aselage, Terrence L. (62 Avenida Del Sol, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Emin, David (1502 Harvard Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106-3712)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Dry etching method for compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dry etching method. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators.

Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Constantine, Christopher (Safety Harbor, FL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

386

Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Biogenic Potassium Salt Particles as Seeds for Secondary Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the condensation of low- or semi-volatile organic compounds from the atmospheric gas phase or multiphase oxidation is most relevant to the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (6). The aerosol samples were collected The fine particles serving as cloud condensation nuclei in pristine Amazonian rainforest air consist mostly

388

The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic Photochemistry1 Howard E zimmerman@bert.chem.wisc.edu Received May 31, 2000 ABSTRACT The di--methane rearrangement is firmly established as a mode of synthesizing three-membered-ring compounds. We now report the tri-- methane

Cirkva, Vladimir

389

Quaternary Ammonium Compounds as Water Channel Blockers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/AQP2/AQP4, whereas the water permeability of AQP3 and AQP5, which lack a corresponding TyrQuaternary Ammonium Compounds as Water Channel Blockers SPECIFICITY, POTENCY, AND SITE OF ACTION, West Mains Road, EH9 3JJ Scotland, United Kingdom Excessive water uptake through Aquaporins (AQP) can

de Groot, Bert

390

High Performance Subgraph Mining in Molecular Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Performance Subgraph Mining in Molecular Compounds Giuseppe Di Fatta1,2 and Michael R data makes distributed graph mining techniques particularly relevant. In this paper, we present method has been evaluated on the well-known National Cancer Institute's HIV-screening dataset, where

Reiterer, Harald

391

Superconductivity in iron compounds G. R. Stewart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the superconductivity in this new class of compounds. These iron pnictide and chalcogenide (FePn/Ch) superconductors-phonon coupled ``conventional'' superconductors. Clearly, superconductivity and magnetism or magnetic of magnetism and superconductivity in FePn/Ch superconductors 1606 D. Tc and TS=TSDW versus pressure 1607 1

Wu, Zhigang

392

HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS M.D. MCCLUSKEY* University) spectroscopy of hydrogen and deuterium in GaP, AlSb, ZnSe, and GaN has provided important information about the structures of dopant- hydrogen complexes and their interaction with the host lattice. In GaN:Mg, for example

McCluskey, Matthew

393

Organic photovoltaics and concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

Mapel, Jonathan King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Complexant stability investigation. Task 2. Organic complexants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety of high-level defense waste operations has always been given highest priority at the Hanford site. This document is part of the continued effort to appraise and reevaluate the safety of the waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Reservation. Hanford high-level defense waste consists mainly of moist, inorganic salts, NaNO/sub 3/, NaAl(OH)/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and other sodium salts. However, in addition to these salts, quantities of organic compounds constitute a significant portion of the waste. The potential reaction of the organic compounds with inorganic salts to form explosive substances is examined and found to be nonexistent or negligible. The concept that the waste mixture might react exothermically is found to be untenable under the present storage conditions. The phenomenon of slurry growth in double-shell waste storage tanks is expected to cause no increase in exothermic reaction potential within the waste. The results of this study indicate that the presence of organic material in the high-level defense waste does not constitute undue hazard under the present storage conditions.

Martin, E.C.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Organic photosensitive devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

396

Organic and inorganic components in estuarine colloids: Implications for sorption and transport of pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In colloids isolated from Chesapeake Bay and its subestuaries the concentrations of Al, Fe, and a number of trace elements were determined to vary with the clay mineral fraction that was most abundant in freshwater samples collected during the winter. The elements As, Ba, Sb, and Zn, however, increased with increasing organic content, indicating a covariance with the organic component. Organic analyses for amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids indicate that these biopolymers comprised 4 to 22%, 20 to 60%, and less than 1%, respectively, of the colloidal organic carbon in these samples. The results are significant because amino acids and carbohydrates contain oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functional groups capable of reacting with trace metals and organic pollutants. The sorption properties of several neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, including PAHs and herbicides, and several aromatic amines were investigated using the estuarine colloidal material. The effects of several environmental variables on these sorption properties were determined. The results indicate that colloids have the capacity to sorb and transport relatively insoluble pollutants that otherwise might remain immobile in the environment. Colloidal organic matter in natural water systems may serve as substrates for the sorption or binding of organic contaminants. Although most of the data has been developed using neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, data also exist for selected polar compound groups such as aromatic amines. The chemical behavior of these compound groups in interaction with DOM appears to have some similarity to their chemical interaction with sediments and soils. Partitioning constants are linear, except for polar compounds, and appear to be closely correlated to fundamental compound properties such as solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. 84 references.

