National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for organic compounds voc

  1. ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2006-07-10

    Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

  2. Quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil via passive sampling : polyethylene sampler design and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, David G. (David Gannon)

    2015-01-01

    The potential for the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to our natural environment is pervasive. However, the ability to accurately measure and predict VOC soil vapor concentrations is still limited. A polyethylene ...

  3. Southern California Edison's (SCE) Research Program for Industrial Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, R. D.; Cascone, R.; Reese, J.

    1990-01-01

    EDISON'S (SCE) RESEARCH PROGRAM FOR INDUSTRIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) EMISSIONS CONTROL ROGER D. SUNG RON CASCONE JIM REESE Program Manager Senior Consultant Manager Southern California Edison Chem Systems, Inc. Applied Utility Systems... Rosemead, California Tarrytown, New York Santa Ana, California ABSTRACT SCE has developed and implemented a research program for customer retention through VOC emission control. Following characterization of problematic emission sources, SCE has...

  4. Characterization of low-VOC latex paints: Volatile organic compound content, VOC and aldehyde emissions, and paint performance. Final report, January 1997--January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortmann, R.; Lao, H.C.; Ng, A.; Roache, N.

    1999-04-01

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as `low-odor,` `low-VOC (volatile organic compound),` or `no-VOC.` Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints and to identify the predominant VOCs and aldehydes in the emissions following application to test substrates. The performance of the paints was evaluated and compared to that of commonly used conventional latex paints by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard methods that measured parameters such as scrubbability, cleanability, and hiding power. The report describes the paints that were tested, the test methods, and the experimental data. Results are presented that can be used to evaluate the low-odor/low-VOC paints as alternatives to conventional latex wall paints that contain and emit higher concentrations of VOCs.

  5. Benchtop testing of polyethylene passive sampling towards a quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil vapours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soo, Yu Xiang Jaren

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of polyethylene (PE) as a passive sampler for quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was analysed in this work by means of a benchtop testing. A benchtop physical model was setup, which ...

  6. Comparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    is traditionally treated as the dominant mechanism of gas transport in unsaturated zones under natural conditionsComparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions Kehua You a , Hongbin Zhan a,b, a Department of Geology

  7. Occupational hygiene in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols at two solid waste management plants in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehtinen, Jenni; Tolvanen, Outi; Nivukoski, Ulla; Veijanen, Anja; Hänninen, Kari

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Odorous VOCs: acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene. ? VOC concentrations did not exceed occupational exposure limit concentrations. ? 2,3-Butanedione as the health effecting compound is discussed. ? Endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems in waste treatment. - Abstract: Factors affecting occupational hygiene were measured at the solid waste transferring plant at Hyvinkää and at the optic separation plant in Hämeenlinna. Measurements consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols including microbes, dust and endotoxins. The most abundant compounds in both of the plants were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, esters of carboxylic acids, ketones and terpenes. In terms of odour generation, the most important emissions were acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene due to their low threshold odour concentrations. At the optic waste separation plant, limonene occurred at the highest concentration of all single compounds of identified VOCs. The concentration of any single volatile organic compound did not exceed the occupational exposure limit (OEL) concentration. However, 2,3-butanedione as a health risk compound is discussed based on recent scientific findings linking it to lung disease. Microbe and dust concentrations were low at the waste transferring plant. Only endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems; the average concentration inside the plant was 425 EU/m{sup 3} which clearly exceeded the threshold value of 90 EU/m{sup 3}. In the wheel loader cabin the endotoxin concentrations were below 1 EU/m{sup 3}. High microbial and endotoxin concentrations were measured in the processing hall at the optic waste separation plant. The average concentration of endotoxins was found to be 10,980 EU/m{sup 3}, a concentration which may cause health risks. Concentrations of viable fungi were quite high in few measurements in the control room. The most problematic factor was endotoxins whose average measured concentrations was 4853 EU/m{sup 3}.

  8. ARTIFACT FORMATION IN HIGH VOLUME SAMPLING OF VOC's AND SOLID ORGANIC COMPOUNDS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    when sampling polluted air. Purified air containing 180 ppbv ozone seems to destroy PAH according Atmospheriques, Boite 7059, UNIVERSITE PARIS 7, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 PARIS Cedex 05 ABSTRACT Pollutants from well äs solid (SOC's) organic compounds. High volume samplers are commonly used m air quality

  9. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    ethene toluene n-butane propane i-pentane i-butane propeneethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These fiveVOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were

  10. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    a focus on benzene and 1,3- butadiene, Atmos. Environ. , 30,propylbenzene cis-2-butene 1,3-butadiene 2,3-dimethylbutaneVOCs (e.g. benzene and 1,3-butadiene) emitted from vehicles

  11. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Chemistry and Physics Vehicular emission of volatile organicY. , and Huang, Y. S. : Emission factors and characteristicslight-duty vehicle emissions, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 30,

  12. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

  13. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  14. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  15. Class 2 Permit Modification Request Revise Volatile Organic Compound...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Program scfm standard cubic feet per minute (ft 3 min) TCE trichloroethylene TIC tentatively identified compound TRU transuranic VOC volatile organic compound WIPP...

  16. Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testoni, A. L.

    2011-10-19

    This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

  17. Airborne flux measurements of methane and volatile organic compounds over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    natural gas extraction can lead to signi?cant emissions of methane (CH 4 ), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and nitrogen

  18. Electrospun Polyurethane Fibers for Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholten, Elke

    Electrospun polyurethane fibers for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air with rapid VOC absorption and desorption have been developed. Polyurethanes based on 4,4-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) (MDI) and ...

  19. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  20. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY)

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  1. Astatinated organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milius, R.A.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1989-05-02

    Methods and kits for incorporating a radioactive astatine isotope (particularly [sup 211]At) into an organic compound by electrophilic astatodestannylation of organostannanes. 3 figs.

  2. QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT (VOCs) in stormwater from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g. gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important non-point sources of VOCs, with each being important

  3. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortner, E. C.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

  4. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    containing compounds carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and dimethyl1,2-Dichloroethane Carbonyl sulfide Dimethyl sulfide

  5. Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles Juli tailpipe sources to motor vehicle volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Contributions were determined in a highway tunnel were used to define the composition of running vehicle emissions. The chemical mass balance

  6. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

  7. Modeling VOC sorption of building materials and its impact on indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinsong, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by building materials can have significant effect on the indoor VOC concentration levels and indoor air quality in buildings. The objective of this study was to investigate ...

  8. Airborne and ground based measurements of volatile organic compounds using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry in Texas and Mexico City 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortner, Edward Charles

    2009-05-15

    Measurements of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) are reported from recent airborne and surface based field campaigns. The Southeast Texas Tetroon Study (SETTS) ...

  9. THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMMISSIONS FROM 21 INDUSTRIES BY JONATHAN FISHER CSERGE WORKING PAPER WM 97-03 #12;THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMISSIONS FROM 21 INDUSTRIES by Jonathan Fisher ERM Economics 8 and Industry to estimate the costs of various levels of controls on emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds

  10. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, Curtis Dale (Albuquerque, NM); Thornberg, Steven Michael (Peralta, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  11. NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to date 308 to present SR- BCLDP.003.001 Savannah River Site This waste consists of CH Hydraulic Sludge and Debris generated by the BCLDP program during the D&D of the Building...

  12. Energy Saving System to Remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S. DOE Office of99Saving Gift Ideas for Dad

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER CFD-based modeling and design for energy-efficient VOC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    it is applied to the surface of any substrate in paint spray operation, the volatile organic compounds (VOC 2013 Ó Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOC's) are among surface coating application system for energy-efficient emission reduction. A case study on paint spray

  14. Environmental Impact on Applied Technology- Global Warming CFCs & VOCs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Hardly a day goes by that the threats to our environment are not brought to our attention. Whether you are following oil spills, groundwater contamination, global warming, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or volatile organic compounds (VOCs), you must...

  15. Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-05-06

    Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

  16. Aging of secondary organic aerosol from small aromatic VOCs. Changes in chemical composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-12-12

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form and transform SOA from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx. The effects of chemical aging on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state OSC) and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore »photo-oxidation, and the final OA OS C ranged from -0.29 to 0.45 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  17. Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy; Li, Na; Hodgson, Alfred; Offermann, Francis; Singer, Brett

    2013-02-01

    Continually changing materials used in home construction and finishing can introduce new chemicals or changes in the VOC profile in residential air and the trend towards tighter homes can lead to higher exposure concentrations for many indoor sources. However, the complex mixture of VOCs in residential air makes it difficult to discover emerging contaminants and/or trends in pollutant profiles. The purpose of this study is to prepare a comprehensive library of chemicals found in homes, along with a semi-quantitative approach to maximize the information gained from VOC measurements. We carefully reviewed data from 108 new California homes and identified 238 individual compounds. The majority of the identified VOCs originated indoors. Only 31% were found to have relevant health based exposure guidelines and less than 10% had a chronic reference exposure level (CREL). The finding highlights the importance of extending IAQ studies to include a wider range of VOCs

  18. Implementation of a solvent management program to control paint shop volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floer, M.M.; Hicks, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    The majority of automobile assembly plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are generated from painting operations. Typical paint operations generate more than 90 percent of the total plant emissions and, up to, 50 percent can be released by cleaning sources. Plant practices which contribute to the release of VOC emissions include the cleaning of paint lines and equipment, tanks, spray booths, floors and vehicles. Solvents continue to be the largest contributing source of VOC emissions in an automotive paint shop. To reduce overall VOC emissions, environmental regulations and guidelines were introduced under the Clean Air Act; Pollution Prevention and Waste Minimization programs, Control Techniques, and special air permit conditions. The introduction of these regulations and guidelines has driven industry toward continual refinement of their present cleaning methods while pursuing new techniques and technologies. Industry has also shown a proactive approach by introducing new waterborne and powder coating paint technologies to reduce overall emissions. As new paint technologies are developed and introduced, special attention must be given to the types of materials utilized for cleaning. The development and implementation of a solvent management program allows a facility to standardize a program to properly implement materials, equipment, technologies and work practices to reduce volatile organic compound emissions, meet strict cleaning requirements posed by new paint technologies and produce a vehicle which meets the high quality standards of the customer. This paper will assess the effectiveness of a solvent management program by examining pollution prevention initiatives and data from four different painting operations.

  19. Final disposal of VOCs from industrial wastewaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying, W.; Bonk, R.R.; Hannam, S.C. (Occidential Chemical Corp., Grand Island, NY (United States)); Qi-dong Li (Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China))

    1994-08-01

    Vapor phase carbon adsorption followed by spent carbon regeneration and catalytic oxidation were evaluated as methods for disposal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from industrial wastewaters during treatment operations such as aeration, air-stripping and aerobic biodegradation. Adsorptive capacities and breakthrough characteristics for eight VOCs found in many hazardous landfill leachates and contaminated groundwater were compared for selection of the best adsorbent and optimum treatment conditions. Coconut shell-based activated carbons exhibited higher VOC loading capacities than coal-based carbons, fiber carbon, molecular sieve and zeolite. Steam and hot nitrogen were both effective for regeneration of the spent carbon. A small quantity of adsorbates left in the regenerated carbon did not result in immediate VOC breakthrough in the next cycle adsorption treatment. Catalytic oxidation was found to be an attractive alternative for VOC disposal. Using a new commercial catalyst developed for destruction of halogenated organic compounds, even stable VOCs such as trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were completely destroyed at <350[degrees]C when oxidation was conducted at a space velocity of 17000/hr. 25 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Evaluation of low-VOC latex paints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, J.C.S.; Fortmann, R.C.; Roache, N.F.; Lao, H.C.

    1999-11-01

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that the VOC contents of all four paints are considerably lower than those of conventional latex paints. Low-VOC emissions were confirmed by small chamber emission tests. However, sigificant emissions of several aldehydes, especially formaldehyde, were detected from two of the paints. ASTM methods were used to evaluate the hiding power, scrubbability, washability, dry to touch, and yellowing index. The results indicated that one of the low-VOC paints tested showed performance equivalent or superior to that of a widely used conventional latex paint used as a control. It was concluded that low-VOC latex paint can be a viable option to replace conventional latex paints for prevention of indoor air pollution. However, paints marketed as low-VOC may still have significant emissions of some individual VOCs, and some may not have performance characteristics matching those of conventional latex paints.

  1. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  2. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2012-10-23

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  3. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-03-19

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  4. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, M. J.; Zoerb, M. C.; Campbell, N. R.; Zimmermann, K. J.; Blomquist, B. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-10-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e. DMS, ?-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, ?-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt?1) to DMS, isoprene, and ?-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion-molecule reactions likely proceed through amore »combination of ligand-switching and direct charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (R2=0.80) over a wide range of sampling conditions.« less

  5. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  6. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  7. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  8. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  9. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  10. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  11. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    of these and other compounds, branch enclosure air was also analyzed for VOCs using thermal desorption gas chromatography-proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (GC-PTR-MS) in the field and thermal desorption gas, Oracle, AZ 85623, USA. [2] University of Arizona, Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Soil, Water

  12. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  13. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  14. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH reactivity in the downwind plume. The model results generally showed good agreement with experimental results for the total VOC OH reactivity downwind and gave insight into the distributions of VOC chemical classes downwind. A box model with detailed gas phase chemistry (NCAR Master Mechanism), initialized with concentrations observed at one of the ground sites in the MCMA, was used to examine the expected evolution of specific VOCs over a 1-2 day period. The models clearly supported the experimental evidence for NMHC oxidation leading to the formation of OVOCs downwind, which then become the primary fuel for ozone production far away from the MCMA.

  15. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH reactivity in the downwind plume. The model results generally showed good agreement with experimental results for the total VOC OH reactivity downwind and gave insight into the distributions of VOC chemical classes downwind. A box model with detailed gas phase chemistry (NCAR Master Mechanism), initialized with concentrations observed at one of the ground sites in the MCMA, was used to examine the expected evolution of specific VOCs over a 1-2 day period. The models clearly supported the experimental evidence for NMHC oxidation leading to the formation of OVOCs downwind, which then become the primary fuel for ozone production far away from the MCMA.

  16. Ventilation Control of Volatile Organic Compounds in New U.S. Homes: Results of a Controlled Field Study in Nine Residential Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willem, Henry; Hult, Erin L.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion L.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Singer, Brett C.

    2013-01-01

    In order to optimize strategies to remove airborne contaminants in residences, it is necessary to determine how contaminant concentrations respond to changes in the air exchange rate. The impact of air exchange rate on the indoor concentrations of 39 target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was assessed by measuring air exchange rates and VOC concentrations at three ventilation settings in nine residences. Active sampling methods were used for VOC concentration measurements, and passive perfluorocarbon tracer gas emitters with active sampling were used to determine the overall air exchange rate corresponding to the VOC measurements at each ventilation setting. The concentration levels and emission rates of the target VOCs varied by as much as two orders of magnitude across sites. Aldehyde and terpene compounds were typically the chemical classes with highest concentrations, followed by alkanes, aromatics, and siloxanes. For each home, VOC concentrations tended to decrease as the air exchange rate was increased, however, measurement uncertainty was significant. The indoor concentration was inversely proportional to air exchange rate for most compounds. For a subset of compounds including formaldehyde, however, the indoor concentration exhibited a non-linear dependence on the timescale for air exchange

  17. Volatile organic compound and particulate emission studies of AF (Air Force) paint-booth facilities. Phase 1. Final report, February-December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayer, J.; Wolbach, D.

    1988-07-01

    This study presents the results of volatile organic compound (VOC) and particulate emission surveys performed at three Air Force painting facilities. The three facilities -- one in McClellan AFB buildings 655 and two at Travis AFB in buildings 550 and 1014 -- did not meet local VOC emission standards. The possibility of reducing these emissions with recirculation modifications and various VOC reduction and control strategies is discussed. Although VOC emissions from paint spray booths can be controlled by add-on control systems, control is expensive for present air flow rates. The use of air recirculation within the spray booth can reduce the cost of VOC emission controls by reducing the quantity of air that requires processing. Recirculation systems were designed for two of the painting facilities included in this study. In designing the systems, various criteria such as paint booth VOC concentrations and health and safety standards were considered. Add-on VOC emission-control systems that can be used in conjunction with the recirculation system are evaluated. The devices of interest are a solvent incineration system and an activated-carbon adsorption bed. The VOC removal efficiency, initial capital investment and operating costs for both of these technologies are discussed.

  18. Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

    2011-07-05

    An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

  19. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds. Phase 1, Conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The ``Toxic-Release Inventory`` of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M`s work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

  20. Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

    2011-03-16

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

  1. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Hu, Jianli (Kennewick, WA); Hart, Todd R. (Kennewick, WA); Neuenschwander, Gary G. (Burbank, WA)

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  2. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  3. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  4. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  5. Improved land cover and emission factors for modeling biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions from Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, DYC; Wong, P; Cheung, BKH; Guenther, A

    2010-01-01

    organic compounds emissions in Hong Kong. Atmosphericvolatile organic compounds emission inventory for Beijing.volatile organic compound emissions. Journal of Geophysical

  6. Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

    2013-06-01

    A very important aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970's. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

  7. Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, Anna C.; Russell, Marion; Lee, Wen-Yee; Apte, Michael; Maddalena, Randy

    2010-09-20

    The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 mu g/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to>500 mu g/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~;;15 mu g/m2/h while the new wood material emitted>100 mu g/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs.

  8. Field demonstration and transition of SCAPS direct push VOC in-situ sensing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William M. Davis

    1999-11-03

    This project demonstrated two in-situ volatile organic compound (VOC) samplers in combination with the direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometer (DSITMS). The technologies chosen were the Vadose Sparge and the Membrane Interface Probe (MIP) sensing systems. Tests at two demonstration sites showed the newer VOC technologies capable of providing in situ contaminant measurements at two to four times the rate of the previously demonstrated Hydrosparge sensor. The results of this project provide initial results supporting the utility of these new technologies to provide rapid site characterization of VOC contaminants in the subsurface.

  9. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  10. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  11. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    anthropogenic sources on carbonyl sulfide in Beijing City,Measurements of carbonyl sulfide in automotive emissions andThese include CO, CO 2 , carbonyl sulfide (OCS), carbon

  12. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    7504, 2009 petroleum gas (LPG), gasoline, and diesel are thevehicles, while diesel and LPG fueled vehicles accounted forShing Mun Tunnel, Hong Kong LPG, gasoline, and diesel ethene

  13. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    LPG, gasoline, and diesel ethene toluene n-butane propane i-pentane i-butane propene benzene ethyne 1,2,4-order, ethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane.

  14. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    1-pentene 2-methylpentane ethane n-pentane 1-butene o-xylenethe ratios of ethene/ethane and m,p-xylene/ethylbenzene wereaverage value of ethene/ethane and m,p-xylene/ethylbenzene

  15. NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact: Janet Lambert4NIEHS7, 2015 NMED Approves3 NMED

  16. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-01-28

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gasmore »chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  17. Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

    1985-08-06

    Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about [minus]10 C to about 30 C or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

  18. Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

    1985-01-01

    Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about -10.degree. C. to about 30.degree. C. or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

  19. ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic air pollutants emitted from wastewater and solids handling Management District (SC-AQMD). Contaminated air at POTWs contains two major groups of pollutants: reduced the use of microorganisms that convert air pollutants into harmless end-products. Treatment costs

  20. Technical Assistance to Ohio Closure Sites Technologies to Address Excavated VOC Contaminated Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    bioremediation, thermal desorption, vacuum desorption, chemical oxidation, incineration, and DNAPL removal Soil from Areas 3A/4A and Plant 6 at Fernald Environmental Management Project, Ohio Technical volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soils. The technical assistance team was composed of technical

  1. Control of VOC emissions from ink and paint manufacturing processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMinn, B.W.; Marsosudiro, P.J.

    1992-04-01

    The document presents the results of a study to collect and report information on processes used to manufacture paint and ink, volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions generated during these operations, emission control techniques and their effectiveness, and costs associated with process changes and emission control options.

  2. Common Indoor Sources of volatile organic compounds: emission rates and techniques for reducing consumer exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    categories. Latex paints contain organic solvents such assemivolatile organic compounds from waterborne paint - Theorganic compounds from PVC flooring, carpet and paint.

  3. Numerical modeling of VOC emissions from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in an aircraft cabin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    300072, China *Tel. (765)496-7562, Fax (765)494-0539, Email: yanchen@purdue.edu Abstract Volatile organic to VOCs, their concentrations in the breathing zones should be used. 1. Introduction Volatile organic). These compounds are emitted as gases from a variety of indoor materials such as paints, furniture, and building

  4. Oxidation of atmospheric organic carbon : interconnecting volatile organic compounds, intermediate-volatility organic compounds, and organic aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, James Freeman

    2015-01-01

    .Organic molecules have many important roles in the atmosphere, acting as climate and biogeochemical forcers, and in some cases as toxic pollutants. The lifecycle of atmospheric organic carbon is extremely complex, with ...

  5. Catalytic oxidation of VOC`s and air toxics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lassen, M.A.; Chu, W. [Johnson Matthey, Wayne, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic oxidation for VOC control of stationary sources has been in use since the 1940`s for energy recovery and odor control. Widespread use of catalytic oxidation, as a means for controlling emissions began in earnest in the early 1970`s with the passage of the Clean Air Act of 1970. Since that time, catalytic technology has undergone many improvements and advancements. Some of these include higher destruction efficiencies at lower temperatures, poison resistance, enhanced durability and the ability to effectively control halogenated hydrocarbon compounds. This is particularly important for meeting the Title III requirements, since many of the air toxics regulated under Title III are halogenated VOC`s. This paper will describe catalytic oxidation, how it works, its benefits and limitations, its cost relative to thermal, and describe recent technology advances.

  6. Evaluation of emplacement sensors for detecting radiation and volatile organic compounds and for long-term monitoring access tubes for the BWCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, D.L.; Averill, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    This document evaluates sensors for detecting contaminants in the excavated waste generated by the Buried Waste Containment System (BWCS). The Barrier Placement Machine (BPM) removes spoils from under a landfill or plume and places it on a conveyor belt on the left and right sides of the BPM. The spoils will travel down the conveyor belts past assay monitors and be deposited on top of the site being worked. The belts are 5 ft wide and transport approximately 15 ft3 /minute of spoils. This corresponds to a 10 ft per hour BPM advance rate. With a 2 in. spoils height the belt speed would be 3.6 in. per second. The spoils being removed are expected to be {open_quotes}clean{close_quotes} (no radiation or volatile organics above background levels). To ensure that the equipment is not digging through a contaminated area, assay equipment will monitor the spoils for mg radiation and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The radiation monitors will check for gross radiation indication. Upon detection of radiation levels above a predetermined setpoint, further evaluation will be performed to determine the isotopes present and their quantity. This will require hand held monitors and a remote monitoring station. Simultaneously, VOC monitors will monitor for predetermined volatile/semi-volatile organic compounds. A Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) monitor is recommended for this operation. Specific site requirements and regulations will determine setpoints and operation scenarios. If VOCs are detected, the data will be collected and recorded. A flat panel display will be mounted in the BPM operator`s cab showing the radio nuclide and VOC monitoring data. As the BPM advances, a 3-in. diameter PVC tube will be placed on the bottom of the barrier slot in front of the 12 to 16-in. containment barrier being emplaced.

