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1

A Critical Review on Studies of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Sorption by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Critical Review on Studies of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Sorption by Building Materials (RP the pros and cons of existing sorption models, as well as experimental methods. In addition, it summarizes existing sorption data in order to understand the phenomenon of VOC sorption on building materials better

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

2

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST OTHER CHANGES TO VOC MONITORING PROGRAM Page 1 of 21 VOC 3·1: PMR Section 3, Topic 1, Table 1 Recalculated Waste Matrix Code Group Weighting Factors based on the 2004 Compliance Recertification Contact Handled (CH) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Inventory (m 3 ) The new weighting factors appear to be based on CH TRU waste only and do not include remote handled (RH) TRU waste. There was no discussion in the PMR addressing possible differences in Waste Matrix Code Group (WMCG) for RH TRU that could potentially impact the weighting factors. Please provide data characterizing the differences in emissions between the two types of waste, in support of the assertion that modeling data from CH TRU waste adequately

3

Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ethene toluene n-butane propane i-pentane i-butane propeneethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These fiveVOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Southern California Edison's (SCE) Research Program for Industrial Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Applied Utility Systems Rosemead, California Tarrytown, New York Santa Ana, California ABSTRACT SCE has developed and implemented a research program for customer retention through VOC emission control. Following characterization of problematic..., California RON CASCONE Senior Consultant Chem Systems, Inc. Tarrytown, New York JIM REESE Applied Utility Santa Ana, California ABSTRACT SCE has developed and implemented a research program for customer retention through VOC emission control. Following...

Sung, R. D.; Cascone, R.; Reese, J.

5

ARTIFACT FORMATION IN HIGH VOLUME SAMPLING OF VOC's AND SOLID ORGANIC COMPOUNDS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when sampling polluted air. Purified air containing 180 ppbv ozone seems to destroy PAH according Atmospheriques, Boite 7059, UNIVERSITE PARIS 7, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 PARIS Cedex 05 ABSTRACT Pollutants from well äs solid (SOC's) organic compounds. High volume samplers are commonly used m air quality

Boyer, Edmond

6

Air filters from HVAC systems as possible source of volatile organic compounds (VOC) laboratory and field assays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air filters of HVAC systems was to be evaluated. In a first study carbonyl compounds (14 aldehydes and two ketones) were measured by reacting them with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). Analysis was done by HPLC and UV detection. In laboratory experiments pieces of used and unused HVAC filters were incubated in test chambers. Filters to be investigated were taken from a filter bank of a large HVAC system in the centre of Berlin. First results show that among those compounds formaldehyde and acetone were found in higher concentrations in the test chambers filled with used filters in comparison to those with unused filters. Parallel field measurements were carried out at the prefilter and main filter banks of the two HVAC systems. Here measurements were carried out simultaneously before and after the filters to investigate whether those aldehydes or ketones arise from the filter material on site. Formaldehyde and acetone significantly increased in concentration after the filters of one HVAC system. In parallel experiments microorganisms were proved to be able to survive on air filters. Therefore, a possible source of formaldehyde and acetone might be microbes.

Hans Schleibinger; Henning Rden

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Physics Vehicular emission of volatile organicY. , and Huang, Y. S. : Emission factors and characteristicslight-duty vehicle emissions, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 30,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from Biomass Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from biomass combustion have been investigated. VOC contribute both to ... 0.510 MW. A variety of biomass fuel types and combustion equipment was covered. The su...

Lennart Gustavsson; Mats-Lennart Karlsson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

10

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi...

You, Kehua

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mechanisms for formation of organic and inorganic by-products and their control in nonthermal plasma chemical processing of VOCs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the major by-products derived from Nonthermal Plasma (NTP) chemical processing of different types of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), mechanisms for their formation, effects of reactor types and additives such as water and gaseous oxygen on by-product distribution, and safe operations of NTP reactors for the removal of VOCs.

Shigeru Futamura; Masami Sugasawa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Electrospun Polyurethane Fibers for Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrospun polyurethane fibers for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air with rapid VOC absorption and desorption have been developed. Polyurethanes based on 4,4-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) (MDI) and ...

Scholten, Elke

15

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Literature review of stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds and the implications for Hanford grouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted on the stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Based on this literature, it is likely that the limestone-containing grout will not permanently immobilize VOCs and that no presently available additives can guarantee permanent immobilization. The Westinghouse hanford company grout may be fairly effective at retarding aqueous leaching of VOCs, and commercial additives can improve this performance. Significant VOC losses do occur during stabilization/solidification, and the high temperatures of the Westinghouse Hanford Company waste and grout should exacerbate this problem. In fact, these high temperatures raise doubts about the presence of VOCs in the double-shell tanks supernates.

Spence, R.D.; Osborne, S.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

Fortner, E. C.

19

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

20

Investigations of release phenomenon of volatile organic compounds and particulates from residual storage chip piles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the method for estimating Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from wood handling and storage operations at a pulp mill. Fugitive particulate matter emissions from wood handling and storage operations are due to material load/dropout operations, wind erosion from storage piles and vehicular traffic on paved roads. The particulate matter emissions are a function of a number of variables like windspeed, surface moisture content, material silt content, and number of days of precipitation. Literature review attributes VOC emissions to biological, microbiological, chemical, and physical processes occurring in wood material storage pile. The VOC emissions are from the surface of these piles and the VOC released during retrieval of chips from the pile. VOC emissions are based on the chip throughput, number of turnovers, moisture content and surface area of the pile. The emission factors with the requisite calculation methodology to be utilized for quantifying VOC emissions from chip piles has been discussed in this paper.

Mohan, S.; Nagarkatti, M. [Trinity Consultants, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling VOC sorption of building materials and its impact on indoor air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by building materials can have significant effect on the indoor VOC concentration levels and indoor air quality in buildings. The objective of this study was to investigate ...

Zhang, Jinsong, 1975-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Opportunities for reducing volatile organic compound emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions: a feasibility analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A feasibility analysis is reported of reduction opportunities for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions. The pollution prevention (P2) methodology as defined by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment ... Keywords: emissions, manufacturing, office furniture, pollution prevention, volatile organic compound

Frank S. Luisser; Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Title Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6257E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords indoor air quality, Passive Sampling, Uptake Rates, vocs Abstract Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick's Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

25

VOC transport in vented drums containing simulated waste sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model is developed to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement in a lab-scale vented waste drum containing simulated waste sludge. The VOC transport model estimates the concentration using the measured VOC concentration beneath the drum lid and model parameters defined or estimated from process knowledge of drum contents and waste drum configuration. Model parameters include the VOC diffusion characteristic across the filter vent, VOC diffusivity in air, size of opening in the drum liner lid, the type and number of layers of polymer bags surrounding the waste, VOC permeability across the polymer, and the permeable surface area of the polymer bags. Comparison of model and experimental results indicates that the model can accurately estimate VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement. The model may be useful in estimating the VOC concentration in actual waste drums.

Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the target list or not, according to proposed language in Permit Attachment N. If a TIC is determined to contribute more than one percent of the risk, then it will be added to...

27

T2VOC user`s guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

T2VOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase, three-component, non-isothermal flow of water, air, and a volatile organic compound (VOC) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. Developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, T2VOC is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program. This report is a self-contained guide to application of T2VOC to subsurface contamination problems involving nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). It gives a technical description of the T2VOC code, including a discussion of the physical processes modeled, and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Detailed instructions for preparing input data are presented along with several illustrative sample problems.

Falta, R.W. [Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Pruess, K.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Battistelli, A. [AQUATER S.p.A., San Lorenzo in Campo, (Italy)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Thermal treatment for VOC control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic and thermal oxidation are well-established technologies for controlling volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Oxidation destroys pollutants, rather than capturing them. Oxidation units can destroy nearly 100% of VOC and toxic emissions targeted by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990--some systems attain destruction efficiencies over 99.99%. To assist in the design of these systems, an engineer will often look a/t the heat of combustion of the gas stream, along with the type of pollutant, to best determine the correct type of oxidation device to use. The paper discusses catalytic and thermal oxidation, energy recovery, and equipment for these processes.

Cloud, R.A. [Huntington Environmental Systems, Schaumburg, IL (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Use of sonication for in-well softening of semivolatile organic compounds. 1997 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'This project investigates the in-situ degradation of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using in-well sonication, in-well vapor stripping, and bioremediation. Pretreating groundwaters with sonication techniques in-situ would form VOCs that can be effectively removed by in-well vapor stripping and bioremediation. The mechanistic studies focus on the coupling of megasonics and ultrasonics to soften (i.e., partially degrade) the SVOCs; oxidative reaction mechanism studies; surface corrosion studies (on the reactor walls/well); enhancement due to addition of oxidants, quantification of the hydroxyl radical formation; identification/quantification of degradation products; volatility/degradability of the treated waters; development of a computer simulation model to describe combined in-well sonication/in-well vapor stripping/bioremediation; systems analysis/economic analysis; large laboratory-scale experiment verification; and field demonstration of the integrated technology. Benefits of this approach include: (1) Remediation is performed in-situ; (2) The treatment systems complement each other; their combination can drastically reduce or remove SVOCs and VOCs; (3) Ability to convert hard-to-degrade organics into more volatile organic compounds; (4) Ability to remove residual VOCs and softened SVOCs through the combined action of in-well vapor stripping and biodegradation; (5) Does not require handling or disposing of water at the ground surface; and (6) Cost-effective and improved efficiency, resulting in shortened clean-up times to remediate a site.'

Peters, R.W.; Manning, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Hoffman, M.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (US); Gorelick, S. [Stanford Univ., CA (US)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Diversity of the Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by 55 Species of Tropical Trees: a Survey in French Guiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in French Guiana Elodie A. Courtois & C. E. Timothy Paine & Pierre-Alain Blandinieres & Didier Stien & Jean, LLC 2009 Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are pro- duced by a broad range of organisms, from tropical tree species in a lowland rainforest of French Guiana. We discovered a remarkably high chemical

Chave, Jérôme

31

Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission to the atmosphere is of great concern to semiconductor manufacturing industries, research laboratories, the public, and regulatory agencies. Some industries are seeking ways to reduce emissions by reducing VOCs at the point of use (or generation). This paper discusses the requirements, design, calibration, and use of a sampling inlet/quadrupole mass spectrometer system for monitoring VOCs in a semiconductor manufacturing production line. The system uses chemical ionization to monitor compounds typically found in the lithography processes used to manufacture semiconductor devices (e.g., acetone, photoresist). The system was designed to be transportable from tool to tool in the production line and to give the operator real-time feedback so the process(es) can be adjusted to minimize VOC emissions. Detection limits ranging from the high ppb range for acetone to the low ppm range fore other lithography chemicals were achieved using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy at a data acquisition rate of approximately 1 mass spectral scan (30 to 200 daltons) per second. A demonstration of exhaust VOC monitoring was performed at a working semiconductor fabrication facility during actual wafer processing.

Thornberg, S.M.; Mowry, C.D.; Keenan, M.R.; Bender, S.F.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gas Analysis Lab.; Owen, T. [Intel Corp., Rio Rancho, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs Speaker(s): Miranda Loh Date: February 1, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Boston Exposure Assessment in Microenvironments (BEAM) study was designed to examine the concentration distributions of VOCs in various microenvironments in and around Boston with the main objective of reducing the uncertainties in predicting exposure levels. A suite of VOC's with potential health effects including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, several chlorinated compounds and aldehydes were collected in all microenvironments. Phase I. BEAM examined common non-residential microenvironments that have not been extensively studied, in particular, dining, shopping, and transportation microenvironments. Sampling using scripted activities in these microenvironments. For some compounds,

34

Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

VOCs and formaldehyde emissions from cleaning products and air Ccilia Solal1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOCs and formaldehyde emissions from cleaning products and air fresheners Cécilia Solal1: air fresheners, glass cleaners, furniture polishes, toilet products, carpet and floor cleaning Formaldehyde, Volatile organic compounds, Household products, Exposure INTRODUCTION Most indoor air pollutants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

43

VOC reduction strategies for the aerospace industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aerospace NESHAP, which was issued on September 1, 1995, requires reductions in Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and organic Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) emissions associated with the application of primer and topcoat. The regulation affects any facility that is a major source of HAPs and produces, reworks, or repairs, in any amount any commercial, civil, or military aerospace vehicle. Options for reducing VOC and organic HAP emissions include use of low VOC/organic HAP containing coatings or implementation of air pollution control systems. Use of primers and topcoats that meet the regulatory limits for VOC and organic HAP content is clearly the lowest cost option of meeting requirements of the aerospace NESHAP. However, some facilities have been unsuccessful in identifying aerospace paints and primers that meet requirements of the NESHAP and also have acceptable performance properties. For those aerospace companies considering implementation of air pollution control systems, several strategies can help to reduce the anticipated capital and operating costs. Such strategies include: segregation of specialty coatings, non-aerospace coatings, and low-use coatings not affected by the aerospace NESHAP from regulated paints and primers; reduction of airflows in affected booths; recirculation of air; and combination of exhausts from one or more booth. Estimated capital and operating costs are also provided for the air pollution control systems best suited for aircraft painting and priming operations. These systems include regenerative thermal oxidizers and fluidized bed/rotary concentrators in conjunction with thermal oxidizers. Even after implementing strategies to reduce VOC and organic HAP pollution control system costs, economics will dictate use of compliant primers and topcoats for many aerospace companies. 6 refs.

Bauer, J.P. [Burns & McDonnell, Kansas City, MO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Volatile Organic Compound Investigation Results, 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were discovered while drilling in the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Sites 300 Area during 2006. The discovery involved an interval of relatively finer-grained sediment within the unconfined aquifer, an interval that is not sampled by routine groundwater monitoring. Although VOC contamination in the unconfined aquifer has been identified and monitored, the concentrations of newly discovered contamination are much higher than encountered previously, with some new results significantly higher than the drinking water standards. The primary contaminant is trichloroethene, with lesser amounts of tetrachloroethene. Both chemicals were used extensively as degreasing agents during the fuels fabrication process. A biological degradation product of these chemicals, 1,2-dichloroethene, was also detected. To further define the nature and extent of this contamination, additional characterization drilling was undertaken during 2007. Four locations were drilled to supplement the information obtained at four locations drilled during the earlier investigation in 2006. The results of the combined drilling indicate that the newly discovered contamination is limited to a relatively finer-grained interval of Ringold Formation sediment within the unconfined aquifer. The extent of this contamination appears to be the area immediately east and south of the former South Process Pond. Samples collected from the finer-grained sediment at locations along the shoreline confirm the presence of the contamination near the groundwater/river interface. Contamination was not detected in river water that flows over the area where the river channel potentially incises the finer-grained interval of aquifer sediment. The source for this contamination is not readily apparent. A search of historical documents and the Hanford Waste Information Data System did not provide definitive clues as to waste disposal operations and/or spills that might have resulted in groundwater contamination in this sediment, although several relatively small accidental releases of VOCs have occurred in the past in the northern portion of the 300 Area. It is likely that large quantities of degreasing solutions were disposed to the North and South Process Ponds during the 1950s and 1960s, and that evidence for them in the upper portion of the unconfined aquifer has been removed because of groundwater movement through the much more transmissive sediment. Also, investigations to date have revealed no evidence to suggest that a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid remains undetected in the subsurface. Potential pathways for contamination to migrate from this finer-grained sediment include groundwater movement through the interval to offshore locations in the Columbia River channel, dispersion out of the finer-grained interval into the overlying transmissive sediment (again, with transport to the riverbed), and potential future withdrawal via water supply wells.

Peterson, Robert E.; Williams, Bruce A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

Stripping of organic compounds from wastewater as an auxiliary fuel of regenerative thermal oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic solvents with different volatilities are widely used in various processes and generate air and water pollution problems. In the cleaning processes of electronics industries, most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are vented to air pollution control devices while most non-volatile organic solvents dissolve in the cleaning water and become the major sources of COD in wastewater. Discharging a high-COD wastewater stream to wastewater treatment facility often disturbs the treatment performance. A pretreatment of the high-COD wastewater is therefore highly desirable. This study used a packed-bed stripping tower in combination with a regenerative thermal oxidizer to remove the COD in the wastewater from a printed circuit board manufacturing process and to utilize the stripped organic compounds as the auxiliary fuel of the RTO. The experimental results showed that up to 45% of the COD could be removed and 66% of the RTO fuel could be saved by the combined treatment system.

Meng-Wen Chang; Jia-Ming Chern

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Arid site characterization and technology assessment: Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) program was initiated in March 1991 to evaluate technologies for all phases of remediation of VOCs in soils and groundwater at DOE arid/semiarid sites. The primary site for field demonstrations under the VOC-Arid ID program is the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to describe (1) the bases for technologies currently under evaluation in the VOC-Arid ID program; (2) the types of subsurface contamination at DOE arid/semiarid sites; and (3) the areas of potential common technology interests based on perceived technology needs at other DOE sites. This report was compiled by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in response to DOE`s Office of Technology Development`s mission to carry out an aggressive program to accelerate the development and implementation of new and existing technologies to meet a 30-year goal set by DOE in June 1989 to clean up all of its sites and to bring all sites into compliance with current and future environmental regulations. A key component of this program is the development of technologies that are better, faster, safer, and cheaper than those technologies currently available. Included in this report are an evaluation of technologies currently (fiscal year 1993) being pursued at the Hanford Site under the auspices of the VOC-Arid ID program, an assessment of subsurface contaminants at arid/semiarid sites, a summarization of technologies under consideration at other DOE sites, a discussion of areas of potential common technology interests, and the conclusions. Also included are a summary of the extent of contamination at the DOE arid/semiarid sites under consideration and a bibliography of source documents from which this report was prepared.

Riley, R.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

VOC compliance on the ball: Aluminum can manufacturer rolls to California VOC compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since entering the North American beverage can market in 1969, Ball Corp., has increased its market share at a pace more than double the growth of the market itself. In addition to holding numerous patented advancements in can-making technology, Ball prides itself as an environmentally responsible company. When Ball decided to increase production capacity in its Fairfield, California, plant, the challenge was to produce more cans, while still complying with the state`s stringent air emissions regulations. As with other aluminum can manufacturing facilities, Ball`s coating and curing operations generate volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Ball`s permit from the state of California allows only limited amounts of VOC discharges into the atmosphere. With proposed increases in production capacities, however, the Bay Area`s Air Quality Management District--a local US EPA authority--required Ball to incinerate far more VOCs than the existing recuperative abatement system could handle. According to California regulations, facilities that wish to increase VOC emissions must install some type of VOC-control system or provide technological offsets. This regulatory pressure led Ball to seek a solution that would not only comply with emissions regulations, but would not compromise the company`s production process. Ball engineers selected a regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) for the Fairfield, Calif., plant. Considering the success Ball has encountered in previous experiences with this type of oxidation unit, the company immediately selected an RTO instead of catalytic oxidizers or other types of pollution control equipment.

Gay, R. [Engelhard Corp., Iselin, NJ (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A very important aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970's. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Title Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3979e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ortiz, Anna C., Marion L. Russell, Wen-Yee Lee, Michael G. Apte, and Randy L. Maddalena Pagination 29 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 μg/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to >500 μg/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~ 15 μg/m2/h while the new wood material emitted > 100 μg/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs

53

Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology Technology...

54

Scale-up analysis and development of gliding arc discharge facility for volatile organic compounds decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influences of inlet gas flow rate and reactor configuration on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) decomposition efficiency in a traditional gliding arc (T-GA) facility are studied based on laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. The ratio of the nozzle diameter and the shortest distance of two electrodes should be maintained in a suitable value range to guarantee the decomposition efficiency, which indicates simply enlarging the nozzle inner diameter is not a proper way to raise the T-GA treatment capacity in a fixed supply voltage condition. A developed gliding arc gas discharge (D-GA) reactor based on a modified gas feed system is proposed: small flow rate air goes through the bottom nozzle to process the GA evolution, and high flow rate contaminated gas goes frontal through the plasma region and decomposes. The performances of D-GA reactor in the decomposition of \\{VOCs\\} with relative high gas flow rate, including decomposition efficiency and specific energy consumption, are better than T-GA reactor. D-GA reactor also avoids the drawbacks of the increases of power system amount and electric power consumption in multi-electrode GA system.

Zheng Bo; Jianhua Yan; Xiaodong Li; Yong Chi; Kefa Cen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Exhaust emissions of volatile organic compounds of powered two-wheelers: Effect of cold start and vehicle speed. Contribution to greenhouse effect and tropospheric ozone formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Powered two-wheeler (PTW) vehicles complying with recent European type approval standards (stages Euro 2 and Euro 3) were tested on chassis dynamometer in order to measure exhaust emissions of about 25 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the range C1C7, including carcinogenic compounds as benzene and 1,3-butadiene. The fleet consists of a moped (engine capacity?50cm3) and three fuel injection motorcycles of different engine capacities (150, 300 and 400cm3). Different driving conditions were tested (US FPT cycle, constant speed). Due to the poor control of the combustion and catalyst efficiency, moped is the highest pollutant emitter. In fact, fuel injection strategy and three way catalyst with lambda sensor are able to reduce VOC motorcycles' emission of about one order of magnitude with respect to moped. Cold start effect, that is crucial for the assessment of actual emission of \\{PTWs\\} in urban areas, was significant: 3051% of extra emission for methane. In the investigated speed range, moped showed a significant maximum of VOC emission factor at minimum speed (10km/h) and a slightly decreasing trend from 20 to 60km/h; motorcycles showed on the average a less significant peak at 10km/h, a minimum at 3040km/h and then an increasing trend with a maximum emission factor at 90km/h. Carcinogenic \\{VOCs\\} show the same pattern of total VOCs. Ozone Formation Potential (OFP) was estimated by using Maximum Incremental Reactivity scale. The greatest contribution to tropospheric ozone formation comes from alkenes group which account for 5080% to the total OFP. VOC contribution effect on greenhouse effect is negligible with respect to CO2 emitted.