Sigleo, A.C.; Means, J.C. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

Compound refractive X-ray lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA); Cahn, Robert (Walnut Creek, CA); Cederstrom, Bjorn (Traellborg, SE); Danielsson, Mats (Stocksund, SE); Vestlund, Jonas (Stockholm, SE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hydromechanical transmission with compound planetary assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power transmission having three distinct ranges: (1) hydrostatic, (2) simple power-split hydromechanical, and (3) compound power-split hydromechanical. A single compound planetary assembly has two sun gears, two ring gears, and a single carrier with two sets of elongated planet gears. The two sun gears may be identical in size, and the two ring gears may be identical in size. A speed-varying module in driving relationship to the first sun gear is clutchable, in turn, to (1) the input shaft and (2) the second sun gear. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being the one clutchable to either the input shaft or to the second sun gear. The other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, is connected in driving relation to the first sun gear. A brake grounds the carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft is also clutchable to the second ring gear of the compound planetary assembly.

Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

Sen, Ayusman

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Occurrence of priority and emerging organic compounds in fishes from the Rhone River , P. Labadie2**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and hexachloro-butadiene (HCBD). About 50 fish samples (individual specimens or pooled fishes) were collected is confirmed. In contrast, the pertinence of a priority status for HCBD, which was never quantified in our

402

Remedial extraction and catalytic hydrodehalogenation for treatment of soils contaminated by halogenated hydrophobic organic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the extraction of 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzne (TeCB) or pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated soil. Palladium-catalyzed hydrodehalogenation (HDH) was applied for destroying TeCB or PCP in mixtures of water and ethanol in a batch mode. The experimental results...

Wee, Hun Young

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Atmospheric Aerosols Aging Involving Organic Compounds and Impacts on Particle Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through sandstorm.2 Examples of anthropogenic sources are vehicle exhaust, plant emission, and construction sites. Some aerosols may have both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. For example, soot aerosols, also known as black carbon, can be produced... with an initial size of 150 nm increases slightly faster than those of soot with the initial size of 80 or 100 nm. Table 1. Properties of Fresh Soot Particles. Dp, nm mp, 10 ?16 g Dve, nm Npp a 82.4 1.47 54.1 20 101 2.34 63.2 32 155 7.77 94.3 105 a...

Qiu, Chong

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA 94720 ABSTRACT in the boiler used to make process steam.water, gas condensate, and boiler blowdown. A summary of thewater, gas condensate, and boiler blowd01m. Retort water and

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologiesand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State,

Ortiz, Anna C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

In-situ remediation system for volatile organic compounds with deep recharge mechanism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the treatment and remediation of a contaminated aquifer in the presence of an uncontaminated aquifer at a different hydraulic potential. The apparatus consists of a wellbore inserted through a first aquifer and into a second aquifer, an inner cylinder within the wellbore is supported and sealed to the wellbore to prevent communication between the two aquifers. Air injection is used to sparge the liquid having the higher static water level and, to airlift it to a height whereby it spills into the inner cylinder. The second treatment area provides treatment in the form of aeration or treatment with a material. Vapor stripped in sparging is vented to the atmosphere. Treated water is returned to the aquifer having the lower hydraulic potential.

Jackson, Jr., Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (Augusta, SC); Phifer, Mark A. (Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and observe an integrated effect from what is called an upwind footprint area. Previous such studies have been limited to a few cities: Nemitz et al. (2002) and Dorsey et al. (2002) measured particle and CO 2 fluxes above the city of Edinburgh, UK, while M... intercomparison tests ..................................... 28 2.5.2. Quantification............................................................................. 30 2.5.3. Footprint analysis...