  7. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1987-07-14

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

  8. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (625 Gulfwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37923)

    1987-01-01

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

  9. Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias, Nick; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Mike; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2012-01-01

    More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from an aerosol sample. One method is a Dekati Thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented for this project in an engine test cell built around a direct injection spark ignited (DISI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. Direct injection is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency but this comes with the production of a significant amount of (PM) and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition. The first interesting observation is that PM number distributions, acquired using a TSI SMPS, have a large accumulation mode (30-294 nm) but a very small nuclei mode (8-30 nm). This is understood to represent a lack of condensation particles meaning that neither the exhaust conditions nor the sample handling conditions are conducive to condensation. This lack of nuclei mode does not, however, represent a lack of VOCs in the sample. It has been observed, using mass spectral analysis (limited to PM>50 nm), that PM from the DISI engine has approximately 40% organic content through varying operating conditions. This begs the question of how effective different sample handling methods are at removing these VOCs. For one specific operating condition, called Cold Start, the un-treated PM was 40% organic. The TD reduced this by 7% while the EvCh reduced it by 13%. For other operating conditions, PM treated for volatile removal actually exhibited an increase in organic fraction on the order of 5%. This addition appears to be sensitive to the gaseous hydrocarbon concentrations in the exhaust although a precise correlation has not yet been derived. It has been concluded that VOCs are tightly bound to the PM carbon core and thus are not effectively removed by either treatment method.

  10. 5, 90979126, 2005 VOC emissions from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation pyrolysis J. P. Greenberg et al. Title Page Discussions Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation J. P. Greenberg, H is licensed under a Creative Commons License. 9097 #12;ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation

  11. Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds Ethylbenzene Carbon tetrachloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds · Ethylbenzene · Carbon tetrachloride · Benzene · 1 and petroleum. It is also found in manufactured products such as inks, insecticides, and paints. Ethylbenzene, carpet glues, varnishes and paints, and use of tobacco. Some people are exposed to ethylbenzene at work

  12. Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of the United States, 1985-1995 P A U L, ambient groundwater of the conterminous United States was conducted based on samples collected from 2948-chloropropane, which had a reporting level of 1.0 µg/L. Because ambient groundwater was targeted, areas of known

  13. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Cows and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    , California 94720, and Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 of California Senate Bill 700. The proposed SJV Air District Rule 4570 intends to reduce VOC emissions from

  14. Emission, oxidation, and secondary organic aerosol formation of volatile organic compounds as observed at Chebogue Point,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    acid, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, tentatively identified formic acid and hydroxyacetone organic aerosol production. We clearly show these compounds do not originate from local sources. We also show these compounds match the oxidation products of isoprene observed in smog chamber studies, and we

  15. A pulse combustion-based VOC destruction technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.; Allendorf, M.A.; Barr, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    Herein we describe a recently initiated project to develop and demonstrate a novel technique for volatile organic compound (VOC) destruction that relies upon the unique characteristics of pulse combustors to effect a two-stage (thermal and catalytic) destruction process. The concept exploits both the high combustion intensity (energy release rate per unit volume) in the pulse combustor combustion chamber and the acoustic resonance in the pulse combustor tailpipe. High combustion intensity results from rapid fluid dynamic mixing, and will lead to compact, transportable designs; acoustic resonance results in significantly increased mass transport to the catalyst material, leading to high destruction efficiencies. The operation of a pulse combustor and its unique characteristics are described and illustrated with experimental data and theoretical calculations. The new pulse combustion-based VOC destruction system is discussed, and results from a preliminary feasibility study are presented.

  16. A pulse combustion-based VOC destruction technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.; Allendorf, M.A.; Barr, P.K.

    1992-06-01

    Herein we describe a recently initiated project to develop and demonstrate a novel technique for volatile organic compound (VOC) destruction that relies upon the unique characteristics of pulse combustors to effect a two-stage (thermal and catalytic) destruction process. The concept exploits both the high combustion intensity (energy release rate per unit volume) in the pulse combustor combustion chamber and the acoustic resonance in the pulse combustor tailpipe. High combustion intensity results from rapid fluid dynamic mixing, and will lead to compact, transportable designs; acoustic resonance results in significantly increased mass transport to the catalyst material, leading to high destruction efficiencies. The operation of a pulse combustor and its unique characteristics are described and illustrated with experimental data and theoretical calculations. The new pulse combustion-based VOC destruction system is discussed, and results from a preliminary feasibility study are presented.

  17. NICS report links VOCs to respiratory problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-04-22

    Children who live near the chemical plants of Kanawha Valley, WV, suffer more acute and chronic respiratory aliments than those farther away, says a Harvard University School of Public Health report. In the $1-million, five-year study commissioned by the National Institute for Chemical Studies (NICS:Charleston, WV) and funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, proximity to chemical plants that emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was linked to higher incidence of asthma, acute eye irritation, shortness of breath, and chronic cough. The researchers say they adjusted for most other factors, such as parental smoking and petroleum. {open_quotes}The research hypothesis was whether children in the valley had more symptoms,{close_quotes} says NICS president Paul Hill. {open_quotes}Yes, there is a difference.{close_quotes} The study showed that some ailments were up to 28% more prevalent in children in the valley than in other Kanawha County children.

  18. VOCs in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (ID) was initiated in 1989. Objectives for the ID were to test the integrated demonstration concept, demonstrate and evaluate innovative technologies/systems for the remediation of VOC contamination in soils and groundwater, and to transfer technologies and systems to internal and external customers for use in fullscale remediation programs. The demonstration brought together technologies from DOE laboratories, other government agencies, and industry for demonstration at a single test bed. The Savannah River Site was chosen as the location for this ID as the result of having soil and groundwater contaminated with VOCS. The primary contaminants, trichlorethylene and tetrachloroethylene, originated from an underground process sewer line servicing a metal fabrication facility at the M-Area. Some of the major technical accomplishments for the ID include the successful demonstration of the following: In situ air stripping coupled with horizontal wells to remediate sites through air injection and vacuum extraction; Crosshole geophysical tomography for mapping moisture content and lithologic properties of the contaminated media; In situ radio frequency and ohmic heating to increase mobility, of the contaminants, thereby speeding recovery and the remedial process; High-energy corona destruction of VOCs in the off-gas of vapor recovery wells; Application of a Brayton cycle heat pump to regenerate carbon adsorption media used to trap VOCs from the offgas of recovery wells; In situ permeable flow sensors and the colloidal borescope to determine groundwater flow; Chemical sensors to rapidly quantify chlorinated solvent contamination in the subsurface; In situ bioremediation through methane/nutrient injection to enhance degradation of contaminants by methanotrophic bateria.

  19. Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, B.D.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO{sub 2} and CuCl. The CO{sub 2} is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH{sub 3}I to form CH{sub 3}Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio. 9 figs.

  20. Evaluation of innovative volatile organic compound and hazardous air-pollutant-control technologies for U. S. Air Force paint spray booths. Final report, Aug 88-Aug 89

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritts, D.H.; Garretson, C.; Hyde, C.; Lorelli, J.; Wolbach, C.D.

    1990-10-01

    Significant quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants are released into the atmosphere during USAF maintenance operations. Painting operations conducted in paint spray booths are major sources of these pollutants. Solvent based epoxy primers and solvent-based polyurethane coatings are typically used by the Air Force for painting aircraft and associated equipment. Solvents used in these paints include methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, lacquer thinner, and other solvents involved in painting and component cleaning. In this report, carbon paper adsorption/catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) were evaluated as control technologies to destroy VOC emissions from paint spray booths. Simultaneous testing of pilot-scale units was performed to evaluate the technical performance of both technologies. Results showed that each technology maintained greater than 99 percent Destruction and Removal Efficiencies (DREs). Particulate emissions from both pilot-scale units were less than 0.08 grains/dry standard cubic foot. Emissions of the criteria pollutants--sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide--were also below general regulatory standards for incinerators. Economic evaluations were based on a compilation of manufacturer-supplied data and energy consuption data gathered during the pilot scale testing. CPACM and FBCI technologies are less expensive than standard VOC control technologies when net present costs for a 15-year equipment life are compared.

  1. Modeling the VOC emissions from interior latex paint applied to gypsum board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Z.; Fortmann, R.; Marfiak, S.; Tichenor, B.; Sparks, L.

    1997-09-01

    The paper discusses modeling volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from indoor latex paint applied to gypsum board. An empirical source model for a porous substrate was developed that takes both the wet- and dry-stage emission into consideration. Tests in the U.S. EPA`s Source Characterization Laboratory showed that common interior surfaces such as gypsum board and carpet could absorb significant amounts of latex paint VOCS from the air, and that they were re-emitted very slowly. An indoor air quality model incorporating the source model, an irreversible sink model, and the air movement data obtained from tracer gas tests made satisfactory predictions for the VOC levels in a test house.

  2. Response of fine particulate matter to emission changes of oxides of nitrogen and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandra P. Tsimpidi; Vlassis A. Karydis; Spyros N. Pandis

    2008-11-15

    A three-dimensional chemical transport model (Particulate Matter Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions) is used to investigate changes in fine particle (PM2.5) concentrations in response to 50% emissions changes of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during July 2001 and January 2002 in the eastern United States. The reduction of NOx emissions by 50% during the summer results in lower average oxidant levels and lowers PM2.5 (8% on average), mainly because of reductions of sulfate (9-11%), nitrate (45-58%), and ammonium (7-11%). The organic particulate matter (PM) slightly decreases in rural areas, whereas it increases in cities by a few percent when NOx is reduced. Reduction of NOx during winter causes an increase of the oxidant levels and a rather complicated response of the PM components, leading to small net changes. Sulfate increases (8-17%), nitrate decreases (18-42%), organic PM slightly increases, and ammonium either increases or decreases a little. The reduction of VOC emissions during the summer causes on average a small increase of the oxidant levels and a marginal increase in PM2.5. This small net change is due to increases in the inorganic components and decreases of the organic ones. Reduction of VOC emissions during winter results in a decrease of the oxidant levels and a 5-10% reduction of PM2.5 because of reductions in nitrate (4-19%), ammonium (4-10%), organic PM (12-14%), and small reductions in sulfate. Although sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) reduction is the single most effective approach for sulfate control, the coupled decrease of SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions in both seasons is more effective in reducing total PM2.5 mass than the SO{sub 2} reduction alone. 34 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Process for removing an organic compound from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

    1993-12-28

    A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

  4. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy(trihexyl)phosphonium dicyanamide as the RTIL. It was determined that it has good absorption properties for methanol and ?-pinene, is thermally stable, and is relatively easy to synthesize. It has a density of 0.89 g/mL at 20°C and a molecular weight of 549.9 g/mol. Trials were conducted with a small absorption system and a larger absorption system. Methanol, formaldehyde, and other HAPs were absorbed well, nearly 100%. Acetaldehyde was difficult to capture. Total VOC capture, while satisfactory on methanol and ?-pinene in a lab system, was less than expected in the field, 60-80%. The inability to capture the broad spectrum of total organics is likely due to difficulties in cleaning them from the ionic liquid rather than the ability of the ionic liquid to absorb. It’s likely that a commercial system could be constructed to remove 90 to 100% of the gas contaminates. Selecting the correct ionic liquid would be key to this. Absorption may not be the main selection criterion, but rather how easily the ionic liquid can be cleaned is very important. The ionic liquid absorption system might work very well in a system with a limited spectrum of pollutants, such as a paint spray line, where there are not very high molecular weight, non volatile, compounds in the exhaust.

  5. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  6. Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-09-11

    Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

  7. Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-06-25

    Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

  8. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

    1989-01-01

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

  9. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

    1987-02-25

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias, Nicholas; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Michael; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul M.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun S.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2012-01-01

    More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). One method is a thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented in an engine test cell with a spark ignited direct injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. SIDI is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency compared to other SI engines, however, the efficiency benefit comes with greater PM emissions and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based PM regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition.

  11. Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias, Nicholas; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Michael; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun S.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2012-01-01

    More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). One method is a thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented in an engine test cell with a spark ignited direct injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. SIDI is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency compared to other SI engines, however, the efficiency benefit comes with greater PM emissions and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based PM regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition

  12. Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L.; Moya, J.

    1999-07-01

    Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

  13. LOW TEMPERATURE VOC COMBUSTION OVER MANGANESE, COBALT AND ZINC ALPO4 MOLECULAR SIEVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosemarie Szostak

    2003-03-06

    The objective of this project was to prepare microporous aluminophosphates containing magnesium, manganese, cobalt and zinc (MeAPOs) and to evaluate their performance as oxidation catalysts for the removal of low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gas streams. The tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) To develop reliable synthesis methods for metal aluminophosphates containing manganese, cobalt and zinc in their framework; (2) To characterize these materials for crystallinity, phase purity, the location and nature of the incorporated metal in the framework; and (3) To evaluate the materials for their catalytic activities in the oxidation of volatile organic environmental pollutants.

  14. Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations and Emission Rates in New Manufactured and Site-Built Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armin Rudd

    2008-10-30

    This study was conducted with the primary objective of characterizing and comparing the airborne concentrations and the emission rates of total VOCs and selected individual VOCs, including formaldehyde, among a limited number of new manufactured and site-built houses.

  15. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    methanol, ethanol, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde), while higher VOCs are represented as a lumped alkane (BIGANE), lumped alkene (BIGENE) and lumped aromatic (

  16. Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

    2013-01-08

    The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

  17. Decomposing VOCs with an electron-beam plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, S.A.; Hadidi, K.; Cohn, D.R.; Bromberg, L.; Falkos, P.

    1996-04-01

    Several emerging technologies are being tested for decomposing VOCs. Among these are bioreactors, catalytic oxidation, photoinduced decomposition, thermal plasma processes, and nonequilibrium plasma processes. For a new technology to be successfully offered for commercial use, it must be reliable, economically competitive, and ready for use on an industrial scale. The authors have been working on an electron-beam-generated plasma reactor that now meets these prerequisites. The reactor can decompose halogenated organic compounds in dilute concentrations 1--3,000 ppm in airstreams at atmospheric pressure. The technology is more energy efficient than thermal technologies and thus represents lower electricity costs for the overall process. The reactor can easily be scaled to industrial needs and was tested successfully in Hanford, WA, to treat the offgas from the remediation of soils contaminated with CCl{sub 4}.

  18. Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Rondall James

    1994-01-01

    The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

  19. Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

    1996-08-13

    A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

  20. Organic solid state switches incorporating porphyrin compounds and method for producing organic solid state optical switches

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Gaines, G.L.; Niemczyk, M.P.; Johnson, D.G.; Gosztola, D.J.; O`Neil, M.P.

    1996-07-23

    A light-intensity dependent molecular switch comprised of a compound which shuttles an electron or a plurality of electrons from a plurality of electron donors to an electron acceptor upon being stimulated with light of predetermined wavelengths, said donors selected from porphyrins and other compounds, and a method for making said compound are disclosed. 4 figs.

  1. Organic solid state switches incorporating porphyrin compounds and method for producing organic solid state optical switches

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wasielewski, Michael R. (Naperville, IL); Gaines, George L. (River Forest, IL); Niemczyk, Mark P. (Wheaton, IL); Johnson, Douglas G. (Grayslake, IL); Gosztola, David J. (Bolingbrook, IL); O'Neil, Michael P. (San Leandro, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A light-intensity dependent molecular switch comprised of a compound which shuttles an electron or a plurality of electrons from a plurality of electron donors to an electron acceptor upon being stimulated with light of predetermined wavelengths, said donors selected from porphyrins and other compounds, and a method for making said compound.

  2. Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from Pulp Mills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridman, Alexander A.; Gutsol, Alexander; Kennedy, Lawrence A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Korobtsev, Sergey V.; Shiryaevsky, Valery L.; Medvedev, Dmitry

    2004-07-28

    Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program various plasma technologies were evaluated under project FWP 49885 ''Experimental Assessment of Low-Temperature Plasma Technologies for Treating Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Pulp Mills and Wood Products Plants''. The heterogeneous pulsed corona discharge was chosen as the best non-equilibrium plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. The technology for removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from gas emissions with conditions typical of the exhausts of the paper industry by means of pulsed corona plasma techniques presented in this work. For the compounds of interest in this study (methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfide and ? -pinene), high removal efficiencies were obtained with power levels competitive with the present technologies for the VOCs removal. Laboratory experiments were made using installation with the average power up to 20 W. Pilot plant prepared for on-site test has average plasma power up to 6.4 kW. The model of the Pilot Plant operation is presented.

  3. Composites for removing metals and volatile organic compounds and method thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2006-12-12

    Functionalized hydrophobic aerogel/solid support structure composites have been developed to remove metals and organic compounds from aqueous and vapor media. The targeted metals and organics are removed by passing the aqueous or vapor phase through the composite which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The composites adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous or vapor stream. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific functionalization of the aerogels tailored towards specific metals and/or organics. After adsorption, the composites can be disposed of or the targeted metals and/or organics can be reclaimed or removed and the composites recycled.

  4. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  5. Thermal engine driven heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drake, Richard L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for separating volatile organic compounds from a stream of process gas. An internal combustion engine drives a plurality of refrigeration systems, an electrical generator and an air compressor. The exhaust of the internal combustion engine drives an inert gas subsystem and a heater for the gas. A water jacket captures waste heat from the internal combustion engine and drives a second heater for the gas and possibly an additional refrigeration system for the supply of chilled water. The refrigeration systems mechanically driven by the internal combustion engine effect the precipitation of volatile organic compounds from the stream of gas.

  6. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. The model combines Köhler theory with semi-empirical group contribution methods to estimate molar volumes, activity coefficients and liquid-liquid phase boundaries tomore »predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of two. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging testbeds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger scale models.« less

  7. Global comparison of VOC and CO observations in urban areas Erika von Schneidemesser a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sources, such as industry and LPG-related sources in non- Annex I countries. Yearly benzene to ethyne of air quality. Certain VOCs are very reactive in the atmosphere (e.g., xylenes and benzene compounds

  8. Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

  9. SPECTROSCOPIC METHODS FOR ANALYZING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN FLUID INCLUSIONS DURING PLANETARY EXPLORATION. A. Mazzini 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    to support of life, and could even contain direct biomolecular signatures of life. Accessing the fluid which provide data on organic compounds in fluid inclusions. The techniques used are Ra- man entrapped in chemosynthetic carbonate at a modern cold seep site. Cold seeps have been identified as targets

  10. A large dynamic chamber for characterizing particulate and VOC emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless, P.A.; Smith, D.D.; Ensor, D.S. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Sparks, L.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-12-31

    A dynamic chamber (8 m{sup 3}) was designed and constructed for the investigation of particulate emissions from appliances and office equipment and their impact on indoor air quality. The supply air incorporated high efficiency particle filters to provide a near-zero particle background in a low turbulence flow. The flow rate could be varied from 2 to 80 m{sup 3}/min. For testing operating appliances, such as vacuum cleaners, the dimensions of the chamber were chosen to allow an operator to use an appliance over a floor area of about 2 m{sup 2}. The need for low particle backgrounds dictated that the chamber be operated in an overpressure mode, so that all leaks were from the inside and would only affect the total flow measurements. The flow converges into an outlet tube 20 cm in diameter where velocity and concentration measurements could be made in multiple ports. The chamber was furnished with interior lights and electrical outlets. Recently, the chamber has been modified with carbon filters on the inlet to allow for sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as from floor wax. The filters remove the VOC background to a level below that detectable by the sorbent cartridges/analysis system used for sampling. The chamber has even been pressed into service as a small cleanroom for some operations that required its unique characteristics. The chamber has been successfully operated in both a closed-loop mode and in an open-loop mode. The main advantage of the closed loop mode is that the backgrounds can be reduced to zero more quickly, but the disadvantage is that humidity and carbon dioxide concentrations grow because they are not removed by the filters.

  11. Anthropogenic emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds in eastern Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickley, Loretta J.

    al 2003, Parrish et al 2012) and in an oil/gas field of northern Colorado (Gilman et al 2013 of VOCs, have been used to constrain AHRVOC emissions in East Asia (Fu et al 2007) and Nigeria (Marais et

  12. Customizing a VOC control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enneking, J.C.

    1998-12-31

    An extremely important but very difficult element in applying an emission control device to an exhaust stream is to chose the proper technology. Once it has been determined that recovery, rather than destruction, is appropriate, there are still several process choices available. The type of process is generally dictated by the VOC concentration and total air flow rate. Adsorption is usually chosen for low concentrations and high flow rates while refrigeration is usually best for high concentrations and low flow rates. This paper describes six applications. Adsorption was applied to two of them and condensation to the other four. Solvent vapors from a tape coating operation are recovered in an activated carbon adsorption process and reused. VOC`s from soil vapor extraction operations are captured by activated carbon which is regenerated by a mobile unit. VOC`s displaced from filling tank cars at a refinery are condensed at low temperatures in a high pressure system which uses a pressure swing dryer to remove water. Two different processes were installed to prevent VOC emissions from pharmaceutical processing plants. They both use a thermal swing dryer to remove moisture and low temperature condensation to recover the solvent. With very high concentrations of solvent in an inert gas stream, indirect condensation is used to purify the nitrogen and recover the solvent for reuse. Process flow diagrams and operating results are presented.

  13. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Jeffry

    2007-02-13

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  14. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

    2000-01-01

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  15. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2003-05-27

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  16. Space-based formaldehyde measurements as constraints on volatile organic compound emissions in east and south Asia and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    Space-based formaldehyde measurements as constraints on volatile organic compound emissions in east a continuous 6-year record (1996­2001) of GOME satellite measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns over east (2007), Space-based formaldehyde measurements as constraints on volatile organic compound emissions

  17. Chlorinated organic compounds evolved during the combustion of blends of refuse-derived fuels and coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaodong Yang; Napier, J.; Sisk, B.; Wei-Ping Pan; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this study was to examine the possible formation of chlorinated organic compounds during the combustion of blends of refuse derived fuels (RDF) and coal under conditions similar to those of an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. A series of experiments were conducted using a TGA interfaced to FTIR and MS systems. Additional experiments using a tube furnace preheated to AFBC operating temperatures were also conducted. The combustion products were cryogenically trapped and analyzed with a GUMS system. The chlorination of phenols and the condensation reactions of chlorophenols were investigated in this study. A possible mechanism for the formation of chlorinated organic; compounds such as dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans, by chlorination and condensation reactions involving phenols, was proposed.

  18. Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Zinn, Yuri [Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Gisladottir, Gudrun [University of Iceland; Ann, Russell [Iowa State University

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

  19. Separation of polar compounds using a flexible metal-organic framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Nune, Satish K.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-01-01

    A flexible metal-organic framework constructed from a flexible linker is shown to possess the capability of separating mixtures of polar compounds by exploiting the differences in the saturation capacities of the constituents. The separation possibilities with the flexible MOF include mixtures of propanol isomers, and various azeotropes. Transient breakthrough simulations show that these sorption-based separations are in favor of the component with higher saturation capacity.

  20. Concentration of light organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions by adsorption on bound silicalite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Kathryn Louise

    1989-01-01

    azeotrope, the solvent can enhance the volatility of either water or ethanol. Gasoline, when used as a solvent in the extractive distillation of azeotropic ethanol, enhances the volatility of water. The water and the lower boiling components... of the gasoline are taken ofF at the top of the column. The ethanol and the remaining components of the gasoline are collected at the bottom. The ethanol and organic compounds are separated from the water in the distillate from the extractive distillation...

  1. Performance specifications for technology development: Application for characterization of volatile organic compounds in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, S.E.; Doskey, P.V.; Erickson, M.D.; Lindahl, P.C.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains information about technology development for the monitoring and remediation of environmental pollution caused by the release of volatile organic compounds. Topics discussed include: performance specification processes, gas chromatography, mass spectrometer, fiber-optic chemical sensors, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, piezoelectric sensors and electrochemical sensors. These methods are analyzed for their cost efficiency, accuracy, and the ability to meet the needs of the customer.