M. Antonietta Costagliola; Fabio Murena; M. Vittoria Prati

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM WOOD REMEDIAL TREATMENT: CHAMBER TESTS AND FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products on indoor air quality. The emissions of two wood remedial treatment products (water in real conditions during a roof renovation work in an old building. A petroleum-based solvent product of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from building products. Simple models can be applied to emission

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

59

5, 90979126, 2005 VOC emissions from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation pyrolysis J. P. Greenberg et al. Title Page Discussions Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation J. P. Greenberg, H is licensed under a Creative Commons License. 9097 #12;ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

60

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater, Surface, Ground.W., Meyer, M.T., and Zaugg, S.D., 2004, Presence and distri- bution of organic wastewater compounds in wastewater, surface, ground, and drinking waters, Minnesota, 2000-02: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sorption to soil of hydrophobic and ionic organic compounds: measurement and modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The sorption of organic compounds to soil, sediments and dissolved organic matter affects the fate of organic compounds. Given the central role of this process (more)

Laak, Thomas Laurens ter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The mechanisms and relative importance of abiotic and biological processes for VOC loss from sludge amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in sewage sludge has been a cause of increasing concern due to the possible risk to human health and the environment when sludge is applied to agricultural soils. Sludge application to agricultural land in the UK is expected to increase as a result of restrictions on alternative disposal routes and also increasingly stringent wastewater treatment requirements. Few studies have examined the fate and behavior of VOCs in sewage sludge amended soils and those reported have used spiked sludge rather than investigating the behavior of VOCs resident in the sludge itself. This study was designed to evaluate the behavior of aromatic VOCs (namely toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene) in unspiked sewage sludge amended soils and assess the relative importance and mechanisms of abiotic and biological loss processes. This was undertaken by adding sewage sludge to sterilized and unsterilized soil in closed and open systems. Results indicated that abiotic loss processes, primarily volatilization, were most important for the removal of VOCs. Initial rate of VOC loss was similar in all systems. After 65 days a residual VOC soil concentration remained which was apparently dependent on the conditions within the system.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Environmental and Biological Sciences

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ambient air VOC concentrations at WIPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is an underground facility designated as a potential repository for transuranic wastes. Approximately 60% of the wastes proposed to be emplaced at the WIPP are considered mixed wastes, which contain both radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-regulated hazardous chemical components. As part of the Addendum to the WIPP No-Migration Variance Petition', the US Department of Energy presented a plan to monitor the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the WIPP unit boundary. This program should fulfill the monitoring requirements of 40CFR268.6 allowing the disposal of wastes prohibited from land disposal only after demonstration that, to a reasonable degree of certainty, there will be no migration of constituents from the disposal unit for as long as the wastes remain hazardous.

Wu, C.F.; Frank-Supka, L. (Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division, Carlsbad, NM (United States)); Zimmer, R.A. (Harding Lawson Associates, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

On-line Analysis of Organic Compounds in Diesel Exhaust Using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using H3O+ proton transfer in an ion drift tube (PTR-MS) was used to measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations on-line in diesel engine exhaust as a function on engine load. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the PTR-MS instrument as an analytical tool for diesel engine emissions abatement research. Measured sensitivities determined from gas standards were found to be between 30% and 100% greater than calculated sensitivities. A slight humidity dependent sensitivity was observed for non-polar species, implying that reactions with H+(H2O)2 were important for some organics. The mass spectra of diesel exhaust were complex but displayed a pattern of strong ion signals at 14n+1 (n=3..8) masses, with a relative ion abundance similar to that obtained from electron impact ionization of alkanes. Laboratory experiments verified that C8-C16 n-alkanes and C8-C13 1-alkenes react with H3O+ in dissociative proton transfer reaction resulting in alkyl cation ion products, primarily m/z 41, 43, 57, 71 and 85. Monitoring the sum of these ions signals may be useful for estimating alkane emissions from unburnt diesel fuel. Alkane fragmentation likely simplified the diesel exhaust mass spectrum and reduced potential mass interferences with isobaric aromatic compounds. It is shown that the relative abundances of VOCs changed as a function of engine load. Concentrations of aldehydes and ketones dominated those of aromatic species with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde estimated to be the most abundant VOCs in the PTR-MS mass spectrum at all engine loads. The relative abundances of benzene and toluene increased with engine load indicating their pyrogenic origin. The relative abundance of alkanes, aromatics, aldehydes, and alcohols was broadly consistent with literature publications of diesel exhaust analysis by gas chromatography. About 75% of the organic ion signal could be assigned. On line analysis of diesel exhaust using this technology may be valuable tool for diesel engine emission research.

Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Maupin, Gary D.; Muntean, George G.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

VOC identification and inter-comparison from laboratory biomass burning using PTR-MS and PIT-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from fires of biomass commonly found in the southeast and southwest U.S. were investigated with PTR-MS and PIT-MS, which are capable of fast measurements of a large number of VOCs. Both instruments were calibrated with gas standards and mass dependent calibration curves are determined. The sensitivity of the PIT-MS linearly increases with mass, because the ion trap mass spectrometer used in PIT-MS is more efficient for higher masses, whereas the quadrupole in PTR-MS is most efficient around 70amu. The identification of \\{VOCs\\} in the complicated mix of the fire emissions was done by gas chromatographic pre separation and inter-comparison with other instrumentation: GCMS, FTIR, and NI-PT-CIMS. With these state of the art identification methods only 5075% of the mass detectable by PTR-MS or PIT-MS could be identified. The amount of identified material was dependent on the type of fuel used and the phase of the burns, more can be identified in the flaming stage of the fire. Compounds with masses above 100amu contributed the largest fraction of the unidentified mass. Emission ratios with CO for all identified and unidentified compounds were determined. Small oxygenated \\{VOCs\\} had the highest emission ratios of the observed compounds.

C. Warneke; J.M. Roberts; P. Veres; J. Gilman; W.C. Kuster; I. Burling; R. Yokelson; J.A. de Gouw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The use of radon (Rn-222) and volatile organic compounds in monitoring soil gas to localize NAPL contamination at a gas station in Rio Claro, So Paulo State, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focuses on the presence of radon (222Rn) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gases at a gas station located in the city of Rio Claro, So Paulo, Brazil, where a fossil fuel leak occurred. The spatial distribution results show a correlation between 222Rn and VOCs, consistent with the fact that radon gas has a greater chemical affinity with organic phases than with water. This finding demonstrates that the presence of a residual hydrocarbon phase in an aquifer can retain radon, leading to a reduced radon content in the soil gas. The data in this study confirm the results of previous investigations, in which the method used in this study provided a preliminary fingerprint of a contaminated area. Furthermore, the data analysis time is brief, and only simple equipment is required.

E.Q. Barbosa; J.A. Galhardi; D.M. Bonotto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cold Temperature and Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Speciated Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Diesel Trucks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions testing was conducted on a chassis dynamometer at two ambient temperatures (?7 and 22 C) operating on two fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel and 20% soy biodiesel blend) over three driving cycles: cold start, warm start and heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving cycle. ... Different 2007+ aftertreatment technologies involving catalyst regeneration led to significant modifications of VOC emissions that were compound-specific and highly dependent on test conditions. ... However, emissions of other toxic partial combustion products such as carbonyls were not reduced in the modern diesel vehicles tested. ...

Ingrid J. George; Michael D. Hays; Richard Snow; James Faircloth; Barbara J. George; Thomas Long; Richard W. Baldauf

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

VOC Exposure Metrics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 VOC Exposure Metrics ... and "Sick Building Syndrome" Figure1: The elevated odds ratios (above unity) in this figure suggest that exposures to VOCs from water-based points and solvents are associated with a variety of sick building symptions (* indicates the OR is significant at p < 0.05; ** for p < 0.01). The indoors is often regarded as safe haven from problems associated with outdoor air pollution, but a growing number of reports have suggested that exposures in indoor environments may lead to health problems. One area in which evidence has been accumulating is the relationship between working in office buildings (as opposed to industrial exposure conditions) and a variety of health effects, such as eye, nose, and throat irritation and

73

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

74

Neutral-ionic transitions in organic mixed-stack compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Torrance et al. have made the interesting observation that several mixed-stack organic compounds undergo transitions from neutral states to ionic states as the temperature or pressure is varied. We examine a simple model of such transitions including Coulomb interaction and hybridization of neutral and ionic states. In the limit of weak hybridization and long-range repulsive interaction between ionic planes, it is proven that there is a complete devil's staircase where the degree of ionicity assumes an infinity of rational values. For attractive interactions between ionic planes, the neutral-ionic transition is shown to be first order for weak hybridization. Comparison with experiment indicates that this situation applies to tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) chloranil. For strong hybridization the transition is continuous but goes through a metallic phase. It is shown, for the first time, that the spectrum of the charge-transfer Hamiltonian contains both a bound spectrum, the observed charge-transfer excitations, and a continuum.

Bruinsma, R.; Bak, P.; Torrance, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

New Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U S  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil Volatile Organic Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y N a t i o n a l E n e r g y T e c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y Successes AdvAnced ReseARch To support coal and power systems development, NETL's Advanced Research Program conducts a range of pre-competitive research focused on breakthroughs in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, computational energy science, and bioprocessing-opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality. NETL also sponsors cooperative educational initiatives in University Coal Research, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Other Minority Institutions. Accomplishments P Process improvement P Cost reduction P Greater efficiency

76

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of...6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl...

Keunhee Park; Seungsik Oh; Donggeun Jung; Heeyeop Chae

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extracellular organic compounds...directly to the cells with a graphite...dioxide to organic compounds...microbial production of multicarbon...to convert solar energy that...hydrogen production was verified...outlet, but a solar-powered...a) H-cell device for...errors of the organic acid and...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Assessment of subsurface VOCs using a chemical microsensor array. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of laboratory investigations of several performance parameters relevant to surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) chemical sensor arrays for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated soil and groundwater. The small size, low cost, sensitivity and selectivity of such instruments promise improvements in the quality and quantity of data used to guide site assessment and restoration efforts. In this investigation, calibrations were performed for 15 different coated SAW sensors. Each sensor was exposed to six VOCs selected to represent three chemical classes of contaminants that are commonly found at waste sites (i.e., aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons). A new pattern recognition method was developed for determining which coated sensors would maximize the selectivity and accuracy of quantitation for a given set of vapor contaminants. Using this method, an optimal subwet of four coated sensors was selected for testing in a prototype microsensor instrument. Additional laboratory experiments were performed with this optimized array to assess the limits of detection and linear response ranges for the representative vapors, as well as the additivity of responses to vapors in binary mixtures, temperature and humidity effects, aging effects, and other performance parameters related to the application of this technology to soil and groundwater VOC monitoring. Results demonstrate that SAW microsensor arrays can identify and quantify specific VOCs at concentrations in the {mu}g/L to mg/L range when present alone or in simple (e.g., binary) mixtures. SAW sensor technology offers a potentially effective alternative to existing field instrumentation for headspace analysis, soil vapor monitoring, and vacuum extraction process monitoring of VOCs in subsurface media.

Batterman, S.A.; Zellers, E.T. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Public Health

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic organic compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

83

Development of efficiency-enhanced cogeneration system utilizing high-temperature exhaust-gas from a regenerative thermal oxidizer for waste volatile-organic-compound gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a gas-turbine cogeneration system that makes effective use of the calorific value of the volatile organic compound (VOC) gases exhausted during production processes at a manufacturing plant. The system utilizes the high-temperature exhaust-gas from the regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) which is used for incinerating VOC gases. The high-temperature exhaust gas is employed to resuperheat the steam injected into the gasturbine. The steam-injection temperature raised in this way increases the heat input, resulting in the improved efficiency of the gas-turbine. Based on the actual operation of the system, we obtained the following results: Operation with the steam-injection temperature at 300C (45C resuperheated from 255C) increased the efficiency of the gasturbine by 0.7%. The system can enhance the efficiency by 1.3% when the steam-injection temperature is elevated to 340C (85C resuperheated). In this case, up to 6.6 million yen of the total energy cost and 400 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions can be reduced annually. A gas-turbine cogeneration and RTO system can reduce energy consumption by 23% and CO2 emission by 30.1% at the plant.

Masaaki Bannai; Akira Houkabe; Masahiko Furukawa; Takao Kashiwagi; Atsushi Akisawa; Takuya Yoshida; Hiroyuki Yamada

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Volatile organic compound monitoring by photo acoustic radiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods for sampling and analyzing volatile organics in subsurface pore gas were developed for use at the Hazardous Waste Disposal Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One is Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TDGCMS), the other is Photoacoustic Radiometry (PAR). Presented here are two years worth of experience and lessons learned as both techniques matured. The sampling technique is equally as important as the analysis method. PAR is a nondispersive infrared technique utilizing band pass filters in the region from 1 to 15 {mu}m. A commercial instrument, the Model 1302 Multigas Analyzer, made by Bruel and Kjaer, was adapted for field use. To use the PAR there must be some a priori knowledge of the constellation of analytes to be measured. The TDGCMS method is sensitive to 50 analytes. Hence TDGCMS is used in an initial survey of the site to determine what compounds are present and at what concentration. Once the major constituents of the soil-gas vapor plume are known the PAR can be configured to monitor for the five analytes of most interest. The PAR can analyse a sample in minutes, while in the field. The PAR is also quite precise in controlled situations.

Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dual cure low-VOC coating process. Final technical report, Phase 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US EPA is implementing increasingly stringent environmental regulations on the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which amount to about 7 {times} 10{sup 9} lb/year, largely from paints and other coating systems in industry. Objective of this project is to develop Dual Cure Photocatalyst coating technology for aerospace topcoats (urethane/acrylate), aerospace primers (epoxy/acrylate), and solventless tape backings. Some problems (moisture etc.) were encountered in the primer area. Cost, economic, and energy analyses were conducted. The dual cure technology has already been commercialized in 3M`s flexible diamond resin products. Tabs.

Kinzer, K.E.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Impacts of nitrogen fertilization on volatile organic compound emissions from decomposing plant litter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decomposing litter from 12 plant species over 125 days, measuring both CO2 and VOC emissions throughout with C emissions as VOCs ranging from 0% to 88% of C emissions as CO2. Methanol was the dominant VOC was occasionally large enough to account for the increased CO2 emissions on a per unit C basis, suggesting that N

Fierer, Noah

87

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Surface Tension for Pure Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Surface Tension for Pure Organic Compounds ... This study investigates the applicability of artificial neural networks as an efficient tool for the prediction of pure organic compounds surface tensions for a wide range of temperatures. ... The most accurate network among several constructed configurations has one hidden layer with 20 neurons. ...

Aliakbar Roosta; Payam Setoodeh; Abdolhossein Jahanmiri

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Implementation of VOC source reduction practices in a manufactured house and in school classrooms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed studies of a new manufactured house and four new industrialized relocatable school classrooms were conducted to determine the emission sources of formaldehyde and other VOCs and to identify and implement source reduction practices. Procedures were developed to generate VOC emission factors that allowed reasonably accurate predictions of indoor air VOC concentrations. Based on the identified sources of formaldehyde and other aldehydes, practices were developed to reduce the concentrations of these compounds in new house construction. An alternate ceiling panel reduced formaldehyde concentrations in the classrooms. Overall, the classrooms had relatively low VOC concentrations.

Hodgson, A.T.; Apte, M.G.; Shendell, D.G.; Beal, D.; McIlvaine, J.E.R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

Regenerative thermal oxidizers for VOC and NO{sub x} -- efficiency and cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerative fume incinerators or thermal oxidizers have a combustion chamber at about 1,600 F. Heat recovery is provided by switching regenerator beds filled with ceramic. Volatile organic compounds, VOC`s, are about 99% removed along with a thermal efficiency of 90 to 95%. Improvements are discussed which reduce fuel costs, reduce investment cost and give better VOC removal. A method of preventing NO{sub x} formation is presented as well as a possible method for removing NO{sub x} from incoming feed gas. Regenerative fume incinerators or regenerative thermal oxidizers have 3 possible improvements. (1) Add the required fuel to the incoming gas to nearly eliminate NO{sub x} generation while improving thermal efficiency. (2) Remove NO{sub x} from the incoming gas by a new modification of the Exxon Thermal DeNO{sub x} process. (3) Use a new 4-way valve for 1 or 2-bed regenerators to cut investment and improve destruction efficiency.

Houston, R. [Houston Consulting, Hendersonville, NC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

VOC/HAP control systems for the shipbuilding and aerospace industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliant coating systems, i.e., those which meet limits on pounds of volatile organic compound (VOC)/hazardous air pollutant (HAP) per gallon, on a solids applied basis, are routinely used to meet emission regulations in the shipbuilding and aerospace industries. However, there are occasions when solvent based systems must be used. Total capture and high destruction of the solvents in those systems is necessary in order to meet the required emission limit, e.g., a reasonably available control technology (RACT) limit of 3.5lbs of VOC/gallon. Water based marine coatings and certain aerospace finish coats do not provide sufficient longevity or meet other customer specifications in these instances. Furthermore, because of best available control technology (BACT) determinations or facility limits for operation in serious, severe, and extreme nonattainment areas, it is necessary to reduce annual emissions to levels which are below the levels required by the coating standards. The paper discusses those operations for controlling emissions from large-scale solvent based painting and coating systems in those instances when a high degree of overall control is required. Permanent total enclosures (stationary and portable), concentrators, regenerative thermal oxidizers, and other air pollution control systems are evaluated, both for technical applicability and economic feasibility. Several case studies are presented which illustrate techniques for capturing painting emissions, options for air handling in the workplace, and methods for destroying exhaust stream VOC concentrations of less than 40 ppm.

Lukey, M.E.; Toothman, D.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

1. PRECONCENTRATION, THERMAL DESORPTION & ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: peltier, liq. N?.. Heated transfer line 2) Desorption & transfer by fastheatlng Cooled & heated trap jas trap. The trap is then quickly heated, under a low flow of hélium, to desorb and inject thé compounds. This highly concentrated plug of sample is transferred via a heated transfer line, to a capillary

Boyer, Edmond

93

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: A review of current understanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: (1) polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides; (2) carbamate and organophosphorus; (3) herbicides; (4) phenols; (5) halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (6) phthalate esters; (7) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and (8) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Process that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate process are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the US are discussed. 699 refs., 26 figs., 47 tabs.

Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, P.J.; Fusillo, T.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Growth Yields of Bacteria on Selected Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...calculate heats of combustion of an exceedingly...carbohydrates, and hydrocarbons, wehave calculated...9, 10), heats of combustion per available...microbial cells on hydrocarbons. Science...S. 1929. Heats of combustion of organic...

W. R. Mayberry; G. J. Prochazka; W. J. Payne

1967-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. Sublimation, Vaporization and Fusion Enthalpies From  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. Sublimation, Vaporization and Fusion Enthalpies From 1880 to 2010 William Acree, Jr. Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 James S. Chickosa... Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Chickos, James S.

96

Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

Hudson, Rondall James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

98

Control of spider mites on cotton by organic sulphur compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of two species of spider mites using 8 gallons of spray per acre. . 57 10. Results of laboratory ovicidal tests for control of two species of spider mites using 100 gallons of spray per acre.................................................. 59 11...-volurae sprays in the control of cotton pests has presented the problem of getting enough effective sulphur into these sprays to control the spider mites# A series of tests was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of various sulphur compounds in low...

King, Charles Edward

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

99

Progress in Understanding Low-Temperature Organic Compound Oxidation Using a Jet-Stirred Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Progress in Understanding Low-Temperature Organic Compound Oxidation Using a Jet-Stirred Reactor Lorraine, CNRS, ENSIC, BP 20451, 1 rue Grandville, 54000 Nancy, France Abstract The jet-stirred reactor compounds that can be found in fuels and biofuels. Such an improvement in understanding requires

100

Supercritical CO2 extraction of organic compounds from soil-water slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPERCRITICAL COi EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering SUPERCRITICAL COz FXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Carter, Brian Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Tree's Response to Herbivory: Quantification of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Tree's Response to Herbivory: Quantification of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions an abundant source of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). These emissions are known to vary in quantity and composition due to both biogenic and anthropogenic stressors. In this study, BVOC emissions from bristlecone

Collins, Gary S.

103

Developing carbon-based "organic" compounds for microelectronic applications is a promising, rapidly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Performance and production solutions to electronics, displays, solar cells, white lighting and room lightingDeveloping carbon-based "organic" compounds for microelectronic applications is a promising inorganic materials such as silicon and copper, organic microelectronics are flexible, lighter weight, less

Hayden, Nancy J.

104

Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...powered by solar energy is...converted to organic compounds...strategies for the production of fuels...harvesting solar energy...electrodes to cells, has received...microbial fuel cells. Bioresour...microbial production platform...challenges in solar energy utilization...conversion of organic matter to...