Park, Chang Hyoun

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

408

Simple general limiting law for the overall decay of organic compounds with global pollution potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is rigorously shown that the effective decay rate in the environment of a chemical is between the minimum decay rate in one of its possible compartments and an upper value, which is the weighted-average decay rates in all compartments. The weights are the compartments` volumes and the equilibrium concentrations that would have occurred in the compartment due to transport alone, with no degradation. This upper value is approached, in the sense of a general limiting law, if degradation is much slower than transport. This limiting law, together with an estimate for the spatial range of a persistent chemical, could serve as a minimal base for exposure-based assessment of environmental risk. As a first illustration, the result is applied to DDT and hexachloroethane. A broader group of chemicals will be discussed elsewhere. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Mueller-Herold, U. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)] [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Annual research plan, 1983-84. [Organic compounds derived from fossil substances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) resulted from efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure the continuity of the unique energy research capabilities that had been developed at the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) over the past 65 years. This was accomplished by a Cooperative Agreement between DOE and IIT Research Institute (IITRI). The agreement to operate NIPER for the five fiscal years 1984-88 became effective October 1, 1983. The NIPER Annual Research Plan for 1983-84 consists of eight projects in the Base Program and 13 projects in the Optional Program. A sampling of potential Work for Others projects is also presented. The Base Program consists of five EOR and three Fundamental Petroleum Chemistry projects. The Optional Program has three EOR projects, one Unconventional Gas Recovery project, five APT projects, and four Advanced Utilization Research projects.

None

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Observations of nonmethane organic compounds during ARCTAS - Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

burning in Siberia and Kazakhstan as an important source forgrassland fires in Kazakhstan (Warneke et al. , 2009) duringfires from East Asia/Kazakhstan. Likewise there was no sta-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hybrid membranes and their use in volatile organic compound/air separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of membrane. This housing is equipped with a gasket seal between the high and low pressure sides ol tbe membrane. While the feed/retentate side of the membrane is held at 20-30 in HtO above atmospheric pressure, the permeate side is held at approximately...

Krohn, John Eric

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A study of the tropospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanisms and kinetics of reactions important to the troposphere have been investigated using a high pressure, turbulent, discharge-flow technique coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The ability to ...

Broekhuizen, Keith Edward, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dispersion of a Mexico City pollution out- flow eventon air pollution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area,pollution transport during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign: a case study of a major Mexico

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a flameless atomic absorption detector for speciationA. , "Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometerscoupled with an atomic absorption detector," in preparation,

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Atmospheric Environment 33 (1999) 783--795 The solvent-extractable organic compounds in the Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Indonesia biomass burning aerosols -- characterization studies M. Fang *, M. Zheng , F. Wang , K.L. To , A-of-control biomass burning for agricultural purposes in Indonesia started in June 1997, has become a severe Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Indonesia forest fire; Malaysia; Biomass burning

Zheng, Mei

416

Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methyl-tertiary-butyl- ether (MTBE) and the biomass burningfrom all source categories. MTBE is a gasoline additive andwith the fuel tracer MTBE (e.g. 0.82 for MTBE/benzene).

Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D; Blake, D. R; Wiedinmyer, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methanol Ethanol Acetone MEK MTBE CO Methane UCI UCI TOGA/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and toluene all ratioedthe observed decay. For MTBE, also a species that is not

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-butyl ether (MTBE) on urban particles indicates a site- specific interaction between MTBE and a particulate is a possible source only for the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Lopes and Bender (1998

419

Removal of volatile organic compounds from polluted air in a reverse flow reactor: An experimental study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of the reverse flow reactor for the purification of contaminated air has been carried out. An experimental reactor with an inner diameter of 0.145 m has been constructed. It almost completely reached the goal of an adiabatically operating system. The influence of several operating parameters such as gas velocity, cycle period, chemical character, and concentration of the pollutants and reactor pressure are discussed. The reactor could be operated autothermally provided that the inlet concentrations were sufficiently high. If a mixture of contaminants is fed to the reactor, it might be necessary to increase the total hydrocarbon concentration to assure an autothermal process. Increasing the reactor pressure will hardly change the axial temperature profiles, if the mass flux is kept constant. Increasing the mass flow rate will lead to a higher plateau temperature. Not only the reactor behavior at fixed operating conditions, but also the response of the reactor toward variations in inlet conditions is reported.

Beld, B. van de; Borman, R.A.; Derkx, O.R.; Woezik, B.A.A. van; Westerterp, K.R. (Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Methyl halide and biogenic volatile organic compound fluxes from perennial bioenergy crops and annual arable crops   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The depletion of fossil fuel resources, pollution concerns and the challenge of energy security are driving the search for renewable energy sources. The use of lignocellulosic plant biomass as an energy source is increasing ...