  2. Evaluation of control strategies for volatile organic compounds in indoor air (journal article)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, K.; Debler, V.L.

    1988-01-01

    The paper discusses research which evaluates the application of adsorption techniques to the control of indoor organic vapors. The adsorption on activated carbon of three compounds representing three classes of organic species was studied at 30 C in the concentration range zero to 200 ppb using a microbalance. The three were benzene (aromatic), acetaldehyde (oxygenated aliphatic), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (halogenated aliphatic). Three sorbents (a wood base carbon, a coal base carbon, and a coconut shell base carbon) were examined. Uptakes for all the compounds on all the carbons were low (on the order of 10 to the minus 7th power gmol/g carbon). Simulation of a packed bed of carbon indicated that carbon adsorption may not be practical for continuous removal, but may be applicable to sudden releases (e.g., spills). Potential alternatives to activated carbon adsorption are discussed. Potentially toxic organic vapors are emitted from a wide variety of building materials, consumer products, and human activities. Control of indoor organic vapors generally involves removing the source and/or increasing the ventilation rate. The ubiquitous nature of sources of organic vapors generally makes source removal impractical. Increased ventilation causes increased energy usage with its resultant economic penalties. Therefore, practical removal methods are needed.

  3. Stratification of particulate and VOC pollutants in horizontal-flow-paint spray booths. Report for September 1988-October 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses stratification of particulate and volatile organic compound (VOC) pollutants in horizontal flow paint spray booths, as part of a joint U.S. Air Force/EPA research and development program on emissions from paint spray booths. The test program discussed in the paper was designed to characterize the pollutants both within and exiting a typical back-draw booth for which emissions control strategies are being developed. The results of one series of tests indicate that the pollutants, both particulate and VOC, fall to the lower level of the booth or stratify at the level at which they were generated. This might be expected since the densities of typical pollutants found in spray booths are greater than air. The results showed, however, that the concentration of pollutants in the lower level prior to exiting the booth was significantly greater than expected. Data indicated that, for the 16 ft (4.9 m) high booth tested, the concentration at the exit of the booth below the 8 ft (2.4 m) level was 5-25 times greater than the concentration above that level. The importance of these findings is that it might be possible to partition a booth's air flow into two zones, one lean and the other concentrated. The concentrated zone could be directed to a proportionally smaller VOC control system of significantly less capital and operating cost.

  4. Characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Asian and north American pollution plumes during INTEX-B: identification of specific Chinese air mass tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfidemass balances of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disul-of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) and some similarities

  5. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Kehua

    2013-04-19

    solution in a three-layered unsaturated zone in response to field atmospheric pressure fluctuations at the Hanford site in Richland, Washington... ................................................................................................. 92 4.3 Comparison of gas flow rate calculated by the ML solution with measured flow rates in a three-layered unsaturated zone in response to field atmospheric pressure variations at the Hanford site in Richland...

  6. Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

    1995-01-01

    An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

  7. 4, 66916718, 2004 VOC emissions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Temperature and light dependence of the VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen 1 , H. Hakola 1.tarvainen@fmi.fi) 6691 #12;ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract

  8. Study on removal of organic sulfur compound by modified activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan Huiling; Li Chunhu; Guo Hanxian [Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). Research Inst. for Chemical Engineering of Coal

    1997-12-31

    With the price of coal increasing in China, more and more small and medium scale chemical plants are turning to high sulfur coal as the raw material in order to cut cost. However, the major drawback is that the lifetime of the ammonia synthesis catalyst is then reduced greatly because of the high concentration of the sulfur compounds in the synthesis gas, especially organic sulfur, usually CS{sub 2} and COS. The effects of water vapor and experimental temperature on removal of organic sulfur compounds by using a modified activated carbon were studied in this paper. It was found that water vapor had a negative effect on removal of carbon disulfide by activated carbon impregnated with organic amine. The use of activated carbon impregnated with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for removal of carbonyl sulfide was also investigated over the temperature range 30--60, the results show a favorable temperature (40) existing for carbonyl sulfide removal. Fixed-bed breakthrough curves for the adsorbent bed were also offered in this paper.

  9. Photochemical aging of volatile organic compounds in the Los Angeles basin: Weekday-weekend effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    in ozone, caused by lower NOx emissions due to reduced diesel truck traffic in the weekends, has been nonattainment area. [3] In the LA basin the main emission sources for the ozone precursors VOCs and NOx (NO + NO that in the LA basin in 2008 mobile sources were the dominant emission sources and accounted for 89% of total NOx

  10. Isotopes of Volatile Organic Compounds: An Emerging Approach for Studying Atmospheric Budgets and Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Emissions 5034 4.1.1. Fossil Fuels 5034 4.1.2. Transportation 5036 4.1.3. Industrial Production 5036 4 Isotope Effects 5038 5.1. Chemical and Photochemical Processes 5038 5.1.1. Production 5038 5.1.2. Losses of carbonaceous particles. This technique has since been applied to VOCs such as formaldehyde, other aldehydes, ac

  11. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, S. C.

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

  12. Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

    2010-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

  13. Work plan for support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek east end VOC plumes well installation project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 guidelines and requirements from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the Y-12 Plant initiated investigation and monitoring of various sites within its boundaries in the mid-1980s. The entire Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was placed on the National Priorities List of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites within the ORR require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) or an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) of potential remedial actions. Data from monitoring wells at the east end of the Y-12 Plant have identified an area of groundwater contamination dominated by the volatile organic compound (VOC) carbon tetrachloride; other VOCs include chloroform, tetrachloroethene, and trichloroethene.

  14. The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Gordon Barcus

    1979-01-01

    THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

  15. Measurement of surface emission flux rates for volatile organic compounds at Technical Area 54

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trujillo, V.; Morgenstern, M.; Krier, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gilkeson, R. [Weirich and Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The survey described in this report was conducted to estimate the mass of volatile organic compounds venting to the atmosphere from active and inactive waste disposal sites at Technical Area 54. A large number of nonintrusive passive sample collection devices were placed on the ground surface for 72 hours to characterize an area of approximately 150 acres. Results provided an indication of the boundary location of the known volatile organic plume, plume constituents, and isolated high concentration areas. The data from this survey enhanced existing data from a limited number of monitor wells currently used for plume surveillance. Results indicate that the estimated mass emission to the atmosphere is orders of magnitude lower than what is considered a small flux rate at a spill site or a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act landfill and is far below the threshold limit established by the State of New Mexico as an air quality concern.

  16. Volatile organic compounds: Comparison of two sample collection and preservation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liikala, T.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Teel, S.S.; Lanigan, D.C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Two soil sample collection and preservation methods for volatile organic compounds, used during site characterization activities, were evaluated using standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency analytical methods. A conventional bulk method recommends completely filling a sample container with soil; a less commonly used methanol method recommends placing a soil aliquot into methanol. Analytical results showed large negative biases associated with the bulk samples as compared to the methanol samples for aromatic compounds. Order of magnitude differences in concentrations measured between the methods were observed for benzene and toluene. Lesser differences were noted for xylenes and ethylbenzene. Limited data for chlorinated compounds suggest behavior similar to the aromatic species. A limited spike recovery study was conducted using the methanol method on laboratory and field samples. Samples were analyzed 82 days after spike addition. Poorer spike recoveries were noted from spiked methanol vials transported to the field and used for collection of soil samples. Differences between mean recovery values for the laboratory and field samples appear to be the result of losses during sample collection and transport. Despite the 82-day holding time, spike recoveries were within 70% of initial spike concentrations. These results demonstrate the stability of using methanol as a preservative for soil samples. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Test methods for determining short and long term VOC emissions from latex paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krebs, K.; Lao, H.C.; Fortmann, R.; Tichenor, B.

    1998-09-01

    The paper discusses an evaluation of latex paint (interior, water based) as a source of indoor pollution. A major objective of the research is the development of methods for predicting emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over time. Test specimens of painted gypsumboard are placed in dynamic flow-through test chambers. Samples of the outlet air are collected on Tenax sorbents and thermally desorbed for analysis by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. These tests produce short- and long-term data for latex paint emissions of Texanol, 2-2(-butoxyethoxy)-ethanol, and glycols. Evaluation of the data shows that most of the Texanol emissions occur within the first few days, and emissions of the glycols occur over several months. This behavior may be described by an evaporative mass transfer process that dominates the short-term emissions, while long-term emissions are limited by diffusion processes within the dry paint-gypsumboard.

  18. Analysis of organic compounds in water by direct adsorption and thermal desorption. [Dissertation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, J.P. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    An instrument was designed and constructed that makes it possible to thermally desorb organic compounds from wet adsorption traps to a gas chromatograph in an efficient and reproducible manner. Based on this device, a method of analyzing organics in water was developed that is rapid, sensitive, and of broader scope than previously published methods. The system was applied to the analysis of compounds with a wide range of volatilities. Temperature and flow parameters were investigated and specific procedures for quantitation were established. Real samples, including tap water and well water, were also analyzed with this system. Depending on the analysis requirements, the thermal desorption instrument can be used with either packed column or high resolution open-tubular column gas chromatography. The construction plans of normal and high-resolution systems are presented along with chromatograms and data produced by each. Finally, an improved thermal desorption instrument is described. Modifications to the basic system, including splitless injection onto a capillary column, automation, dual cryogenic trapping, reduction of scale, and effluent splitting to dual detection are discussed at length as they relate to the improved instrument.

  19. Geobacter strains that use alternate organic compounds, methods of making, and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek R; Summers, Zarath Morgan; Haveman, Shelley Annette; Izallalen, Mounir

    2013-12-03

    In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides new isolated strains of Geobacter species that are capable of using a carbon source that is selected from C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds selected from pyruvate or metabolic precursors of pyruvate as an electron donor in metabolism and in subsequent energy production. In other aspects, other preferred embodiments of the present invention include methods of making such strains and methods of using such strains. In general, the wild type strain of the microorganisms has been shown to be unable to use these C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds as electron donors in metabolic steps such as the reduction of metallic ions. The inventive strains of microorganisms are useful improving bioremediation applications, including in situ bioremediation (including uranium bioremediation and halogenated solvent bioremediation), microbial fuel cells, power generation from small and large-scale waste facilities (e.g., biomass waste from dairy, agriculture, food processing, brewery, or vintner industries, etc.) using microbial fuel cells, and other applications of microbial fuel cells, including, but not limited to, improved electrical power supplies for environmental sensors, electronic sensors, and electric vehicles.

  20. Development of a modeling framework to predict indoor air concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Loy, M.D.; Nazaroff, W.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Daisey, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental and Energy Technologies Div.

    1998-12-31

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are an important but largely unstudied class of indoor air pollutants. SVOCs have been well-studied as outdoor air pollutants, but much less effort has been focused on understanding the factors affecting their concentrations in indoor air. Because of these compounds` low (10-6 to 10 Pa at room temperature) vapor pressures, they readily partition into condensed phases from the gas phase. In outdoor air, this phenomenon is important as a source of secondary organic aerosol and as a mechanism for long range transport and persistence of SVOCs in the atmosphere as particle-phase species. Indoor environments include another potential condensed phase besides the airborne particle phase: surface materials such as carpet, wallboard, upholstery, ceiling tiles, linoleum, and many others. Adsorption to these materials has a markedly different effect on indoor contaminant concentrations because the condensed phase is stationary. Unlike the airborne particle phase, for which ventilation is a significant removal mechanism, the only significant pathway for removal of reversibly sorbed pollutants from the indoor environment is desorption into the gas phase followed by ventilation. Because buildings generally have a large surface area to gas-phase volume ratio, the net removal of SVOCs from the indoor environment via this mechanism is likely to be very slow. Compounds re-emitted from one surface are likely to quickly re-absorb to another. This paper presents an analysis of the factors affecting indoor concentrations of SVOCs including ventilation, gas-particle partitioning, gas phase sorption on indoor surfaces, particle deposition, and oxidative radical chemistry and estimates their relative importance to facilitate simplification of numerical simulations of indoor pollutant concentrations.

  1. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore »coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  2. Plasmas and Polymers, Vol. 5, Nos. 3/4, 2000 Synthesis of Organic Compounds from Mixtures of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Plasmas and Polymers, Vol. 5, Nos. 3/4, 2000 Synthesis of Organic Compounds from Mixtures operation, due to surface modification processes (polymer film deposition, its oxidation or reduction gases; polymer films; dielectric-barrier discharge; organic synthesis. 1. INTRODUCTION The first

  3. Airborne flux measurements of methane and volatile organic compounds over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    emissions from oil and gas production pads using mobileuxes over other oil and gas production regions using eddycompounds (VOCs) from oil and gas production may have large

  4. Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevin, KP; Hensley, SA; Franks, AE; Summers, ZM; Ou, JH; Woodard, TL; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Lovley, DR

    2011-04-20

    Microbial electrosynthesis, a process in which microorganisms use electrons derived from electrodes to reduce carbon dioxide to multicarbon, extracellular organic compounds, is a potential strategy for capturing electrical energy in carbon-carbon bonds of readily stored and easily distributed products, such as transportation fuels. To date, only one organism, the acetogen Sporomusa ovata, has been shown to be capable of electrosynthesis. The purpose of this study was to determine if a wider range of microorganisms is capable of this process. Several other acetogenic bacteria, including two other Sporomusa species, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Clostridium aceticum, and Moorella thermoacetica, consumed current with the production of organic acids. In general acetate was the primary product, but 2-oxobutyrate and formate also were formed, with 2-oxobutyrate being the predominant identified product of electrosynthesis by C. aceticum. S. sphaeroides, C. ljungdahlii, and M. thermoacetica had high (> 80%) efficiencies of electrons consumed and recovered in identified products. The acetogen Acetobacterium woodii was unable to consume current. These results expand the known range of microorganisms capable of electrosynthesis, providing multiple options for the further optimization of this process.

  5. Comparison of nonmethane organic compound concentration data collected by two methods in Atlanta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreffler, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 calls for 'enhanced monitoring' of ozone, which is planned to include measurements of atmospheric non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs). NMOC concentration data gathered by two methods in Atlanta, Georgia during July and August 1990 are compared in order to assess the reliability of such measurements in an operational setting. During that period, automated gas chromatography (GC) systems (Field systems) were used to collect NMOC continuously as one-hour averages. In addition, canister samples of ambient air were collected on an intermittent schedule for quality control purposes and analyzed by laboratory GC (the Lab system). Data from the six-site network included concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone, total NMOC (TNMOVC), and 47 identified NMOCs. (Copyright (c) 1993-Air Waste Management Association.)

  6. Membranes for Reverse-Organic Air Separations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Membranes Use Reverse Separation to Reduce Pollutant Emissions: Many industrial applications need a process to separate pollutants known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air in order to protect the environment and save energy. One such application is the venting of vapor from underground storage tanks (UST) used in gasoline storage and dispensing. These vapors, which can build up and create high pressure within the UST, contribute to ground-level ozone and smog upon release.

  7. Study of organic compounds evolved during the co-firing of coal and refuse derived fuel using TG/MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puroshothama, Shobha; Lu, R.; Yang, Xiaodong

    1996-10-01

    The evolution of organic compounds during the combustion of carbonaceous fuel coupled with solid waste disposal and limited landfill space has been a cause for concern. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuel seems an attractive alternative technique to tackle the dual problem of controlling SO{sub x} emissions as well as those of the chlorinated organic toxins. The TG serves to emulate the conditions of the fluidized bed combustor and the MS serves as the detector for evolved gases. This versatile combination is used to study the decomposition pathway as well as predict the conditions at which various compounds are formed and may serve as a means of reducing the formation of these chlorinated organic compounds.

  8. Complex Organic and Inorganic Compounds in Shells of Lithium-rich K Giant Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Reza, Ramiro; Oliveira, Isa; Rengaswamy, Sridharan

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon organic material, as found in the interstellar medium, exists in complex mixtures of aromatic and aliphatic forms. It is considered to be originated from carbon enriched giant stars during their final stages of evolution, when very strong mass loss occurs in a few thousand years on their way to become planetary nebulae. We show here that the same organic compounds appear to be formed in previous stages of the evolution of giant stars. More specifically, during the first ascending giant branch K-type stars. According to our model this happens only when these stars are being abruptly enriched with lithium together with the formation of a circumstellar shell with a strong mass loss during just a few thousand years. This sudden mass loss is, on an average, a thousand times larger than that of normal Li-poor K giant stars. This shell would later be detached, specially when the star stops its Li enrichment and a rapid photospheric Li depletion occurs. In order to gain extra carbon-based material to form...

  9. Laser ablation and ionisation by laser plasma radiation in the atmospheric-pressure mass spectrometry of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pento, A V; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Grechnikov, A A; Alimpiev, S S

    2013-01-31

    A new method was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of organic and bioorganic compounds, which involves laser ablation with the ionisation of its products by laser-plasma radiation and enables analysing gaseous, liquid, and solid substances at atmospheric pressure without sample preparation. The capabilities of this method were demonstrated by the examples of fast pharmaceutical composition screening, real-time atmosphere composition analysis, and construction of the mass spectrometric images of organic compound distributions in biological materials. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  10. Field evaluation of ground water sampling devices for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muska, C F; Colven, W P; Jones, V D; Scogin, J T; Looney, B B; Price, V Jr

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies conducted under laboratory conditions demonstrated that the type of device used to sample ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds can significantly influence and analytical results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, under field conditions, both commercial and developmental ground water sampling devices as part of an ongoing ground water contamination investigation and remediation program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Ground water samples were collected using six types of sampling devices in monitoring wells of different depths and concentrations of volatile organic contaminants (primarily trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene). The study matrix was designed to statistically compare the reuslts of each sampling device under the test conditions. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation criteria were used to determine the relative performance of each device. Two categories of sampling devices were evaluated in this field study, positive displacement pumps and grab samplers. The positive displacement pumps consisted of a centrifugal (mechanical) pump and a bladder pump. The grab samples tested were a syringe sampler, a dual-check valve bailer, a surface bomb sampler, and a pressurized bailer. Preliminary studies were conducted to establish the analytical and sampling variability associated with each device. All six devices were then used to collect ground water samples in water table (unconfined), semi-confined aquifer, and confined aquifer monitoring wells. Results were evaluated against a set of criteria that included intrasampling device variability (precision), volatile organic concentration (accuracy), sampling and analytical logistics, and cost. The study showed that, by using careful and reproducible procedures, overall sampling variability is low regardless of sampling device.

  11. The relation of certain organic phosphorus compounds to blood cholinesterase activity and their value as parasiticides in swine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, Delfin Dancel de

    1960-01-01

    THE RELATION OF CERTAIN ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS TO BLOOD CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY AND THEIR VALUE AS PARASFIICIDES IN SWINE A Thesis By DELFIN DANCEL de LEON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College... of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1960 Major Subject: Animal Husbandry THE RELATION OF CERTAIN ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS CON/EXPOUNDS TO BLOOD CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITT AND THEIR VALUE...

  12. SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    organoarsenic compounds in oi.l shale process waters using aPresented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.

  13. SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater...

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    III VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName,...

  16. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I/IV VOC | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IIV VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU IIV VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName,...

  17. Petroporphyrins The most abundant and problematic metal compounds in crude oil exist as organic complexes of vanadium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Petroporphyrins ­The most abundant and problematic metal compounds in crude oil exist as organic of porphyrins is critical for developing petroleum upgrading processes, as well as linking crude oil to source rock conditions. Because petroporphyrins concentrate in heavy oils, direct characterization challenges

  18. OCCURRENCE AND POTENTIAL ADVERSE EFFECTS OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STREAMBED SEDIMENT, UNITED STATES, 1992-95

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 OCCURRENCE AND POTENTIAL ADVERSE EFFECTS OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STREAMBED SEDIMENT) in streambed sediment were assessed at 536 sites in 20 major river basins across the United States from 1992 density, and PAHs also correlated with physical/chemical properties. On the basis of sediment

  19. Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

    1999-07-01

    Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

  20. Stratification of particulate and VOC pollutants in paint spray booths, June 1990. Report for April 1988-April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.; Ayer, J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses flow management as part of a joint EPA/U.S. Air Force program on emissions from paint spray booths. The goal of the program is to identify and develop efficient and economical emissions control concepts for this source. Flow management is one potential solution that reduces the volume of gases that must be processed in a control system. Although it will not itself control pollution, it can influence the economic and technical viability of subsequent control systems. The test program discussed here was designed to characterize the pollutants both within and exiting a typical back-draw booth for which emissions control and flow management strategies are being developed. Study results indicate that both particulate and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) fall to the lower level of the booth or, at most, stratify at the level at which they were generated. Results indicate that the concentration at the lower level of the booth near the exhaust was from 5 to 25 times greater than that at the upper level. The importance of these findings is that it might be possible to partition a booth's air flow into two zones, one lean and the other concentrated. The enriched lower zone could then be directed to a proportionately smaller VOC control system, of lower capital and operating costs.

  1. Chemiresistor microsensors for in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Michael Loren; Hughes, Robert Clark; Kooser, Ara S.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.; Davis, Chad Edward

    2003-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the three-year LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project aimed at developing microchemical sensors for continuous, in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds. A chemiresistor sensor array was integrated with a unique, waterproof housing that allows the sensors to be operated in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. Numerous tests were performed to evaluate and improve the sensitivity, stability, and discriminatory capabilities of the chemiresistors. Field tests were conducted in California, Nevada, and New Mexico to further test and develop the sensors in actual environments within integrated monitoring systems. The field tests addressed issues regarding data acquisition, telemetry, power requirements, data processing, and other engineering requirements. Significant advances were made in the areas of polymer optimization, packaging, data analysis, discrimination, design, and information dissemination (e.g., real-time web posting of data; see www.sandia.gov/sensor). This project has stimulated significant interest among commercial and academic institutions. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was initiated in FY03 to investigate manufacturing methods, and a Work for Others contract was established between Sandia and Edwards Air Force Base for FY02-FY04. Funding was also obtained from DOE as part of their Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative program from FY01 to FY03, and a DOE EMSP contract was awarded jointly to Sandia and INEEL for FY04-FY06. Contracts were also established for collaborative research with Brigham Young University to further evaluate, understand, and improve the performance of the chemiresistor sensors.