Kelly P. Nevin; Sarah A. Hensley; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Jianhong Ou; Trevor L. Woodard; Oona L. Snoeyenbos-West; Derek R. Lovley

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Removal of hydrophobic Volatile Organic Compounds1 in an integrated process coupling Absorption and2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology like photochemical oxidation shows high efficiency70 but is also high energy-consuming; moreover processes involve water as absorbent, they appear not always really efficient for the treatment of24 of the process, hydrophobic VOC27 absorption in a gas-liquid contactor, and biodegradation in the TPPB. VOC

Boyer, Edmond

107

Radiocarbon Measurements of Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds:? Quantifying the Biogenic Contribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to obtain quality (interpretable) [14C]VOC measurements however relies on additional factors:? (1) transferring individual VOCs to the measurement system in a manner that preserves their original relative concentrations in the atmosphere (recovery), (2) quantifying limitations in the VOC isolation process (bias), and 3) quantifying chemical and isotopic contamination (blanks). ... The fM results for the VOC fractions from calibration mixtures and ambient samples are corrected for CO2 contamination using eq 2, where ?BLK in this case is defined as in which mCO2 is the carbon mass of residual atmospheric CO2 following LiOH treatment plus the carbon mass of CO2 contamination from the O2 used for VOC oxidation, and mREC is the total recovered carbon (Table 3). ... During pressurized sampling of humid air, water will be condensed in the canisters. ...

George A. Klouda; Charles W. Lewis; Reinhold A. Rasmussen; George C. Rhoderick; Robert L. Sams; Robert K. Stevens; Lloyd A. Currie; Douglas J. Donahue; A. J. Timothy Jull; Robert L. Seila

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

VOC recovery using microwave regeneration of adsorbents: Pilot-column studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale column was constructed to evaluate the technical feasibility of microwave (MW) heating as a means of regenerating adsorbents for recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The 6 inch diameter moving-bed column, which has a throughput capacity of 200 lb/hr of adsorbent, is representative of a full-scale component of a small-capacity recovery system or a single element of a large-capacity system. Regeneration experiments were conducted to study the effects of key process variables, including adsorbent and stripping gas feed rates, initial adsorbent coverage and microwave power input, on column performance. Two adsorbents with contrasting dielectric loss characteristics were studied, Dowex Optipore L502 (low dielectric loss styrene-based) and Rohm and Haas Ambersorb 600 (moderate dielectric loss carbonaceous). Adsorbates included polar and nonpolar compounds: isopropyl alcohol (iPA), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and toluene. Solvent recovery rates of 20--30 lbs/hr were achieved. The results of the pilot-column experiments demonstrate that axial temperature and desorption profiles are dependent on the dielectric characteristics of the adsorbent/sorbate pair, and that final regeneration coverage can be correlated with a dimensionless stripping gas ratio and final adsorbent temperature. Implications for design of microwave-regenerated VOC recovery systems are discussed.

Salinas, M.J.; Price, D.W.; Schmidt, P.S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

4, 66916718, 2004 VOC emissions of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Temperature and light dependence of the VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen 1 , H. Hakola 1.tarvainen@fmi.fi) 6691 #12;ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M. [Yuan Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Asian and north American pollution plumes during INTEX-B: identification of specific Chinese air mass tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1,2-DCE), ethane, ethyne, propane, butanes, i-pentane, andDCE Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-PentaneDCE Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Asian and north American pollution plumes during INTEX-B: identification of specific Chinese air mass tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal and biofuel combustion and biomass burning (Khalil andcombustion products ethyne and benzene, and of the biomass/combustion tracer ethyne, the industrial solvent CH 2 Cl 2 , and the two coal/biomass

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Determination of Migration Parameters for Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Terephthalate and Nylon 6 by Dynamic Permeation Cell Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Migration Parameters for Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Terephthalate, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP); however

Heller, Barbara

115

Enthalpies of Sublimation of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. James S. Chickosa...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enthalpies of Sublimation of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. 1910­2001 James S. Chickosa... Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri 63121 William E. Acree, Jr.b... Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 Received 22 October 2001; accepted 11

Chickos, James S.

116

Intake of Toxic and Carcinogenic Volatile Organic Compounds from Secondhand Smoke in Motor Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BR.Measurement of emissions from air pollution sources. 5. C1-C32 organic compounds...Ott W , Klepeis N, Switzer P.Air change rates of motor vehicles and...experimental investigation of tobacco smoke pollution in cars.Nicotine Tob Res 2009...

Gideon St.Helen; Peyton Jacob III; Margaret Peng; Delia A. Dempsey; S. Katharine Hammond; and Neal L. Benowitz

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Rejection and fate of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) during membrane distillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rejection and fate of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) during membrane distillation Kaushalya COCs) Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) Volatility Fate and transport Hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity a b s t r a c t In this study, we examined the feasibility of membrane distillation (MD) for removing

118

In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...abundance, as compared to an ambient run (i.e., gas-phase and particle-phase...carbon number. Because n-alkanes are straight chained, and have very low polarity, they do not enter the particle...Diurnal and seasonal variability of gasoline-related volatile organic compound emissions...

Brent J. Williams; Allen H. Goldstein; Nathan M. Kreisberg; Susanne V. Hering

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Work plan for support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek east end VOC plumes well installation project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 guidelines and requirements from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the Y-12 Plant initiated investigation and monitoring of various sites within its boundaries in the mid-1980s. The entire Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was placed on the National Priorities List of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites within the ORR require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) or an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) of potential remedial actions. Data from monitoring wells at the east end of the Y-12 Plant have identified an area of groundwater contamination dominated by the volatile organic compound (VOC) carbon tetrachloride; other VOCs include chloroform, tetrachloroethene, and trichloroethene.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cancer risks from soil emissions of volatile organic compounds at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission isolation flux chamber (EIFC) methodology was applied to Superfund investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 to determine if on-site workers were exposed to VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface and what, if any, health risks could be attributed to the inhalation of the VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface. During July and August of 1996, twenty, eighteen, and twenty six VOC soil vapor flux samples were collected in the Building 830, 832, and 854 areas, respectively using EIFCS. The VOC concentrations in the vapor samples were used to calculate soil flux rates which were used as input into an air dispersion model to calculate ambient air exposure-point concentrations. The exposure-point concentrations were compared to EPA Region IX Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). Buildings 830 and 832 exposure-point concentrations were less then the PRGs therefore no cancer risks were calculated. The cancer risks for Building 854 ranged from 1.6 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -6}. The resultant inhalation cancer risks were all within the acceptable range, implying that on-site workers were not exposed to VOC vapors volatilizing from the subsurface soil that could have significant cancer risks. Therefore remediation in these areas would not be necessary.

Dibley, V. R., LLNL

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Northeastern Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Northeastern Colorado ... Only 4% of all samples at BAO had high ROH+VOCO&NG and were from the western sector where the nearest wells are located indicating that they were not the dominant O&NG source at BAO. ... parameters were measured concurrently at a site on the western perimeter of Boulder, Colorado, during Feb., 1991. ...

J. B. Gilman; B. M. Lerner; W. C. Kuster; J. A. de Gouw

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

Performance specifications for technology development: Application for characterization of volatile organic compounds in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information about technology development for the monitoring and remediation of environmental pollution caused by the release of volatile organic compounds. Topics discussed include: performance specification processes, gas chromatography, mass spectrometer, fiber-optic chemical sensors, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, piezoelectric sensors and electrochemical sensors. These methods are analyzed for their cost efficiency, accuracy, and the ability to meet the needs of the customer.

Carpenter, S.E.; Doskey, P.V.; Erickson, M.D.; Lindahl, P.C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasoline samples collected at Sacramento area service stations. Vapor-liquid equilibrium relationships were summer 2001. Additional gasoline- related VOC emissions not shown in Figure 1 occur at service stations gasoline permeation through rubber and plastic components of the fuel system. [3] EMFAC [California Air

Silver, Whendee

126

Transport and sorption of volatile organic compounds and water vapor in porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain insight on the controlling mechanisms for VOC transport in porous media, the relations among sorbent properties, sorption equilibrium and intraparticle diffusion processes were studied at the level of individual sorbent particles and laboratory columns for soil and activated carbon systems. Transport and sorption of VOCs and water vapor were first elucidated within individual dry soil mineral grains. Soil properties, sorption capacity, and sorption rates were measured for 3 test soils; results suggest that the soil grains are porous, while the sorption isotherms are nonlinear and adsorption-desorption rates are slow and asymmetric. An intragranular pore diffusion model coupled with the nonlinear Freundlich isotherm was developed to describe the sorption kinetic curves. Transport of benzene and water vapor within peat was studied; partitioning and sorption kinetics were determined with an electrobalance. A dual diffusion model was developed. Transport of benzene in dry and moist soil columns was studied, followed by gaseous transport and sorption in activated carbon. The pore diffusion model provides good fits to sorption kinetics for VOCs to soil and VOC to granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers. Results of this research indicate that: Intraparticle diffusion along with a nonlinea sorption isotherm are responsible for the slow, asymmetric sorption-desorption. Diffusion models are able to describe results for soil and activated carbon systems; when combined with mass transfer equations, they predict column breakthrough curves for several systems. Although the conditions are simplified, the mechanisms should provide insight on complex systems involving transport and sorption of vapors in porous media.

Lin, Tsair-Fuh

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Treatment of biorefractory organic compounds in wool scour effluent by hydroxyl radical oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wool scouring effluent that had been treated with chemical flocculation and aerobic biological treatment (Sirolan CFB effluent) was tertiary treated by hydroxyl radical oxidation to remove residual organic compounds. These compounds impart a high chemical oxygen demand of 5003000mg/L and dark colour. However, a H2O2/UV process was found to effectively treat the majority of residual compounds, with up to 75% COD, 85% total organic carbon, and 100% removal of colour (T480nm) achieved. This was despite the effluent being strongly absorbing in the UV region, with a film thickness of 0.21mm reducing T254nm by 50%. Treatment was unaffected by pH over the range 39. H2O2/UV treatment increased the biodegradability of the effluent (5-day biochemical oxygen demand increased from wool scour effluent of approximately 97.5%. This degree of treatment is sufficient for discharge in many, but not all, circumstances.

Andrew J Poole

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Photochemical Modeling of Emissions Trading of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds in Houston, Texas. 2. Incorporation of Chlorine Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of the State Implementation Plan for attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality has created a Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOC) Emissions Cap and Trade Program for ...

Linlin Wang; Tammy Thompson; Elena C. McDonald-Buller; David T. Allen

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

Herndon, S. C.

132

Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Electrocatalytic Materials and Techniques for the Anodic Oxidation of Various Organic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this thesis was first to characterize and improve the applicability of Fe(III) and Bi(V) doped PbO{sub 2} film electrodes for use in anodic O-transfer reactions of toxic and waste organic compounds, e.g. phenol, aniline, benzene, and naphthalene. Further, they investigated the use of alternative solution/electrode interfacial excitation techniques to enhance the performance of these electrodes for remediation and electrosynthetic applications. Finally, they have attempted to identify a less toxic metal oxide film that may hold promise for future studies in the electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis of O-transfer reactions using metal oxide film electrodes.

Stephen Everett Treimer

2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

134

Solar-Powered Electrochemical Oxidation of Organic Compounds Coupled with the Cathodic Production of Molecular Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar-Powered Electrochemical Oxidation of Organic Compounds Coupled with the Cathodic Production of Molecular Hydrogen ... The volume percent of the headspace was calculated assuming that it was directly proportional to the ion current measured by the mass spectrometer and that the transfer of all gases through the membrane and their 70 eV electron ionization cross-sections were approximately equivalent. ... In addition, even if hydrogen is mixed with carbon dioxide, CO2 can be readily removed just by chemical absorption process (e.g., flowing carbon dioxide gas through amine solution), which is a typical CO2 separation process in gas turbine power plants. ...

Hyunwoong Park; Chad D. Vecitis; Michael R. Hoffmann

2008-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

The effect of mean cell residence time on the adsorbability of dissolved organic compounds found in petrochemical wastewaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THF EFFECT OF MEAN CELL RESIDENCE TIME ON THE ADSORBABILITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FOUND IN PETROCHEMICAL WASTEWATERS A Thesis by TIMOTHY LURING JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University ir, Partia. fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE EFFECT OF MEAN CELL RESIDENCE TIME ON THE ADSORBABILITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FOUND IN PETROCHEMICAL WASTENATERS A Thesis by TIMOTHY LORING...

Johnson, Timothy Loring

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

136

The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

Evans, Gordon Barcus

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Hygroscopicity of Water-Soluble Organic Compounds in Atmospheric Aerosols:? Amino Acids and Biomass Burning Derived Organic Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the hygroscopic measurement, the chemicals were first dissolved in ultrapure water to make stock solutions that were used to generate particles by a piezoelectric droplet generator (Uni-Photon Inc., NY., USA, Model 201). ... Together with the measurements of the hygroscopicity of glucose, glycerol, humic-like substances, and arginine, which have been detected in biomass burning aerosols and found noncrystallizing in single particle measurements (8,9,16,20,28,41), these results suggest that organic species derived from biomass burning may retain water at low RH in the atmosphere. ... (6)?Zhang, Q.; Anastasio, C. Free and combined amino compounds in atmospheric fine particles (PM2.5) and fog waters from Northern California. ...

Man Nin Chan; Man Yee Choi; Nga Lee Ng; Chak K. Chan

2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of the catalytic bed.

Tom Barton

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Geobacter strains that use alternate organic compounds, methods of making, and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides new isolated strains of Geobacter species that are capable of using a carbon source that is selected from C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds selected from pyruvate or metabolic precursors of pyruvate as an electron donor in metabolism and in subsequent energy production. In other aspects, other preferred embodiments of the present invention include methods of making such strains and methods of using such strains. In general, the wild type strain of the microorganisms has been shown to be unable to use these C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds as electron donors in metabolic steps such as the reduction of metallic ions. The inventive strains of microorganisms are useful improving bioremediation applications, including in situ bioremediation (including uranium bioremediation and halogenated solvent bioremediation), microbial fuel cells, power generation from small and large-scale waste facilities (e.g., biomass waste from dairy, agriculture, food processing, brewery, or vintner industries, etc.) using microbial fuel cells, and other applications of microbial fuel cells, including, but not limited to, improved electrical power supplies for environmental sensors, electronic sensors, and electric vehicles.

Lovley, Derek R; Summers, Zarath Morgan; Haveman, Shelley Annette; Izallalen, Mounir

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

140

Neutron reflectometry reveals the internal structure of organic compounds deposited on aluminum oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils plays a significant role in the global C cycle, therefore understanding the structure and function of the OCsoil mineral interface is of high importance. To study the interface, films of simple OC compounds and natural organic matter (NOM) were deposited onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3) using spin coating and were exposed to humidity. The thickness, density and structure of the films were studied using a depth-sensitive, nano-scale technique of neutron reflectometry. A single homogenous layer was observed when NOM and glucose (GL) were adsorbed onto Al2O3. However, when stearic acid (SA) was added to either NOM or GL, separate layers attributed to SA and either NOM or GL were detected. The formation of distinct, immiscible layers is due to insolubility of SA with NOM and GL. In contrast, GL and NOM are both water-soluble, and therefore soluble with each other, forming a homogenous layer on the mineral surface. Our results suggest that the extent of complex layering formed on the OCmineral interface may depend on the relative solubility of the compounds.

Melanie Mayes; Sindhu Jagadamma; Haile Ambaye; Loukas Petridis; Valeria Lauter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Thermogravimetric investigation on characteristic of biomass combustion under the effect of organic calcium compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Experiments were conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer to investigate thermal behavior of different organic calcium compounds (OCCs) and its blended fuels with three kinds of biomass. The effectiveness of synthesized method for OCC was assessed by the pyrolysis test. Effect of the mole ratio of calcium to sulfur on co-combustion characteristics was studied. Results indicated that preparation method of modified calcium acetate (MCA) had high precision and accuracy. Co-combustion characteristic of \\{OCCs\\} blended with biomass was controlled by OCCs additive amount and the content of volatile matter which is mainly composed of small hydrocarbon molecules. Combustion performance indexes for peanut shell and wheat straw impregnated by \\{OCCs\\} were improved, however, an inverse trend was found for rice husk because of lower additive amount of OCCs. The blended fuel show higher combustion performance indexes compared with combustion of individual biomass, and these indexes decrease with increases of Ca/S ratio.

Lihui Zhang; Feng Duan; Yaji Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A numerical solution to three-dimensional multiphase transport of volatile organic compounds in unsaturated soils -- with an application to the remedial method of in-situ volatilization. Part I: Theoretical development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this paper presents the development and application of a numerical model for determining the fate and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in the unsaturated zone resulting from forced volatilization and gaseous advection-dispersion of organic vapor in a multipartitioned three-dimensional environment. The model allows for single-component transport in the gas and water phases. The hydrocarbon is assumed to be in specific retention and, therefore, immobile. Partitioning of the hydrocarbon between the oil, water, gas, and soil is developed as rate-limited functions that are incorporated into sink/source terms in the transport equations. The code for the model was developed specifically to investigate in-situ volatilization (ISV) remedial strategies, predict the extent of cleanup from information obtained at a limited number of measurement locations, and to help design ISV remedial systems. Application of the model is demonstrated for a hypothetical one-dimensional ISV system. Part II of this paper will present the analysis of an existing ISV system using the full three-dimensional capability of the model.

Filley, T.; Tomasko, D.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Emissions of non-methane organic compounds from a grassland site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons (OxHCs), isoprene, and monoterpenes was detected in the emissions from a grassland site in the Midwestern United States. A plot dominated by crown vetch (Coronilla varia) and bluegrass (Poa spp.), exhibited a constant decrease in emissions of total non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) from 580 {mu}g m{sup -2} hr{sup -1} in June 1992 to 150 {mu}g m{sup - 2} hr{sup -1} in October 1992, except for a slight increase in August. Oxygenated hydrocarbons (methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and terpenes (isoprene, limonene, myrcene, {alpha}-pinene, and {beta}- pinene) composed about 90% and 10% of the identified NMOC emissions, respectively. Isoprene represented about 10% of the terpene emissions. Total NMOC emission rates based on vegetative biomass averaged 2.3 {mu}g g{sup -1} hr{sup -1}, with 10% of the identified NMOCs attributed to monoterpenes and the remainder mainly OxHCs. Over the course of the investigation, the relationship between the monoterpene emission rate and the temperature for a single plot was logarithmic and similar to the one between compound vapor pressure and temperature. However, emission rates normalized to temperature decreased throughout the summer and fall, indicating that parameterizations of emission rates from herbaceous plants must include a factor to compensate for environmental conditions such as soil moisture and nutrient deposition, which affect plant phenology and the seasonal pattern of species dominance.

Fukui, Yoshiko; Doskey, P.V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Selected Values of Heats of Combustion and Heats of Formation of Organic Compounds Containing the Elements C, H, N, O, P, and S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selected values of the heats of combustion and heats of formation of 719 organic compounds are reported here. The data tabulated pertain to compounds containing the elements carbon hydrogen nitrogen oxygen phosphorus and sulfur (CHNOPS). The information is arranged according to classes of compounds and within each class compounds are arranged by empirical formula. The general classes covered are: hydrocarbons alcohols phenols polyols ethers aldehydes ketones acids acid anhydrides esters steroids lactones carbohydrates heterocyclic oxygen compounds amines amides urea derivatives guanidine derivatives amino acids peptides alkaloids heterocyclic nitrogen compounds porphyrins organic sulfur compounds and organic phosphorus compounds. When a selection was made from among several investigators commentary is provided to indicate the choice and usually some relevant data. The number of references cited is 596. An alphabetical compound index is provided which gives the name page number empirical formula and the Wiswesser Line Notation (WLN) for each compound.

Eugene S. Domalski

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The plants used in the rooftop greenhouse and on the floors were made up of a number of species selected for the following functions: daytime metabolic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absorption, nighttime metabolic CO{sub 2} absorption, and volatile organic compound (VOC) and inorganic gas absorption/removal for air cleaning. The building contains a reported 910 indoor plants. Daytime metabolic species reported by the PBC include Areca Palm, Oxycardium, Rubber Plant, and Ficus alii totaling 188 plants (21%). The single nighttime metabolic species is the Sansevieria with a total of 28 plants (3%). The 'air cleaning' plant species reported by the PBC include the Money Plant, Aglaonema, Dracaena Warneckii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm with a total of 694 plants (76%). The plants in the greenhouse (Areca Palm, Rubber Plant, Ficus alii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm) numbering 161 (18%) of those in the building are grown hydroponically, with the room air blown by fan across the plant root zones. The plants on the building floors are grown in pots and are located on floors 1-6. We conducted a one-day monitoring session in the PBC on January 1, 2010. The date of the study was based on availability of the measurement equipment that the researchers had shipped from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in the U.S.A. The study date was not optimal because a large proportion of the regular building occupants were not present being New Year's Day. An estimated 40 people were present in the building all day during January 1. This being said, the building systems were in normal operations, including the air handlers and other HVAC components. The study was focused primarily on measurements in the Greenhouse and 3rd and 5th floor environments as well as rooftop outdoors. Measurements included a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes, with a more limited set of observations of indoor and outdoor particulate and carbon dioxide concentrations. Continuous measurements of Temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) were made selected indoor and outdoor locations.

Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

147

Photocatalytic Degradation of VOC's by TOTO's Hydrotect (TiO2 Impregnated) Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, naturally occurs in wood and volcanic gases. Decaying organic matter can also produce methanol. Paint. This report describes the photocatalytic degradation of formaldehyde and methanol, two common VOC's, by TiO2 and methanol tests (Land et al., 2008). A standardized aqueous solution of formaldehyde and methanol was used

Bergin, Mike

148

The relation of certain organic phosphorus compounds to blood cholinesterase activity and their value as parasiticides in swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RELATION OF CERTAIN ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS TO BLOOD CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY AND THEIR VALUE AS PARASFIICIDES IN SWINE A Thesis By DELFIN DANCEL de LEON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College... of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1960 Major Subject: Animal Husbandry THE RELATION OF CERTAIN ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS CON/EXPOUNDS TO BLOOD CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITT AND THEIR VALUE...