Morrison, Eilidh Christina

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbon isotope ratios of organic compound fractions in oceanic suspended particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 101,slope to the abyssal NE Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Partwaters of the equatorial Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Part

Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

High-precision optical measurements of 13 isotope ratios in organic compounds at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

range with an average precision of 0.95 and 0.67 for ethane and propane, respec- tively. The calibrated accuracy for methane, ethane, and propane is within 3 of the values determined using isotope ratio mass place in chemistry, especially in geochemistry, for determining reaction mechanisms and pro- viding

Zare, Richard N.

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic organic compounds Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

impossible... and qualitatively, the entire empirical basis for the anthropogenic greenhouse effect, specifically ... Source: Schwartz, Stephen E. - Environmental Chemistry...

424

Investigation of Nitro-Organic Compounds in Diesel Engine Exhaust: Final Report, February 2007 - April 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory upgraded its ReFUEL engine and vehicle testing facility to speciate unregulated gas-phase emissions. To complement this capability, the laboratory contracted with the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) to study the effects of soy biodiesel fuel and a diesel particle filter (DPF) on emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAH). CSM developed procedures to sample diesel particulate matter (PM) emissions from raw and diluted exhaust, with and without a DPF. They also developed improved procedures for extracting PAH and NPAH from the PM and quantifying them with a gas chromatograph-electron monochromator mass spectrometer. The study found the DPF generally reduced PAH emissions by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. PAH conversion was lowest for B100, suggesting that PAHs were forming in the DPF. Orders of magnitude reductions were also found for NPAH emissions exiting the DPF.

Dane, J.; Voorhees, K. J.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Impact of California Reformulated Gasoline on Motor Vehicle Emissions. 2. Volatile Organic Compound Speciation and Reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Reformulated Gasoline On Motor Vehicle EmissionsCalifornia Reformulated Gasoline on Motor Vehicle EmmissionsBerkeley Environ. ScLTechnoL gasoline Impact California of

Kirchstetter, Thomas; Singer, Brett; Harley, Robert

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AT A SITE OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L.A T A SITE OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L.a site contaminated with gasoline. Although the high V O C

Fischer, M.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

New electrolyte systems for capillary zone electrophoresis of metal cations and non-ionic organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excellent separations of metal ions can be obtained very quickly by capillary electrophoresis provided a weak complexing reagent is incorporated into the electrolyte to alter the effective mobilities of the sample ions. Indirect photometric detection is possible by also adding a UV-sensitive ion to the electrolyte. Separations are described using phthalate, tartrate, lactate or hydroxyisobutyrate as the complexing reagent. A separation of twenty-seven metal ions was achieved in only 6 min using a lactate system. A mechanism for the separation of lanthanides is proposed for the hydroxyisobutyrate system.

Shi, Y.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

Enthalpies of Vaporization of Organic and Organometallic Compounds, James S. Chickosa...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63121 William E. Acree, Jr.b... Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 Received 17 June 2002; accepted 17 compendia focused on fusion and sublimation enthalpies. Sufficient data are presently available for many

Chickos, James S.

429

Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mixing ratios and vertical wind speed plotted as a functionPanel: De-trended vertical wind speed (blue) and toluene (between toluene and vertical wind speed. Dashed curve

Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D; Blake, D. R; Wiedinmyer, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979). retort water, boiler blowdown, and heater- treaterGeokinetics Retort Water Occidental Heater-Treater :ss.ssa) situ Occidental Heater-Treater Water Retort 6 modified

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Quantitative and qualitative sensing techniques for biogenic volatile organic compounds and their oxidation products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Porter, H. Fuelberg, J. Halland and D. B. Millet, J.Porter, H. Fuelberg, J. Halland, T. H. Bertram, R. C. Cohen,

Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex; Apel, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. R. , and Hao, W. M. : Emissions from forest fires nearM. O. and Merlet, P. : Emission of trace gases and aerosolsW. : Automo- bile Emissions of Acetonitrile: Assessment of

Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D; Blake, D. R; Wiedinmyer, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Improving Fan System Performance aEnginesInEnergyExhaust