  2. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2015-01-12

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), and organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC) ratios, and of carbon oxidation state (OS C) for a vastly expanded laboratory data set of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard data set, the method introduced by Aiken et al. (2008), which uses experimentally measured ionmore »intensities at all ions to determine elemental ratios (referred to here as "Aiken-Explicit"), reproduces known O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12%, respectively. The more commonly used method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions (referred to here as "Aiken-Ambient"), reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28 and 14% of known values. The values from the latter method are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and especially H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS–vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method uses specific ion fragments as markers to correct for molecular functionality-dependent systematic biases and reproduces known O : C (H : C) ratios of individual oxidized standards within 28% (13%) of the known molecular values. The error in Improved-Ambient O : C (H : C) values is smaller for theoretical standard mixtures of the oxidized organic standards, which are more representative of the complex mix of species present in ambient OA. For ambient OA, the Improved-Ambient method produces O : C (H : C) values that are 27% (11%) larger than previously published Aiken-Ambient values; a corresponding increase of 9% is observed for OM : OC values. These results imply that ambient OA has a higher relative oxygen content than previously estimated. The OS C values calculated for ambient OA by the two methods agree well, however (average relative difference of 0.06 OS C units). This indicates that OS C is a more robust metric of oxidation than O : C, likely since OS C is not affected by hydration or dehydration, either in the atmosphere or during analysis.« less

  3. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2014-07-31

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC), and carbon oxidation state (OSC) for a vastly expanded laboratory dataset of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard dataset, the "Aiken-Explicit" method (Aiken et al., 2008), which uses experimentally measured ion intensities at all ions to determine elementalmore »ratios, reproduces known molecular O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12% respectively. The more commonly used "Aiken-Ambient" method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions, reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28% and 14% of known values. These values are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS-vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method reduces the systematic biases and reproduces O : C (H : C) ratios of individual oxidized standards within 28% (13%) of the known molecular values. The error in Improved-Ambient O : C and H : C values is smaller (12% and 4% respectively) for synthetic mixtures of the oxidized organic standards, which are more representative of the complex mix of species present in ambient OA. For ambient OA, the Improved-Ambient method produces O : C (H : C) values that are 27% (11%) larger than previously published Aiken-Ambient values; a corresponding increase of 9% is observed for OM : OC values. These results imply that ambient OA has a higher relative oxygen content than previously estimated. The OSC values calculated for ambient OA by the two methods agree well, however (average relative difference of 0.06 OSC units). This indicates that OSC is a more robust metric of oxidation than O : C, likely since OSC is not affected by hydration or dehydration, either in the atmosphere or during analysis.« less

  4. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: Characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Ruiz, L. Hildebrandt; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2015-01-12

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), and organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC) ratios, and of carbon oxidation state (OS C) for a vastly expanded laboratory data set of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard data set, the method introduced by Aiken et al. (2008), which uses experimentally measured ionmore »intensities at all ions to determine elemental ratios (referred to here as "Aiken-Explicit"), reproduces known O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12%, respectively. The more commonly used method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions (referred to here as "Aiken-Ambient"), reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28 and 14% of known values. The values from the latter method are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and especially H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS–vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method uses specific ion fragments as markers to correct for molecular functionality-dependent systematic biases and reproduces known O : C (H : C) ratios of individual oxidized standards within 28% (13%) of the known molecular values. The error in Improved-Ambient O : C (H : C) values is smaller for theoretical standard mixtures of the oxidized organic standards, which are more representative of the complex mix of species present in ambient OA. For ambient OA, the Improved-Ambient method produces O : C (H : C) values that are 27% (11%) larger than previously published Aiken-Ambient values; a corresponding increase of 9% is observed for OM : OC values. These results imply that ambient OA has a higher relative oxygen content than previously estimated. The OS C values calculated for ambient OA by the two methods agree well, however (average relative difference of 0.06 OS C units). This indicates that OS C is a more robust metric of oxidation than O : C, likely since OS C is not affected by hydration or dehydration, either in the atmosphere or during analysis.« less

  5. Biofiltration control of VOC and air toxic emissions: n-Butane and benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    n-Butane and benzene vapors are routinely observed in urban atmospheres. Their presence in urban airsheds is of concern because of their ozone production potential as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and/or potential toxicity. Also, these saturated hydrocarbons are representative of airborne aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Separate laboratory studies have been conducted on the biological elimination of n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) from airstreams using treated compost biofilters. The removal efficiencies were found to exceed 90% for a conditioned biofilter medium and pollutant low concentrations (< 25 ppm) and zeroth order kinetics at higher concentrations (> 100 ppm), whereas benzene vapor elimination followed zeroth order kinetics at concentrations up to 200 ppm. The maximum n-butane and benzene elimination capacities observed for the compost biofilters and conditions employed were 25 and 70 g pollutant m{sup -3} h{sup -1}, respectively. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. 8, 1182111851, 2008 VOCs during 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the campaign and many species were quantified including methanol, acetaldehyde, toluene, the sum of C2 benzenes patterns and their origins. Diurnal profiles of weekday10 and weekend/holiday aromatic VOC concentrations

  7. Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes during an extreme drought in a broadleaf temperate forest of the Missouri Ozarks (central USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    usually have lower vapor pressure than the reactant VOCs andtower. Atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was computed

  8. Isotopic constraints on the sources and associations of organic compounds in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Helen K

    2006-01-01

    To provide a new perspective on the fate of both natural organic matter and hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in marine sediments, we have investigated the relationship between radiocarbon (14C) age and the different ...

  9. Recovery of semi-volatile organic compounds during sample preparation: Compilation for characterization of airborne particulate matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartz, Erick; Stockburger, Leonard; Gundel, Lara

    2002-05-01

    Semi-volatile compounds present special analytical challenges not met by conventional methods for analysis of ambient particulate matter (PM). Accurate quantification of PM-associated organic compounds requires validation of the laboratory procedures for recovery over a wide volatility and polarity range. To meet these challenges, solutions of n-alkanes (nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 40}) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs (naphthalene to benzo[ghi]perylene) were reduced in volume from a solvent mixture (equal volumes of hexane, dichloromethane and methanol), to examine recovery after reduction in volume. When the extract solution volume reached 0.5 mL the solvent was entirely methanol, and the recovery averaged 60% for n-alkanes nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 25} and PAHs from naphthalene to chrysene. Recovery of higher MW compounds decreased with MW, because of their insolubility in methanol. When the walls of the flasks were washed with 1 mL of equal parts hexane and dichloromethane (to reconstruct the original solvent composition), the recovery of nC{sub 18} and higher MW compounds increased dramatically, up to 100% for nC{sub 22}-nC{sub 32} and then slowly decreasing with MW due to insolubility. To examine recovery during extraction of the components of the High Capacity Integrated Gas and Particle Sampler, the same standards were used to spike its denuders and filters. For XAD-4 coated denuders and filters, normalized recovery was > 95% after two extractions. Recovery from spiked quartz filters matched the recovery from the coated surfaces for alkanes nC{sub 18} and larger, and for fluoranthene and larger PAHs. Lower MW compounds evaporated from the quartz filter with the spiking solvent. This careful approach allowed quantification of organics by correcting for volatility- and solubility-related sample preparation losses. This method is illustrated for an ambient sample collected with this sampler during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000.

  10. Highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes with a silole-based compound Center for Display Research, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the emission efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes OLED . For con- ventional undoped small-molecule OLEDHighly efficient organic light-emitting diodes with a silole-based compound H. Y. Chen Center Efficient light emission was obtained in a silole-based organic light-emitting diode. A high luminous

  11. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    MEX 1 . Compound C-130 T0 T1 G1 Ethane Propane i-Butanen-Butane i-Pentane n-Pentane n-Hexane n-Heptane n-OctaneEthyne Propane Propene i-Butane n-Butane 1-Butene + i-Butene

  12. Carbon isotope ratios of organic compound fractions in oceanic suspended particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M

    2006-01-01

    Radiocarbon evidence of fossil-carbon cycling in sediments1968), Metabolic fractionation of carbon isotopes in marineof particulate organic carbon using bomb 14 C, Nature,

  13. "The disintegration of organic compounds by microorganisms is accompanied by the liberation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    comple- ment of enzymes necessary to completely oxidize organic fuels to carbon dioxide is not yet they are `carbon-neutral'; the oxidation of the organic matter only releases recently fixed carbon back and sediments. The ubiquitous and innocuous properties of fuels for microbial fuel cells alleviates the need

  14. Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes during an extreme drought in a broadleaf temperate forest of the Missouri Ozarks (central USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA, 8 Atmospheric Chemistryenvironmental factors on organic compounds from oil palms in South-East Asia. Atmospheric Chemistry

  15. Volatilization of selected organic compounds from a creosote-waste land-treatment facility. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the emissions of volatile and semi-volatile compounds which are constituents of a complex creosote waste from laboratory simulations of a land treatment system to assess the potential human exposure to hazardous compounds from this source. In addition, the Thibodeaux-Hwang Air Emission Release Rate (AERR) model was evaluated for its use in predicting emission rates of hazardous constituents of creosote wood preservative waste from land treatment facilities. A group of hazardous volatile and semi-volatile constituents present in the creosote waste was selected for evaluation in this study and included a variety of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA's), phenol, and chlorinated and substituted phenols.

  16. The effect of mean cell residence time on the adsorbability of dissolved organic compounds found in petrochemical wastewaters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Timothy Loring

    1979-01-01

    , each with a different mean cell residence time, biologically treated the waste- water. Follow1ng biolog1cal treatment, the wastewater was subjected to activated carbon adsorption treatment. The Freundlich isotherm, non-adsorbable organic compound... concen- trations and carbon dosage requ1rements were used to evaluate the re- sults of the carbon adsorpt1on treatments. The type and particle size of the carbon used rema1ned constant throughout the study. Any changes 1n the act1vated carbons adsorpt...

  17. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  18. Natural volatile organic compound emissions from plants and their roles in oxidant balance and particle formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kesselmeier, JC

    2009-01-01

    of Emissions of Gases and Aero- sols from Nature), Atmos.of secondary organic aero­ sol: A global modeling study, J.and M. Razzaghi (1989), Aero­bic ethanol-production by

  19. Hybrid membranes and their use in volatile organic compound/air separations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krohn, John Eric

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid organic/inorganic membranes were produced by chemical grafting of octadecyltrichlorosilane onto ?-alumina membranes. Separation factors are presented showing strong evidence of capillary condensation in ungrafted membranes. The grafted...

  20. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State:...

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU V VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    V VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU V VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State:...

  2. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: Surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhi; Sareen, Neha; McNeill, V Faye

    2011-01-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(\\pm2) dyn/cm in pure water and 62(\\pm1) dyn/cm in AS solutions. Surface t...

  3. Brayton Cycle Heat Pump for VOC Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovach, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    The first full size continuous operation Brayton Cycle Heat Pump (1)(2)(3) application for VOC recovery occurred in 1988. The mixed solvent recovery system was designed and supplied by NUCON for the 3M facility in Weatherford, OK (4). This first...

  4. Ozone-forming potential of a series of oxygenated organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Rudy, S.J.; Chang, Tai Y. )

    1991-03-01

    An incremental reactivity approach has been used to assess the relative ozone-forming potentials of various important oxygenated fuels/fuel additives, i.e., tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), dimethyl ether (DME), diethyl ether (DEE), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), in a variety of environments. Calculations were performed using a single-cell trajectory model, combined with the Lurmann-Carter-Coyner chemical mechanism, with (NMOC)/(NO{sub x}) ratios ranging from 4 to 20. This work provides the first quantitative assessment of the air quality impact of release of these important oxygenated compounds. ETBE and DEE are the two most reactive compounds on a per carbon equivalent basis, while TBA is the least reactive species. At a (NMOC)/(NO{sub x}) ratio of 8, which is generally typical of polluted urban areas in the United States, TBA, DME, MTBE, and ETBE all have incremental reactivities less than or equal to that of the urban NMHC mix. Thus, use of these additives in fuels may have a beneficial impact on urban ozone levels.

  5. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  6. Determination of a cost-effective air pollution control technology for the control of VOC and HAP emissions from a steroids processing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    A steroids processing plant located in northeastern Puerto Rico emits a combined average of 342 lb/hr of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various process operations. The approach that this facility used to implement maximum achievable control technology (MACT) may assist others who must contend with MACT for pharmaceutical or related manufacturing facilities. Federal air regulations define MACT standards for stationary sources emitting any of 189 HAPs. The MACT standards detailed in the NESHAPs are characterized by industry and type of emission control system or technology. It is anticipated that the standard will require HAP reductions of approximately 95%. The steroid plant`s emissions include the following pollutant loadings: VOC/HAP Emission Rate (lb/hr): Methanol 92.0; Acetone 35.0; Methylene chloride 126.0; Chloroform 25.0; Ethyl acetate 56.0; Tetrahydrofuran 5.00; and 1,4-Dioxane 3.00. The facility`s existing carbon adsorption control system was nearing the end of its useful life, and the operators sought to install an air pollution control system capable of meeting MACT requirements for the pharmaceutical industry. Several stand-alone and hybrid control technologies were considered for replacement of the carbon adsorption system at the facility. This paper examines the following technologies: carbon adsorption, membrane separation, thermal oxidation, membrane separation-carbon adsorption, and condensation-carbon adsorption. Each control technology is described; the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing each technology for the steroid processing plant are examined; and capital and operating costs associated with the implementation of each technology are presented. The rationale for the technology ultimately chosen to control VOC and HAP emissions is presented.

  7. Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes during an extreme drought in a broadleaf temperate forest of the Missouri Ozarks (central USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Atkinson R (2000) Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx.and ecology. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 33, 23–88.mixed forest. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, 577–

  8. Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes during an extreme drought in a broadleaf temperate forest of the Missouri Ozarks (central USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Atkinson R (2000) Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx.forest. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 56, 165–185. FunkMediterranean oak forest. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics,

  9. Installation and Operation of Sorbathene Solvent Vapor Recovery Units to Recover and Recycle Volatile Organic Compounds at Operating Sites within the Dow Chemical Company 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, T. L.; Larrinaga, L.

    1994-01-01

    hydrocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's), chlorinated solvents, aromatics, and monomers. SORBATHENE units are now meeting air permit requirements for the abatement of VOC's such as benzene, acetone, trichloroethylene, trichlorofluoromethane, carbon...

  10. Single-reactor process for producing liquid-phase organic compounds from biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dumesic, James A.; Simonetti, Dante A.; Kunkes, Edward L.

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is a method for preparing liquid fuel and chemical intermediates from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons. The method includes the steps of reacting in a single reactor an aqueous solution of a biomass-derived, water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon reactant, in the presence of a catalyst comprising a metal selected from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au, at a temperature, and a pressure, and for a time sufficient to yield a self-separating, three-phase product stream comprising a vapor phase, an organic phase containing linear and/or cyclic mono-oxygenated hydrocarbons, and an aqueous phase.

  11. Single-reactor process for producing liquid-phase organic compounds from biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Simonetti, Dante A. (Middleton, WI); Kunkes, Edward L. (Madison, WI)

    2011-12-13

    Disclosed is a method for preparing liquid fuel and chemical intermediates from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons. The method includes the steps of reacting in a single reactor an aqueous solution of a biomass-derived, water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon reactant, in the presence of a catalyst comprising a metal selected from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au, at a temperature, and a pressure, and for a time sufficient to yield a self-separating, three-phase product stream comprising a vapor phase, an organic phase containing linear and/or cyclic mono-oxygenated hydrocarbons, and an aqueous phase.

  12. Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

    1997-09-30

    'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

  13. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from ?-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A.; Daumit, K.; Hunter, J.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gasmore »and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas–particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.« less

  14. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from ?-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Hunter, J. F.; et al

    2015-07-16

    We measured a large suite of gas- and particle-phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas andmore »particle phases, the latter being detected by temperature-programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO–HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50 % of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from high molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e., multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50 % of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle-phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption-temperature-based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.« less

  15. Contribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds to atmospheric carbon monoxide levels in two areas of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    - house gas, but also the hydroperoxide radical (HO2). HO2 converts nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxideContribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds to atmospheric carbon monoxide. Chen, K. Carmody, S. Vutukuru, and D. Dabdub (2007), Contribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile

  16. Analysis of C1, C2, and C10 through C33 particle-phase and semi-volatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    from heavy-duty diesel engines Z. Gerald Liu a,*, Devin R. Berg a , Victoria N. Vasys a , Melissa E 18 November 2009 Keywords: Organic compound emissions Particulate matter emissions Heavy-duty diesel engines Aftertreatment technology Diesel particulate filter Chemical speciation a b s t r a c t To meet

  17. The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process that includes electron transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process of stress are covered in Chapter 26. The impact of the environment on photosynthesis is of interest to plant on environmental conditions is also important to agronomists because plant productivity, and hence crop yield, de

  18. Platinum-CatalyzedOxidations of Organic Compounds by Ferric Sulfate: Use of a Redox Fuel Cell to Mediate Complete Oxidation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Platinum-CatalyzedOxidations of Organic Compounds by Ferric Sulfate: Use of a Redox Fuel Cell of a redox fuel cell. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the fuel cell. Fe(I1) was electrochemically oxidized consisted of WDF graphite felt (Union Carbide) that was surface oxidized with boiling, concentrated nitric

  19. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    control of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide during the growingof atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) and some similaritiesF. : The mass budgets of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide,

  20. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    and particles from savanna fires in southern Africa, J.from Canadian boreal forest fires, Can. J. For. Res. , 39(pattern on interannual forest fire vari- ability in Central

  1. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    in situ PTR-MS mea- n-Butane 0 surements in fresh biomassHydrogen cyanide Acetonitrile Ethane Propane i-Butanen-Butane i-Pentane n-Pentane n-Hexane 2+3-Methylpentane n-

  2. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    to methanogenic tailings pond emissions. Published byand no need for tailings ponds (www.oilsands.alberta.ca).the Syncrude Mildred Lake tailings pond contains about 200

  3. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    and Fehsenfeld, F. C. : Emission sources and ocean uptake ofand No- vakov, T. : Emissions of trace gases and particlesGroot, W. J. : Future emissions from Canadian boreal forest

  4. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76Canadian plumes Alberta oil sands 1-Butene ARCTAS 1-ButeneCanadian plumes Alberta oil sands y = -358 + 1.29x R = 0.599

  5. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations Soc. , 81(reducing bacteria in oil sands fine tail- ings waste, Can.fine tailings from oil sands processing harbour diverse

  6. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    during ARCTAS-B (H. Singh, 1,3-Butadiene m+p-Xylene personal2-Butene trans-2-Butene 1,3-Butadiene Methacrolein Methyl

  7. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    oxidation of iso- prene and 1,3-butadiene in the presence of2-Butene trans-2-Butene 1,3-Butadiene Isoprene C 2 H 6 C 3 HButene t-2-Butene 1,3-Butadiene Isoprene Ethyne Cyclopentane

  8. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    propene, acetone, benzene, propane and ?-pinene (Table 1).cyanide Acetonitrile Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-= Ethane Ethane Ethane Ethane Propane Propane Propane ARCTAS

  9. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    ppbv), methanol, ethene, ethane, ethyne, propene, acetone,ethene, ?-pinene, ?-pinene, ethane, benzene, propene, ace-CO), methane (CH 4 ) and ethane (C 2 H 6 ) (Kasis- chke et

  10. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    For example the catalytic hydrocracking of Athabasca bitumenpossibly from fuel gas and/or hydrocracking. The butanes areerations. Similarly, hydrocracking operations do not appear

  11. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Methanol Ethanol Acetone MEK MAC MVK CHCl 3 C 2 Cl 4 OCS DMS With the exception of the C 9 aromatics,

  12. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    A. : The Tropical Forest and Fire Emis- sions Experiment:W. M. : The Trop- ical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment:A. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:

  13. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operationsand Lee, P. : Does the Alberta tar sands industry pollute?gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76

  14. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    of fuel composition on a heavy-duty, natural-gas direct-are not aware of the composition of the natural gas that isgas. The composition of commercial- grade natural gas is

  15. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    West, C. : Highlighting heavy oil, Oilfield Rev. , 34–53,and enhancement of Mo-heavy oil interaction, Fuel, 83,sticky extra-heavy crude oil that is “unconventional”,

  16. HYDROGEN AND VOC RETENTION IN WASTE BOXES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE ME; MARUSICH RM

    2008-11-21

    The Hanford Waste Management Project Master Documented Safety Analysis (MDSA) (HNF-14741, 2003) identifies derived safety controls to prevent or mitigate the risks of a single-container deflagration during operations requiring moving, venting or opening transuranic (TRU)-waste containers. The issue is whether these safety controls are necessary for operations involving TRU-waste boxes that are being retrieved from burial at the Hanford Site. This paper investigates the potential for a deflagration hazard within these boxes and whether safety controls identified for drum deflagration hazards should be applied to operations involving these boxes. The study evaluates the accumulation of hydrogen and VOCs within the waste box and the transport of these gases and vapors out of the waste box. To perform the analysis, there were numerous and major assumptions made regarding the generation rate and the transport pathway dimensions and their number. Since there is little actual data with regards to these assumptions, analyses of three potential configurations were performed to obtain some indication of the bounds of the issue (the concentration of hydrogen or flammable VOCs within a waste box). A brief description of each of the three cases along with the results of the analysis is summarized.

  17. Chemical and Nutritional Ecology of Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as Related to Volatile Organic Compounds and Associated Essential Amino Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wenqi

    2014-08-07

    are the origin of MVOC. Four bacterially produced VOCs, namely DMDS (Dimethyl disulfide), indole, PAA (Phenylacetic acid), and isobutylamine, which are associated with decomposing carrion were used to investigate the olfactory response of L. sericata of different...

  18. Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms andbathrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, B.C.; Hodgson, A.T.; Hotchi, T.; Ming, K.Y.; Sextro,R.G.; Wood, E.E.; Brown, N.J.

    2005-01-05

    Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential bedrooms (n=4), bathrooms (n=2), and a furnished test chamber. Rooms were studied ''as-is'' with material surfaces and furnishings unaltered. Surface materials were characterized and areas quantified. Experiments included rapid volatilization of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with the room closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase, followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. The mixture included n-alkanes, aromatics, glycol ethers, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, dichlorobenzene, and organophosphorus compounds. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at one surface sink and one potential embedded sink. The 2-parameter sink model tracked measurements for most compounds, but improved fits were obtained for some VOCs with a 3-parameter sink-diffusion or a 4-parameter two-sink model. Sorptive partitioning and initial adsorption rates increased with decreasing vapor pressure within each chemical class.

  19. Transport of organic carbon from the California coast to the slope region: A study of Delta 14 C and delta 13 C signatures of organic compound classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M; Komada, Tomoko

    2005-01-01

    Channel, California, in Shelf Sediment Transport: Processesthat lateral transport of OC on the California margin is an2005 Transport of organic carbon from the California coast

  20. Electron transport in naphthylamine-based organic compounds S. C. Tse, K. C. Kwok, and S. K. Soa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Shu K.

    are organic light-emitting diodes OLEDs , thin-film transistors, solar cells, and photodetectors.1­4 Among. An organic light-emitting diode that employed NPB as the ET material was demonstrated. The electron them, OLED is now a leading contender in ultrathin, flexible, flat panel display technology. A simple

  1. BLUNDEN, JESSICA. Characterization of Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds at Swine Facilities in Eastern North Carolina. (Under the direction of Dr. Viney P. Aneja)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    other VOCs. Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide were positively identified by GC/MS analysis but were hydrocarbons, phenols, and sulfides were identified and quantified by Gas Chromatographic/Flame Ionization) including methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide as well as many

  2. Impact of organic matrix compounds on the retention of steroid hormone estrone by a ‘loose’ nanofiltration membrane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Nghiem, L. D.; Meier, Anja; Neale, Peta A.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of solute-solute interactions on retention and membrane adsorption of the micropollutant estrone was determined in the presence of surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), natural organic matter (NOM) and ...

  3. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.

  4. Contribution from biogenic organic compounds to particle growth during the 2010 BEACHON-ROCS campaign in a Colorado temperate needleleaf forest

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, L.; Gierens, R.; Sogachev, A.; Mogensen, D.; Ortega, J.; Smith, J. N.; Harley, P. C.; Prenni, A. J.; Levin, E. J. T.; Turnipseed, A.; et al

    2015-08-06

    New particle formation (NPF) is an important atmospheric phenomenon. During an NPF event, particles first form by nucleation and then grow further in size. The growth step is crucial because it controls the number of particles that can become cloud condensation nuclei. Among various physical and chemical processes contributing to particle growth, condensation by organic vapors has been suggested as important. In order to better understand the influence of biogenic emissions on particle growth, we carried out modeling studies of NPF events during the BEACHON-ROCS (Bio–hydro–atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosol, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen – Rocky Mountain Organic Carbonmore »Study) campaign at Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory in Colorado, USA. The site is representative of the semi-arid western USA. With the latest Criegee intermediate reaction rates implemented in the chemistry scheme, the model underestimates sulfuric acid concentration by 50 %, suggesting either missing sources of atmospheric sulfuric acid or an overestimated sink term. The results emphasize the contribution from biogenic volatile organic compound emissions to particle growth by demonstrating the effects of the oxidation products of monoterpenes and 2-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO). Monoterpene oxidation products are shown to influence the nighttime particle loadings significantly, while their concentrations are insufficient to grow the particles during the day. The growth of ultrafine particles in the daytime appears to be closely related to the OH oxidation products of MBO.« less

  5. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011 Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions -...