Leon, Delfin Dancel de

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Gas phase radiolysis and vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of heterocyclic organic compounds. Progress report, Feburary 1, 1979-February 1, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-range objective of our research group is to gain a better understanding of the processes by which complex organic molecules react when they absorb large amounts of energy. This progress report describes the results of our recent work in three areas: diradicals derived from heterocyclic compounds; trimethylene diradicals from various sources; and ion-molecule reactions.

Scala, A.A.; Nguyen, D.; Rourke, W.; Caputo, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Numerical simulation of VOC Emissions from Dry Materials , J.S. Zhang2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, subfloors), and insulation materials (fiberglass, rigid foam) emit a variety of volatile organic compounds

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

153

Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residential rooms residential rooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-59303 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3251-3265 Keywords adsorption, hazardous air pollutants, nerve agents, sink effect, volatile organic compounds Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential rooms studied ''as-is'' with furnishings and material surfaces unaltered and in a furnished chamber designed to simulate a residential room. Results are presented for 10 rooms (five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a home office, and two multi-function spaces) and the chamber. Exposed materials were characterized and areas quantified. A mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was rapidly volatilized within each room as it was closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase; this was followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. Included were alkane, aromatic, and oxygenated VOCs representing a range of ambient and indoor air pollutants. Three organophosphorus compounds served as surrogates for Sarin-like nerve agents. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at a surface sink and potentially a second, embedded sink. The 3-parameter sink-diffusion model provided acceptable fits for most compounds and the 4-parameter two-sink model provided acceptable fits for the others. Initial adsorption rates and sorptive partitioning increased with decreasing vapor pressure for the alkanes, aromatics and oxygenated VOCs. Best-fit sorption parameters obtained from experimental data from the chamber produced best-fit sorption parameters similar to those obtained from the residential rooms

154

Treatment of \\{VOCs\\} with molecular sieve catalysts in regenerative catalytic oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work prepares molecular sieve catalysts with various metal species and various metal weight loadings by impregnation, and then screens them in a catalytic combustion system. The current study further investigates the molecular sieve catalyst in an RCO system after it performed well in combustion efficiency. This work tests its performances in terms of CO2 yield, pressure drop, the difference between temperatures of the inlet and outlet gases (Td), and thermal recovery efficiency (TRE), with various operational conditions. Experimental results demonstrate that the 10wt% Cu/(MS) catalyst was the most active because it has the greatest combustion efficiency to treat volatile organic compounds (VOCs) than Co/(MS) catalysts and Mn/(MS) catalysts. The 10wt% Cu/(MS) catalyst used in an RCO system reaches over 95% CO2 yields under the heating zone temperature (Tset)=400C, gas velocity (Ug)=0.37m/s, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) concentration=200400ppm conditions. Moreover, the RCO system performed well in economic efficiency with the RCO with in terms of TRE, Td and pressure drop. The TRE ranged from 90.4% to 94.6% and Td ranged from 14.0 to 34.2C under various conditions at Tset=300450C. Finally, the results of the stability test demonstrated that the catalyst was very stable at various Ug values and various Tset values.

Shih-Wei Huang; Jie-Chung Lou; Yung-Chang Lin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Atmospheric outflow of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds from East Asia in Spring 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To estimate the emissions of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) from East Asia and to identify unique SOC molecular markers in Asian air masses, high-volume air samples were collected on the island of Okinawa, Japan between 22 March and 2 May 2004. Contributions from different source regions (China, Japan, the Koreas, Russia, and ocean/local) were estimated by use of source region impact factors (SRIFs). Elevated concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorcyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and particulate-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were attributed to air masses from China. A large proportion of the variation in the current-use pesticides, gas-phase PAHs, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations was explained by meteorology. Chlordanes showed a technical mixture profile and similar concentrations regardless of source region. {alpha}/{gamma} HCH and trans/cis chlordane ratios did not vary significantly with different source regions and had regional averages of 2.5 {+-} 1.0 and 1.2 {+-} 0.3, respectively. Particulate-phase PAH concentrations were significantly correlated (p value {lt} 0.05) with other incomplete combustion byproduct concentrations, including elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}), CO, NOx{asterisk}, black carbon, submicrometer aerosols, and SO{sub 2}. By use of measured PAH, CO, and black carbon concentrations and estimated CO and black carbon emission inventories, the emission of six carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs was estimated to be 1518-4179 metric tons/year for Asia and 778-1728 metric tons/year for China, respectively. These results confirm that East Asian outflow contains significant emissions of carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs. 39 refs., 3 figs.

Toby Primbs; Staci Simonich; David Schmedding; Glenn Wilson; Dan Jaffe; Akinori Takami; Shungo Kato; Shiro Hatakeyama; Yoshizumi Kajii [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States). Departments of Chemistry and Environmental and Molecular Toxicology

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Photochemical Modeling of Emissions Trading of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds in Houston, Texas. 1. Reactivity Based Trading and Potential for Ozone Hot Spot Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photochemical Modeling of Emissions Trading of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds in Houston, Texas. ... (12)?Thompson, T. M.; Wang, L.; Web, A.; McDonald-Buller, E.; Allen, D. T. Photochemical Modeling of the Air Quality Impacts of an Emissions Trading Program for Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) in Texas; Air and Waste Management Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, June, 2006. ...

Linlin Wang; Tammy Thompson; Elena C. McDonald-Buller; Alba Webb; David T. Allen

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

158

Embedded Electronic Nose for VOC Mixture Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper details the work done towards a low cost, small size, portable embedded electronic nose (e-nose) and its application for analysis of different VOC mixtures. The sensor array is composed of commercially available metal oxide semiconductor sensors by Figaro. The embedded E-nose consists of an ADuC831 and has an RS 232 interface for Desktop PC for higher level data collection and NN training. The ESP tool with database facility and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP NN) is employed to interface the embedded hardware and to process the electronic nose signals before being classified. The use of embedded e-nose for the quantification of VOCs in mixtures is investigated.

Botre, B.; Gharpure, D.; Shaligram, A. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Pune, Pune: 411007 (India)

2009-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

Comparing removal of trace organic compounds and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) at advanced and traditional water treatment plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stability of drinking water can be indicated by the assimilable organic carbon (AOC). This AOC value represents the regrowth capacity of microorganisms...254, and AOC) from water, experimental results indicate th...

Jie-Chung Lou; Chung-Yi Lin; Jia-Yun Han

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a furnished room a furnished room Title Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-53943 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Singer, Brett C., Kenneth L. Revzan, Toshifumi Hotchi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 38 Start Page Chapter Issue 16 Pagination 2483-2494 Abstract We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m3 room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C8-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h-1 and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Isotopic constraints on the sources and associations of organic compounds in marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To provide a new perspective on the fate of both natural organic matter and hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in marine sediments, we have investigated the relationship between radiocarbon (14C) age and the different ...

White, Helen K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4083E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Parthasarathy, Srinandini, Randy L. Maddalena, Marion L. Russell, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors were evaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using the

163

Carbon isotope ratios of organic compound fractions in oceanic suspended particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiocarbon evidence of fossil-carbon cycling in sediments1968), Metabolic fractionation of carbon isotopes in marineof particulate organic carbon using bomb 14 C, Nature,

Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA Citation Nevin, K...attractive strategy to convert solar energy that is harvested intermittently...photosynthesis that might convert solar energy to organic products...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photosynthesis that might convert solar energy to organic products more effectively...nature of renewable sources of energy, most notably solar and wind, is leading to a search for strategies to capture the electrical energy produced from these sources in...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Removal of organic and inorganic compounds from landfill leachate using reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this work was to evaluate an effectiveness of removing organic and inorganic pollutants from landfill leachate in a long-term reverse osmosis (RO) study. Investigations were carried out...4 ...

I. A. Talalaj

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Radionuclides, Trace Metals, and Organic Compounds in Shells of Native Freshwater Mussels Along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River: 6000 Years Before Present to Current Times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents concentrations of radionuclides, trace metals, and semivolatile organic compounds measured in shell samples of the western pearl shell mussel collected along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

B. L. Tiller; T. E. Marceau

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

168

Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds. Progress report, 1993--1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the recent year, the authors extended investigations into insertion reactions by investigating the insertion of dicarboxylate acetylene into the metal-metal bond of Re{sub 2}(CO){sub 9}(NCMe). Secondly, the authors considered the ring opening reactions of the cyclic thioethers: tetrahydrothiophene and thiacyclohexane when complexed to Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(NCMe){sub 2}. In a third effort, various osmium complexes of cyclobutynes were synthesized and the subsequent reactivity probed. Finally, energy storage (via absorption of UV-visible photons) in osmium cluster compounds was investigated.

Adams, R.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary 5 layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/800 OD tube 150m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the 10 tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect 15 from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

Mak, J. E.; Su, L.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011 Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions -...

172

E-Print Network 3.0 - air voc flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences 28 ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT Summary: of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from...

173

Correlation between gas-phase and solution-phase reactivities of hydroxyl radicals toward saturated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas-phase and aqueous-solution-phase reactivities of hydroxyl radicals with a wide variety of organic compounds are compared. When kinetic data are available for the same reaction occurring in both phases, this comparison provides useful information about the reaction mechanism. Through this comparison the authors can demonstrate a linear correlation between the gas/solution-phase OH reactivities for numerous saturated organic compounds. This empirical relationship can be used together with mechanistic information to estimate the OH reactivity in one phase from the measured rate constant in the other. In order to develop and extend the correlation, they have used the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique to measure rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with methanol-d/sub 4/, ethanol-d/sub 6/, 2-chloroethanol, 2,2,2-trichloroethanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, acetone-d/sub 6/, 1,1,1-trifluoroacetone, and 1,2-butylene oxide at 298 K. These results are reported herein.

Wallington, T.J.; Dagaut, P.; Kurylo, M.J.

1988-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

Our planet is becoming increasingly polluted with inorganic and organic compounds, primarily as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced or expected to be present in organ- isms). Many of them are toxic and/or carcinogenic. Sources cleanup in the US, and $25­50 billion per year worldwide (Glass 1999; Tsao 2003). Most remediation that use plants to remove, reduce, degrade, or immobilize environmental pollutants from soil and water

175

"The disintegration of organic compounds by microorganisms is accompanied by the liberation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that of the better- known abiotic hydrogen- and methanol-driven fuel cells. For example, abiotic fuel cells require in a cost-effective manner. Over the past 40 years it has been suggested that microbial fuel cells might convert organic matter into electricity in devices known as microbial fuel cells. However, interest

Lovley, Derek

176

Ozone-forming potential of a series of oxygenated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An incremental reactivity approach has been used to assess the relative ozone-forming potentials of various important oxygenated fuels/fuel additives, i.e., tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), dimethyl ether (DME), diethyl ether (DEE), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), in a variety of environments. Calculations were performed using a single-cell trajectory model, combined with the Lurmann-Carter-Coyner chemical mechanism, with (NMOC)/(NO{sub x}) ratios ranging from 4 to 20. This work provides the first quantitative assessment of the air quality impact of release of these important oxygenated compounds. ETBE and DEE are the two most reactive compounds on a per carbon equivalent basis, while TBA is the least reactive species. At a (NMOC)/(NO{sub x}) ratio of 8, which is generally typical of polluted urban areas in the United States, TBA, DME, MTBE, and ETBE all have incremental reactivities less than or equal to that of the urban NMHC mix. Thus, use of these additives in fuels may have a beneficial impact on urban ozone levels.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Rudy, S.J.; Chang, Tai Y. (Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Thermodynamic properties of organic oxygen compounds XLIII. Vapour pressures of some ethers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vapour pressures of methyl propyl, isopropyl methyl, butyl methyl, ethyl propyl, t-butyl methyl, dipropyl, di-isopropyl, di-t-butyl, and decyl methyl ethers were measured at pressures up to 205 kPa. The measured values were fitted by Antoine and by Chebyshev equations, values already published from this laboratory for three aromatic ethers were recomputed uniformly with the present results, and published values for four additional compounds were incorporated in a scheme for correlation of the vapour pressures of ethers. Estimates were made of the vapour pressures of 10 other ethers. Between 5 and 200 kPa the vapour pressures of ethers may be represented by a single equation in which carbon number or an effective carbon number is a parameter. Chebyshev equations are given for interpolation between the upper bounds of the measurements and the critical pressures of 11 ethers for which this property has been previously determined.

D Ambrose; J.H Ellender; C.H.S Sprake; R Townsend

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3and SO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Continued. SO 2 NO Ethene Propane n- Butane n- Heptanebetween CH 4 , ethane and propane suggest low levels ofa n/a n/a Alkanes Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN andCH3CN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

propene, acetone, benzene, propane and ?-pinene (Table 1).cyanide Acetonitrile Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-= Ethane Ethane Ethane Ethane Propane Propane Propane ARCTAS

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL's emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

Williams, C.H. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)); Eberhart, C.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL`s emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

Williams, C.H. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Eberhart, C.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Single-reactor process for producing liquid-phase organic compounds from biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for preparing liquid fuel and chemical intermediates from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons. The method includes the steps of reacting in a single reactor an aqueous solution of a biomass-derived, water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon reactant, in the presence of a catalyst comprising a metal selected from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au, at a temperature, and a pressure, and for a time sufficient to yield a self-separating, three-phase product stream comprising a vapor phase, an organic phase containing linear and/or cyclic mono-oxygenated hydrocarbons, and an aqueous phase.

Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Simonetti, Dante A. (Middleton, WI); Kunkes, Edward L. (Madison, WI)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Regenerative thermal oxidation and alternative technologies for VOC control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal oxidation technologies have been used successfully to control VOC`s for many years but the recent 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have spurred improvements in the established processes and development of economic alternatives. The combination of the regulatory maze and confusion in the selection of the best technology for a particular application has created a potential nightmare for those companies facing a need to reduce their VOC EMISSIONS. The relative advantages and disadvantages of regenerative, recuperative and catalytic oxidizers will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the economic justification for regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO). Control efficiencies of more than 99% have been demonstrated for RTO`s on a multitude of industrial process exhaust streams. Lowest evaluated cost over a fifteen to twenty year effective equipment life is a key selection criteria. This paper describes the underlying principles of thermal oxidation, and discusses the applicability of these and other emerging technologies for VOC control.

Biedell, E.L. [REECQ, Somerville, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Behavior of partially miscible organic compounds in simulated ground water systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serious ground water contamination problems result from leaks or spills of organic liquids which are partially miscible in water. Two important categories of these liquids include low molecular weight chlorinated solvents and gasoline. 1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCA) abiotically degrades in water forming approximately 17-25% 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) via an elimination reaction. Brominated analogs of TCA hydrolyze 11-13 times faster than TCA. As the number of bromines increase, the percent of elimination products increases. These geminal trihalides degrade by a unimolecular mechanism (E1/SN1). The rate coefficient for TCA degradation in buffered water at elevated temperature is approximately six times greater than hydrolysis of 1-chloropropane (SN2 mechanism) and more than 100 times greater than 1,1-dichloroethane. In the presence of sodium thiosulfate, the 1-chloropropane degradation rate increased by more than a factor of 100, 1,1-dichloroethane rate by 22 and TCA degradation by approximately two. The range of concentrations for major components of gasoline which partition into water was determined for 65 gasoline samples. Benzene concentrations in the water extracts ranged from 12.3-130 mg/l and toluene concentrations ranged from 23-185 mg/l. Fuel/water partition coefficients of seven major aromatic constituents were measured for 31 gasoline types and showed a standard deviation of 10-30%. These coefficients were highly correlated with the pure component solubilities. Chemometric techniques were applied to 20 peaks measured in the aqueous extracts of the 65 gasolines. Bivariate plots and principal component analyses show selected brands have distinguishing equilibrium concentrations, but complete separation of brands was not observed.

Cline, P.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

VOLUME 77, NUMBER 19 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 4 NOVEMBER 1996 Incommensurate Intermodulation of an Organic Intergrowth Compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intermodulation of an Organic Intergrowth Compound Observed by Neutron Scattering R. Lefort,1 J. Etrillard,1 B occurs around 160 K. The neutron scattering experiments were performed at

Boyer, Edmond

188

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

189

Effects of organic silicon compounds as additives on chargedischarge cycling efficiencies of lithium in nonaqueous electrolytes for rechargeable lithium cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Influence of mixing organic silicon compounds into 1M (M: molL?1) LiPF6-ethylene carbonate (EC)/ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) (mixing volume ratio=3:7) mixed solvent electrolytes on chargedischarge cycling efficiencies of lithium metal negative electrodes is examined. As organic silicon compounds, polyether-modified siloxanes with polyethylene oxide chains, chlorotrimethylsilane, tetraethoxysilane, cis-tetra [isobutyl (dimethylsiloxy)] cyclotetrasiloxane and cage-type silsesquioxane are investigated. Chargedischarge cycling tests of lithium are galvanostatically carried out using stainless steel working electrodes. Chargedischarge cycling efficiencies of lithium tend to improve by mixing organic silicon compounds. A cage-type silsesquioxane, octaphenyloctasilsesquioxane (Ph8T8) exhibits the highest cycling efficiency of approximately 80% with small mixing amount of 0.02M Ph8T8. Mechanism of enhancement of lithium cycling efficiencies by mixing organic silicon compounds is considered to be due to the suppression of excess reduction of LiPF6-EC/EMC by lithium and the growth of surface film on lithium.

Ryota Yanagisawa; Hisayuki Endo; Masafumi Unno; Hideyuki Morimoto; Shin-ichi Tobishima

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process that includes electron transport and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process would cause severe problems if special mechanisms did not protect the photosynthetic system from energy or photon units. Irradiance is the amount of energy that falls on a flat sensor of known area per

Ehleringer, Jim

191

Dictionary of Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... an illustration of the considerable increase in the number of entries, the section from Carene to Carvoxime has grown from 3 to 7 pages. In a work ...

JOHN READ

1943-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

192

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 11391152, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/1139/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 2005). A recent global mass-balance calculation for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs

Boyer, Edmond

193

Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

194

8, 1182111851, 2008 VOCs during 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Texas 77843, TX, USA 2 Molina Center for Energy and the Environment, La Jolla, California, CA, USA * now Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of the Megacity Initiative ­ Local and Global Research the probability of significant industrial sources of the two compounds in the15 region. Wind fields during those

Boyer, Edmond

195

The Emissions of Major Aromatic Voc as Landfill Gas from Urban Landfill Sites in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, concentrations of major aromatic VOCs were determined from landfill gas (LFG) at a total of five...?1 (WJ in wintertime). The LFG flux values of aromatic VOC, when compared to the contribution of n...

Ki-Hyun Kim; Sung Ok Baek; Ye-Jin Choi

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

High-precision optical measurements of 13C/12C isotope ratios in organic compounds at natural abundance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-precision...compounds at natural abundance...catalytic combustor, and an isotopic...challenge to the high-cost and...carbon dioxide gas, using...temperature and pressure from which...of carbon gases . Spectrochim...2008 ) High precision...compounds at natural abundance...catalytic combustor, and...

Richard N. Zare; Douglas S. Kuramoto; Christa Haase; Sze M. Tan; Eric R. Crosson; Nabil M. R. Saad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Membrane applications to control VOC emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thin film composite membrane to separate and recover organic vapors is briefly described. The membrane is designed for end of pipe installation with a separation efficiency of greater than 90%. The main components of the membrane system are feed compressor, vacuum pump, and membrane modules. The paper focuses on operating characteristics of the membrane, and provides data on various ideal selectivities for organics; dependence of toluene/nitrogen selectivity and stage cut on flow velocity; and dependence of plant capacity, recovery rate, pressure ratio, stage cut, retentate concentration, and specific energy consumption on membrane area for gasoline vapor separation process conditions. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Ohlrogge, K.; Wind, J. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

Enneking, J. C.

199

ORIGINAL PAPER L. Voc adlo K. S. Knight G. D. Price I. G. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER L. VocÏ adlo á K. S. Knight á G. D. Price á I. G. Wood Thermal expansion and crystal discussed by Wood et al. (1996), VocÏ adlo et al. (1999, 2000) and Mattheiss and Hamann (1993002690100202 L. VocÏ adlo (&) á G. D. Price á I. G. Wood Department of Geological Sciences, University College

Vocadlo, Lidunka

200

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-56787 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(9) Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential bedrooms (n=4), bathrooms (n=2), and a furnished test chamber. Rooms were studied "as-is" with material surfaces and furnishings unaltered. Surface materials were characterized and areas quantified. Experiments included rapid volatilization of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with the room closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase, followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. The mixture included n-alkanes, aromatics, glycol ethers, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, dichlorobenzene, and organophosphorus compounds. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at one surface sink and one potential embedded sink. The 2-parameter sink model tracked measurements for most compounds, but improved fits were obtained for some VOCs with a 3-parameter sink-diffusion or a 4-parameter two-sink model. Sorptive partitioning and initial adsorption rates increased with decreasing vapour pressure within each chemical class.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 VOCsVOCs,, PAHsPAHs, soot, tar, CO, soot, tar, CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxides in the presence of sunlight" (McConville, 1997) PAH polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon tar or liquid fuel components during combustion THC,TOC totalhydrocarbon,totalorganiccarbon HAP (USA with heat recuperationThermal VOC incinerator with heat recuperation 150150EEEEF=66F=66EEEEC, 600C, 600EEEEF

Zevenhoven, Ron

202

O3-NOx-VOC sensitivity and NOx-VOC indicators in Paris: Results from models and Atmospheric Pollution Over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Atmospheric Pollution Over the Paris Area campaign near Paris, with special attention Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Structure-VOC indicators in Paris: Results from models and Atmospheric Pollution Over the Paris Area (ESQUIF) measurements

Menut, Laurent

203

Fatty Acids from Lipids of Marine Organisms: Molecular Biodiversity, Roles as Biomarkers, Biologically Active Compounds, and Economical Aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of their characteristic living environments, marine organisms produce avariety of lipids. Fatty acids constitute the essential part of triglycerides and wax esters, which are the major components ...