434

Three-Dimensional Simulation of Volatile Organic Compound Mass Flux from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1A: HandlingJefferson Lab ThreeMonkeysthe

435

Assigning Oxidation States to Organic Compounds via Predictions from X-ray  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -Grown byAssembly of

436

Detecting Volatile Organic Compounds from Orbit J. J. Harrison & P. F. Bernath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ethane retrievals are currently being optimised by updating and improving the microwindow set. Propane cross sections have also been determined from spectra recorded at the MSF. Propane 215 K Propane Q

437

Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C-130 T0 T1 G1 Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane n-ppbv) Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane Propene i-Butane n-Butanee.g. , ethane, ethene, propane, propane, methanol, ethanol,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer Total Organic Carbon Analyzer The carbon analyzer is used to analyze total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), total organic carbon (TOC), purgeable...

439

Water quality studies in Kranji Catchment, Singapore : use of organic tracer and PEDs for identifying potential sewage sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to identify organic compounds that could serve as indicators of potential human fecal contamination sources to the Kranji Reservoir in Singapore that could be used as confirmation indicators ...

Mendez Sagel, Adriana (Adriana Raquel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Isoreticular metal-organic frameworks, process for forming the same, and systematic design of pore size and functionality therein, with application for gas storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isoreticular metal-organic framework (IRMOF) and method for systematically forming the same. The method comprises the steps of dissolving at least one source of metal cations and at least one organic linking compound in a solvent to form a solution; and crystallizing the solution under predetermined conditions to form a predetermined IRMOF. At least one of functionality, dimension, pore size and free volume of the IRMOF is substantially determined by the organic linking compound.

Yaghi, Omar M.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Li, Hailian; Kim, Jaheon; Rosi, Nathaniel

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hydroxyalkyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This research discloses a compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises a functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine ligand and a metal combined with the ligand. 16 figs.

Katti, K.V.; Singh, P.R.; Reddy, V.S.; Katti, K.K.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hydroxyalkyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises a functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine ligand and a metal combined with the ligand.

Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad R. (Columbia, MO); Reddy, V. Sreenivasa (Columbia, MO); Katti, Kavita K. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness...

444

Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of lanthanide cluster compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on the exploratory synthesis of compounds that contain R6ZI12 (R= Ce, Gd, Er; Z=Mn, Fe, Co, C2) clusters with the goal of finding magnetically interesting compounds. Several new compounds were made via high temperature...

Sweet, Lucas Edward

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); White, James F. (Richland, WA); Holladay, Johnathan E. (Kennewick, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA); Muzatko, Danielle S. (Kennewick, WA); Orth, Rick J. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Comparison of organic combustion products in fly ash collected by a venturi wet scrubber and an electrostatic precipitator at a coal-fired power station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic compounds recovered from fly ash collected by an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a venturi wet scrubber (WS) at a coal-fired power station were analysed. Organic constituents in extracts of solid waste included large numbers of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. A series of normal C/sub 15/-C/sub 30/ paraffins was found in the aliphatic fractions. The aromatic compounds were of 1,2,3 and 4 rings. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons containing more than 4 rings were shown to be poorly recovered. Comparison of organic constituents in extracts of fly ash from the WS and the ESP showed that ESP extracts contained more compounds in greater quantities. The types and quantities of organic compounds recovered are not expected to present any environmental hazard.

Harrison, F.L.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Godshall, Ned A. (Stanford, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Natural attenuation: Chlorinated and recalcitrant compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural, or intrinsic, attenuation is an increasingly important component of site closure strategy. At first maligned as a do-nothing alternative, natural attenuation is now being recognized as a legitimate approach that can supplement and sometimes even supplant more costly approaches. Having gained more widespread acceptance as an option at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, natural attenuation is now beginning to emerge as an option for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents and other recalcitrant compounds such as MTBE. This book brings together the latest research and field applications, with chapters covering field characterization and monitoring, transformation processes, natural attenuation of MTBE, and a number of natural attenuation case studies.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Compound droplet manipulations on fiber arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent works demonstrated that fiber arrays may constitue the basis of an open digital microfluidics. Various processes, such as droplet motion, fragmentation, trapping, release, mixing and encapsulation, may be achieved on fiber arrays. However, handling a large number of tiny droplets resulting from the mixing of several liquid components is still a challenge for developing microreactors, smart sensors or microemulsifying drugs. Here, we show that the manipulation of tiny droplets onto fiber networks allows for creating compound droplets with a high complexity level. Moreover, this cost-effective and flexible method may also be implemented with optical fibers in order to develop fluorescence-based biosensor.