  6. Using a flame ionization detector (FID) to continuously measure toxic organic vapors in a paint spray booth. Rept. for Jul 91-Jan 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, J.K.; Howe, G.B.; Pate, B.A.; Wander, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports the demonstration of linear and similar responses of a Ratfisch RS-55CA flame ionization detector (FID) to a solvent mixture identical to the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the coating and catalyst (NSN 8010-01-336-3036) and to the calibrating gas (propane) used in field calibrations of the FID. Sensitivity and linearity have been shown to extend from 715 to 45 mg/cu m, which brackets the calculated short-term exposure limit (STEL) and lower action thresholds. Monitoring is maintained constantly and, under field conditions, equilibration occurs rapidly (analysis and output transpire in milliseconds). As a trigger for fail-safe conversion from recirculation mode to a straight-through paint spray booth configuration, the FID may confidently be expected to initiate a corrective response before a transient elevation of VOC concentrations overexposes area personnel.

  7. Best available control technology (BACT) equivalent for the control of volatile organic emissions from paint dipping operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenship, W.R.; Pugh, C.W. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides details of a study conducted to demonstrate an equivalent method of Best Available Control Technology (BACT) compliance for volatile organic emissions from dip coating of certain miscellaneous metal parts. The study was proposed to show that the total volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from 3.8 lb of VOC/gallon coating formulations were no greater than the total VOC emissions from 3.5 lb/gallon formulations used under the same conditions for coating steel joists. The presumptive BACT standard enforced by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for dip coating of steel joists is 3.5 lb/gallon. The requirement of 3.5 lb/gallon was derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency Guideline Series Control of Volatile Organic Emissions from Existing Stationary Sources--Volume 6: Surface Coating of Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products. On June 5, 1998 the source completed a 12 month, full scale comparison study under a consent order with the Virginia DEQ. During the study period, the source made daily measurements of product produced, paint used, and emissions from the control and test paint tanks, and reported data to EPA and the DEQ every two months. The study concluded that a 26 percent reduction in paint usage and a 20 percent reduction in emissions was achieved in the test tanks using a 3.8 lb/gal coating compared to the control tanks using a 3.5 lb/gal coating. This study enables the source to achieve greater emission reductions than the presumptive BACT level and at the same time reduce painting costs by 34%. This study provides positive results for the environment, the steel joist industry, and the construction industry. This study could impact EPA's current Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) rule development for Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products and national VOC rules for this source category under Section 183(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  8. Henry's law constants for paint solvents and their implications on volatile organic compound emissions from automotive painting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, B.R.; Kalis, E.M.; DeWulf, T.; Andrews, K.M.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes experimental results of equilibrium partitioning of several significant paint solvents and formaldehyde between air and water to quantify the potential for capturing and retaining the constituents in spraybooth scrubber water during automotive painting. The compounds studied are toluene, n-butanol, methyl ethyl ketone methyl propyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, methyl amyl ketone, butyl cellosolve, butyl cellosolve acetate, butyl carbitol, and n-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone. A set of field data collected at a Ford Motor Company assembly plant was also analyzed to determine whether data were consistent with the equilibrium phenomenon. The primary findings include: (a) There were more than six orders of magnitude difference in the Henry's law constants among the solvents studied. A solvent with a smaller constant is less easily stripped from water. The Henry's law constants decrease in the following order: toluene and xylenes > methyl ethyl ketone > n-butanol > butyl cellosolve acetate > butyl cellosolve > formaldehyde > butyl carbitol > n-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone. (b) Field data showed accumulation of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and stable concentrations of butyl carbitol, butyl cellosolve, and n-butanol in the paint-sludge pit water during a 2-month period. Stable concentrations indicate a continuous, balanced capture and stripping of the solvents. Data were consistent with measured Henry's law constants. (c) The low Henry's law constant for formaldehyde is the result of the fact that it is hydrated when dissolved in water.

  9. VOCs, Pesticides, Nitrate, and Their Mixtures in Groundwater Used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VOCs, Pesticides, Nitrate, and Their Mixtures in Groundwater Used for Drinking Water in the United, Rapid City, South Dakota 57702 Samples of untreated groundwater from 1255 domestic drinking-water wells of the groundwater resource and, thus, were distributed geographically across large aquifers, primarily in rural

  10. VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enneking, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

  11. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  12. Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinness, M.

    2003-01-01

    plug and blind off the media or kill the microorganisms if the emissions carry metals or organics that act as biocides at elevated concentrations (Webster, 1999). Bio-trickling filters and stationary air biofilters use fixed microorganisms... but the bio-trickling filters use a flowing water phase. Bio-scrubbers use a suspended biomass and a flowing water phase. Biofilters do not produce CO, NOx, and only produce small amounts of C02. Incineration They typically oxidize VOHAPs to C02...

  13. Extending the Range of Organic Compounds that Can Be Destroyed Using the Process of Adsorption Coupled with Electrochemical Regeneration - 13054

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Nigel; Lodge, Mike; Hilton, Linda; Adams, Alex [Arvia Technology Ltd, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Cheshire, WA4, 4FS (United Kingdom)] [Arvia Technology Ltd, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Cheshire, WA4, 4FS (United Kingdom); Vaudey, Claire-Emilie [AREVA CL BU, AREVA BUA STMI ZAC de Courcelle 1 route de la Noue 91196 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [AREVA CL BU, AREVA BUA STMI ZAC de Courcelle 1 route de la Noue 91196 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Toulemonde, Valerie [AREVA DRD, Tour AREVA, 1, place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)] [AREVA DRD, Tour AREVA, 1, place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry is not a provider of oils and solvents but uses them in motors, equipment and even in chemical processes to extract valuable products. Currently, for old and contaminated oils and solvents, techniques still exist, such as incineration, but not all the oils and solvents are compatible with this technique because the activities of some components inside the oils are too high to be accepted at the incineration facility. For these oils, an alternative technique needs to be found for treatment. A process developed for water treatment using a technique of adsorption coupled with electrochemical regeneration has been investigated to assess its capability to treat these organic wastes. One of the strengths of the process is its flexibility and adaptation to different compositions of oils. This point is important because, in the AREVA case, there are a lot of small volumes of old oils which need to be re-characterized. It takes time and money to do it especially when oils are contaminated; this is one reason why the technique is interesting to investigate. Tests have been performed with different oils coming from different sites to test the feasibility. Results demonstrate the destruction of a range of organics with regeneration energy requirements of 13.4 - 68.7 kWh/l and offer confidence for the future potential of the process. (authors)

  14. Environmental Technology Vol. 32, No. 6, April 2011, 617623

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; air pollution control; toluene; n-hexane; VOC mixtures Introduction Volatile organic compounds (VOCs plants, process- ing facilities, paint shops and a wide range of industries. The impacts of VOCs on human

  15. Polymorphism in small organic compounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budd, Laura Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the crystal structure of deuterated piperidine has been studied using neutron powder diffraction. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that there are multiple phases accessible via ...

  16. ARM - Measurement - Volatile organic compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARMtotalgovMeasurementsVisibility ARM

  17. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

  18. Observations of Diurnal to Weekly Variations of Monoterpene-Dominated Fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds from Mediterranean Forests: Implications for Regional Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fares, Silvano; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Xiaoyan, Jiang; Guenther, Alex B.; Hansel, Armin; Loreto, Francesco

    2013-09-04

    Most vascular plants species, especially trees, emit biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). Global estimates of BVOC emissions from plants range from 1 to 1.5 Pg C yr?1.1 Mediterranean forest trees have been described as high BVOC emitters, with emission depending primarily on light and temperature, and therefore being promoted by the warm Mediterranean climate. In the presence of sufficient sunlight and nitrogen oxides (NOx), the oxidation of BVOCs can lead to the formation of tropospheric ozone, a greenhouse gas with detrimental effects on plant health, crop yields, and human health. BVOCs are also precursors for aerosol formation, accounting for a significant fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in the atmosphere. The presidential Estate of Castelporziano covers an area of about 6000 ha located 25 km SW from the center of Rome, Italy (Figure 1) and hosts representative forest ecosystems typical of Mediterranean areas: holm oak forests, pine forests, dune vegetation, mixed oak and pine forests. Between 1995 and 2011, three intensive field campaigns were carried out on Mediterranean-type ecosystems inside the Estate. These campaigns were aimed at measuring BVOC emissions and environmental parameters, to improve formulation of basal emission factors (BEFs), that is, standardized emissions at 30 °C and 1000 ?mol m?2s?1 of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). BEFs are key input parameters of emission models. The first campaign in Castelporziano was a pioneering integrated study on biogenic emissions (1993? 19964). BVOC fluxes from different forest ecosystems were mainly investigated using plant- and leaf enclosures connected to adsorption tubes followed by GC?MS analysis in the laboratory. This allowed a first screening of Mediterranean species with respect to their BVOC emission potential, environmental control, and emission algorithms. In particular, deciduous oak species revealed high isoprene emissions (Quercus f rainetto, Quercus petrea, Quercus pubescens), while evergreen oaks emitted monoterpenes only, for example, Quercus ilex = holm oak. Differences in constitutive emission patterns discovered in Castelporziano supplied basic information to discriminate oak biodiversity in following studies.Ten years later, a second experimental campaign took place in spring and summer 2007 on a dune-shrubland experimental site. In this campaign, the use of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS14) provided the fast BVOC observations necessary for quasi-real-time flux measurements using Disjunct Eddy Covariance. This allowed for the first time continuous measurements and BEFs calculation at canopy level. Finally, in September 2011 a third campaign was performed with the aim of further characterizing and improving estimates of BVOC fluxes from mixed Mediterranean forests dominated by a mixed holm oak and stone pine forest, using for the first time a proton transfer reaction?time-of-flight?mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS). In contrast to the standard quadrupole PTR-MS, which can only measure one m/z ratio at a discrete time, thus being inadequate to quantify fluxes of more than a handful of compounds simultaneously, PTR-TOF-MS allowed simultaneous measurements (10 Hz) of fluxes of all BVOCs at the canopy level by Eddy Covariance.17?20, 50 In this work, we reviewed BEFs from previous campaigns in Castelporziano and calculated new BEFs from the campaign based on PTR-TOF-MS analysis. The new BEFs were used to parametrize the model of emissions of gases and aerosols from nature (MEGAN v2.11).

  19. DOAS measurement of glyoxal as an indicator for fast VOC chemistry in urban air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOAS measurement of glyoxal as an indicator for fast VOC chemistry in urban air Rainer Volkamer (2005), DOAS measurement of glyoxal as an indicator for fast VOC chemistry in urban air, Geophys. Res for a better quality of life are offset by a severe degradation of air quality caused by photochemical smog

  20. A comparison of the chemical sinks of atmospheric organics in the gas and aqueous phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, S. A; Nizkorodov, S. A

    2012-01-01

    for the set of rele- vant organic compounds. Introductionatmospherically rele- vant compounds. In the absence of

  1. WAT ENVIRON RESEARCH (in press, final version may have small changes) ODOR AND VOC TREATMENT BY BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: PILOT SCALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Los Angeles to study H2S/odor and VOC removal from the Headworks' waste air. The performance to the efficiency of removal of H2S as the major pollutant. VOCs were present at concentrations up to 150 ppb. Low Biotrickling filter, biological waste air treatment, hydrogen sulfide, odor, VOCs. #12;INTRODUCTION

  2. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  3. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-05-04

    Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was the only one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 mu g m-2 h 1 in the morning and 257 to 347 mu g m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 mu g m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 mu g/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 mu g/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (material surface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde.

  4. Co-treatment of VOCs in low-pH sulfide biofilters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devinny, J.S.; Chitwood, D.E.; Choi, D.S.

    1999-07-01

    Biofiltration of off-gases from wastewater treatment plants requires removal of sulfides and volatile organic compounds. Sulfides are readily removed in low-pH biofilters filled with inorganic media. If the same biofilter could simultaneously remove the volatile organic compounds, an efficient single-step system would be possible. Laboratory work on co-treatment of toluene and sulfides, and fieldwork on several volatile compounds indicate that this is possible. Removals of over 90% of toluene, xylene, acetone, methanol, and ethylbenzene should be possible with an empty bed contact time of 60 s. Methyl tert-butyl ether, isopentane, chloroform and methylene chloride were removed with lower but still substantial efficiencies. Biofilters operated at steady state but non-neutral pHs represent a promising avenue of research.

  5. Zero discharge organic coatings, powder paint - UV curable paint - E-coat. Volume 1. Final report, June 1993-June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal, J.; Martin, D.R.; Spadafora, S.J.; Eng, A.T.; Stark, H.

    1995-06-01

    Zero Discharge Organic Coatings project developed powder paint, Ultraviolet (UV) curable paint, and electro- coating (E-coat) paint for military Applications. These technologies offer potential for high performance coatings with little or no volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions or hazardous waste generation. The ZDOC project focused on formulating non-toxic corrosion inhibitors into these coating technologies, and the applications development of powder coatings. Non-toxic replacements for traditional lead and chromate inhibitors were selected based on a previous NAWCADWAR investigation. Once incorporated, the performance of the coatings with and without inhibitors was compared. Also, the protective mechanisms of these inhibitors were studied. The applications development for powder coatings analyzed technologies to allow powder coating of non-conductive substrates and evaluated the use of IR energy to cure powder coatings. Inhibitors were successfully incorporated into electrocoatings and powder coatings, however corrosion performance results varied with coating formulation.

  6. Radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Edwards, D.D. [Geological Survey, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Campbell, L.J. [State of Idaho, Dept. of Water Resources (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for manmade pollutants and naturally occurring constituents. The samples were collected from seven irrigation wells, five domestic wells, two springs, one stock well, two dairy wells, one observation well, and one commercial well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. The water samples were analyzed for selected radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria. None of the radionuclides, inorganic constituents, or organic compounds exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Most of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations exceeded their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for surfactants and dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that exceeded their reporting level. Toluene concentrations exceeded the reporting level in one water sample. Two samples contained fecal coliform bacteria counts that exceeded established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water.

  7. The Chicago VOC trading system : the consequences of market design for performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosobud, Richard F.

    2004-01-01

    The Chicago cap-and-trade approach to regulating stationary source VOC emissions in the Chicago ozone non-attainment area is a pioneering program that could set a precedent for other urban areas troubled by high ozone ...

  8. Apparatus for sensing volatile organic chemicals in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert C.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Kottenstette, Richard; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2005-06-07

    A chemical-sensing apparatus is formed from the combination of a chemical preconcentrator which sorbs and concentrates particular volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and one or more chemiresistors that sense the VOCs after the preconcentrator has been triggered to release them in concentrated form. Use of the preconcentrator and chemiresistor(s) in combination allows the VOCs to be detected at lower concentration than would be possible using the chemiresistor(s) alone and further allows measurements to be made in a variety of fluids, including liquids (e.g. groundwater). Additionally, the apparatus provides a new mode of operation for sensing VOCs based on the measurement of decay time constants, and a method for background correction to improve measurement precision.

  9. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palm, B. B.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Ortega, A. M.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Karl, T.; Hansel, A.; Hunter, J. F.; Cross, E. S.; et al

    2015-11-04

    Ambient air was oxidized by OH radicals in an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) located in a montane pine forest during the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign to study biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and aging. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semi-continuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative time scales of condensation of low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles, condensational loss to the walls, and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. Moremore »SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 4 ?g m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 1 ?g m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene + p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 LT. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic compounds, and net production at lower ages followed by net consumption of terpenoid oxidation products as photochemical age increased. New particle formation was observed in the reactor after oxidation, especially during times when precursor gas concentrations and SOA formation were largest. Approximately 6 times more SOA was formed in the reactor from OH oxidation than could be explained by the VOCs measured in ambient air. Several recently-developed instruments quantified ambient semi- and intermediate-volatility organic compounds (S/IVOCs) that were not detected by a PTR-TOF-MS. An SOA yield of 24–80 % from those compounds can explain the observed SOA, suggesting that these typically unmeasured S/IVOCs play a substantial role in ambient SOA formation. Our results allow ruling out condensation sticking coefficients much lower than 1. Our measurements help clarify the magnitude of SOA formation in forested environments, and demonstrate methods for interpretation of ambient OFR measurements.« less

  10. Assigning Oxidation States to Organic Compounds via Predictions from X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy: A Discussion of Approaches and Recommended Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Vipul; Ganegoda, Hasitha; Engelhard, Mark H.; Terry, Jeff H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2014-02-11

    The traditional assignment of oxidation numbers to organic molecules is problematic. Accordingly, in 1999, Calzaferri proposed a simple and elegant solution that is based on the similar electronegativities of carbon and hydrogen: hydrogen would be assigned an oxidation number of zero when bonded to carbon. Here we show that X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a core electron spectroscopy that is sensitive to oxidation states of elements, confirms his suggestion. In particular, in this work we: (i) list the typical rules for assigning oxidation numbers, (ii) discuss the traditional assignment of oxidation numbers to organic molecules, (iii) review Calzaferri’s solution, (iv) introduce X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), (v) show the consistency of Calzaferri’s suggestion with XPS results, (vi) provide supporting examples from the literature, (vii) provide examples from our own research, and (viii) further confirm the Calzaferri suggestion/photoelectron spectroscopy results by discussing two organic well-known reactions. We end by reechoing Calzaferri’s suggestion that the traditional rules for assigning oxidation numbers to organic molecules be modified.

  11. Alternative current conduction mechanisms of organic-inorganic compound [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Bechir, M. Karoui, K.; Guidara, K.; Ben Rhaiem, A.; Tabellout, M.

    2014-04-21

    [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} has been studied by X-ray powder diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and impedance spectroscopy. The [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} hybrid compound is crystallized at room temperature (T ? 300?K) in the orthorhombic system with Pnma space group. Five phase transitions (T{sub 1}?=?255?K, T{sub 2}?=?282?K, T{sub 3}?=?302?K, T{sub 4}?=?320?K, and T{sub 5}?=?346?K) have been proved by DSC measurements. The electrical technique was measured in the 10{sup ?1}-10{sup 7}?Hz frequency range and 233–363?K temperature interval. The frequency dependence of alternative current (AC) conductivity is interpreted in terms of Jonscher's law. The AC electrical conduction in [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} is analyzed by different processes, which can be attributed to several models: the correlated barrier hopping model in phase I, the overlapping large polaron tunneling model in phase II, the quantum mechanical tunneling model in phase IV, and the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in phases III, V, and VI. The conduction mechanism is studied with the help of Elliot's theory, and the Elliot's parameters are determined.

  12. Alternative current conduction mechanisms of organic-inorganic compound [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Bechir, M. Karoui, K.; Guidara, K.; Ben Rhaiem, A.; Tabellout, M.

    2014-05-28

    The [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} single crystal has been analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and electrical impedance spectroscopy. [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} crystallizes at room temperature in the monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/{sub C} space group. Three phase transitions at T{sub 1}?=?226?K, T{sub 2}?=?264?K, and T{sub 3}?=?297?K have been evidenced by DSC measurements. The electrical technique was measured in the 10{sup ?1}–10{sup 7}?Hz frequency range and 203–313?K temperature intervals. The frequency dependence of alternative current (AC) conductivity is interpreted in terms of Jonscher's law (developed). The AC electrical conduction in [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} compound is studied by two processes which can be attributed to a hopping transport mechanism: the correlated barrier hopping model in phases I, II, and III, the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in phase IV. The conduction mechanism is interpreted with the help of Elliot's theory, and the Elliot's parameters are found.

  13. Method for lowering the VOCS emitted during drying of wood products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sujit (1832 Jacksons Creek Point, Marietta, GA 30068); Boerner, James Robert (154 Junedale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45218); Su, Wei (2262 Orleans Ave., Marietta, GA 30062)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for removal of VOCs from wood products prior to drying the wood products. The method of the invention includes the steps of providing a chamber having an opening for receiving wood and loading the chamber with green wood. The wood is loaded to an extent sufficient to provide a limited headspace in the chamber. The chamber is then closed and the wood is heated in the chamber for a time and at a temperature sufficient to saturate the headspace with moisture and to substantially transfer VOCs from the wood product to the moisture in the headspace.

  14. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen VOCs, PAHs, soot, tar, CO 17.6.2001 6-1 Chapter 6 VOCs, PAHs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    17.6.2001 6-2 Table 6.2 Organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) of interest for thermal power) hazardous air pollutant POHC (USA) principle organic hazardous constituents, selected on the basis of difficulties with their incineration (LaGrega et al., 1994) Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as defined

  15. An In-Situ Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Detecting Gaseous VOCs in Unsaturated Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R. Jacob

    . The IMS system will be packaged in a probe housing for deployment using direct push methods methods for sampling and analyzing soil gas samples fall into two classes: passive sampling and active sampling. Passive sampling methods involve the shallow burial of a sorbent collector, which adsorbs the VOC

  16. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-24

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore »photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  17. Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in diesel exhaust

  18. Services Initiatives | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and is very low in Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) which evaporate little and cause no air pollution, whereas petroleum-based inks are high in VOCs and cause air pollution when...

  19. An Introduction to Texas Senate Bill 5 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    ), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and oxygen (O2) combine in the presence of strong sunlight. In response to this effort the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) developed a strategy with the EPA that reduced VOCs from large regulated...