Jean-Pascal Berg; Gilles Barnathan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Application of solar photocatalytic oxidation to VOC-containing airstreams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently conducted two pilot-scale field tests located at McClellan Air Force Base (AFB) in Sacramento, California and at the Fort Carson US Army Installation in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The objective of the tests was to determine the effectiveness of solar-powered photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) treatment units for destroying emissions of chlorinated organic compounds (trichloroethylene and dichloroethylenes) from an air stripper at ambient temperature and destroying paint solvent emissions (toluene and MEK) from a painting facility at higher temperatures. Their goals for field testing these solar-driven systems was to gather real-world treatability data and establish that the systems maintained performance during the duration of the testing. This paper reports the results of these field tests.

Magrini, K.A.; Watt, A.S.; Boyd, L.C.; Wolfrum, E.J.; Larson, S.A.; Roth, C.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Chapter 10 - Regenerative catalytic oxidizer technology for VOC control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The regenerative catalytic oxidizer (RCO) technology has evolved significantly as an efficient method to control volatile organic compounds. The RCO technology favors using oxide catalysts because it allows for easy compensation of lower activity by an increase in the catalyst amount or temperature. Heat transfer and accumulation properties of ceramic packing material strongly influence RCO performance. The rate of heat transfer affects the temperature gradients along the bed length that, in turn, determine the volume of material required to preheat the gas to the temperature of catalytic or thermal oxidation. During the catalyst operation, it gradually becomes less active and must be eventually replaced. The factors affecting the catalyst lifetime include high temperature, catalytic poisons, and masking agents. Compounds of halogens and sulfur are the most common catalyst poisons. Temperature control, poison tolerant catalysts, and gas-flow pretreatment are used to reduce the impact of catalyst deactivation. This chapter also presents the behavior of an RCO when the catalyst deactivates, and proposes strategies ensuring the required performance during the entire catalyst lifetime.

V.O. Strots; G.A. Bunimovich; C.R. Roach; Yu.Sh. Matros

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Introduction A combined heat and power (CHP) system can be a financially attractive energy option for many...

207

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Michael G. Apte Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 43 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5626-5632 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THUVOC and aldehyde emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehydeconcentrations ranged from 378 µg m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 µg m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 µg m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 µg m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and materialspecific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was theonly one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 µg m-2 h-1 in the morning and 257 to 347 µg m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 µg m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 µg/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 µg/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (materialsurface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde

208

Mechanisms of synfuel degradation 1. Effects of organic nitrogen compounds on the stability of a shale derived diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable accelerated fuel stability test regimen has been developed and applied to the study of the storage stability of a shale derived diesel fuel marine (DFM). The results of a survey of nitrogen compounds as dopants in a stable shale DFM base fuel indicate that some pyrroles and indoles may play significant roles in storage stability. A complete stability test matrix has been developed for the temperatures of 43, 65 and 80/sup 0/C, for time periods between 4 and 179 days, and for a ten-fold concentration range of a model dopant, 2,5-dimethylpyrrole (DMP). Stability was defined by the amount of total insoluble material (filterable sediment and adherent gum) produced after stress, and also by the amount of titratable peroxide present in the filtrates of stressed fuel samples. A very regular pattern for insolubles formation was found within the test matrix. Deposit formation rates exhibited a first-order dependence on DMP concentration, with an apparent activation energy of 11-12 kcal/mol. The sediment was found to contain 12% nitrogen and 18-20% oxygen irrespective of the stress conditions employed.

Cooney, J.V.; Beal, E.J.; Huzlett, R.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their high rates of chemical consumption. Additionally, chemical scrubbers are ineffective for the removalACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH _______ ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from wastewater treatment plant waste air. The biofilter

210

CSTB / CTBA Wood Preservation -Cannes 2001 MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM CURATIVE TREATED WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSTB / CTBA Wood Preservation - Cannes 2001 1 MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM CURATIVE TREATED WOOD : A NEW EMISSION TEST CHAMBER METHOD François MAUPETIT1 , Olivier RAMALHO1 and Christophe YRIEIX2 wood, emission test chamber, VOCs Introduction A poor indoor air quality (IAQ) is now recognized

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

211

Versatile piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source for gaseous compounds and organic molecules with femtomole accuracy for UHV and surface science applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note describes the construction of a piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source based upon a design presented in an earlier work [D. Proch and T. Trickl, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 60, 713 (1988)]. The design features significant modifications that permit the determination of the number of molecules in a beam pulse with an accuracy of 1x10{sup 11} molecules per pulse. The 21 cm long plunger-nozzle setup allows the molecules to be brought to any point of the UHV chamber with very high intensity. Furthermore, besides typical gaseous compounds, also smaller organic molecules with a vapor pressure higher than 0.1 mbar at room temperature may serve as feed material. This makes the new design suitable for various applications in chemical and surface science studies.

Schiesser, Alexander; Schaefer, Rolf [Eduard-Zintl-Institut fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 20, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparative evaluation of several small mammal species as monitors of heavy metals, radionuclides, and selected organic compounds in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate which small mammal species are the best monitors of specific environmental contaminants. The evaluation is based on the published literature and on an analysis of small mammals trapped at several sites on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Studies on the uptake of heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic chemicals are reviewed in Chapter II to evaluate several small mammal species for their capacity to serve as sentinels for the presence, accumulation, and effects of various contaminants. Where several species were present at a site, a comparative evaluation was made and species are ranked for their capacity to serve as monitors of specific contaminants. Food chain accumulation and food habits of the species are used to establish a relationship with suitability as a biomonitor. Tissue-specific concentration factors were noted in order to establish target tissues. Life histories, habitat, and food habits are reviewed in order to make generalizations concerning the ability of similar taxa to serve as biomonitor. Finally, the usefulness of several small mammal species as monitors of three contaminants -- benzo(a)pyrene, mercury, and strontium-90 -- present on or near the ORNL facilities was investigated. 133 refs., 5 figs., 20 tabs.

Talmage, S.S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organization Print Organization Print 2012-12 org chart A complete ALS organization chart (June 2013) is available in PDF. Appointed and elected members of advisory panels provide guidance to Berkeley Lab and ALS management in developing the ALS scientific and user programs. ALS Staff Photo staff photo thumb Click on the image to see a recent photo of ALS staff in front of the dome. The photo was taken on May 14, 2013. ALS Management and Advisory Team Steve Kevan, Deputy Division Director, Science Michael J. Banda, Deputy Division Director, Operations Robert W. Schoenlein, Senior Staff Scientist, Next Generation Light Source Initiative Janos Kirz, Scientific Advisor Paul Adams, Division Deputy for Biosciences ALS Scientific, Technical, and User Support Groups Accelerator Physics

215

Application of Electron Beams for the Treatment of VOC Streams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Material Development, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan, and Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan ... However, VOC emissions to the atmosphere accounted for more than 80% of the total emission of 898?308 t/year to the environment in 2001, according to reports from the industrial corporations handling pollutants listed in the PRTR registry and the estimation of pollutant emissions from nonregistered corporations, mobile sources, and households.2 Figure 1 shows the emission amounts of the 10 highest-ranked substances reported by the PRTR in 2001. ...

Koichi Hirota; Hiroki Sakai; Masakazu Washio; Takuji Kojima

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

216

ACCU Core Sampling/Storage Device for VOC Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accu Core sampler system consists of alternating cylindrical clear acrylic sections and one-inch cylindrical stainless steel sections arranged in clear shrink wrap. The set of alternating acrylic and stainless steel sections in the shrink wrap are designed to fit in a Geoprobe dual-tube penetrometer for collection of continuous soil cores. The clear acrylic sections can have 1/2-inch access holes for easy soil headspace screening without violating the integrity of the adjacent stainless steel sections. The Accu Core sampler system can be used to store a soil sample collected in the stainless steel section by capping the ends of the section so it becomes a sample storage container. The sampler system can also be used to collect a subsurface soil sample in one of the sections that can be directly extruded from the section into a container for storage during shipment to the laboratory. In addition, the soil in a sampler section can be quickly sub-sampled using a coring tool and extruded into a storage container so the integrity of the soil is not disrupted and the potential for VOC loss during sub-sampling is greatly reduced. A field validation study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the Accu Core sampler to store VOC soil samples during transportation to the laboratory for analysis and to compare the performance of the Accu Core with current sampling and storage techniques, all of which require sub-sampling when the soil sample is brought to the surface. During some of the validation testing, the acrylic sections having access holes for headspace screening were included in the Accu Core sampler configuration and soil in these sections was screened to show the usefulness of the sample screening capability provided by the Accu Core system. This report presents the results of the field validation study as well as recommendations for the Accu Core sampler system.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Mark M. Sanderson

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Removal of organic compounds and trace metals from oil sands process-affected water using zero valent iron enhanced by petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oil production generates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), referring to the water that has been in contact with oil sands or released from tailings deposits. There are concerns about the environmental impacts of the release of OSPW because of its toxicity. Zero valent iron alone (ZVI) and in combination with petroleum coke (CZVI) were investigated as environmentally friendly treatment processes for the removal of naphthenic acids (NAs), acid-extractable fraction (AEF), fluorophore organic compounds, and trace metals from OSPW. While the application of 25g/L ZVI to OSPW resulted in 58.4% removal of \\{NAs\\} in the presence of oxygen, the addition of 25g petroleum coke (PC) as an electron conductor enhanced the \\{NAs\\} removal up to 90.9%. The increase in ZVI concentration enhanced the removals of NAs, AEF, and fluorophore compounds from OSPW. It was suggested that the electrons generated from the oxidation of ZVI were transferred to oxygen, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radicals and oxidation of NAs. When OSPW was de-oxygenated, the \\{NAs\\} removal decreased to 17.5% and 65.4% during treatment with ZVI and CZVI, respectively. The removal of metals in ZVI samples was similar to that obtained during CZVI treatment. Although an increase in ZVI concentration did not enhance the removal of metals, their concentrations effectively decreased at all ZVI loadings. The Microtox bioassay with Vibrio fischeri showed a decrease in the toxicity of ZVI- and CZVI-treated OSPW. The results obtained in this study showed that the application of ZVI in combination with PC is a promising technology for OSPW treatment.

Parastoo Pourrezaei; Alla Alpatova; Kambiz Khosravi; Przemys?aw Drzewicz; Yuan Chen; Pamela Chelme-Ayala; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) Filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existing particle filters in HVAC systems of buildingscandidates for use as VOC filters in HVAC systems. Recentcost of an ACF filter bed in an HVAC system is the energy

Sidheswaran, Meera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Detecting odorous compounds emitted from building and consumer products within the European Project SysPAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detecting odorous compounds emitted from building and consumer products within the European Project.horn@bam.de Keywords: Olfactory detection port, VOC analysis, Thermal extraction, Building material, Consumer products Introduction In 2006 the European research project Innovative Sensor System for Measuring Perceived Air Quality

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

220

Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Novel New Approach to VOC and HAP Emission Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

222

Effects of Environmental Conditions on the Sorption of VOCs on Building Materials-Part II: Model Evaluation (RP-1097)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Effects of Environmental Conditions on the Sorption of VOCs on Building Materials-Part II: Model, Ph.D. Member ASHRAE 1 ABSTRACT: Sorption data obtained by using small environmental chambers under to evaluate the linear Langmuir model and the diffusion model for VOC sorption by different building materials

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

223

Photoconductive Decay Lifetime and Suns-Voc Diagnostics of Efficient Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report results of minority carrier lifetime measurements for double-sided p-type Si heterojunction devices and compare Suns-Voc results to Light I-V measurements on 1 cm2 solar cell devices measured on an AM1.5 calibrated XT-10 solar simulator.

Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal L.; Bauer, R.; Yan, H.-C.; Wang, Q.; Meier, D. L.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Carbide-Derived Carbons for Adsorptive Removal of VOCs from Air Streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbide-Derived Carbons for Adsorptive Removal of VOCs from Air Streams References 1. USEPA Literature Results Carbide-Derived Carbons Motivation Future Research · The effect of pore size and pore size decreasing removal cost is an advancement for the industry and the environment. Carbide-derived carbons (CDCs

Das, Suman

225

Determination of VOC emissions from French wood products Christophe YRIEIX *, Franois MAUPETIT **, Olivier RAMALHO **  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building products. Introduction Today, it is well known that building products may influence indoor air1/10 Determination of VOC emissions from French wood products Christophe YRIEIX *, François air quality (IAQ), it appears necessary to have analytical protocol for the measurement and health

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Energy Recovery Efficiency and Cost Analysis of VOC Thermal Oxidation Pollution Control Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Respective cost models were derived for recuperative thermal oxidizer (TO) and regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO). ... In a thermal oxidation process, VOC-laden air is thermally treated (oxidized/decomposed) at temperatures about 730?850 C. ... Choi and Yi(4) worked on the simulation and optimization of regenerative thermal oxidizers. ...

Aruna S. K. Warahena; Yew Khoy Chuah

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Adsorption of VOCs from the Gas Phase to Different Minerals and a Mineral Mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption of VOCs from the Gas Phase to Different Minerals and a Mineral Mixture ... Here adsorption to three well-defined minerals (hematite, corundum, and lime) was studied by a chromatographic method. ... (39)?Suzuki, S.; Green, P. G.; Bumgarner, R. E.; Dasgupta, S.; Goddard, W. A.; Blake, G. A. Science 1992, 257, 942?945. ...

Kai-Uwe Goss; Steven J. Eisenreich

1996-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Sidheswaran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon fiber (ACF) filters for air cleaning in HVAC systems. The parallel aims for the air cleaningEnergy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Velocities through the ACF media were typical of those in normal particle filter systems (w0.5 m s?1

229

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

230

Complete Detoxification of Short Chain Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds: Isolation of Halorespiring Organisms and Biochemical Studies of the Dehalogenating Enzyme Systems - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work focused on the isolation and characterization of halorespiring populations, and the initial investigation of the dechlorinating enzyme systems. In addition, tools to evaluate the presence/activity to halorespiring populations in the environment were developed. The tools developed in this work (measurements of hydrogen consumption thresholds, molecular probes) are relevant for regulatory agencies in order to facilitate decisions on which bioremediation technology (biostimulation or bioaugmentation) is most promising at a particular site. In addition, a better understanding of the physiology of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems enhances our knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

Tiedje, J.M.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Communication accepte: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997Communication accepte: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997 DISCRIMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication acceptée: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997Communication acceptée: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997 DISCRIMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC manuscript, published in "4th International Conference on Healthy Buildings'97, Washington : United States

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Semivolatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a group of compounds that includes some  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Triclosan Antimicrobial Toothpaste, hand/dish soaps Polychlorinated Biphenyls Heat-transfer fluid Food

Iglesia, Enrique

233

Treatability test of a stacked-tray air stripper for VOC in water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common strategy for hydraulic containment and mass removal at VOC contaminated sites is `pump and treat (P&T)`. In P&T operations, contaminated ground water is pumped from wells, treated above ground, and discharged. Many P&T remediation systems at VOC sites rely on air stripping technology because VOCs are easily transferred to the vapor phase. In stacked-tray air strippers, contaminated water is aerated while it flows down through a series of trays. System operations at LLNL are strictly regulated by the California and federal Environmental Protection Agencies (Cal/EPA and EPA), the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). These agencies set discharge limits, require performance monitoring, and assess penalties for non-compliance. National laboratories are also subject to scrutiny by the public and other government agencies. This extensive oversight makes it necessary to accurately predict field treatment performance at new extraction locations to ensure compliance with all requirements prior to facility activation. This paper presents treatability test results for a stacked- tray air stripper conducted at LLNL and compares them to the vendor`s modeling software results.

Pico, T., LLNL

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Services Initiatives | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and is very low in Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) which evaporate little and cause no air pollution, whereas petroleum-based inks are high in VOCs and cause air pollution when...

235

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in diesel exhaust

237

The Perkin-Elmer ATD-400 system for monitoring of ambient VOC ozone precursors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The systems described were used in the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) program. Continuous VOC monitoring programs were implemented in June through November of this year in Houston. This Perkin-Elmer developed monitoring system included a dual capillary column chromatographic application in an 8700 GC with a modified ATD-400 sampling system. The resulting separations are monitored and quantified using Turbochrom (ver. 3.2) chromatographic data handling software. The key element to this system is the thermal desorption device which is capable of concentrating VOCs from ambient air then desorbing them directly to the gas chromatograph on a continuous cycle.The ATD-400, unlike other similar devices, contains an activated carbon trap which is electrically cooled during collection via Peltier technology. This eliminates the need for cryogenic liquids or compressed air (vortex) for sample collection and makes unattended field operation more feasible than previous systems. The entire system is integrated to provide a completely automatic sample collection cycle, gas chromatographic analysis and data collection, reduction and report generation. Reliability and repeatability data suggest that the system is robust. Good correlation between systems and quality audits confirms data from the manufacturer. Modifications which are being implemented to the chromatographic system, system sites, and operator behavior to enhance the system performance will also be presented.

Radenheimer, P. [Consolidated Sciences Corp., Pasadena, TX (United States); Gibich, J. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States); Ogle, L. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Microwave plasma conversion of volatile organic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MHz; Gerling Laboratory) and a resonant plasma tuner (ASTEX) were used to generate an argon/steam- based plasma at one atmosphere

Ko, Y; Yang, G S; Chang, DPY; Kennedy, Ian M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................... ltudy by Means of Carbon Dioxide Formed 8 ............................... lomparison of . Various Materials 9 ...................................... lffect of Nature of Soil 14 ..................................... Ixidation of Soil Carbon 18... was drawn to take out the carbon dioxide. Althongl~ such experi- ments are well adapted to estimate carbon cliosicle, obviously, such con- ditions do not prevail in the soil, and while it is possible that Wollnp's conclusions may appl~r to the soil uncler...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

DOE/RL-96-68  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

100114 Vol. 4: ix RPD Relative Percent Difference RSD Relative Standard Deviation TIC Tentatively Identified Compound TPU Total Propagated Uncertainty VOC Volatile Organic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Low-Cost Packaged Combined Heat and Power System with Reduced...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

monoxide (CO), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) * Yearly reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by 950 tons com- pared to separate generation of electricity and heat,...

242

The effect of impurities on the doping and VOC of CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of introducing impurities in CdTe, namely antimony (Sb) and oxygen (O), on the net carrier concentration in CdS/CdTe solar cells and on their open-circuit voltage (VOC) has been investigated. Oxygen was introduced in the CdTe films during the deposition of this layer by the close-spaced sublimation process. The total pressure was held constant at 1330Pa (N2 and O2). The amount of oxygen was varied by varying its partial pressure. Antimony was introduced into CdTe using a post-deposition diffusion process. Following the deposition of CdTe a thin film (a few nm) of Sb was deposited onto the CdTe surface and subsequently heat-treated to cause in-diffusion of Sb. The temperature and time during the diffusion process were varied in the range of 300525C and 20160min respectively. In both instances it was possible to vary (increase) the doping concentration in CdTe. The increase in doping was accompanied by an increase in VOC. However, in all instances the doping in CdTe reached a maximum value, beyond which further increases were not possible leading to saturation in VOC. The highest VOC measured was similar to state-of-the-art values in the range of 800830mV, and the highest doping concentration measured was in the 1016cm?3 range.

H. Zhao; Alvi Farah; D. Morel; C.S. Ferekides

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions- Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions, given by David Cygan of the Gas Technology Institute, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

244

Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

269 Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis, in organic geochemistry cases highlighting subtle yet important details not revealed by bulk analyses alone. For example

Long, Bernard

245

Volatile organic chemical emissions from carpets. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research, was to measure the emission rates of selected individual VOC, including low molecular-weight aldehydes, released by samples of four new carpets that are typical of the major types of carpets used in residences, schools and offices. The carpet samples were collected directly from the manufacturers` mills and packaged to preserve their chemical integrity. The measurements of the concentrations and emission rates of these compounds were made under simulated indoor conditions in a 20-M{sup 3} environmental chamber designed specifically for investigations of VOC. The measurements were conducted over a period of one week following the installation of the carpet samples in the chamber. Duplicate experiments were conducted for one carpet. In addition, the concentrations and emission rates of VOC resulting from the installation of a new carpet in a residence were measured over a period of seven weeks. The stabilities of the week-long ventilation rates and temperatures were one percent relative standard deviation. The four carpets emitted a variety of VOC, 40 of which were positively identified. Eight of these were considered to be dominant. They were (in order of chromatographic retention time) formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane), 1,2-propanediol (propylene glycol), styrene, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), and 2,6 di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). With the exception of formaldehyde, only limited data are available on the toxicity and irritancy of these compounds at low concentrations. Therefore, it is difficult to determine at this time the potential magnitude of the health and comfort effects that may occur among the population from exposures to emissions from new carpets. The concentrations and emission rates of most compounds decreased rapidly over the first 12 h of the experiments.

Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Mapping isoprene emissions over North America using formaldehyde column observations from space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping isoprene emissions over North America using formaldehyde column observations from space. [1] We present a methodology for deriving emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) using space to local VOC emissions, with a spatial smearing that increases with the VOC lifetime. Isoprene

Chance, Kelly

247

Relationship between energetic disorder and open-circuit voltage in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We simulate organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. The effects of energetic disorder are incorporated through a Gaussian or exponential model of density of states. Analytical models of open-circuit voltage (VOC) are derived from the splitting of quasi-Fermi potentials. Their predictions are backed up by more complex numerical device simulations including effects such as carrier-densitydependent charge-carrier mobilities. It is predicted that the VOC depends on: (1) the donor-acceptor energy gap; (2) charge-carrier recombination rates; (3) illumination intensity; (4) the contact work functions (if not in the pinning regime); and (5) the amount of energetic disorder. A large degree of energetic disorder, or a high density of traps, is found to cause significant reductions in VOC. This can explain why VOC is often less than expected in real devices. Energetic disorder also explains the nonideal temperature and intensity dependence of VOC and the superbimolecular recombination rates observed in many real bulk heterojunction solar cells.

James C. Blakesley and Dieter Neher

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

248

Mixed crystal organic scintillators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

APPENDIX E. AIRNOVA, INC. EMISSION EVALUATION TEST REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.6 Specific Volatile Organic Compounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 4.7 Dioxins, Furans, and PCBs)* · Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)* · Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)* · Dioxins and Furans · Toxic Metals

Brookhaven National Laboratory

250

Novel amine-based presursor compounds and composite membranes thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel amine-based precursor compounds comprising the condensation products of dialkylenetriamine and alpha, beta-unsaturated acid halides are disclosed, as well as composite membranes containing such compounds, the membranes being useful in RO-type processes for desalination and the removal of low molecular weight organic compounds such as phenols and carboxylic acids.

Lee, Eric K. L. (Wilmington, DE); Tuttle, Mark E. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Sorption of naphthoic acids and quinoline compounds to estuarine sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of naphthoic acids and quinoline compounds to estuarine sediment William D. Burgos The sorption of 16 ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) to an estuarine sediment was measured in synthetic were quinoline compounds. The linear sorption distribution coefficient (Kd) was used to correlate

Burgos, William

252

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mononuclear Organolead Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tetraorganolead compounds in general exhibit lower thermal stability and greater reactivity than the corresponding compounds of the lighter Group 14 elements. The thermal stability is strongly dependent on the...

Friedo Huber; Wolfgang Petz

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Exhaust Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in...

255

Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12;Nucleus Electrons Cloud of negative charge (2 electrons) Fig. 2.5: Simplified model of a Helium (He) Atom He 4.002602 2 Helium Mass Number (~atomic mass) = number of Neutrons + Protons = 4 for Helium Atomic

Frey, Terry

257

Fluorine Speciation Analysis Using Reverse Phase Liquid Chromatography Coupled Off-Line to Continuum Source Molecular Absorption Spectrometry (CS-MAS): Identification and Quantification of Novel Fluorinated Organic Compounds in Environmental and Biological Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1-4) Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are especially well-known for their unusual solubility, being simultaneously hydro- and lipophobic. ... (5, 6) This recognition has triggered a boost in interest in the monitoring of PFCs in water, wildlife and food. ... Chemicals used for AAS modifiers, reported by Gleisner et al.,(17) included gallium nitride (99.9%, ...

Zhiwei Qin; David McNee; Heike Gleisner; Andrea Raab; Kwaku Kyeremeh; Marcel Jaspars; Eva Krupp; Hai Deng; Jrg Feldmann

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbo Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk Electric Turbo Compounding Highlights Electric...

259

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Control of insects and spider mites by translocated compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applied to soil could be detected in a bioassay method using Aedes larvae. Schrader (1947a), working in Germany during World War II, prepared several phosphorus and fluorine compounds that were shown to be systemic. These compounds were taken up... ............................ .. . . . 113 Attempts to Isolate a Toxic Principle from Plants Treated with Octamethyl Pyrophosphoramide ? ? ? ? ? ? . . ? 118 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND SYSTEMIC ACTIVITY OF ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS............... 125 Derivatives...

Ivy, Edward Everett

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

263

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demonstrates self-catalytic schemes for large-scale synthesis of compound semiconductor nanowire powders for inorganic-organic hybrid thermoelectric cells

264

Exploratory and Newer Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In writing a chapter on Exploratory and Newer Compounds in a book concerned with anesthesia, the authors feel that it is most important to have a clear idea of the aims of their work. The Why? must never b...

T. H. S. Burns; A. Bracken

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

1983-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic chemical compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... in burn pits include, but...

269

Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinccarbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. Spent alkaline and zinccarbon size AA batteries were used. A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinccarbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 C, while heptane requires more than 400 C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinccarbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

Gallegos, Mara V., E-mail: plapimu@yahoo.com.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropsito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Falco, Lorena R., E-mail: mlfalco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropsito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Peluso, Miguel A., E-mail: apelu@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigacin y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Dr. J. Ronco CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sambeth, Jorge E., E-mail: sambeth@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigacin y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Dr. J. Ronco CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomas, Horacio J. [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropsito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marketed separately from conventionally grown produce in order to be profitably sold. Because of the amount of organic material include compost, Purdue University · Cooperative Extension Service · Knowledge to Go

271

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

272

Microoptical compound lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, David D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

273

Unsaturated macrocyclic carbonyl bridge compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unsaturated macrocyclic carbonyl bridge compounds ... Catalytic Ring-Closing Metathesis of Doubly Armed, Bridged Bicyclic Sulfones. ...

C. F. H. Allen; J. A. VanAllan

1953-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Compound floating pivot micromechanisms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

275

EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a full-scale implementation. The SVE well, monitoring point arrays and four fracturing wells were installed and the well testing has been completed. Four fractures were successfully created the week of July 25, 2005. The fractures were created in an open area at the bottom of steel well casing by using a water jet to create a notch in the soil and then injecting a guar-sand slurry into the formation. The sand-filled fractures increase the effective air permeability of the subsurface formation diffusion path lengths for contaminant removal. The primary metrics for evaluation were an increase in SVE flow rates in the zone of contamination and an increase in the zone of influence. Sufficient testing has been performed to show that fracturing in the Upland Unit accelerates SVE solvent remediation and fracturing can increase flow rates in the Upland Unit by at least one order of magnitude.

Riha, B

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

High Efficiency Organic Solar Cells: December 16, 2009 - February 2, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Details on the development of novel organic solar cells incorporating Trimetasphere based acceptors are presented including: baseline performance for Lu-PCBEH acceptor blended with P3HT demonstrated at 4.89% PCE exceeding the 4.5% PCE goal; an increase of over 250mV in Voc was demonstrated for Lu-PCBEH blended with low band gap polymers compared to a comparable C60-PCBM device. The actual Voc was certified at 260mV higher for a low band gap polymer device using the Lu-PCBEH acceptor; and the majority of the effort was focused on development of a device with over 7% PCE. While low current and fill factors suppressed overall device performance for the low band gap polymers tested, significant discoveries were made that point the way for future development of these novel acceptor materials.

Walker, K.; Joslin, S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Investigation of pentaarylazafullerenes as acceptor systems for bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a comparative study a novel class of pentaarylazafullerene derivatives is investigated as acceptor material in solution-processed organic solar cells. Due to their raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) compared to phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) the orbital matching to P3HT is optimized so that an increased open-circuit voltage (VOC) compared to the standard PC61BM acceptor is gained. However, the performance of pentaarylazafullerene solar cells is limited by rather low short circuit currents (JSC) and fill factors (FF) which can be partially improved by using 1-methylnaphtalene as additive. Within this series the azafullerenes with phenoxyphenyl and phenoxymethyl addends 1 and 3 show the best results with encouraging \\{VOCs\\} of >800mV and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 0.9%.

Cordula D. Wessendorf; Regina Eigler; Siegfried Eigler; Jonas Hanisch; Andreas Hirsch; Erik Ahlswede

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission dataset of biogenic VOCs available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980 - 2010. This dataset is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg(C) yr1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2 %. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of * 17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene in ventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the datasets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene and*-pinene showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements in the Amazon andthe model was able to capture the seasonal variation of emissions in this region.

Sindelarova, K.; Granier, Claire; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, Alex B.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

Polybenzimidazole Compounds, Polymeric Media, and Methods of Post-Polymerization Modifications  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

INL has developed a patented process to handle and process polybenzimdazole (PBI) compounds that previously could only be handled in very heavy low vapor pressure organic solvents. With the new process the resulting compounds are modified to provide increased solubility in higher vapor pressure solvents and at significantly greater concentrations. These compounds may be utilized in a wide array of applications where high temperature and polymeric materials are utilized. Compounds made with...

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

280

Science Organizations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


282

CHARACTERISTICS Nitrated compounds constitute a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds. If there is a chance of an explosive reaction, conduct the operation behind a blast shield

Wilcock, William

283

Naming chemical compounds: Calculator drill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

36. Bits and pieces, 13. A calculator can be programmed to drill students on chemical compound naming rules.

David Holdsworth; Evelyn Lacanienta

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separable organics have been defined as those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be no visible layer of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

285

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.

1992-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

286

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, Stephen B. (Portola Valley, CA); Koo, Myoung-Seo (San Francisco, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Highly efficient inverted organic solar cells using amino acid modified indium tin oxide as cathode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report that highly efficient inverted organic solar cells were achieved by modifying the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) using an amino acid, Serine (Ser). With the modification of the ITO surface, device efficiency was significantly enhanced from 0.63% to 4.17%, accompanied with an open circuit voltage (Voc) that was enhanced from 0.30?V to 0.55?V. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the work function reduction induced by the amino acid modification resulting in the decreased barrier height at the ITO/organic interface played a crucial role in the enhanced performances.

Li, Aiyuan; Nie, Riming; Deng, Xianyu, E-mail: xydeng@hitsz.edu.cn [Research Center for Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Wei, Huaixin; Li, Yanqing; Tang, Jianxin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zheng, Shizhao; Wong, King-Young [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

About Us Organization Organization Organization Printable PDF News & Blog CIO Leadership Organization Contact Us...

289

Organization | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

About Us Organization Organization Organization News Leadership Organization History Careers Contact Us...

290

Synthesis and thermal studies of flexible polyurethane nanocomposite foams obtained using nanoclay modified with flame retardant compound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents thermal studies of nanocomposites based on the flexible polyurethane (PU) matrix and filled using montmorillonite organically modified with organophosphorus flame retardant compound. Flexibl...

?ukasz Piszczyk; Magdalena Danowska

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Preparation of Samples of Plant Material for Chromatographic Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......impurities, the pesticide fraction was precleaned in a...in order to isolate airborne-originating volatile...VOCs Living vegetation releases a large number of VOCs...burned in Catalan forest fires. Comparison with the...indicator of exposure to airborne volatile organic compounds......

B. Zygmunt; J. Namiesnik

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Case for Safer Building Materials: Lifecycle Concerns, Data Gaps, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; microenvironments · Heating and ventilation · Dampness and humidity · Chemicals in building materials · VOCs have;Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) · Aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and associated supplies · Adhesives · Building materials · Furnishings and clothing · Combustion appliances

Lee, Seung-Wuk

293

WearAir: Expressive T-shirts for Air Quality Sensing Sunyoung Kim and Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are less proactively concerned with air quality. AIR POLLUTANT: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS Different types of air pollutants contribute to air quality in different locations: Ozone, CO, NOx and VOCs are major contributors to outdoor air pollution; and particulate matters, VOCs, carbon monoxide and lead are common air

Mankoff, Jennifer

294

2 Extracting and trapping biogenic 3 volatile organic compounds stored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Subcritical water extraction; UAE, Ultrasound-assisted extraction 36 1. Introduction Plants release

Goldstein, Allen

295

Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds Ethylbenzene Carbon tetrachloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Ethylbenzene Ethylbenzene is a colorless, flammable liquid found in natural products such as coal tar and petroleum. It is also found in manufactured products such as inks, insecticides, and paints. Ethylbenzene in the air. In surface water, ethylbenzene breaks down by reacting with other chemicals found naturally

296

The Effect of Organic Compounds in Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBSTATIONS P. L. DowNs, President, Temple.. . .. ................... .. .. ... ... . ... .. .. .. .. ... .. .. ... .. ... ... .. . ...... Term expires 1919 CHARLES RoGAN, Vice Preszdenl, Austin...... ... .. .. .. . Term expires 1917 W . P. HoBBY, Beaumont... Secretary CHAS. A. FELKER, Chief Clerk J. H. RoGERS, Inspector W. H. WooD, Inspector T. H. WoLTERS, Inspector S. D. PEARCE, Inspector J. M. ScHAEDEL, Inspector W. M. WICKES, Inspector SUBSTATION NO. 1: Beeville, Bee County E. E .. BINFORD, B. S...

Fraps, G. S.

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Degradation of organic phosphorus compounds in anoxic Baltic Sea ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Public Affairs Join the Policy Action Network Science Education Science ... in anoxic Baltic Sea sediments: A 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study. Ahlgren...

298

Biodegradation of organic compounds in vadose zone and aquifer sediments.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rotary head. Conventional, steam-cleaned, hollow-stem augers...phos- phorus, by using the ignition method (34); total nitrogen...mineral nitrogen, by using steam distillation (22); and exchangeable...substrates. This suggestion is based on the assumption that the affinities...

A Konopka; R Turco

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nanoparticle Formation of Organic Compounds With Retained Biological Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Pediatric, Radiology, Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive

Zare, Richard N.

300

Three-Dimensional Simulation of Volatile Organic Compound Mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulations using data from the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site, where carbon tetrachloride is present in a low permeability zone about 30 m above the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Green Solvents for Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate to Poly(Methyl Methacrylate)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solvents are often volatile organic compounds (VOCs) ... decade, chemistry research into the use of greener, alternative solvents has been grown enormously. Alternative solvents suitable for green chemistry are t...

S. Krishna Mohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Climate change, ambient ozone, and health in 50 US cities Michelle L. Bell & Richard Goldberg & Christian Hogrefe &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change, ambient ozone, and health in 50 US cities Michelle L. Bell & Richard Goldberg Haven, CT 06511, USA e-mail: michelle.bell@yale.edu R. Goldberg Center for Climate Systems Research emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs),

303

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 1097710988, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/10977/2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

side. In addition, there are also about 1000 coal bed methane wells and conventional wells located in emissions of greenhouse gases (mostly methane), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx

Pierce, Jeffrey

304

EnviroDB: Applied Database Systems Design for the National Environmental Assessment Toolkit (NEAT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOC), particulates (PM), air velocity (AIR_VEL), light levels at 3 locations (LGH), and a photometric camera that analyzes brightness/contrast and glare. The sensor outputs are recorded...

Kim, S. H.; Srivastava, V.; Aziz, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Vapor intrusion modeling : limitations, improvements, and value of information analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vapor intrusion is the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subsurface source into the indoor air of an overlying building. Vapor intrusion models, including the Johnson and Ettinger (J&E) model, can be ...

Friscia, Jessica M. (Jessica Marie)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

Corsello, Joseph William

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Mr. John Kieling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the receipt of va lidated analytical results for a vo latile organic compound (VOC), carbon tetrachloride , which exceeded the 50 percent action level listed in Part 4, Table...

308

Power Generating Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

while consuming on-site emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC's). References: Power Generating Inc1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Power...

309

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

310

The design of new ligands and transition metal compounds for the oxidation of organic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................... 2 1.3 Epoxidation of ?,?-unsaturated carboxylic acids with catalytic sodium tungstate and hydrogen peroxide ........................................ 3 1.4 The Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation reaction.............................. 4 1.5... as Jacobsen?s catalyst 1-3 but generally only olefins with cis geometry or trisubstituted olefins are epoxidized in high ee. 6 Scheme 1.5. Salen ligands A crystallographic study of these catalysts provides valuable insight...

Grill, Joseph Michael

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

311

300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

Spane, Frank A.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

Chemoprevention by Fruit Phenolic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes available information on the chemopreventive effects of fruit phenolic compounds in various experimental systems. Emphasis is placed on the anticarcinogenic activity of these phenolics ...

Gary D. Stoner PhD; Bruce C. Casto ScD

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Characterization of the crude oil polar compound extract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is designed to determine if there are any naturally occurring constituents in crude oils that can be chemically altered to bring about increased oil production. An extract containing only the polar organic compounds of the crude oil was obtained by using a modification of the ASTM-2007 procedure. Chemical characterization of the polar compounds were carried out using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography. The HPLC analyses indicated a range of polar organic compound content of 10 crude oils from 1.6% to 12.7%. Wettability determinations show that by adding a small amount of the polar fraction from a crude oil, to a mineral oil, a 40 to 111% change of wettability toward a more oil-wet system will occur, depending on the specific extract used.

Donaldson, E.C.; Crocker, M.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modeling Semivolatile Organic Aerosol Mass Emissions from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in diluted diesel and wood combustion exhaust are interpreted using a two-component absorptive with dilution of both wood smoke and diesel exhaust can be described by two lumped compounds in roughly equal. Introduction Sources of organic aerosol such as diesel engines and wood stoves emit semivolatile organic

Stanier, Charlie

315

Effects of ZnO Nanoparticles on P3HT:PCBM Organic Solar Cells with DMF-Modulated PEDOT:PSS Buffer Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic solar cells based on bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) have been investigated because of their low cost, environmentally friendly production, ease of deposition, and flexible applications. ... The best performance with this cell structure produced an open-circuit voltage, Voc, of 440 mV, a short circuit c.d., Jsc, of 2.2 mA/cm2, a fill factor, FF, of 0.56, and a conversion efficiency, ?, of 0.53%. ...

Sang Hoon Oh; Seung Jin Heo; Jeong Suk Yang; Hyun Jae Kim

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Organic Photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfying the world's growing demand for energy is an urgent societal challenge. Organic photovoltaics holds promise as a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly solution.

Kippelen, Bernard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

COMPOUND-SPECIFIC RADIOCARBON ANALYSES OF PHOSPHOLIPID FATTYACIDS AND n -ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Analyses of Phospholipid Fatty Acids and n-Alkanes in Ocean Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Initial-phase optimization for bioremediation of munition compound-contaminated soils.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the first stage of remediation was between 6.5 and...of the first stage of remediation of munition compound-contaminated...bioremediation explosives ground water herbicides Oregon organic...pollutants pollution remediation soil treatment soils...

S B Funk; D J Roberts; D L Crawford; R L Crawford

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Pajarito Canyon Watershed LA-UR-10-1362 1 March 2010 Summary: organic compounds, dioxins, and furans should be added to the analytical suite for each sample (NMED 2009... in...

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Pajarito Canyon Watershed LA-UR-10-1362 1 March 2010 Summary: organic compounds, dioxins, and furans should be added to the analytical suite for each sample (NMED 2009......

323

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

Stowell, M.S.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Nitroaromatic Compounds, from Synthesis to Biodegradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compounds that enter the TCA cycle. Interestingly, expression...and then converted to TCA cycle compounds, with salicylate...nitroaromatic compounds, but several fundamental aspects regarding their biosynthesis...Explosives development and fundamentals of explosives technology...

Kou-San Ju; Rebecca E. Parales

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

333

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

compound queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps...

335

Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

336

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion...

337

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of...

338

Intermediate-Volatility Organic Compounds: A Large Source of Secondary Organic Aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Schauer, J. J.; Kleeman, M. J.; Cass, G. R.; Simoneit, B. R. T.Measurement of emissions from air pollution sources. ... Measurement of Emissions from Air Pollution Sources. ... Schauer, J. J.; Kleeman, M. J.; Cass, G. R.; Simoneit, B. R. T.Measurement of emissions from air pollution sources. ...

Yunliang Zhao; Christopher J. Hennigan; Andrew A. May; Daniel S. Tkacik; Joost A. de Gouw; Jessica B. Gilman; William C. Kuster; Agnes Borbon; Allen L. Robinson

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Supporting Information:1 Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System Laboratory, National Center for22 Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO USA23 Now at: Air Pollution 8 Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France16 9 ?cole des Mines de Douai, Douai, France17 10

Meskhidze, Nicholas

340

Polybenzimidazole compounds, polymeric media, and methods of post-polymerization modifications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about 15.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Phosphorus Compounds of Cotton Seed Meal and Wheat Bran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Phar. & Expt. Therapeutics 1,151) claims that ? the chief poisonous principle of cottonseed meal is a salt of pyrophos- phoric acid.? It has been shown by the writer (Bulletin 146) that the product which these writers thought was inorganic... compound as phytin, but do not report complete analyses of the product. Levine (Biochem. Ztscher. 16, 390) describes a semicrystalline barium salt of an organic phosphorus acid. Yorbrodt (Anzeiger. Akad. Wiss. Krakau, 1910. Series A. 414) separated...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic energy organization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6. A common trait of simple organic compounds is to have Lewis... in a certain organic molecule absorbs radiation that has a frequency of 6.0 x 1013 s1. a. What... is the...

345

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Volatile compounds from marine algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile compounds from marine algae ... Seasonal Variations of Bromophenols in Brown Algae (Padina arborescens, Sargassum siliquastrum, and Lobophora variegata) Collected in Hong Kong ... Seasonal Variations of Bromophenols in Brown Algae (Padina arborescens, Sargassum siliquastrum, and Lobophora variegata) Collected in Hong Kong ...

Richard E. Moore

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Exhaust Materails from a Set of Gasoline and a Set of Diesel Engine Vehicles Operated at 30F In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate...