Weyer, Floriane; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Organic vapor jet printing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

452

Application of Biodegradable Oils (VOS{sup TM}) for Treatment of Chlorinated Ethenes in the Vadose Zone - 12085  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few active remediation alternatives are available to treat residual chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) within the vadose zone. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) can be very effective at removing cVOCs in permeable soils; however, recoveries decline substantially in low permeability zones where mass transfer is diffusion-limited. Entrapped cVOCs in these zones represent a slow but continuous source of contamination to underlying groundwater. An ongoing field study was initiated at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to evaluate an in situ biological treatment technology to address cVOC contamination in the vadose zone. Developed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), VOS{sup TM} is a thixotropic (shear thinning) formulation of biodegradable oil, water, nutrients, buffers, and de-chlorinating bacteria (Dehalococcoides sp.) that is designed to sequester and biodegrade slow-diffusing cVOCs from unsaturated, low permeable soils. Injection of 871 L (230 gal) of VOS{sup TM} resulted in a rapid and significant decrease in cVOC gas concentration, generation of cVOC daughter products, a decrease in oxygen concentration, and an increase in carbon dioxide and methane production. (authors)

Riha, Brian D.; Noonkester, Jay V.; Looney, Brian B.; Hyde, W. Keith; Walker, Richard W. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Richardson, Stephen D.; Elkins, Brad; Beckwith, Walter [EOS Remediation, LLC, Raleigh, NC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

Gary, Charles K.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

454

Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 91419158, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/9141/2013/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comprise gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or condensed phase matter which partitions at least, NEDC) on a chassis dy- namometer in a vehicle test cell. Emissions from the entire NEDC were sampled aging, with aged OA/POA in the range 9­15. A thorough investigation of the composition of the gas phase

Meskhidze, Nicholas

456

CX-011446: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Measurements and Modeling to Quantify Emissions of Methane and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Shale Gas Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 11/13/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

457

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 88838888, 2009 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/8883/2009/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified the long range trans- port of pollution associated with Arctic Haze as well as ocean in the lifetime of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including methane. In addition, summertime concentra- tions of anthropogenic activities in- cluding iron, steel, and ferro-alloy manufacturing; coal com- bustion; oil

458

Air Quality Conformity G.C. Sciara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) · Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) · Ozone (O3) ­ Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) ­ Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) · Oxides disease · Contributes to 80,000 premature deaths/year in CA #12;U.S. Sources of Oxides of Nitrogen EPA

Handy, Susan L.

459

Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 43 2000 2544 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract The capture and removal of a continuously produced, migrating Volatile Organic Compound Z .VOC the model aquifer. The electrical conduc- tivity of the Kq -spiked water was continuously monitored using by the stripping well, and the lower unaffected by the remediation system. Thereby, the primary factors

Gvirtzman, Haim

460

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 64956510, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/6495/2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field measurements of volatile organic compounds over a Norway spruce-dominated forest in centralVOC) fluxes from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) tree in central Germany and explored the emission responses emissions from Norway spruce, with monoter- penes and sesquiterpenes accounting for 50.8 ± 7.2 % and 19

Pierce, Jeffrey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

*Corresponding author. Tel.: #1-510-643-2451; fax: #1-510-643-5098.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributions to acetone mixing ratios in a rural environment Allen H. Goldstein*, Gunnar W. Schade Ecosystem correlated with acetone mixing ratios (r"0.80), suggesting that the quantity of biogenic and anthropogenic of biogenically and anthropogenically emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and biomass burning

Goldstein, Allen

462

A backward-time stochastic Lagrangian air quality model Deyong Wen a,*, John C. Lin a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that simulated O3 concentrations usually agree well with observations across sites in rural areas, small towns). Biomass burning from land use change has been accelerating (Setzer et al., 1994), releasing large quantities of NOx (NO þ NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) to the atmosphere (Chatfield and Delany

Mlllet, Dylan B.