  20. Modeling the formation and aging of secondary organic aerosols in Los Angeles during CalNex 2010

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hayes, P. L.; Carlton, A. G.; Baker, K. R.; Ahmadov, R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Alvarez, S.; Rappenglück, B.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; et al

    2014-12-20

    Four different parameterizations for the formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are evaluated using a 0-D box model representing the Los Angeles Metropolitan Region during the CalNex 2010 field campaign. We constrain the model predictions with measurements from several platforms and compare predictions with particle and gas-phase observations from the CalNex Pasadena ground site. That site provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation close to anthropogenic emission sources with limited recirculation. The model SOA formed only from the oxidation of VOCs (V-SOA) is insufficient to explain the observed SOA concentrations, even when using SOA parameterizations with multi-generationmore »oxidation that produce much higher yields than have been observed in chamber experiments, or when increasing yields to their upper limit estimates accounting for recently reported losses of vapors to chamber walls. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ) model (version 5.0.1) provides excellent predictions of secondary inorganic particle species but underestimates the observed SOA mass by a factor of 25 when an older VOC-only parameterization is used, which is consistent with many previous model-measurement comparisons for pre-2007 anthropogenic SOA modules in urban areas. Including SOA from primary semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (P-S/IVOCs) following the parameterizations of Robinson et al. (2007), Grieshop et al. (2009), or Pye and Seinfeld (2010) improves model/measurement agreement for mass concentration. When comparing the three parameterizations, the Grieshop et al. (2009) parameterization more accurately reproduces both the SOA mass concentration and oxygen-to-carbon ratio inside the urban area. Our results strongly suggest that other precursors besides VOCs, such as P-S/IVOCs, are needed to explain the observed SOA concentrations in Pasadena. All the parameterizations over-predict urban SOA formation at long photochemical ages (≈ 3 days) compared to observations from multiple sites, which can lead to problems in regional and global modeling. Among the explicitly modeled VOCs, the precursor compounds that contribute the greatest SOA mass are methylbenzenes. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are less important precursors and contribute less than 4% of the SOA mass. The amounts of SOA mass from diesel vehicles, gasoline vehicles, and cooking emissions are estimated to be 16–27, 35–61, and 19–35%, respectively, depending on the parameterization used, which is consistent with the observed fossil fraction of urban SOA, 71 (±3) %. In-basin biogenic VOCs are predicted to contribute only a few percent to SOA. A regional SOA background of approximately 2.1 ?g m?3 is also present due to the long distance transport of highly aged OA. The percentage of SOA from diesel vehicle emissions is the same, within the estimated uncertainty, as reported in previous work that analyzed the weekly cycles in OA concentrations (Bahreini et al., 2012; Hayes et al., 2013). However, the modeling work presented here suggests a strong anthropogenic source of modern carbon in SOA, due to cooking emissions, which was not accounted for in those previous studies. Lastly, this work adapts a simple two-parameter model to predict SOA concentration and O/C from urban emissions. This model successfully predicts SOA concentration, and the optimal parameter combination is very similar to that found for Mexico City. This approach provides a computationally inexpensive method for predicting urban SOA in global and climate models. We estimate pollution SOA to account for 26 Tg yr?1 of SOA globally, or 17% of global SOA, 1/3 of which is likely to be non-fossil.« less

  1. Modeling the formation and aging of secondary organic aerosols in Los Angeles during CalNex 2010

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hayes, P. L.; Carlton, A. G.; Baker, K. R.; Ahmadov, R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Alvarez, S.; Rappenglück, B.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; et al

    2015-05-26

    Four different literature parameterizations for the formation and evolution of urban secondary organic aerosol (SOA) frequently used in 3-D models are evaluated using a 0-D box model representing the Los Angeles metropolitan region during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) 2010 campaign. We constrain the model predictions with measurements from several platforms and compare predictions with particle- and gas-phase observations from the CalNex Pasadena ground site. That site provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation close to anthropogenic emission sources with limited recirculation. The model SOA that formed only from the oxidationmore »of VOCs (V-SOA) is insufficient to explain the observed SOA concentrations, even when using SOA parameterizations with multi-generation oxidation that produce much higher yields than have been observed in chamber experiments, or when increasing yields to their upper limit estimates accounting for recently reported losses of vapors to chamber walls. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ) model (version 5.0.1) provides excellent predictions of secondary inorganic particle species but underestimates the observed SOA mass by a factor of 25 when an older VOC-only parameterization is used, which is consistent with many previous model–measurement comparisons for pre-2007 anthropogenic SOA modules in urban areas. Including SOA from primary semi-volatile and intermediate-volatility organic compounds (P-S/IVOCs) following the parameterizations of Robinson et al. (2007), Grieshop et al. (2009), or Pye and Seinfeld (2010) improves model–measurement agreement for mass concentration. The results from the three parameterizations show large differences (e.g., a factor of 3 in SOA mass) and are not well constrained, underscoring the current uncertainties in this area. Our results strongly suggest that other precursors besides VOCs, such as P-S/IVOCs, are needed to explain the observed SOA concentrations in Pasadena. All the recent parameterizations overpredict urban SOA formation at long photochemical ages (? 3 days) compared to observations from multiple sites, which can lead to problems in regional and especially global modeling. However, reducing IVOC emissions by one-half in the model to better match recent IVOC measurements improves SOA predictions at these long photochemical ages. Among the explicitly modeled VOCs, the precursor compounds that contribute the greatest SOA mass are methylbenzenes. Measured polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalenes) contribute 0.7% of the modeled SOA mass. The amounts of SOA mass from diesel vehicles, gasoline vehicles, and cooking emissions are estimated to be 16–27, 35–61, and 19–35%, respectively, depending on the parameterization used, which is consistent with the observed fossil fraction of urban SOA, 71(±3) %. The relative contribution of each source is uncertain by almost a factor of 2 depending on the parameterization used. In-basin biogenic VOCs are predicted to contribute only a few percent to SOA. A regional SOA background of approximately 2.1 ?g m?3 is also present due to the long-distance transport of highly aged OA, likely with a substantial contribution from regional biogenic SOA. The percentage of SOA from diesel vehicle emissions is the same, within the estimated uncertainty, as reported in previous work that analyzed the weekly cycles in OA concentrations (Bahreini et al., 2012; Hayes et al., 2013). However, the modeling work presented here suggests a strong anthropogenic source of modern carbon in SOA, due to cooking emissions, which was not accounted for in those previous studies and which is higher on weekends. Lastly, this work adapts a simple two-parameter model to predict SOA concentration and O/C from urban emissions. This model successfully predicts SOA concentration, and the optimal parameter combination is very similar to that found for Mexico City. This approach provides a computationally inexpensive method for predicting urban SOA in global

  2. A Novel New Approach to VOC and HAP Emission Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinness, M.

    2000-01-01

    if the emissions carry metals or organics that act as biocides at elevated concentrations (Webster, 1999). Bio-trickling filters and stationary air biofilters use fixed microorganisms but the bio-trickling filters use a flowing water phase. Bio-scrubbers use a...&D EFFORTS The Navy has been investigating a pilot scale bio trickling filter (Webster, 1999) for treating off gases from spray paint booths. The project was funded by the Navy's Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program. Test results indicated...

  3. Ex 7.6(a) The vapor pressure of benzene is 400 Torr at 60.6C, but it fell to 386 Torr when 19.0 g of an involatile organic compound was dissolved in 500 g of benzene. Calculate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Ex 7.6(a) The vapor pressure of benzene is 400 Torr at 60.6°C, but it fell to 386 Torr when 19.0 g of an involatile organic compound was dissolved in 500 g of benzene. Calculate the molar mass of the involatile

  4. Red Balloon, Green Balloon, Sensors in the Sky Stacey Kuznetsov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    engines [9]; and VOC's (volatile organic compounds) originate from paints, pesticides, or certain types color based on input from attached air quality sensors (exhaust, diesel, or volatile organic compounds). The balloons change color in response to one of exhaust gas, diesel, or VOC's (volatile organic compounds

  5. Volatile Organic Compound Detection Using Nanostructured Copolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lee E.

    conductivity of these copolymers increased or decreased depending upon the polymer composition and the specific,3-6 conductive poly- mers (CPs),7-12 and carbon black-polymer composites.13,14 Metal oxide materials Carbon black-polymer composites have also attracted a lot of research interest as a promising sensing

  6. Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1915-01-01

    aerated. It is known, for example, that nitrification in a liquid culture is not the same as nitrification in the soil. Cottonseed meal will putrefy in soil in flaslcs stopperecl with cotton wool, while in glass jars, the same mixture will nitrifv. A... cnpaciiy. The nitrif-ing capac- it" the oxidatioa capacity 'and the capacit~ of the soil to convert am- monia into nitrates and ammonia are to a certain extent related, espe- . cially the t-ro latter. They are not necessarily the same in the same soils...

  7. Reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications -- Canam Steel Corporation Point of Rocks, MD case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monfet, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications is not an environmental constraint, it is an economic opportunity. This case study shows how the industry can reap economic benefits from VOC reductions while improving air quality. The Canam Steel Corporation plant located in Point of Rocks, MD operates dip tanks for primer application on fabricated steel joists and joist girders. This process is presently subject to a regulation that limits the paint VOC content to 3.5 pounds per gallon of coating less water. As a result of the high paint viscosity associated with that regulation, the paint thickness of the dipped steel is thicker than the customers` specifications. Most of the VOC emissions can therefore be associated with the excess of paint applied to the products rather than to the required thickness of the coating. The higher paint usage rate has more than environmental consequences, it increases the cost of the applied coating. The project is to reduce the paint usage by controlling the viscosity of the coating in the tank. Experimental results as well as actual mass balance calculations show that using a higher VOC content paint would reduce the overall VOC emissions. The author explained the project to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Air and Radiation Management Administration. First, the MDE agreed to develop a new RACT determination for fabricated steel dipping operations. The new regulation would limit the amount of VOC than can be emitted to dip coat a ton of fabricated steel. Second, the MDE agreed to allow experimentation of the higher VOC content paint as a pilot project for the new regulation. This paper demonstrates the need for a RACT determination specific to fabricated steel dipping operations.

  8. Novel amine-based presursor compounds and composite membranes thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Eric K. L. (Wilmington, DE); Tuttle, Mark E. (Bend, OR)

    1989-01-01

    Novel amine-based precursor compounds comprising the condensation products of dialkylenetriamine and alpha, beta-unsaturated acid halides are disclosed, as well as composite membranes containing such compounds, the membranes being useful in RO-type processes for desalination and the removal of low molecular weight organic compounds such as phenols and carboxylic acids.

  9. Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

    1985-08-06

    Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

  10. Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

    1985-01-01

    Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

  11. Long Wavelength Catalytic Infrared Drying System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a 20' to 30' rotating drum while tumbling the wood product. Product scorching and air emission problems, particularly with carbon, NOx, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs),...

  12. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  13. A Case for Safer Building Materials: Lifecycle Concerns, Data Gaps, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    ;Conventional Building Materials · Wood · Stone · Cement · Metal · Glass · Straw · Ceramics #12;Synthetic;Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) · Aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons

  14. Maintaining Indoor Air Quality During Construction and Renovation Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    / Hazards Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds that are readily Flooring Caulks Fuels, Cleaners Wall Coverings Sealants Adhesives Composite Wood Products Paints Carpeting be implemented. Hazardous Particulates which are subject to special regulation include lead paint dust which

  15. Limited effect of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides on secondary organic aerosol formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Y.; Unger, N.; Hodzic, A.; Emmons, L.; Knote, C.; Tilmes, S.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Yu, P.

    2015-12-08

    Globally, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is mostly formed from emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by vegetation, but it can be modified by human activities as demonstrated in recent research. Specifically, nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) have been shown to play a critical role in the chemical formation of low volatility compounds. We have updated the SOA scheme in the global NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Atmospheric Model version 4 with chemistry (CAM4-chem) by implementing a 4-product volatility basis set (VBS) scheme, including NOx-dependent SOA yields and aging parameterizations. Small differences are found for themore »no-aging VBS and 2-product schemes; large increases in SOA production and the SOA-to-OA ratio are found for the aging scheme. The predicted organic aerosol amounts capture both the magnitude and distribution of US surface annual mean measurements from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network by 50 %, and the simulated vertical profiles are within a factor of 2 compared to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements from 13 aircraft-based field campaigns across different regions and seasons. We then perform sensitivity experiments to examine how the SOA loading responds to a 50 % reduction in anthropogenic nitric oxide (NO) emissions in different regions. We find limited SOA reductions of 0.9–5.6, 6.4–12.0 and 0.9–2.8 % for global, southeast US and Amazon NOx perturbations, respectively. The fact that SOA formation is almost unaffected by changes in NOx can be largely attributed to a limited shift in chemical regime, to buffering in chemical pathways (low- and high-NOx pathways, O3 versus NO3-initiated oxidation) and to offsetting tendencies in the biogenic versus anthropogenic SOA responses.« less

  16. Limited effect of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides on Secondary Organic Aerosol formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Y.; Unger, N.; Hodzic, A.; Emmons, L.; Knote, C.; Tilmes, S.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Yu, P.

    2015-08-28

    Globally, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is mostly formed from emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by vegetation, but can be modified by human activities as demonstrated in recent research. Specifically, nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) have been shown to play a critical role in the chemical formation of low volatility compounds. We have updated the SOA scheme in the global NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 4 with chemistry (CAM4-chem) by implementing a 4-product Volatility Basis Set (VBS) scheme, including NOx-dependent SOA yields and aging parameterizations. The predicted organic aerosol amounts capture both the magnitude and distribution ofmore »US surface annual mean measurements from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network by 50 %, and the simulated vertical profiles are within a factor of two compared to Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) measurements from 13 aircraft-based field campaigns across different region and seasons. We then perform sensitivity experiments to examine how the SOA loading responds to a 50 % reduction in anthropogenic nitric oxide (NO) emissions in different regions. We find limited SOA reductions of 0.9 to 5.6, 6.4 to 12.0 and 0.9 to 2.8 % for global, the southeast US and the Amazon NOx perturbations, respectively. The fact that SOA formation is almost unaffected by changes in NOx can be largely attributed to buffering in chemical pathways (low- and high-NOx pathways, O3 versus NO3-initiated oxidation) and to offsetting tendencies in the biogenic versus anthropogenic SOA responses.« less

  17. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  18. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  19. Partially fluorinated ionic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

    2008-11-25

    Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

  20. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  1. Mapping isoprene emissions over North America using formaldehyde column observations from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    Mapping isoprene emissions over North America using formaldehyde column observations from space. [1] We present a methodology for deriving emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) using space to local VOC emissions, with a spatial smearing that increases with the VOC lifetime. Isoprene

  2. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  3. Source Contributions to VOC's to Ozone Formation in Southeast Texas Using a Source-oriented Air Quality Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Anupama

    2011-08-08

    and petrochemical industries to ozone formation in the atmosphere. Source-oriented emissions needed to drive the model were generated using a revised Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model version 2.4. VOC/NOx ratios are found to be a critical factor...

  4. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions- Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation on Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions, given by David Cygan of the Gas Technology Institute, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

  5. Heart testing compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1983-06-29

    The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  6. Heart testing compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1985-01-01

    The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  7. Persistent Organic By Steven Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Persistent Organic Pollutants By Steven Jackson #12;What are POP's? · POP's are organic compounds ¹,²- (Fungicide) Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) ¹,² (Industrial processes eg paint additives) Polychlorinated by accumulating in the body fat of living organisms and becoming more concentrated as they move from one creature

  8. Mechanisms of Organic-inorganic Interactions in Soils and Aqueous Environments Elucidated using Calorimetric Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Omar R.

    2011-08-08

    : bacteria, viruses and spores; roads, tire and brake abrasions; and fine soil particles [20]. Secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) are formed through condensation of VOCs in the atmosphere [20]. Estimates of atmospheric organic matter production are very... of the biochar formed during pyrolysis is dependent on combustion conditions (eg. temperature, combustion duration and oxygen supply) and the chemistry of the original plant tissues. As combustion temperature increases transformation of plant tissues occur via...

  9. A novel inorganic-organic compound: Synthesis and structural characterization of tin(II) phenylbis(phosphonate), Sn{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}PO{sub 3})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subbiah, Ayyappan; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai; Clearfield, Abraham . E-mail: clearfield@mail.chem.tamu.edu

    2005-04-15

    A novel tin(II) phenylbis(phosphonate) compound has been synthesized hydrothermally and its structure has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure is monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/c (no. 14), a=4.8094(4), b=16.2871(13), c=6.9107(6)A; {beta}=106.292(6){sup o}, V=519.59(7)A{sup 3}, Z=2. The three-dimensional structure consists of 3-coordinated tin and 4-coordinated phosphorus double layers separated (pillared) by phenyl rings. These phenyl rings are placed 4.8A apart along the a-axis in the structure resulting in lower surface area ({approx}14m{sup 2}/g). The porosity has been increased by replacing phenyl groups by methyl groups ({approx}31m{sup 2}/g)

  10. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

    2008-02-12

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  11. Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    synthesis of compound semiconductor nanowire powders for inorganic-organic hybrid thermoelectric cells vaddiraju.pdf More Documents & Publications NSFDOE Thermoelectric...

  12. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  13. Aminopropyl thiophene compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

  14. Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.

  15. Control of insects and spider mites by translocated compounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivy, Edward Everett

    1951-01-01

    hydrocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's), chlorinated solvents, aromatics, and monomers. SORBATHENE units are now meeting air permit requirements for the abatement of VOC's such as benzene, acetone, trichloroethylene, trichlorofluoromethane, carbon...

  16. Multicylinder compound engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, M.A.; Paul, A.

    1990-10-23

    This patent describes a compound, rotary-reciprocal engine. It comprises: a two-cycle reciprocator having cylinders, each cylinder having at least one piston arranged for reciprocation in the cylinder in a cycled operation with a timed air input to the cylinder and a timed exhaust from the cylinder; a compressed air intake and combustion gas exit in each cylinder of the reciprocator; fuel injection means for injecting fuel into the cylinders at appropriate times in the cycled operation; and, a rotocharger.

  17. Complex Compound Chemical Heat Pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockenfeller, U.; Langeliers, J.; Horn, G.

    1987-01-01

    Complex-compound solid-vapor fluid pairs can be used in heat of reaction heat pumps for temperature amplifier (TA) as well as heat amplifier (HA) cycle configurations. This report describes the conceptual hardware design for complex compound...

  18. Titanium alkoxide compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-14

    A titanium alkoxide composition is provided, as represented by the chemical formula (OC.sub.6H.sub.5N).sub.2Ti(OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2).sub.2. As prepared, the compound is a crystalline substance with a hexavalent titanium atom bonded to two OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2 groups and two OC.sub.6H.sub.5N groups with a theoretical molecular weight of 480.38, comprising 60.01% C, 5.04% H and 11.66% N.

  19. Boronated porphyrin compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.

    1992-09-22

    A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

  20. Boronated porphyrin compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kahl, Stephen B. (Portola Valley, CA); Koo, Myoung-Seo (San Francisco, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

  1. Effects of additional nonmethane volatile organic compounds, organic nitrates, and direct emissions of oxygenated organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sillman, Sanford

    mechanism. The model was then extended by adding emissions and photochemical reactions for aromatic isoprene. Emissions of methanol, phenol, acetic acid and formic acid associated with biomass burning were. The extended model shows improved agreement with measurements for methanol, acetic acid and peroxypropional

  2. Sorption of selected volatile organic constituents of jet fuels and solvents on natural sorbents from gas and solutions phases. Final report, April 1985-September 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, P.S.; Rhue, R.D.; Johnson, C.T.; Oguada, R.A.

    1988-08-01

    Sorption of selected volatile organic constituents (VOC) of jet fuels and solvents on several natural sorbents from the gas and aqueous phases was investigated. The sorbates studied were: trans-1,2-dichloroethylene; 1,2-dichloroethane; trichloroethylene; 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane; toluene; ethylbenzene; p-xylene; o-xylene; and cyclohexane. The sorbents used included clays (kaolin, montmorillonite, SAz-1), soils (Webster and Oldsmar), and aquifer materials (Borden and Lula). Sorption from the vapor phase was studied using three techniques; the headspace analysis method, dynamic-flow method, and a gas chromatographic method. Sorption of VOC on anhydrous sorbents and sorbents in equilibrium with water at different relative humidities was examined. The energetics of sorption were characterized by measuring VOC sorption at several temperatures.

  3. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  4. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jardine, K; Abrell, L; Kurc, SA; Huxman, T; Ortega, J; Guenther, A

    2010-01-01

    S. : Uptake of carbonyl sulfide (cos) and emission ofF. : The mass budgets of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide,M. , and Mu, Y. J. : Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide

  5. A biogenic volatile organic compound emission inventory for Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsui, JK-Y; Guenther, A; Yip, W-K; Chen, F

    2009-01-01

    isoprene emissions from 15 Eucalyptus species in Australia.Cinnamomum camphora Cyclobalanopsis edithiae Eucalyptuscitriodora Eucalyptus robusta Eucalyptus torelliana Ficus

  6. Modeling Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from New Carpets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    BPt Name (abbreviation) Styrene (STY) Ethylbenzene andthe study carpets that have a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)coefficient, polymer backing, styrene-butadiene rubber,

  7. Nanoparticle Formation of Organic Compounds With Retained Biological Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    .58C and 75.8 bar). Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) is also nonflammable and inexpensive.6 to be formed as well as control of the size distribution.7 Moreover, SC-CO2 antisolvent precipitation is highly of supercritical carbon dioxide as an antisolvent for meeting this need for two model drug systems, quercetin

  8. Control of spider mites on cotton by organic sulphur compounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Charles Edward

    1954-01-01

    Toxicity tests ............. .................. . 23 Ovicidal t e sts...................................... 25 Residual toxicity tests............................... 26 Calculation of dosage-mortality curves ......... ? ? ? ? ? 28 Results... and Discussions . . . . ........... . . . . . . . . . 38 Toxicity tests 1950-1951.............. ...............38 Toxicity tests 1951-1952 .............. ............... 51 Ovicidal tests ............ ......................... 52 Residual t e...

  9. Modeling Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from New Carpets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    carpets that have a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) backing,polymer backing, styrene-butadiene rubber, environmentalbacking with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latex adhesive.

  10. The Effect of Organic Compounds in Pot Experiments. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.

    1915-01-01

    11H, 5100, 5700, 5937 and 5710, and has little effect on 5947 and 5948. The ft:rtilizer acl .ditions are beneficia.l to practica.lly all the soils and produce decided increases. The soilf:l tested were practically all poor soi1R. The conclusion is...

  11. Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein Khalil HusseinH2FASTCELL TECHNOLOGIESCoal

  12. The design of new ligands and transition metal compounds for the oxidation of organic compounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grill, Joseph Michael

    2009-06-02

    A review of metal-mediated epoxidation is given. Jacobsen's catalyst and the Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation catalyst are discussed. The origins of enantioselectivity are explained using stereochemical models. Several new ...

  13. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, María V.; Falco, Lorena R.; Peluso, Miguel A.; Sambeth, Jorge E.; Thomas, Horacio J.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

  14. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowell, M.S.

    1995-08-22

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

  15. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  16. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowell, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  17. Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Analyses of Phospholipid Fatty Acids and n-Alkanes in Ocean Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

  18.  COMPOUND-SPECIFIC RADIOCARBON ANALYSES OF PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACIDS AND n -ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

  19. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  20. Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  1. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowell, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  2. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  3. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

  4. Impacts of seasonal and regional variability in biogenic VOC emissions on surface ozone in the Pearl River delta region, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    chained carbonyl compounds from Eucalyptus spp. in southernby changing all forest to eucalyptus, except for protectedlocal natural parks. The eucalyptus BVOC emission fac- tors

  5. High Efficiency Organic Solar Cells: December 16, 2009 - February 2, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, K.; Joslin, S.

    2011-05-01

    Details on the development of novel organic solar cells incorporating Trimetasphere based acceptors are presented including: baseline performance for Lu-PCBEH acceptor blended with P3HT demonstrated at 4.89% PCE exceeding the 4.5% PCE goal; an increase of over 250mV in Voc was demonstrated for Lu-PCBEH blended with low band gap polymers compared to a comparable C60-PCBM device. The actual Voc was certified at 260mV higher for a low band gap polymer device using the Lu-PCBEH acceptor; and the majority of the effort was focused on development of a device with over 7% PCE. While low current and fill factors suppressed overall device performance for the low band gap polymers tested, significant discoveries were made that point the way for future development of these novel acceptor materials.