348

Handbook of GC/MS data and information for selected Clean Air Act amendments compounds. Report for January 1992-December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook presents a compilation of the results of laboratory experiments to test the applicability of GC/MS techniques using EPA methods 8270 and 5041, and the compatibility of the Title III organic compounds with organic solvents. The Handbook contains the following information: (1) Compounds that can and cannot be analyzed; (2) Relative response factors; (3) Chromatograms, reference mass spectra; and (4) Evaluation of compound compatibility for semivolatile organic compounds in isolation. Data and information included in the Handbook are intended to address analytical issues only; sample collection issues are not addressed.

Rice, J.; Bursey, J.T.; McGaughey, J.F.; Merrill, R.G.; Harvan, D.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

On modeling the potential impacts of CO2 sequestration on shallow groundwater: Transport of organics and co-injected H2S by supercritical CO2 to shallow aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solvent, and its use to decontaminate soils impacted by hazardous organic compounds is regarded as a green

Zheng, L.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

4, 227265, 2004 Effect of organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Physics Discussions Effect of organic compounds on nanoparticle formation in diluted diesel exhaust U. Introduction Exhaust from diesel engines represents an important anthropogenic source of particles in ambient Print Version Interactive Discussion © EGU 2004 Abstract The nucleation of nanoparticles in the exhaust

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

351

Organic chemical contaminants in Biosolids Sally Brown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the general classification "dioxins." Dioxins are one of the well known dangerous organic chemicals. Dioxins had commercial uses, primarily in the pulp and paper industry, but have been outlawed due. There are many types of dioxins. "Dioxin" is actually a general term for a large number of compounds that contain

Brown, Sally

352

Thermodynamic evaluation of the compounds of gold, silver, and other trace elements formed upon the combustion of brown coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermodynamically most probable main compounds of Ag, Au, Ge, Se, Sr, U, and ash-forming elements formed upon the combustion of brown coal, which was close in the composition of organic and mineral matter ...

M. Ya. Shpirt; A. A. Lavrinenko; I. N. Kuznetsova

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Muon-spin spectroscopy of the organometallic spin-1/2 kagome-lattice compound Cu(1,3-benzenedicarboxylate)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using muon-spin resonance, we examine the organometallic hybrid compound Cu(1,3-benzenedicarboxylate) [Cu(1,3-bdc)], which has structurally perfect spin-1/2 copper kagome planes separated by pure organic linkers. This ...

Marcipar, Lital

354

Hyperpolarizable compounds and devices fabricated therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Substituted compounds having relatively large molecular first order hyperpolarizabilities are provided, along with devices and materials containing them. In general, the compounds bear electron-donating and electron-withdrawing chemical substituents on a polyheterocyclic core. 13 figs.

Therien, M.J.; DiMagno, S.G.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Bibliography of work on the photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a bibliography of information in the open literature on work that has been done to date on the photocatalytic oxidation of compounds, principally organic compounds. The goal of the listing is removing hazardous oompounds from water or air. It contains lists of substances and literature citations. The bibliography includes information obtained through the middle of 1993 and some selected references for the balance of that year.

Blake, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report gives the second year`s findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

8, 1190911965, 2008 Reactive Trace Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds (VOC) in the boundary layer over French Guyana and Suriname during the October 2005 GABRIEL

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

358

Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Da Costa, Andre R. (Menlo Park, CA); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA); Amo, Karl D. (Mountain View, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Zirconia coating on stainless steel sheets from organozirconium compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability and the coating characteristics of a variety of organozirconium compounds have been investigated to coat ZrO/sub 2/ films on stainless steel sheets for the improvement of heat resistance against oxidation. Zirconium tetraoctylate and zirconium tetrakis(acetylacetonate). The authors discuss how the compounds were found to be more stable than zirconium alkoxides in an ambient atmosphere. The ZrO/sub 2/ films from zirconium alkoxides became white and discontinuous when the thickness of the films exceeded about 200 A (20nm). On the other hand, transparent ZrO/sub 2/ films were obtained from zirconium tetraoctylate and zirconium tetrakis(acetylacetonate). The IR spectra of the films showed that the heat treatment at 400{sup 0}C for 5 min produced organic-free ZrO/sub 2/ films. The heat resistance of stainless steel sheets against oxidation was improved by the ZrO/sub 2/ coating, depending on the film thickness.

Izumi, K.; Murakami, M.; Deguchi, T.; Morita, A. (Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Tohge, N.; Minami, T. (Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Mozu-Umekmachi, Sakai-Shi, Osaka- Fu 591 (JP))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Flameless thermal oxidation. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (PICs).

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Reduction of carbon monoxide emissions with regenerative thermal oxidizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) have been extensively used for the control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from various sources. However, very little information is available on the ability of RTOs to control carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. This paper presents the results of extensive tests conducted on two RTOs to determine their VOC and CO control efficiencies. The inlet gas stream to the RTOs includes VOC and CO concentrations as high as 2,000 ppm and 3,600 ppm, respectfully. The testing demonstrated that both RTOs were capable of controlling greater than 98% of both inlet VOCs and CO. While the destruction efficiencies within the combustion chambers exceeded 99.9%, direct leakage past valves accounted for the lower control efficiencies. The tests indicated that the overall VOC and CO control efficiencies of the RTOs may be limited by valve leakage. The design and permitting of a RTO should include conservative control estimates which account for possible valve leakage.

Firmin, S.M.; Lipke, S.; Baturay, A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Giant magnetoresistive cobalt oxide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are disclosed for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties. 58 figs.

Schultz, P.G.; Xiang, X.; Goldwasser, I.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminants. Later one plays a vital role in IAQ of hospitals. Indoor contaminants can be further classified as Chemical contaminants and Biological contaminants. Tobacco smoke, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), Radon, Inorganic gases, Carbon dioxide... of 50 ? 260 OC and hence existing in vapour form at room temperature. ASHRAE Standard 62 (1999) suggests that complaints are unlikely to arise for total VOC concentrations below 3000 mg/m3, whereas above 3000 mg/m3 complaints are likely. Radon is a...

Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reading Comprehension - Dissecting and Compound Microscopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dissecting and Compound Microscopes Two types of microscopes. _________ Dissecting and Compound Microscopes Two types of microscopes. _________ Dissecting Microscope Compound Microscope _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ Dissecting Microscope Compound Microscope _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light

366

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Compound Semiconductor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and chemistry foundations to advance the state-of-the-art compound semiconductor optoelectronic materials and devices. Our approach is based on a focused effort including...

367

Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

Sklarew, D.S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Compound cryopump for fusion reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

Kovari, M; Shephard, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Publications Daniel Kost 1. D. Kost, "Principles of Organic Chemistry" a study unit textbook. Open University, Tel Aviv,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Publications Daniel Kost (A) Books 1. D. Kost, "Principles of Organic Chemistry" a study unit, "Hypervalent Silicon Compounds", Invited chapter in "The Chemistry of Organic Silicon Compounds", Z. Rappoport and Chiroptical Properties", Invited chapter in "The Chemistry of Sulfenic Acids and Their Derivatives", S. Patai

Vardi, Amichay

370

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty perform research in molecular machines, exotic CHEMISTRY FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS Anne M. Andrews, Professor-in-Residence: Understanding how areas of interest include cross- coupling reactions, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and natural

Levine, Alex J.

371

Research Article Decomposition of Epoxy Model Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-critical water (NCW) or subcritical water, i.e., water at 250­300 °C [20], turn out to be alternative candidatesResearch Article Decomposition of Epoxy Model Compounds in Near-Critical Water Two tpyes of epoxy water (NCW). In the case of model compound I, at low temperatures the water molecules behave

Guo, John Zhanhu

372

Mechanistic and kinetic evaluation of organic disinfection by-product and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) formation during the ozonation of drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ozonation of drinking water results in the formation of low molecular weight (LMW) organic by-products. These compounds are easily utilisable by microorganisms and can result in biological instability of the water. In this study, we have combined a novel bioassay for assessment of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) with the detection of selected organic acids, aldehydes and ketones to study organic by-product formation during ozonation. We have investigated the kinetic evolution of LMW compounds as a function of ozone exposure. A substantial fraction of the organic compounds formed immediately upon exposure to ozone and organic acids comprised 6080% of the newly formed AOC. Based on experiments performed with and without hydroxyl radical scavengers, we concluded that direct ozone reactions were mainly responsible for the formation of small organic compounds. It was also demonstrated that the laboratory-scale experiments are adequate models to describe the formation of LMW organic compounds during ozonation in full-scale treatment of surface water. Thus, the kinetic and mechanistic information gained during the laboratory-scale experiments can be utilised for upscaling to full-scale water treatment plants.

Frederik Hammes; Elisabeth Salhi; Oliver Kster; Hans-Peter Kaiser; Thomas Egli; Urs von Gunten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Organic Rankine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chap. 3 is dedicated to Rankine cycles with organic fluids: the so-called organic Rankine cycles (ORC), which in recent years have ... of the use of...

Costante Mario Invernizzi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization Organization The Office of Economic Impact and Diversity is comprised of: The Office of the Director- contact us Office of Minority Business and Economic Development -...

375

Separation and Identification of Volatile Compounds from Liquid Cultures of Trichoderma harzianum by GC-MS using Three Different Capillary Columns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......functions in the organism that are of remarkable importance to humankind in medical, industrial or agricultural applications. Some...activities. Volatile compounds are appear as intermediate and end products of diverse metabolic pathways and belong to various......

Shafiquzzaman Siddiquee; Bo Eng Cheong; Khanam Taslima; Hossain Kausar; Md Mainul Hasan

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Multiferroic Metal Organic Frameworks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with the oxygen of the framework. Upon cooling the compounds go under a phase transition, due to the ordering of nitrogen, leading to ferroelectric ordering. They also order...

377

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

378

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

379

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

380

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

382

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

383

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Semi-volatile Organics in PM Semi-volatile Organics in PM This project is a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University (BYU) and researchers from the DOE-NETL Office of Science and and Engineering Research to determine the contribution of semi-volatile particulate organic compounds (SVOC) to total ambient suspended fine particulate mass at the NETL-Pittsburgh air monitoring facility. Project funding comes from DOE‘s University Coal Research (UCR) program. The hypothesis of the project is that fine particulate mass will be significantly under-determined in urban environments using single filter samplers such as the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) because of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from the particles during sampling and storage. It is postulated that fine particulate mass, including the semi-volatile fine particulate organic species, are an appropriate surrogate for the components of fine particles which are associated with observed mortality and morbidity effects in epidemiological studies. Further, it is postulated that the most important fraction of the semi-volatile organic material with respect to exacerbation of health problems will be semi-volatile secondary compounds formed from reactions of volatile organic material with ozone and nitrogen oxides. Under-determination of these semi-volatile species will tend to over emphasize the importance of non-volatile fine particulate components such as sulfate or may reduce the significance of correlations with measured health effects.

384

Transportation Organization and Functions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Office of Packaging and Transportation list of organizations and functions, with a list of acronyms.

385

ORGANIC CONTENT OF LAKE WATER By EDWARD A. BIRGE and CHANCEY JUDAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the nature of the organic compounds. Thus it furnishes the beginnings of an inventory of the primary food was based Oil the same samples as those employed in the present paper; it is the source of the nitrogen

386

Variations in organic aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties upon heterogeneous OH oxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the evolution of organic aerosol extinction cross sections (?[subscript ext]) and subsaturated hygroscopicity upon heterogeneous OH oxidation are reported for two model compounds, squalane (a C30 saturated ...

Cappa, Christopher D.

387

The Gut as an Osmoregulatory Organ: Comparative Aspects and Special References to Fishes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When considering the gut as an osmoregulatory organ, it must be kept in mind that the basic function of the gut is to split foodstuffs into simple compounds, small enough to cross cell membranes. The splitting...

R. Kirsch; W. Humbert; V. Simonneaux

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Compound and Elemental Analysis Details Activities (104) Areas (69) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Results can aid in the determination of fluid source regions and circulation pathways. Thermal: Certain elements exhibit high spatial correlation with high-temperature geothermal systems. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / compound Median Estimate (USD): 30.003,000 centUSD

389

Digital Construction Platform: A Compound Arm Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel large-scale Digital Construction Platform (DCP) for on-site sensing, analysis, and fabrication. The DCP is an in-progress research project consisting of a compound robotic arm system comprised of a ...

Spielberg, Nathan A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Monitoring Estrogen Compounds in Wastewater Recycling Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in treated wastewater is gaining attention due to their potential ... quantify estrogen compounds in sa...

Deborah M. Kvanli; Sreelatha Marisetty; Todd A. Anderson

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Perfluorohalogenoorgano Compounds of Main Group 5 Elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The compounds of the Main Group 5 elements phosphorus, arsenic, antimony, and bismuth, are covered to the end of 1973 in Perfluorhalogenorgano-Verbindungen der Hauptgruppenelemente, Part 3, 1975 (cited here ...

Alois Haas; Michael R. Chr. Gerstenberger

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNH) compounds: recent developments in hydrogen storage, applications in hydrogenation and catalysis, and new syntheses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The strong efforts devoted to the exploration of BNH compounds for hydrogen storage have led to impressive advances in the field of boron chemistry. This review summarizes progress in this field from three aspects. It starts with the most recent developments in using BNH compounds for hydrogen storage, covering NH3BH3, B3H8 containing compounds, and CBN compounds. The following section then highlights interesting applications of BNH compounds in hydrogenation and catalysis. The last part is focused on breakthroughs in the syntheses and discovery of new BNH organic analogues. The role of N?H?+H?-?B dihydrogen interactions in molecule packing, thermal hydrogen evolution, and syntheses is also discussed within the review. Part of this research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energys Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle.

Huang, Zhenguo; Autrey, Thomas

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade-Offs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies has highlighted the need for high- density energy storage.1 In the case of fuel cell vehicles (FCVTheoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade predict the hydrogen storage properties of these compounds. Approximately 20 000 candidate compounds were

Cafarella, Michael J.

394

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date...

395

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

396

Process for production of a borohydride compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

Questions and Answers - Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atoms make up sugar? atoms make up sugar? Previous Question (What atoms make up sugar?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (In the equation for methane, why is there more hydrogen than carbon?) In the equation for methane, why isthere more hydrogen than carbon? Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic matter? The answer is yes and no. Yes, carbon IS found in all organic matter, but NOT in inorganic matter. Although there are many definitions of "organic," in the scientific disciplines, the basic definition comes from chemistry. In chemistry, organic means chemical compounds with carbon in them. In a more general sense, organic refers to living things. And this is connected to the idea of organic chemistry being based on carbon compounds. Organic

398

Semitransparent organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The organic solar cell technology has attracted great interests due to ... low cost solution process capability. Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells offer a potentially much cheaper alternative way to harness...

Furong Zhu

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Effect of Mineral and Organic Soil Constituents on Microbial Mineralization of Organic Compounds in a Natural Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remediation technology of in situ soil washing (10, 28). Most modern surfactants...Knaebel and Vestal (20). The surfactant-soil constituent complexes were added...small amount (100 mg) of the surfactant-soil constituent complex was mixed...

David B. Knaebel; Thomas W. Federle; Drew C. McAvoy; J. Robie Vestal

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

EMSL - organic materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compounds. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is applied to determine the angular distribution of 1 MeV Au ions after penetrating a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Organic photosensitive devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

Agblevor, F.A.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Isomerism in MetalOrganic Frameworks: Framework Isomers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

His research interest focuses on the controlled formation, and eventual design, of metalorganic frameworks for application in gas storage for clean energy technologies. ... After that, he completed his M.Sc. in Applied Chemistry at New Mexico Highlands University where he worked on X-ray structure determination of low-melting organic materials and their complexes with mercury-organic compounds. ... This was observed upon heating Cd(abdc)bipy-1 under pressure to generate Cd(abdc)bipy-3, and exposing Cd(abdc)bipy-3 to air to reform Cd(abdc)bipy-1. ...

Trevor A. Makal; Andrey A. Yakovenko; Hong-Cai Zhou

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

404

Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization Organization Organization Office of Indian Energy Organizational Structure As a program office at DOE responsible for implementing energy programs, the Office of Indian Energy is structurally organized under the Office of the Under Secretary. This programmatic structure also focuses and facilitates the coordination between the Office of Indian Energy and the other companion program offices such as the Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Office of Indian Energy is organized around its major statutory functions, namely, policy and programs: Indian Energy Policy. The Office of Indian Energy coordinates participation in the development, refinement, training, and advice

405

8.08 - Photophysics of Lanthanoid Coordination Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent years, lanthanoids have become vital components to a wealth of advanced optical materials and related technologies. Sharp visible and near-infrared emissions result in exciting applications in lighting devices (fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes/organic light-emitting diodes), displays, telecommunications, lasers, sensors, luminescent bioprobes, or solar energy conversion and photocatalysts, to name a few. Many of these applications are presently based on coordination compounds, so that the field of luminescent lanthanoid complexes with organic ligands has literally exploded during the past two decades and presently more than 500 original articles are published annually on the subject. An exhaustive presentation of these works would require an entire book. Therefore, in this chapter, the focus is more on the basic aspects pertaining to the design of luminescent lanthanoid-containing complexes. After an introduction to lanthanoid spectroscopy, energy transfer processes are presented and analyzed, as well as ways of avoiding nonradiative deactivation through vibrations. Representative examples are detailed but extensive enumeration of data is avoided. Furthermore, the chapter gives some highlights on application to fields as diverse as biosciences, telecommunications, electroluminescent materials, and photovoltaics.

J.-C.G. Bnzli; S.V. Eliseeva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cytokinin Regulates Compound Leaf Development in Tomato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sample values fell within the standard curve (efficiency of 0.96...relative to the respective standard curve. At least three independent...compound leaves: A critical review. Plant Cell 22 : 1019-1032...plants with different body plans. Curr. Biol. 12 : 1557-1565...

Eilon Shani; Hadas Ben-Gera; Sharona Shleizer-Burko; Yogev Burko; David Weiss; Naomi Ori

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nitroaromatic Compounds, from Synthesis to Biodegradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...explosives but also are the fundamental building blocks in...from all combustion engines contains hydrocarbons...atmospheric pollution is diesel engine-powered motor...compounds, but several fundamental aspects regarding their...Explosives development and fundamentals of explosives technology...

Kou-San Ju; Rebecca E. Parales

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

High Performance Subgraph Mining in Molecular Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Performance Subgraph Mining in Molecular Compounds Giuseppe Di Fatta1,2 and Michael R data makes distributed graph mining techniques particularly relevant. In this paper, we present method has been evaluated on the well-known National Cancer Institute's HIV-screening dataset, where

Reiterer, Harald

411

HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS M.D. MCCLUSKEY* University) spectroscopy of hydrogen and deuterium in GaP, AlSb, ZnSe, and GaN has provided important information about the structures of dopant- hydrogen complexes and their interaction with the host lattice. In GaN:Mg, for example

McCluskey, Matthew

412

Organic geochemical studies at a commercial shallow-land disposal site of low-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface migration of radionuclides has been studied at a commercial, shallow-land burial site of low-level nuclear waste at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. A variety of radionuclides including /sup 3/H, /sup 238/ /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr have migrated short distances on-site (meters to tens of meters). A number of the mobile radionuclides, notably plutonium and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic species with organic properties. As a result, we have studied the organic geochemistry of radioactive leachates pumped from a number of waste burial trenches throughout the site. The major aim of the organic research is to elucidate the role of organic compounds in mediating the subsurface migration of the mobile radionuclides in groundwater. A survey study of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic content of the waste leachates has revealed that organic compounds are readily leached from the buried waste. Organic chelating agents like EDTA, HEDTA and ED3A are the major hydrophilic organic compounds in the leachates, their concentrations ranging from 78 ppB to 19,511 ppB. A number of carboxylic acids are also present in the leachates, ranging from 675 ppB to 8757 ppB, collectively. A variety of hydrophobic organic compounds including barbiturates and other aromatic compounds, presumably waste-derived, are also present in the leachates, generally at lower ppB concentrations. A detailed chemical speciation study, aimed at determining whether any of the organic compounds identified in the survey study are associated with the mobile radionuclides, was undertaken using leachate from one of the waste trenches. It is clear that EDTA is chelated to plutonium and /sup 60/Co in the leachate, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. Other radionuclides, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr, may be associated with polar organic compounds such as carboxylic acids. 14 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Organic and inorganic components in estuarine colloids: Implications for sorption and transport of pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In colloids isolated from Chesapeake Bay and its subestuaries the concentrations of Al, Fe, and a number of trace elements were determined to vary with the clay mineral fraction that was most abundant in freshwater samples collected during the winter. The elements As, Ba, Sb, and Zn, however, increased with increasing organic content, indicating a covariance with the organic component. Organic analyses for amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids indicate that these biopolymers comprised 4 to 22%, 20 to 60%, and less than 1%, respectively, of the colloidal organic carbon in these samples. The results are significant because amino acids and carbohydrates contain oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functional groups capable of reacting with trace metals and organic pollutants. The sorption properties of several neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, including PAHs and herbicides, and several aromatic amines were investigated using the estuarine colloidal material. The effects of several environmental variables on these sorption properties were determined. The results indicate that colloids have the capacity to sorb and transport relatively insoluble pollutants that otherwise might remain immobile in the environment. Colloidal organic matter in natural water systems may serve as substrates for the sorption or binding of organic contaminants. Although most of the data has been developed using neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, data also exist for selected polar compound groups such as aromatic amines. The chemical behavior of these compound groups in interaction with DOM appears to have some similarity to their chemical interaction with sediments and soils. Partitioning constants are linear, except for polar compounds, and appear to be closely correlated to fundamental compound properties such as solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. 84 references.