463

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 53495368, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/5349/2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 ­ Accepted: 22 April 2014 ­ Published: 3 June 2014 Abstract. The increasing demand for palm oil for uses in biofuel and food products is leading to rapid expansion of oil palm agriculture. Methyl organic compound (VOC) that was recently identified as the main floral emission from an oil palm

Meskhidze, Nicholas

464

NARSTO OZONE ASSESSMENT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Atmospheric scientists examine O3 production and transport through measurements, analysis, and the application Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Although policy recommendations are not within the purview organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx ) are exposed to sunlight. Since the emissions

465

Effective Presentations Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Pericles Effective Presentations · Content · Organization · Delivery · Visual aids and graphics Be brave Graphics · KISS · Powerpoint: ­ Font · Bigger than you'd expect · San serif ­ Lines · Thicker than · Organization · Energy · Clarity · Poise Key: Practice Web Resources · http

Shull, David H.

466

Fragranced consumer products: Chemicals emitted, ingredients unlisted  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, and each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.

Steinemann, Anne C., E-mail: acstein@u.washington.ed [University of Washington, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Evans School of Public Affairs, Seattle, WA 98195-2700 (United States); MacGregor, Ian C.; Gordon, Sydney M. [Battelle Memorial Institute (United States); Gallagher, Lisa G.; Davis, Amy L.; Ribeiro, Daniel S. [University of Washington (United States); Wallace, Lance A. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (ret.) (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Determination of Henry's law constants of organics in dilute aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of Henry's law constants, H, or air/water partitioning coefficients are required to predict the behavior of organic compounds in the environment. In particular, when the compounds are relatively volatile and exhibit low solubility in water, air stripping may be a viable method for above-ground treatment. Henry's law constants of 15 volatile organic compounds in dilute aqueous solutions were measured by the procedure of equilibrium partitioning in a closed system. The method is based upon the measurement of the headspace concentration by gas chromatography. The compounds investigated included six halogenated hydrocarbons, four aromatic hydrocarbons, and five alkanes. The measurements were made at three temperatures between 25 and 45 C. The measured Henry's law constants compared well with the literature data of some liquids. The temperature dependence of Henry's law constant was also studied from the van't Hoff relation.

Hansen, K.C.; Zhou, Zhou; Yaws, C.L.; Aminabhavi, T.M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

469

Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

Heller, Christian Maria Anton (Albany, NY)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

470

Departmental Organization Management System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Public Law 95-91, 42 United States Code 7101, Department of Energy Organization Act, Section 642 gives to the Secretary of the Department of Energy the responsibility to approve organization changes affecting the number, designation, or mission of Departmental Elements and to approve the addition, deletion, or transfer of missions and/or functions of or between Departmental Elements. In order to streamline the organizational change process, the Secretary has delegate to the Heads of Departmental Headquarters and Field Elements the authority to approve organization changes. No cancellations.

1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

471

New organically templated photoluminescence iodocuprates(I)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two types of organic cyclic aliphatic diamine molecules piperazine (pip) and 1,3-bis(4-piperidyl)propane (bpp) were used, respectively, to react with an inorganic mixture of CuI and KI in the acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions under the solvothermal conditions, generating finally three new organically templated iodocuprates as 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 (tmpip=N,N,N',N'-tetramethylpiperazinium) and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Note that the templating agent tmpip{sup 2+} in compound 2 originated from the in situ N-alkylation reaction between the pip molecule and the methanol solvent. The photoluminescence analysis indicates that the title compounds emit the different lights: yellow for 1, blue for 2 and yellow-green for 3, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The solvothermal self-assemblies of CuI, KI and pip/bpp in acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions created three iodocuprates 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Highlights: > A new layered iodocuprate(I) with 20-membered rings was hydrothermally prepared. > A simple approach to prepare the new organic templating agent was reported. > Photoluminescence analysis indicates the emission for iodocuprate(I) is associated with the Cu...Cu interactions.