  6. Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

  7. Planta (2007) 226:839851 DOI 10.1007/s00425-007-0530-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    / Published online: 12 May 2007 © Springer-Verlag 2007 Abstract Certain plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), in the absence of physical contact with a plant stimulate growth via volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, through largely unknown mechanisms. To probe how PGPR VOCs trigger growth in plants

  8. WearAir: Expressive T-shirts for Air Quality Sensing Sunyoung Kim and Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    and health from people who are less proactively concerned with air quality. AIR POLLUTANT: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS Different types of air pollutants contribute to air quality in different locations: Ozone, CO, NOx and VOCs are major contributors to outdoor air pollution; and particulate matters, VOCs, carbon monoxide

  9. WearAir: Expressive T-shirts for Air Quality Sensing Sunyoung Kim and Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    are less proactively concerned with air quality. AIR POLLUTANT: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS Different types of air pollutants contribute to air quality in different locations: Ozone, CO, NOx and VOCs are major contributors to outdoor air pollution; and particulate matters, VOCs, carbon monoxide and lead are common air

  10. Role of ethylene on surface oxidation of TiO2(110) Y. Murata, V. Petrova, I. Petrov, C. V. Ciobanu, and S. Kodambaka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    ,6 and photo-assisted purification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs),7 as a support for metal catalysts,8 all of the above-mentioned applications, TiO2 is well-known for its photo-assisted oxidation of VOCs understanding of the factors controlling the surface stoichiometry is critical for rational design of high

  11. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 16471664, 2009 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/1647/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and Physics SCIAMACHY formaldehyde observations: constraint for isoprene emission estimates over Europe? G. Formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important interme- diate compound in the degradation of volatile organic com- pounds (VOCs) in the troposphere. Sources of HCHO are largely dominated by its secondary production from VOC

  12. Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xudong, 1966-

    1999-01-01

    Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

  13. Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsello, Joseph William

    2014-01-01

    Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

  14. Vapor intrusion modeling : limitations, improvements, and value of information analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friscia, Jessica M. (Jessica Marie)

    2014-01-01

    Vapor intrusion is the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subsurface source into the indoor air of an overlying building. Vapor intrusion models, including the Johnson and Ettinger (J&E) model, can be ...

  15. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 40954106, 2007 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/4095/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    , it has been estimated that globally the prin- cipal natural sources of organic compounds are woods, crops of VOCs in the atmosphere have been described extensively; previous laboratory stud- ies have demonstrated

  16. Evaluation of the pathways of tropospheric nitrophenol formation from benzene and phenol using a multiphase model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Mathew R; Harrison, Mark A J; Cape, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Phenols are a major class of volatile organic compounds (VOC) whose reaction within, and partitioning between, the gas and liquid phases affects their lifetime within the atmosphere, the local oxidising capacity, and the ...

  17. DOE/CBFO-11-3479 Panel Closure System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of View Attachment B: Effective Permeability of the Redesigned Panel Closure System Attachment C: Summary Concrete TRU Transuranic VOC Volatile Organic Compound WIPP Waste Isolation Pilot Plant #12;iii Glossary

  18. PDID: Pulsed-Discharge Ionization Detector A new detector for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-1387C Sandia's Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Biomarker Detection Technology 0.25" grid Photons emitted from a miniaturized helium plasma source...

  19. Ground-level ozone in eastern North America : its formation and transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zemba, Stephen G.

    1990-01-01

    Ozone (Os), a natural component of the troposphere, is augmented by photochemical processes involving manmade emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Sufficiently high concentrations of ...

  20. Environmental Control of Isoprene Emission: from Leaf to Canopy Scale 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pegoraro, Emiliano

    Isoprene is the most abundant volatile organic compound (VOC) emitted from vegetation, mainly trees. Because it plays an important role in tropospheric chemistry leading to formation of pollutants and enhancing the lifetime ...

  1. A cost-effectiveness analysis of alternative ozone control strategies : flexible nitrogen oxide (NOx) abatement from power plants in the eastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Lin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    Ozone formation is a complex, non-linear process that depends on the atmospheric concentrations of its precursors, nitrogen oxide (NOx) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), as well as on temperature and the available ...

  2. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron...

  3. Process for production of a borohydride compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chin, Arthur Achhing; Jain, Puja; Linehan, Suzanne; Lipiecki, Francis Joseph; Maroldo, Stephen Gerard; November, Samuel J; Yamamoto, John Hiroshi

    2013-02-19

    A process for production of a borohydride compound. The process comprises combining a compound comprising boron and oxygen with an adduct of alane.

  4. Compatibilization/Compounding Evaluation of Recovered Polymers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CompatibilizationCompounding Evaluation of Recovered Polymers CompatibilizationCompounding Evaluation of Recovered Polymers Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  5. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woody, M. C.; Baker, K. R.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Koo, B.; Pye, H. O. T.

    2015-10-05

    Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations utilizing the volatility basis set (VBS) treatment for organic aerosols (CMAQ-VBS) were evaluated against measurements collected at routine monitoring networks (Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE)) and those collected during the 2010 California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaign to examine important sources of organic aerosol (OA) in southern California. CMAQ-VBS (OA lumped by volatility, semivolatile POA) underpredicted total organic carbon (OC) at CSN (?25.5 % Normalized Median Bias (NMdnB)) and IMPROVE (?63.9 % NMdnB) locations and total OC wasmore »underpredicted to a greater degree compared to the CMAQ-AE6 (9.9 and ?55.7 % NMdnB, respectively; semi-explicit OA treatment, SOA lumped by parent hydrocarbon, nonvolatile POA). However, comparisons to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements collected at Pasadena, CA indicated that CMAQ-VBS better represented the diurnal profile and the primary/secondary split of OA. CMAQ-VBS secondary organic aerosol (SOA) underpredicted the average measured AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, a surrogate of SOA) concentration by a factor of 5.2 (4.7 ?g m?3 measured vs. 0.9 ?g m?3 modeled), a considerable improvement to CMAQ-AE6 SOA predictions, which were approximately 24× lower than the average AMS OOA concentration. We use two new methods, based on species ratios and on a simplified SOA parameterization from the observations, to apportion the SOA underprediction for CMAQ-VBS to too slow photochemical oxidation (estimated as 1.5× lower than observed at Pasadena using ? log (NOx: NOy)), low intrinsic SOA formation efficiency (low by 1.6 to 2× for Pasadena), and too low emissions or too high dispersion for the Pasadena site (estimated to be 1.6 to 2.3× too low/high). The first and third factors will be similar for CMAQ-AE6, while the intrinsic SOA formation efficiency for that model is estimated to be too low by about 7×. For CMAQ-VBS, 90 % of the anthropogenic SOA mass formed was attributed to aged secondary semivolatile vapors (70 % originating from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and 20 % from intermediate volatility compounds (IVOCs)). From source-apportioned model results, we found most of the CMAQ-VBS modeled POA at the Pasadena CalNex site was attributable to meat cooking emissions (48 %, and consistent with a substantial fraction of cooking OA in the observations), compared to 18 % from gasoline vehicle emissions, 13 % from biomass burning (in the form of residential wood combustion), and 8 % from diesel vehicle emissions. All "other" inventoried emission sources (e.g. industrial/point sources) comprised the final 13 %. The CMAQ-VBS semivolatile POA treatment underpredicted AMS hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) + cooking-influenced OA (CIOA) at Pasadena by a factor of 1.8 (1.16 ?g m?3 modeled vs. 2.05 ?g m?3 observed) compared to a factor of 1.4 overprediction of POA in CMAQ-AE6, but did well to capture the AMS diurnal profile of HOA and CIOA, with the exception of the midday peak. We estimated that using the National Emission Inventory (NEI) POA emissions without scaling to represent SVOCs underestimates SVOCs by ~1.7×.« less

  6. Highly efficient inverted organic solar cells using amino acid modified indium tin oxide as cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Aiyuan; Nie, Riming; Deng, Xianyu; Wei, Huaixin; Li, Yanqing; Tang, Jianxin; Zheng, Shizhao; Wong, King-Young

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report that highly efficient inverted organic solar cells were achieved by modifying the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) using an amino acid, Serine (Ser). With the modification of the ITO surface, device efficiency was significantly enhanced from 0.63% to 4.17%, accompanied with an open circuit voltage (Voc) that was enhanced from 0.30?V to 0.55?V. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the work function reduction induced by the amino acid modification resulting in the decreased barrier height at the ITO/organic interface played a crucial role in the enhanced performances.

  7. Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

  8. Polybenzimidazole compounds, polymeric media, and methods of post-polymerization modifications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

    2007-08-21

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about 15.

  9. EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B

    2005-10-31

    The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a full-scale implementation. The SVE well, monitoring point arrays and four fracturing wells were installed and the well testing has been completed. Four fractures were successfully created the week of July 25, 2005. The fractures were created in an open area at the bottom of steel well casing by using a water jet to create a notch in the soil and then injecting a guar-sand slurry into the formation. The sand-filled fractures increase the effective air permeability of the subsurface formation diffusion path lengths for contaminant removal. The primary metrics for evaluation were an increase in SVE flow rates in the zone of contamination and an increase in the zone of influence. Sufficient testing has been performed to show that fracturing in the Upland Unit accelerates SVE solvent remediation and fracturing can increase flow rates in the Upland Unit by at least one order of magnitude.

  10. Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelarova, K.; Granier, Claire; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, Alex B.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

    2014-09-09

    The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission dataset of biogenic VOCs available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980 - 2010. This dataset is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg(C) yr1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2 %. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of * 17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene in ventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the datasets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene and*-pinene showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements in the Amazon andthe model was able to capture the seasonal variation of emissions in this region.

  11. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2011-10-31

    The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

  12. Method of increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherry, Robert S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A method for increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a bioreactor is disclosed. The method comprises dissolving in the aqueous phase of the bioreactor a water soluble, nontoxic, non-biodegradable polymer having a molecular weight of at least 500 and operable for decreasing the distribution coefficient of the VOCs. Polyoxyalkylene alkanols are preferred polymers. A method of increasing the growth rate of VOC-degrading microorganisms in the bioreactor and a method of increasing the solubility of sparingly soluble VOCs in aqueous solution are also disclosed.

  13. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Weller, Thomas E. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Howard, Christopher A. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC? and YbC? in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  14. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC? and YbC? in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore »and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  15. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  16. Process Development for High Voc CdTe Solar Cells: Phase I, Annual Technical Report, October 2005 - September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferekides, C. S.; Morel, D. L.

    2007-04-01

    The focus of this project is the open-circuit voltage of the CdTe thin-film solar cell. CdTe continues to be one of the leading materials for large-scale cost-effective production of photovoltaics, but the efficiency of the CdTe solar cell has been stagnant for the last few years. At the manufacturing front, the CdTe technology is fast paced and moving forward with U.S.-based First Solar LLC leading the world in CdTe module production. To support the industry efforts and continue the advancement of this technology, it will be necessary to continue improvements in solar cell efficiency. A closer look at the state-of-the-art performance levels puts the three solar cell efficiency parameters of short-circuit current density (JSC), open-circuit voltage (VOC), and fill factor (FF) in the 24-26 mA/cm2, 844?850 mV, and 74%-76% ranges respectively. During the late 1090s, efforts to improve cell efficiency were primarily concerned with increasing JSC, simply by using thinner CdS window layers to enhance the blue response (<510 nm) of the CdTe cell. These efforts led to underscoring the important role 'buffers' (or high-resistivity transparent films) play in CdTe cells. The use of transparent bi-layers (low-p/high-p) as the front contact is becoming a 'standard' feature of the CdTe cell.

  17. Fermilab | About | Organization | Fermilab Organization | Explanation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Symbols Line Organization: sectors, divisions, sections Line Organization Matrix Organization: centers, projects and programs utilizing resources spanning the entire...

  18. Hyperpolarizable compounds and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Therien, Michael J. (Philadelphia, PA); DiMagno, Stephen G. (Lincoln, NE)

    1998-01-01

    Substituted compounds having relatively large molecular first order hyperpolarizabilities are provided, along with devices and materials containing them. In general, the compounds bear electron-donating and electron-withdrawing chemical substituents on a polyheterocyclic core.

  19. Hyperpolarizable compounds and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Therien, M.J.; DiMagno, S.G.

    1998-07-21

    Substituted compounds having relatively large molecular first order hyperpolarizabilities are provided, along with devices and materials containing them. In general, the compounds bear electron-donating and electron-withdrawing chemical substituents on a polyheterocyclic core. 13 figs.

  20. Formation of Norisoprenoid Flavor Compounds in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) Roots: Characterization of a Cyclic-Specific Carotenoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tholl, Dorothea

    , and -zeacarotene.9 Carrot flavor is influenced by carotenoid degradation products as well as other compounds, such as organic acids, phenolics, and alkynes.10,11 Carotenoids are tetraterpenoid pigments and normally

  1. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

    1995-05-02

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

  2. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

  3. Bibliography of work on the photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    This is a bibliography of information in the open literature on work that has been done to date on the photocatalytic oxidation of compounds, principally organic compounds. The goal of the listing is removing hazardous oompounds from water or air. It contains lists of substances and literature citations. The bibliography includes information obtained through the middle of 1993 and some selected references for the balance of that year.

  4. Preparation and synthetic application of {alpha}-phenylthioethylsamarium compound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasuga, Y.; Matsubara, S.; Utimoto, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Although samarium(II) iodide-mediated reaction of organohalides with carbonyl compounds has been applied to various organic syntheses, intermediary organosamarium species could be detected only when HMPA exists in the reaction system. The authors now report the detection of {alpha}-phenylthioethylsamarium compound in the absence of HMPA and application to diastereoselective reaction with aldehydes. A treatment of the organosamarium reagent, prepared from 1-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide and samarium(II) iodide, with D{sub 2}O afforded 1-deuterioethyl phenyl sulfide in 53% yield (82% D). The reagent reacted with aldehyde containing a stereogenic center at {alpha}-position to give {beta}-hydroxysulfide with high diastereoselectivity. Reaction using Barbier type procedure afforded the same results. These results suggest that {alpha}-phenylthioethylsamarium species is also generated in the Barbier type reaction. Configurational stability of {alpha}-thiosubstituted alkylmetal compounds seems to depend on the applied metal. Hoffmann Test indicated that the configuration of {alpha}-phenylthloethylsamarium compound is unchanged during the reaction with aldehyde, while that of {alpha}-alkylthioalkyllithium is unstable.

  5. The temporal dynamics of terrestrial organic matter transfer to the oceans : initial assessment and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drenzek, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01

    This thesis employs compound-specific stable carbon and radiocarbon isotopic analysis of organic biomarkers to (a) resolve petrogenic from pre-aged vascular plant organic carbon (OC) in continental margin sediments, (b) ...

  6. In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Exhaust Materails from a Set of Gasoline and a Set of Diesel Engine Vehicles Operated at 30F In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate...

  7. STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS OF ORGANIC ANION TRANSPORTING POLYPEPTIDE MEDIATED TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Yi Miao

    2010-04-12

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATP; other: Oatp) form a mammalian transporter superfamily that mediates the transport of structurally unrelated compounds across the cell membrane. Members in this superfamily participate...

  8. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  9. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizingOrganizing

  10. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  11. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 1179511817, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/11795/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    the atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to low volatility products that partition- acterize SOA. Laboratory chamber studies are essential to understand the lifecycle of organics involved of the complete suite of compounds involved in SOA formation is generally not feasible, key observations can

  12. Hybrid inorganic-organic, organic charge transfer, and radical based compounds with chalcofulvalene donors and organic acceptors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinheimer, Eric Wade

    2009-05-15

    The primary focus of this dissertation is the electrochemical preparation of radical cation salts utilizing the donor o-4,4’-dimethyltetrathiafulvalene (o-Me2TTF) and spherical, tetrahedral, octahedral, bimetallic, cyanometallate...

  13. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of organic–inorganic hybrid compound: (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}N{sub 2}){sub 2}(Hg{sub 0.75}Cd{sub 0.25})Cl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elwej, R. Hamdi, M.; Hannachi, N.; Hlel, F.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We have synthesized a new hybrid compound of composition (C6H9N2)2(Hg0.75Cd0.25)Cl4. • The Ac conductivity of the title material was studied as a function of frequency and temperature. • The dielectric data have been analyzed in modulus formalism using KWW. - Abstract: The bis-2-amino-4-picolinium tetrachloromercurate-cadmate compound (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}N{sub 2}){sub 2}(Hg{sub 0.75}Cd{sub 0.25})Cl{sub 4} was prepared by hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The electrical properties of the compound were studied using impedance spectroscopy in the frequency and temperature range of 200 Hz–5 MHz and 308–403 K, respectively. The equivalent circuit is modeled by a combination of a parallel Rp//CPE circuit to explain the impedance results. The dielectric data were analyzed using complex electrical modulus M* at various temperatures. The activation energy responsible for the relaxation calculated from the modulus spectra is found to be almost the same as the value obtained from the temperature variation of dc conductivity. The electrical modulus and its scaling behavior are also investigated.

  14. Fluid Phase Equilibria 243 (2006) 198205 Comment on "prediction of vapor pressures of solid organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    2006-01-01

    of vapor pressures of solid organic compounds with a group contribution method" William E. Acree Jr gave satisfactory vapor pressure predictions for many organic compounds having vapor pressures well only for substituting into their predictive vapor pressure expression. The intent of this short

  15. Giant magnetoresistive cobalt oxide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  16. Giant magnetoresistive cobalt oxide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, P.G.; Xiang, X.; Goldwasser, I.

    1998-07-07

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties. 58 figs.

  17. Compound hybrid geothermal-fossil power plants: thermodynamic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SUPERHEATING; THERMODYNAMICS; WELL TEMPERATURE; WELLHEADS; WESTERN REGION; HEATING; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; NORTH AMERICA; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POWER PLANTS; RESERVOIR TEMPERATURE;...

  18. Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganization Chart Organization Charts

  19. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout EventsOrganizing

  20. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing Committee

  1. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing

  2. Phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with high efficiency and brightness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-11-12

    An organic light emitting device including a) an anode; b) a cathode; and c) an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode, the emissive layer comprising an organic host compound and a phosphorescent compound exhibiting a Stokes Shift overlap greater than 0.3 eV. The organic light emitting device may further include a hole transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the anode; and an electron transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the cathode. In some embodiments, the phosphorescent compound exhibits a phosphorescent lifetime of less than 10 .mu.s. In some embodiments, the concentration of the phosphorescent compound ranges from 0.5 wt. % to 10 wt. %.

  3. Compound structure one-dimensional photonic crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Fang, Yun-Tuan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new compound structure one-dimensional photonic crystal, which include series connection, parallel connection and positive and negative feedback compound structure photonic crystal. We have studied their transmission characteristics and obtained some new results, which should be help to design new type optical devices, such as optical amplifier, photonic crystal laser and so on.

  4. Performance of BNL-TSTA compound cryopump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hseuh, H C; Worwetz, H A

    1980-01-01

    A compound cryopump using cryocondensation pumping for hydrogen isotopes and cryosorption pumping with coconut charcoal as adsorbent for helium was designed. This compound cryopump was subsequently built (by Janis Research, Stoneham, MA) and has been tested at Brookhaven, fulfilling the design requirements and are delivered to Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) Vacuum Facility at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for on-line operations.

  5. The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2011-01-01

    The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

  6. PESTICIDES AND SOLVENTS Modern pesticides include a diverse number of compounds, grouped according to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    PESTICIDES AND SOLVENTS Modern pesticides include a diverse number of compounds, grouped according in groundwater today. Solvents include a number of organic liquids that are used in a variety of house- hold products such as paint, cleaners, degreasers, and other applications. The most dangerous solvents often

  7. Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Da Costa, Andre R. (Menlo Park, CA); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA); Amo, Karl D. (Mountain View, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2003-06-03

    A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

  8. Emission and chemistry of organic carbon in the gas and aerosol phase at a sub-urban site near Mexico City in March 2006 during the MILAGRO study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    C 11 -aromatics naphthalene benzene Oxygenates methanoland aromatics. In the af- oxygenated VOCs (formaldehyde, methanol,

  9. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willem, Henry

    2010-01-01

    organic aerosols from ozone-initiated reactions with emissions from wood-based materials and a "green" paint.organic compounds (VOCs) and other air pollutants from the indoor application of water - based paints.Paints and coatings Wall finish and surfaces Acrylic urethane Glass fiber, resin, polystyrene, polyurethane, polyethylene foam, organic

  10. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout Events

  11. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout

  12. Digital Construction Platform: A Compound Arm Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spielberg, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel large-scale Digital Construction Platform (DCP) for on-site sensing, analysis, and fabrication. The DCP is an in-progress research project consisting of a compound robotic arm system comprised of a ...

  13. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  14. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  15. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  16. Alternative descriptions and bipartite compound quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Scolarici; L. Solombrino

    2008-11-10

    We analyze some features of alternative Hermitian and quasi-Hermitian quantum descriptions of simple and bipartite compound systems. We show that alternative descriptions of two interacting subsystems are possible if and only if the metric operator of the compound system can be obtained as tensor product of positive operators on component spaces. Some examples also show that such property could be strictly connected with symmetry properties of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian.

  17. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-04-23

    Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

  18. Innovative technology summary report: in situ air stripping using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In situ air stripping (ISAS) technology was developed to remediate soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISAS employs horizontal wells to inject (sparge) air into the ground water and vacuum extract VOCs from vadose zone soils. The innovation is creation of a system that combines two somewhat innovative technologies, air sparging and horizontal wells, with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  19. Turbo Compounding: A Technology Whose Time Has Come | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding...A Technology Who's Time Has Come Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck...

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  4. Interplay between compound and fragments aspects of nuclear fission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interplay between compound and fragments aspects of nuclear fission and heavy-ion reaction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interplay between compound and fragments...

  5. Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells 2010 DOE Vehicle...

  6. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles & Lambert, 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  8. DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrathall, James Anthony

    2011-01-01

    OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS James Anthony AprilCOAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS James Anthony Wrathalla promising agent in coal-liquid desulfurization, assuming

  9. Partitioning Behavior of Organic Contaminants in Carbon Storage Environments: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burant, Aniela; Lowry, Gregory V.; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

    2013-01-13

    Carbon capture and storage is a promising strategy for mitigating the CO{sub 2} contribution to global climate change. The large scale implementation of the technology mandates better understanding of the risks associated with CO{sub 2} injection into geologic formations and the subsequent interactions with groundwater resources. The injected supercritical CO{sub 2} (sc-CO{sub 2}) is a nonpolar solvent that can potentially mobilize organic compounds that exist at residual saturation in the formation. Here, we review the partitioning behavior of selected organic compounds typically found in depleted oil reservoirs in the residual oil–brine–sc-CO{sub 2} system under carbon storage conditions. The solubility of pure phase organic compounds in sc-CO{sub 2} and partitioning of organic compounds between water and sc-CO{sub 2} follow trends predicted based on thermodynamics. Compounds with high volatility and low aqueous solubility have the highest potential to partition to sc-CO{sub 2}. The partitioning of low volatility compounds to sc-CO{sub 2} can be enhanced by cosolvency due to the presence of higher volatility compounds in the sc-CO{sub 2}. The effect of temperature, pressure, salinity, pH, and dissolution of water molecules into sc-CO{sub 2} on the partitioning behavior of organic compounds in the residual oil–brine–sc-CO{sub 2} system is discussed. Data gaps and research needs for models to predict the partitioning of organic compounds in brines and from complex mixtures of oils are presented. Models need to be able to better incorporate the effect of salinity and cosolvency, which will require more experimental data from key classes of organic compounds.

  10. Partitioning Behavior of Organic Contaminants in Carbon Storage Environments: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burant, Aniela; Lowry, Gregory V.; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage is a promising strategy for mitigating the CO{sub 2} contribution to global climate change. The large scale implementation of the technology mandates better understanding of the risks associated with CO{sub 2} injection into geologic formations and the subsequent interactions with groundwater resources. The injected supercritical CO{sub 2} (sc-CO{sub 2}) is a nonpolar solvent that can potentially mobilize organic compounds that exist at residual saturation in the formation. Here, we review the partitioning behavior of selected organic compounds typically found in depleted oil reservoirs in the residual oil–brine–sc-CO{sub 2} system under carbon storage conditions. The solubility of pure phase organic compounds in sc-CO{sub 2} and partitioning of organic compounds between water and sc-CO{sub 2} follow trends predicted based on thermodynamics. Compounds with high volatility and low aqueous solubility have the highest potential to partition to sc-CO{sub 2}. The partitioning of low volatility compounds to sc-CO{sub 2} can be enhanced by co-solvency due to the presence of higher volatility compounds in the sc-CO{sub 2}. The effect of temperature, pressure, salinity, pH, and dissolution of water molecules into sc-CO{sub 2} on the partitioning behavior of organic compounds in the residual oil-brine-sc-CO{sub 2} system is discussed. Data gaps and research needs for models to predict the partitioning of organic compounds in brines and from complex mixtures of oils are presented. Models need to be able to better incorporate the effect of salinity and co-solvency, which will require more experimental data from key classes of organic compounds.

  11. PROJECT PROFILE: Utilizing Emergent Material Properties and Novel Device Architectures for Advancing Organic Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will design and develop efficient, stable, and inexpensive organic photovoltaics (PV). It will also make the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s organic photovoltaic database available to the public and add contributions to simulation and stability of organic PV compounds.

  12. An Innovative Reactor Technology to Improve Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, Jane [TIAX LLC., Lexington, MA (United States)

    2013-03-30

    As residential buildings achieve tighter envelopes in order to minimize energy used for space heating and cooling, accumulation of indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), becomes a major concern causing poor air quality and increased health risks. Current VOC removal methods include sorbents, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO), and increased ventilation, but these methods do not capture or destroy all VOCs or are prohibitively expensive to implement. TIAX's objective in this program was to develop a new VOC removal technology for residential buildings. This novel air purification technology is based on an innovative reactor and light source design along with UVPCO properties of the chosen catalyst to purify indoor air and enhance indoor air quality (IAQ). During the program we designed, fabricated and tested a prototype air purifier to demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness. We also measured kinetics of VOC destruction on photocatalysts, providing deep insight into reactor design.

  13. Basics and prospective of magnetic Heusler compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felser, Claudia Wollmann, Lukas; Chadov, Stanislav; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2015-04-01

    Heusler compounds are a remarkable class of materials with more than 1000 members and a wide range of extraordinary multi-functionalities including halfmetallic high-temperature ferri- and ferromagnets, multi-ferroics, shape memory alloys, and tunable topological insulators with a high potential for spintronics, energy technologies, and magneto-caloric applications. The tunability of this class of materials is exceptional and nearly every functionality can be designed. Co{sub 2}-Heusler compounds show high spin polarization in tunnel junction devices and spin-resolved photoemission. Manganese-rich Heusler compounds attract much interest in the context of spin transfer torque, spin Hall effect, and rare earth free hard magnets. Most Mn{sub 2}-Heusler compounds crystallize in the inverse structure and are characterized by antiparallel coupling of magnetic moments on Mn atoms; the ferrimagnetic order and the lack of inversion symmetry lead to the emergence of new properties that are absent in ferromagnetic centrosymmetric Heusler structures, such as non-collinear magnetism, topological Hall effect, and skyrmions. Tetragonal Heusler compounds with large magneto crystalline anisotropy can be easily designed by positioning the Fermi energy at the van Hove singularity in one of the spin channels. Here, we give a comprehensive overview and a prospective on the magnetic properties of Heusler materials.

  14. Process for production of a borohydride compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-19

    A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

  15. Wastewater treatment -- New regs add emissions control to managers' duties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, P.M. (Environmental Process Technologies Inc., Munster, IN (United States)); Forrest, C.J. (Equinox Environmental Consultants Ltd., Wheaton, IL (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Wastewater treatment facilities traditionally were regulated primarily from the standpoint of effluent criteria and solid waste disposal requirements. However, since passage of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments, wastewater treatment facility operators must be concerned with air emissions, especially of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), generated by their processes. Three basic approaches are used to manage VOC emissions from wastewater treatment systems--pollution prevention activities, wastewater treatment control methods and emissions control methods. These approaches may be used in combination to minimize VOCs in industrial and municipal wastewater streams.

  16. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB), which is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation, remediates soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISB involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove .VOCs from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of VOCs. The innovation is in the combination of 3 emerging technologies, air stripping, horizontal wells, and bioremediation via gaseous nutrient injection with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  17. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  18. Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon M Lawrence

    2011-02-15

    The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected for rare-earth-like Hund's rule behavior, essentially because the orbital moment is suppressed for itinerant 5f electrons. We also found that the standard local-moment-based theory of the temperature dependence of the specific heat, susceptibility and neutron scattering fails badly for URu{sub 2}Zn{sub 20} and UCo{sub 2}Zn{sub 20}, even though the theory is phenomenally successful for the closely related rare earth compound YbFe{sub 2}Zn{sub 20}. Both these results highlight the distinction between the itineracy of the 5f's and the localization of the 4f's. It is our hope that these results are sufficiently significant as to stimulate deeper investigation of these compounds.

  19. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shul, R.J.; Constantine, C.

    1997-04-29

    A dry etching method is disclosed. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators. 1 fig.

  20. Beta cell device using icosahedral boride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aselage, Terrence L. (62 Avenida Del Sol, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Emin, David (1502 Harvard Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106-3712)

    2002-01-01

    A beta cell for converting beta-particle energies into electrical energy having a semiconductor junction that incorporates an icosahedral boride compound selected from B.sub.12 As.sub.2, B.sub.12 P.sub.2, elemental boron having an .alpha.-rhombohedral structure, elemental boron having a .beta.-rhombohedral structure, and boron carbides of the chemical formula B.sub.12-x C.sub.3-x, where 0.15compound self-heals, resisting degradation from radiation damage.

  1. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agblevor, F.A.

    1998-09-15

    A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

  2. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agblevor, Foster A. (Lakewood, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

  3. Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-05-28

    Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

  4. Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-11-11

    Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

  5. Apparatus for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Columbus, OH)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil in a manner adapted to decompose the organic compounds; one embodiment of the apparatus comprises a means to supply ozone as a gas-ozone mixture, a stability means to treat ozone obtained from the supply and distribution means to apply the stabilized gas-ozone to soil. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  6. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  7. Characterization of the Molecular Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosols using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellon, Rachel Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    mass spectrometry, Analytical Chemistry, 82(19), 7979-7986.mass spectrometry, Analytical Chemistry, 79(21), Altieri, K.of organic compounds, Analytical Chemistry, 35(13), 2146-&.

  8. Variations in organic aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties upon heterogeneous OH oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappa, Christopher D.

    Measurements of the evolution of organic aerosol extinction cross sections (?[subscript ext]) and subsaturated hygroscopicity upon heterogeneous OH oxidation are reported for two model compounds, squalane (a C30 saturated ...

  9. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater : structure, cycling, and the role of biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan, Tracy M. (Tracy Michelle), 1977-

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate three different areas relating to the characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): further determination of the chemical compounds present in high molecular weight DOM ...

  10. Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade-Offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade predict the hydrogen storage properties of these compounds. Approximately 20 000 candidate compounds were excess H2 uptake and surface area, we predict the theoretical total hydrogen storage capacity

  11. Metal-organic framework materials with ultrahigh surface areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Wilmer, Christopher E.; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Snurr, Randall Q.; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Borah, Bhaskarjyoti

    2015-12-22

    A metal organic framework (MOF) material including a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area greater than 7,010 m.sup.2/g. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bond. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including three types of cuboctahedron cages fused to provide continuous channels. Also a method of making a metal organic framework (MOF) material including saponifying hexaester precursors having alkyne bonds to form a plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bonds and performing a solvothermal reaction with the plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers and one or more metal containing compounds to form the MOF material.

  12. Compound Term Composition Algebra: The Semantics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analyti, Anastasia

    classification and analysis see [12, 6, 18, 7, 9, 10, 8]). Having a faceted taxonomy, the indexing of domain Science, FORTH, Heraklion, Greece 3 Laboratoire de Recherche en Informatique, Universite de Paris to specify the meaningful (valid) compound terms (conjunctions of terms) in a given faceted taxonomy

  13. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulkowski, J.E.

    1986-10-21

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will. 3 figs.

  14. HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS M.D. MCCLUSKEY* University) spectroscopy of hydrogen and deuterium in GaP, AlSb, ZnSe, and GaN has provided important information about the structures of dopant- hydrogen complexes and their interaction with the host lattice. In GaN:Mg, for example

  15. Superconductivity in iron compounds G. R. Stewart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    of the superconductivity in this new class of compounds. These iron pnictide and chalcogenide (FePn/Ch) superconductors-phonon coupled ``conventional'' superconductors. Clearly, superconductivity and magnetism or magnetic of magnetism and superconductivity in FePn/Ch superconductors 1606 D. Tc and TS=TSDW versus pressure 1607 1

  16. ATOC 3500/CHEM 3151 Spring 2014 Particulate Mass and Visibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    atmosphere, volatile organic (VOCs) released from activities such as barbeques, fast-food restaurants, gas-powered lawn mowers, paint, etc., react photochemically to produce more oxidized compounds that tend'll see how much particulate a similar amount of hypothetical organic molecule can produce. (a) Assume

  17. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  18. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  19. Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

    2004-09-21

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  20. Compound transfer matrices: Constructive and destructive interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonserm, Petarapa

    2011-01-01

    Scattering from a compound barrier, one composed of a number of distinct non-overlapping sub-barriers, has a number of interesting and subtle mathematical features. If one is scattering classical particles, where the wave aspects of the particle can be ignored, the transmission probability of the compound barrier is simply given by the product of the transmission probabilities of the individual sub-barriers. In contrast if one is scattering waves (whether we are dealing with either purely classical waves or quantum Schrodinger wavefunctions) each sub-barrier contributes phase information (as well as a transmission probability), and these phases can lead to either constructive or destructive interference, with the transmission probability oscillating between nontrivial upper and lower bounds. In this article we shall study these upper and lower bounds in some detail, and also derive bounds on the closely related process of quantum excitation (particle production) via parametric resonance.

  1. Hydromechanical transmission with compound planetary assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A power transmission having three distinct ranges: (1) hydrostatic, (2) simple power-split hydromechanical, and (3) compound power-split hydromechanical. A single compound planetary assembly has two sun gears, two ring gears, and a single carrier with two sets of elongated planet gears. The two sun gears may be identical in size, and the two ring gears may be identical in size. A speed-varying module in driving relationship to the first sun gear is clutchable, in turn, to (1) the input shaft and (2) the second sun gear. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being the one clutchable to either the input shaft or to the second sun gear. The other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, is connected in driving relation to the first sun gear. A brake grounds the carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft is also clutchable to the second ring gear of the compound planetary assembly.

  2. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA); Cahn, Robert (Walnut Creek, CA); Cederstrom, Bjorn (Traellborg, SE); Danielsson, Mats (Stocksund, SE); Vestlund, Jonas (Stockholm, SE)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  3. Identification and quantification of organic chemicals in supplemental fuel blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salter, F.

    1996-12-31

    Continental Cement Company, Inc. (Continental) burns waste fuels to supplement coal in firing the kiln. It is to be expected that federal and state agencies want an accounting of the chemicals burned. As rules and regulations become more plentiful, a company such as Continental must demonstrate that it has made a reasonable attempt to identify and quantify many specific organic compounds. The chemicals on the SARA 313 list can change frequently. Also the number and concentrations of compounds that can disqualify a material from consideration as a supplemental fuel at Continental continues to change. A quick and reliable method of identifying and quantifying organics in waste fuel blends is therefore crucial. Using a Hewlett-Packard 5972 GC/MS system Continental has developed a method of generating values for the total weight of compounds burned. A similar procedure is used to verify that waste streams meet Continental`s acceptance criteria.

  4. Intercalation compounds and electrodes for batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Sadoway, Donald R.; Jang, Young-Il; Huang, Biyan

    2004-09-07

    This invention concerns intercalation compounds and in particular lithium intercalation compounds which have improved properties for use in batteries. Compositions of the invention include particulate metal oxide material having particles of multicomponent metal oxide, each including an oxide core of at least first and second metals in a first ratio, and each including a surface coating of metal oxide or hydroxide that does not include the first and second metals in the first ratio formed by segregation of at least one of the first and second metals from the core. The core may preferably comprise Li.sub.x M.sub.y N.sub.z O.sub.2 wherein M and N are metal atom or main group elements, x, y and z are numbers from about 0 to about 1 and y and z are such that a formal charge on M.sub.y N.sub.z portion of the compound is (4-x), and having a charging voltage of at least about 2.5V. The invention may also be characterized as a multicomponent oxide microstructure usable as a lithium intercalation material including a multiphase oxide core and a surface layer of one material, which is a component of the multiphase oxide core, that protects the underlying intercalation material from chemical dissolution or reaction. In a particular preferred example the multicomponent oxide may be an aluminum-doped lithium manganese oxide composition. Such aluminum-doped lithium manganese oxide compositions, having an orthorhombic structure, also form a part of the invention. In addition, the invention includes articles, particularly electrodes, for batteries formed from the compositions of the invention, and batteries including such electrodes. The invention further relates to a composite intercalation material comprising at least two compounds in which at least one compound has an orthorhombic structure Li.sub.x Al.sub.y Mn.sub.1-y O.sub.2, where y is nonzero, or a mixture of orthorhombic and monoclinic Li.sub.x Al.sub.y Mn.sub.1-y O.sub.2.

  5. Seasonal and diurnal variations of submicron organic aerosol in Tokyo observed using the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    with carbon monoxide (CO) and fragments of aliphatic and oxygenated organic compounds in the AMS mass spectra. Combustion-related organic aerosol (combustion OA) is defined as the primary organic aerosol (POA) fraction the combustion OA and the background OA from the total OA. The combustion OA and excess OA show good correlation

  6. Phenolic Compounds of Sorghum, their Chemopreventive Properties and Absorption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taleon Alban, Victor Manuel

    2013-07-12

    Sorghum contains many phenolic compounds which have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties as well as natural colorants in foods. Phenolic compounds of stalks, sheaths, leaves, glumes and grains from tan (ARTx631...

  7. Hydroxyalkyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katti, K.V.; Singh, P.R.; Reddy, V.S.; Katti, K.K.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.

    1999-03-02

    This research discloses a compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises a functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine ligand and a metal combined with the ligand. 16 figs.

  8. Hydroxyalkyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad R. (Columbia, MO); Reddy, V. Sreenivasa (Columbia, MO); Katti, Kavita K. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

    1999-01-01

    A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises a functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine ligand and a metal combined with the ligand.

  9. Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

  10. Departmental Organization and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-06-10

    Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

  11. Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  12. Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  13. Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-30

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

  14. Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Godshall, Ned A. (Stanford, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

  15. Modified normal-phase ion-pair chromatographic methods for the facile separation and purification of imidazolium-based ionic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, ND; Schenkel, MR; Robertson, LA; Noble, RD; Gin, DL

    2012-07-04

    lmidazolium- and oligo(imidazolium)-based ionic organic compounds are important in the design of room-temperature ionic liquid materials; however, the chromatographic analysis and separation of such compounds are often difficult. A convenient and inexpensive method for effective thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis and column chromatography separation of imidazolium-based ionic compounds is presented. Normal-phase ion-pair TLC is used to effectively analyze homologous mixtures of these ionic compounds. Subsequent separation of the mixtures is performed using ion-pair flash chromatography on normal-phase silica gel, yielding high levels of recovery. This method also results in a complete exchange of the counter anion on the imidazolium compounds to the anion of the ion-pair reagent. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Highly Selective Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2009-09-28

    This grant was focused on the study of metal-organic frameworks with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the use of MOFs with well-defined open metal sites for binding of gases and small organics. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs that combine large pore size with high surface area for their use in gas adsorption and separation of polycyclic organic compounds. (3) To functionalize MOFs for the storage of inert gases such as methane. A brief outline of our progress towards these objectives is presented here as it forms part of the basis for the ideas to be developed under the present proposal.

  17. Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

  18. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  19. The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds: Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    Research during the current award period has covered several related topics which have emerged and grown as a consequence of the various discoveries that have been made during this award period. They have been divided into the following subsections for clarity and emphasis: The activation of tertiary amines by osmium cluster complexes; CH bond activation and ring opening of a nitrogen containing strained ring heterocycle by an osmium cluster complex; Ring opening of cyclic thioethers; cyclooligomerization of Thietanes; Studies of the cyclobutyne ligand; Insertion of an alkynes into metal-metal bonds; and Energy storage in metal clusters. A summary of the results of these studies is given in the following sections of this report. These studies have resulted in 50 scientific publications over the last three years and details of their studies beyond that given in the following sections can be found in those reports. All of these reports are listed in the final section of this report by the author`s names, title and journal citation.

  20. Annual research plan, 1983-84. [Organic compounds derived from fossil substances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-05-01

    The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) resulted from efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure the continuity of the unique energy research capabilities that had been developed at the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) over the past 65 years. This was accomplished by a Cooperative Agreement between DOE and IIT Research Institute (IITRI). The agreement to operate NIPER for the five fiscal years 1984-88 became effective October 1, 1983. The NIPER Annual Research Plan for 1983-84 consists of eight projects in the Base Program and 13 projects in the Optional Program. A sampling of potential Work for Others projects is also presented. The Base Program consists of five EOR and three Fundamental Petroleum Chemistry projects. The Optional Program has three EOR projects, one Unconventional Gas Recovery project, five APT projects, and four Advanced Utilization Research projects.

  1. A study of the tropospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broekhuizen, Keith Edward, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of reactions important to the troposphere have been investigated using a high pressure, turbulent, discharge-flow technique coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The ability to ...

  2. Concentrations and fluxes of atmospheric biogenic volatile organic compounds by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misztal, Pawel K.

    2010-01-01

    will be of value to the wider flux measurement community. A novel approach to determining the lag time between the vertical wind measurement and the air concentration measurement has been developed that will greatly reduce the uncertainty in the derived flux...

  3. Measurements and receptor modeling of volatile organic compounds in Southeastern Mexico City, 2000 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    paint (VINPA), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), hot soak (HOTS), vehicle exhaust (EXHTI and EXHTN) from Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, unpublished. SOLVENT LPG HOTSOAK EXHAUST _________________ ______ _______ ____________________________________ VINPA VARNISH LPG HOTS EXHTI EXHTN EXHTG1 EXHTG2 Ethane 0.000 0.000 0.011 0.004 0.033 0.017 0.029 0

  4. Impact of California Reformulated Gasoline on Motor Vehicle Emissions. 2. Volatile Organic Compound Speciation and Reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchstetter, Thomas; Singer, Brett; Harley, Robert

    1999-01-01

    California Reformulated Gasoline On Motor Vehicle EmissionsCalifornia Reformulated Gasoline on Motor Vehicle EmmissionsBerkeley Environ. ScLTechnoL gasoline Impact California of

  5. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    AT A SITE OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L.A T A SITE OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L.a site contaminated with gasoline. Although the high V O C

  6. Supporting Information1 Condensational Uptake of Semivolatile Organic Compounds in Gasoline3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    by oxidation with OH, NO3 and O3 was calculated with rate41 coefficients of 1.2E-11, 1.2E-14 and 6.7E-18 cm3 20 21 AURAMS Description22 23 AURAMS (version 1.4.0) is an off-line chemical transport model (CTM) that is24 driven by the Canadian operational weather forecast model, GEM (Global Environmental25

  7. Tethered balloon measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds at a Boreal forest site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirig, VC

    2004-01-01

    the distance upwind where the crosswind-integrated footprintand the maximum of the crosswind- integrated footprint

  8. Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D; Blake, D. R; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    ethane, ethene, propane, propene, acetylene, i- butane,n-butane, 1-butene, trans-2-butene, cis-2-butene, i-pentane,some alkanes (e.g. propane, i-butane, n-butane) (Blake and

  9. Regional Analysis of Nonmethane Volatile Organic Compounds in the Lower Troposphere of the Southeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    , acetylene, propane, i-butane, and n-butane with a winter maximum and a summer minimum. An analysis

  10. Observations of nonmethane organic compounds during ARCTAS - Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Propane WAS Ethane TOGA WAS Butane TOGA WAS Isopentane R. S.24 Plume 28 n-Hexane i-Pentane n-Pentane 1-Butene n-Butanei-Butane Propene Propane Ethyne Ethene Ethane global scale,

  11. Source characteristics of volatile organic compounds during high ozone episodes in Hong Kong, Southern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.; Wang, T.; Chameides, W. L; Cardelino, C.; Blake, D. R; Streets, D. G

    2008-01-01

    Kong. Species TO EPD sites Methane Ethane Propane n-butanei-butane n-pentane i-pentane n-hexane 2,2-dimethybutane 2,3-Species Ethane Propane n-butane i-butane n-pentane i-pentane

  12. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, AbraOF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, Abrareporting indoor air contamination (6,7). Estimation of

  13. Source characteristics of volatile organic compounds during high ozone episodes in Hong Kong, Southern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.; Wang, T.; Chameides, W. L; Cardelino, C.; Blake, D. R; Streets, D. G

    2008-01-01

    2-butene trans-2-butene 1,3-butadiene Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y1-butene 1-pentene 1,3-butadiene Isoprene Cis-2-butene

  14. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Butene cis-2-Butene 1,3-Butadiene 1-Pentene trans-2-Pentenei-Pentane n-Pentane 1,3-Butadiene 1-Pentene Isoprene trans-i-Pentane n-Pentane 1,3-Butadiene 1-Pentene Isoprene trans-

  15. Development of the colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives and volatile organic compounds in air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads 345 East, DK-2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark b Department of Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, Technical University of Denmark, Richard Petersens Plads 321, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark c Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense

  16. Source characteristics of volatile organic compounds during high ozone episodes in Hong Kong, Southern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.; Wang, T.; Chameides, W. L; Cardelino, C.; Blake, D. R; Streets, D. G

    2008-01-01

    TO EPD sites Methane Ethane Propane n-butane i-butane n-to Source Category Species Ethane Propane n-butane i-butane9. Ratios of n-butane-to-ethane vs. propane-to-ethane from

  17. Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D; Blake, D. R; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    A. M. , Onasch, T. B. , Peltier, R. E. , Quinn, P. K. ,J. , Sullivan, A. P. , Peltier, R. E. , Russell, A. , Yan,

  18. In-situ remediation system for volatile organic compounds with deep recharge mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jr., Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (Augusta, SC); Phifer, Mark A. (Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the treatment and remediation of a contaminated aquifer in the presence of an uncontaminated aquifer at a different hydraulic potential. The apparatus consists of a wellbore inserted through a first aquifer and into a second aquifer, an inner cylinder within the wellbore is supported and sealed to the wellbore to prevent communication between the two aquifers. Air injection is used to sparge the liquid having the higher static water level and, to airlift it to a height whereby it spills into the inner cylinder. The second treatment area provides treatment in the form of aeration or treatment with a material. Vapor stripped in sparging is vented to the atmosphere. Treated water is returned to the aquifer having the lower hydraulic potential.

  19. Atmospheric Aerosols Aging Involving Organic Compounds and Impacts on Particle Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Chong

    2013-02-01

    In the first part of this dissertation, we study the aging of soot, a representative type of primary aerosols, in the presence of OH-initiated oxidation products of toluene. Monodisperse soot particles are introduced into an environmental chamber...

  20. Chemistry of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From the Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals With Aromatic Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strollo Gordon, Christen Michelle

    2013-01-01

    C(O)OR Carboxyl C(O)OH Hydroxyl CHOH Peroxide ROOH E1 NA 1oxidation of toluene with hydroxyl radicals. Atmos. Environ.relevant isoprene-derived hydroxyl epoxides. Environ. Sci.