Hou Qin [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Zhao Jinjing [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Zhao Tianqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Jin Juan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Yu Jiehui, E-mail: jiehuiyu@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xu Jiqing, E-mail: xjq@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Organics Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. Because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected, two verification studies were performed to address the 303(d) segments that were listed for metal and organic contaminants in marine sediment. The Metals Verification Study (MVS) was conducted in 2003; the final report, Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington, was published in March 2004 (Kohn et al. 2004). This report describes the Organics Verification Study that was conducted in 2005. The study approach was similar to the MVS in that many surface sediment samples were screened for the major classes of organic contaminants, and then the screening results and other available data were used to select a subset of samples for quantitative chemical analysis. Because the MVS was designed to obtain representative data on concentrations of contaminants in surface sediment throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, aliquots of the 160 MVS sediment samples were used in the analysis for the Organics Verification Study. However, unlike metals screening methods, organics screening methods are not specific to individual organic compounds, and are not available for some target organics. Therefore, only the quantitative analytical results were used in the organics verification evaluation. The results of the Organics Verification Study showed that sediment quality outside of Sinclair Inlet is unlikely to be impaired because of organic contaminants. Similar to the results for metals, in Sinclair Inlet, the distribution of residual organic contaminants is generally limited to nearshore areas already within the actively managed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility Superfund Site, where further source-control actions and monitoring are under way.

Kohn, Nancy P.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Niewolny, Laurie A.; Johnston, Robert K.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

473

Organic matter of anoxic and oxygenated marine waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that a large percentage of the organic matter found in sea water consists of humic-like material (Skopentsev 1972) formed by condensation of simpler compounds such as carbohydrates and amino acids by plankton life processes (Kalle 1962). This newly... Major Subject: Chemical Oceanography ORGANIC MATTER OF ANOXIC AND OXYGENATED MARINE WATERS A Thesis by ROBERT MICHAEL GERSHEY Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of o tt ) r / ~-' t:u 'fl ~~&"f / 8 ~, g t, i~~ (Head of Department...

Gershey, Robert Michael

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality in Relocatable Classrooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds (VOCs). Each RC had two HVAC systems, alternated weekly, consisting of a standard heat-pump system

475

Organic Photovoltaics Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE funds research and development projects related to organic photovoltaics (OPV) due to the unique benefits it offers. Below are a list of the projects, summary of the benefits, and discussion on...

476

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange VisitorsforDepartment ofNoOrganization Organization View

477

Organic contaminant separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

Del Mar, P.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

478

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from each...

479

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Standard X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analyses were used in the...

480

Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds vocs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

482

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

483

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region...

484

Microfluidic self-assembly of quantum dot compound micelles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis is devoted to the development of microfluidic processes for the controlled self-assembly of quantum dot compound micelles (QDCMs). Microfluidic processes are developed to… (more)

Schabas, Greg

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and...

486

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Redondo Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

487

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental...

488

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

489

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

490

Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

Rabin, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

aromatic nitro compounds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

492

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

494

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

497

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

498

Comment on Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds in the vapor phase at trace levels: A tool for testing and Comment on Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic...

499

antimalarial compounds measured: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

William Carter; William P. L. Carter 1995-01-01 16 Logconcavity, ultralogconcavity, and a maximum entropy property of discrete compound Poisson measures Computer Technologies and...

500

Identification of polar, ionic, and highly water soluble organic pollutants in untreated industrial wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a generic protocol for the determination of polar, ionic, and highly water soluble organic pollutants on untreated industrial wastewaters involving the use of two different solid-phase extraction (SPE) methodologies followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Untreated industrial wastewaters might contain natural and synthetic dissolved organic compounds with total organic carbon (TOC) values varying between 100 and 3000 mg/L. All polar, ionic and highly water soluble compounds comprising more than 95% of the organic content and with major contribution to the total toxicity of the sample cannot be analyzed by conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and LC-MS is a good alternative. In this work two extraction procedures were used to obtain fractionated extracts of the nonionic polar compounds: a polymeric Isolute ENV + SPE cartridge for the preconcentration of anionic analytes and a sequential solid-phase extraction (SSPE) method percolating the samples first in octadecylsilica cartridge in series with the polymeric Lichrolut EN cartridge. Average recoveries ranging from 72% to 103% were obtained for a variety of 23 different analytes. Determination of nonionic pollutants was accomplished by reverse-phase liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS), while anionic compounds were analyzed by ion pair chromatography-electrospray-mass spectrometry (IP-ESI-MS) and LC-ESI-MS. This protocol was applied to a pilot survey of textile and tannery wastewaters leading to the identification and quantification of 33 organic pollutants.

Castillo, M.; Alonso, M.C.; Riu, J.; Barcelo, D. [IIQAB-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry] [IIQAB-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z