Sigleo, A.C.; Means, J.C. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Samples for VOC's - Labs 11 and 12 of 772-25B Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Samples for VOC's - Labs 11 and 12 of 772-25B Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina This research will include the analysis of soil gas, stack gas, and other gaseous media by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This activity involves the handling and analysis of gas samples containing VOCs. These analyses will be performed on either a Hewlett Packard Model 5890 Series II or Agilent Model 6890N Gas Chromatograph equipped with flame ionization, electron capture, and an Agilent Model 5975 Mass Selective Detector. B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger

415

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characterization of Downgradient VOC Plume and Installation of Monitoring Well MCB029B Characterization of Downgradient VOC Plume and Installation of Monitoring Well MCB029B Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Three soil borings will be advanced to an estimated depth of 160 feet to characterize the distal portion of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plume down-gradient of the ABRP/MCB/MBP OU. Groundwater monitoring well MCB029B will be installed at the soil boring location with the highest VOC concentration. The monitoring well will be screened in the upper or lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone (ULLAZ or LLLAZ). The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) requested the installation of this monitoring well to support the operational suspension of the ABRP/MCB/MBP OU recirculation well system.

416

Application of Biodegradable Oils (VOS{sup TM}) for Treatment of Chlorinated Ethenes in the Vadose Zone - 12085  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few active remediation alternatives are available to treat residual chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) within the vadose zone. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) can be very effective at removing cVOCs in permeable soils; however, recoveries decline substantially in low permeability zones where mass transfer is diffusion-limited. Entrapped cVOCs in these zones represent a slow but continuous source of contamination to underlying groundwater. An ongoing field study was initiated at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to evaluate an in situ biological treatment technology to address cVOC contamination in the vadose zone. Developed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), VOS{sup TM} is a thixotropic (shear thinning) formulation of biodegradable oil, water, nutrients, buffers, and de-chlorinating bacteria (Dehalococcoides sp.) that is designed to sequester and biodegrade slow-diffusing cVOCs from unsaturated, low permeable soils. Injection of 871 L (230 gal) of VOS{sup TM} resulted in a rapid and significant decrease in cVOC gas concentration, generation of cVOC daughter products, a decrease in oxygen concentration, and an increase in carbon dioxide and methane production. (authors)

Riha, Brian D.; Noonkester, Jay V.; Looney, Brian B.; Hyde, W. Keith; Walker, Richard W. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Richardson, Stephen D.; Elkins, Brad; Beckwith, Walter [EOS Remediation, LLC, Raleigh, NC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

Sen, Ayusman

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

APS Users Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

APSUO APSUO By-Laws Steering Commitee Employment Meetings Compton Award Franklin Award APS Users Organization The APSUO is responsible for advising the APS Associate Laboratory Director in the following areas: The Organization will serve as an advocacy group for the Facility and its user community. The Organization will provide advice to the ALD on matters affecting the user community. The Organization will assure good communication between the APS user community and the APS management. APSUO By-Laws The by-laws upon which the APS User Organization is based. List of Steering Committee Members Steering committee for the APS Users Organization. Employment Bulletin Board APS-related employment opportunities. APSUO Steering Committee Meetings Minutes and presentations from the APSUO meetings.

419

Cascade Organic Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cascade Organic Solar Cells ... Multiple factors control the efficiency of organic solar cells, making it difficult to use single donor or acceptor materials to balance the, often opposing, material properties required to optimize device performance. ... We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C60/bathocuproine/Al. ...

Cody W. Schlenker; Vincent S. Barlier; Stephanie W. Chin; Matthew T. Whited; R. Eric McAnally; Stephen R. Forrest; Mark E. Thompson

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modern Organic Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to organic chemistry, tautomerism, glutaconic acids, the constitution of urea, the menthone chemistry, carene, hydroxymethylenecamphor, squalene, insulin, the production of acetic acid from cellulose by anaerobic fermentation ...

J. R.

1928-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EMSL - soil organic matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soil-organic-matter en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

422

The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds: Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research during the current award period has covered several related topics which have emerged and grown as a consequence of the various discoveries that have been made during this award period. They have been divided into the following subsections for clarity and emphasis: The activation of tertiary amines by osmium cluster complexes; CH bond activation and ring opening of a nitrogen containing strained ring heterocycle by an osmium cluster complex; Ring opening of cyclic thioethers; cyclooligomerization of Thietanes; Studies of the cyclobutyne ligand; Insertion of an alkynes into metal-metal bonds; and Energy storage in metal clusters. A summary of the results of these studies is given in the following sections of this report. These studies have resulted in 50 scientific publications over the last three years and details of their studies beyond that given in the following sections can be found in those reports. All of these reports are listed in the final section of this report by the author`s names, title and journal citation.

Adams, R.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Reactivity of Organic Compounds in Hot Water: Geochemical and Technological Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HIGH-TEMPERATURE HYDROLYSIS AND THERMOLYSIS OF TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE IN RELATION TO STEAM STIMULATION...HIGH-TEMPERATURE HYDROLYSIS OF TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE AND THIOPHENE, FUEL 63 : 125...3. REACTION OF THIOPHENE AND TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE WITH VANADYL AND NICKEL SALTS...

MICHAEL SISKIN; ALAN R. KATRITZKY

1991-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Enthalpies of Vaporization of Organic and Organometallic Compounds, James S. Chickosa...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63121 William E. Acree, Jr.b... Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 Received 17 June 2002; accepted 17 compendia focused on fusion and sublimation enthalpies. Sufficient data are presently available for many

Chickos, James S.

425

Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mixing ratios and vertical wind speed plotted as a functionPanel: De-trended vertical wind speed (blue) and toluene (between toluene and vertical wind speed. Dashed curve

Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D; Blake, D. R; Wiedinmyer, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Innovative technologies and vadose zone treatment of chlorinated volatile organic compounds: Case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...placed in operation in 1996 to provide hydraulic containment of groundwater containing...mechanical response of sediments to the hydraulic advancement of a probe equipped with...testing was performed using a portable, trailer-mounted SVE unit with a maximum capacity...

Jay V. Noonkester; Ralph L. Nichols; Kenneth L. Dixon

427

Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds from the Use of Chlorine-Bleach-Containing Household Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of household cleaning products (bleaches, mildew stain removers, toilet cleaners, cleaning sprays, gels, and scouring powders) contain sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, ?5%). ... Each tube was packed at the upstream (sampling) end with 3 mm silanized glass-wool followed by a series of sections of 150 mg Tenax TA (60/80 mesh) (Supelco, Bellefonte, PA, USA), 3 mm silanized glass-wool, 100 mg Carboxen 1000 (Supelco, Bellefonte, PA), and finally, 3 mm silanized glass-wool at the downstream end. ...

Mustafa Odabasi

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chemistry of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From the Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals With Aromatic Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.M. , Seinfeld J.H. , Wallington T.J. , Yarwood G. , 2002.R.M. , Seinfeld J.H. , Wallington T.J. , Yarwood G. , 2002.R.M. , Seinfeld J.H. , Wallington T.J. , Yarwood G. , 2002.

Strollo Gordon, Christen Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Identification of Organic Compounds in Oil Shale Retort Water by GC and GC-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A separation scheme is presented for the analysis of oil shale retort water by gas chromatography (GC)...

D. H. Stuermer; D. J. Ng; C. J. Morris

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Intake of Toxic and Carcinogenic Volatile Organic Compounds from Secondhand Smoke in Motor Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...illness, history of major medical or psychiatric conditions...the car 60 minutes after the lighting of the first cigarette. The...supported by the Flight Attendants Medical Research Institute (FAMRI...Francisco General Hospital Medical Center (NIH/NCRR UCSF-CTSI...

Gideon St.Helen; Peyton Jacob III; Margaret Peng; Delia A. Dempsey; S. Katharine Hammond; and Neal L. Benowitz

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Chromatographic Enrichment of Acidic Compounds from Organic Solvents Using Alkali Metal Silicates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fox, D.S. Farrier, and R.E. Paulson. Chemical char- acterization and analytical considerations for an in situ oil shale process water. U.S. Department of Energy, LETC/RI-78/7. Laramie Energy Technology Center, Lara- mie, Wyoming......

D.L. Stalling; J.D. Petty; L.M. Smith

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Apparatus for Determining Sulfur in Organic Compounds by Means of Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fuel, crude oil, and various grades of coal. However, our experience with the method...in the Schiiniger flask. The complete combustion of sulfur in pure oxygen is readily effected...moles origin- ally present. Classical chemistry allows one to cal- culate the percentage......

Philipp W. H. Schuessler

1969-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessments L. Niel Plummer1 ; Eurybiades Busenberg2 ; Sandra M. Eberts3 ; Laura M. Bexfield4 ; Craig J. Brown5 ; Lynne S. Fahlquist6 ; Brian G. Katz7 ; and Matthew K. Landon8 Abstract: Concentrations study areas in the United States. In each case, the untreated water sample was used for drinking

434

Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds - a report on the fifth blind test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of the fifth blind test of crystal structure prediction, which show important success with more challenging large and flexible molecules, are presented and discussed.

Bardwell, D.A.

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

435

Annual research plan, 1983-84. [Organic compounds derived from fossil substances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) resulted from efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure the continuity of the unique energy research capabilities that had been developed at the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) over the past 65 years. This was accomplished by a Cooperative Agreement between DOE and IIT Research Institute (IITRI). The agreement to operate NIPER for the five fiscal years 1984-88 became effective October 1, 1983. The NIPER Annual Research Plan for 1983-84 consists of eight projects in the Base Program and 13 projects in the Optional Program. A sampling of potential Work for Others projects is also presented. The Base Program consists of five EOR and three Fundamental Petroleum Chemistry projects. The Optional Program has three EOR projects, one Unconventional Gas Recovery project, five APT projects, and four Advanced Utilization Research projects.

None

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Concentration of light organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions by adsorption on bound silicalite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional distillation with a reflux ratio of 1. 5 R;? for the same separation. Approximately 10. 3 MJ L of the 21. 7 MJ L can be recycled to other processes such as stillage drying so the actual energy consumed is 11. 4 M J L . The intermediate heat pump... which is hydrophilic. The adsorption of water by the binder increases the energy needed to regenerate the column and dilutes the ethanol product. This occurrence is eliminated by using a. hydrophobic binder to attach the Silicalite to heat exchanger...

Flores, Kathryn Louise

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...would not be able to conserve energy in this manner because it contains...part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department...planet: chemical challenges in solar energy utilization. Proc. Natl. Acad...

Kelly P. Nevin; Sarah A. Hensley; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Jianhong Ou; Trevor L. Woodard; Oona L. Snoeyenbos-West; Derek R. Lovley

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

438

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA 94720 ABSTRACT in the boiler used to make process steam.water, gas condensate, and boiler blowdown. A summary of thewater, gas condensate, and boiler blowd01m. Retort water and

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologiesand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State,

Ortiz, Anna C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and observe an integrated effect from what is called an upwind footprint area. Previous such studies have been limited to a few cities: Nemitz et al. (2002) and Dorsey et al. (2002) measured particle and CO 2 fluxes above the city of Edinburgh, UK, while M... intercomparison tests ..................................... 28 2.5.2. Quantification............................................................................. 30 2.5.3. Footprint analysis...

Park, Chang Hyoun

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4 North, University of Massachusetts, Microbiology, 639 North...Microbiology, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts Microbial electrosynthesis...renewable strategies, such as solar or wind, into forms that...

Kelly P. Nevin; Sarah A. Hensley; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Jianhong Ou; Trevor L. Woodard; Oona L. Snoeyenbos-West; Derek R. Lovley

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Reaction of lithium tris(tert-butylthiolato)hydridoaluminate with selected organic compounds containing representative functional groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The simple aldehydes examined were readily reduced with 10% excess reagent at 0C to produce the... 1 $$ {\\text{LiAlH}}_{4} + 3 t{\\text{-BuSH}} {\\mathop{\\longrightarrow}...

Jin Soon Cha; Se Jin Yu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The toxicity of several organic phosphorus compounds to cotton insects and spider mites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by operating a spray gun air-tank assembly, which was mounted on a stand* The cone nozzles could be adjusted to give adequate coverage of the plants. The spray gun con? sisted of 2 nozzles, a small copper tank and a regulated air supply. The spray.......................................................... 79 Bibliography........................................................81 Page TABLES Table Page 1? Results of laboratory cage toxicity tests for boll weevil control using insecticides indicated applied as sprays in experiment 1 at College S t a...

Fuller, Freeman Miree

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

Observations of nonmethane organic compounds during ARCTAS - Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOGA WAS Isobutane WAS Propane WAS Ethane TOGA WAS ButaneButane i-Butane Propene Propane Ethyne Ethene Ethane globallight alkanes against propane determined using the WAS data,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C-130 T0 T1 G1 Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane n-ppbv) Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane Propene i-Butane n-Butanee.g. , ethane, ethene, propane, propane, methanol, ethanol,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a flameless atomic absorption detector for speciationA. , "Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometerscoupled with an atomic absorption detector," in preparation,

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Method of polymerizing exo-methylene cyclic organic compounds using homogeneous ring-opening catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The regiospecific (1,2-Me.sub.2 C.sub.5 H.sub.3).sub.2 ZrMe.sup.+ MeB(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3.sup.- mediated ring-opening polymerization of methylenecyclobutane and its copolymerization with ethylene to polyolefins of microstructure--{CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 C(CH.sub.2)]--.sub.n and {--[CH.sub.2 CHR]--.sub.x [CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 C(CH.sub.2)]--.sub.y }.sub.n' respectively, is disclosed.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Yang, Xinmin (Chicago, IL); Jia, Li (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Magnetic Permanently Confined Micelle Arrays for Treating Hydrophobic Organic Compound Contamination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(19) Owing to their hydrophobic cores, surfactant micelles have the capability of significantly enhancing the water solubility of HOCs,(14, 19, 20) which has prompted the use of surfactants in conventional soil washing systems to enhance their treatment efficiency for HOC-contaminated soils and sediments ex situ. ... (24, 25) Furthermore, in the conventional surfactant-washing system, there is a need to separate fine soil or sediment particles that are laden with surfactants out of aqueous phase after soil washing, which usually is an energy-intensive process, involving centrifugation. ... Although nonionic surfactants have been considered in surfactant-aided soil washing systems, there is little information on the particle-size dependence of these processes, which may have significant implications for design of these systems. ...

Peng Wang; Qihui Shi; Yifeng Shi; Kristin K. Clark; Galen D. Stucky; Arturo A. Keller

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

449

Atmospheric Aerosols Aging Involving Organic Compounds and Impacts on Particle Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and chemical reactions (oxidation of particles by gas-phase oxidants and heterogeneous reactions between gas molecules and particles).5 For example, when initially formed, soot particles are hydrophobic and fractal in morphology, with low effective density... particles have a ? value of 1.0; whereas fractal ones will have ? > 1.0. Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties The optical system consisted of a commercial integrating Nephelometer (Model 3563, TSI) and a CRDS connected in series.20 The particles...

Qiu, Chong

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urea Formaldehyde Foam Insulation (UFFI), Consumer Product1972 urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) caused health

Parthasarathy, Srinandini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strategy for capturing electrical energy in carbon-carbon bonds of...strategy for converting electrical energy harvested with renewable strategies, such as solar or wind, into forms that can be stored...particular concern for solar energy, because it is a vast energy...

Kelly P. Nevin; Sarah A. Hensley; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Jianhong Ou; Trevor L. Woodard; Oona L. Snoeyenbos-West; Derek R. Lovley

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Observations of nonmethane organic compounds during ARCTAS - Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from smoldering combustion of biomass measured by open-pathorganic species from biomass combustion, J. Geophys. Res. ,Biomass Burning Plume Origin Plume Age, Days a Modified Combustion

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic organic compounds Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

impossible... and qualitatively, the entire empirical basis for the anthropogenic greenhouse effect, specifically ... Source: Schwartz, Stephen E. - Environmental Chemistry...

454

Investigation of Nitro-Organic Compounds in Diesel Engine Exhaust: Final Report, February 2007 - April 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory upgraded its ReFUEL engine and vehicle testing facility to speciate unregulated gas-phase emissions. To complement this capability, the laboratory contracted with the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) to study the effects of soy biodiesel fuel and a diesel particle filter (DPF) on emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAH). CSM developed procedures to sample diesel particulate matter (PM) emissions from raw and diluted exhaust, with and without a DPF. They also developed improved procedures for extracting PAH and NPAH from the PM and quantifying them with a gas chromatograph-electron monochromator mass spectrometer. The study found the DPF generally reduced PAH emissions by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. PAH conversion was lowest for B100, suggesting that PAHs were forming in the DPF. Orders of magnitude reductions were also found for NPAH emissions exiting the DPF.

Dane, J.; Voorhees, K. J.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Organic compounds in water extracts of coal: links to Balkan endemic nephropathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the worlds energy is provided by fossil fuels, and coal is the worlds most abundant fossil fuel with reserves substantially greater than those of oil and...2008). Lignite ranks in between peat and sub...

S. V. M. Maharaj; W. H. Orem; C. A. Tatu

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Hybrid membranes and their use in volatile organic compound/air separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the chemical modification of a tubular y-alumina membrane with octadecyltrichlorosilane, ODS. Following the modification, unbound chlorosilane material was extracted Irom the membrane by exposure to toluene. Despite 10 the extraction step, C-H bonds were..., it was concluded that the chlorosilane groups were forming covalent bonds with thc membrane surface hydroxyl groups. A proposed reaction is illustrated in Fig. I. Note that Stevens has presented data clarifying that, because of bond length and angle...

Krohn, John Eric

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The removal kinetics of industrial organic compounds in natural and synthetic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques of most interest are; least squares curve fitting of non-linear functions, differentiation and integration of data wh1ch are not equally spaced, and interpolation - extrapolation (5, 15). The capability of presenting different kinetic...

Petrasek, Albert Charles

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Water quality studies in Kranji Catchment, Singapore : use of organic tracer and PEDs for identifying potential sewage sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to identify organic compounds that could serve as indicators of potential human fecal contamination sources to the Kranji Reservoir in Singapore that could be used as confirmation indicators ...

Mendez Sagel, Adriana (Adriana Raquel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

NARSTO OZONE ASSESSMENT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Atmospheric scientists examine O3 production and transport through measurements, analysis, and the application Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Although policy recommendations are not within the purview organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx ) are exposed to sunlight. Since the emissions

460

Asthma Triggers Connecting Your World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to plastics, cleaning chemicals, perfumed aerosols and other airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs prototyped Asthma Triggers, a wireless sensor that scans the air for harmful chemicals and alerts users so with ZigBee wireless connectivity, builds on the ActuariusTM and the VitalSpanTM gateway cloud platform

Fisher, Kathleen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 91419158, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/9141/2013/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comprise gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or condensed phase matter which partitions at least, NEDC) on a chassis dy- namometer in a vehicle test cell. Emissions from the entire NEDC were sampled aging, with aged OA/POA in the range 9­15. A thorough investigation of the composition of the gas phase

Meskhidze, Nicholas

462

UCI Combustion Laboratory www.ucicl.uci.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UCI Combustion Laboratory www.ucicl.uci.edu August 2014 PERSONNEL Graduate Student: Andres Colorado, pressure, exhaust gas recirculation and heat losses on the emissions of nitrogen oxides. � Compare, unburned hydrocarbons, soot particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC); moreover the addition

Detwiler, Russell

463

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 88838888, 2009 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/8883/2009/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified the long range trans- port of pollution associated with Arctic Haze as well as ocean in the lifetime of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including methane. In addition, summertime concentra- tions of anthropogenic activities in- cluding iron, steel, and ferro-alloy manufacturing; coal com- bustion; oil

464

Air Quality Conformity G.C. Sciara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) · Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) · Ozone (O3) ­ Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) ­ Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) · Oxides disease · Contributes to 80,000 premature deaths/year in CA #12;U.S. Sources of Oxides of Nitrogen EPA

Handy, Susan L.

465

I. Overview A. NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown will participate in multiple deployments and recoveries of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This collection of seawater and cell concentrations will take place (reflectivity), lifetime, and extent and by scattering solar radiation. Characterization of the properties will be made in both high and low productivity waters and relevant surface seawater parameters will be measured

466

Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 43 2000 2544 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract The capture and removal of a continuously produced, migrating Volatile Organic Compound Z .VOC the model aquifer. The electrical conduc- tivity of the Kq -spiked water was continuously monitored using by the stripping well, and the lower unaffected by the remediation system. Thereby, the primary factors

Gvirtzman, Haim

467

Aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006 and their impact on aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by diesel-fueled mobile sources and from the numerous coal- fired industries and power generation stations August thru 11 September 2006) with a number of gas and aerosol instru- ments deployed to measure air and power plants, with emissions rich in reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and NOX [Ryerson et al

468

Organic vapor jet printing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

469

Automation of organic elemental analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automation of organic elemental analysis ... Describes the development and design of an apparatus for automated organic elemental analysis. ...

Velmer B. Fish

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Compound refractive X-ray lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA); Cahn, Robert (Walnut Creek, CA); Cederstrom, Bjorn (Traellborg, SE); Danielsson, Mats (Stocksund, SE); Vestlund, Jonas (Stockholm, SE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hydromechanical transmission with compound planetary assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power transmission having three distinct ranges: (1) hydrostatic, (2) simple power-split hydromechanical, and (3) compound power-split hydromechanical. A single compound planetary assembly has two sun gears, two ring gears, and a single carrier with two sets of elongated planet gears. The two sun gears may be identical in size, and the two ring gears may be identical in size. A speed-varying module in driving relationship to the first sun gear is clutchable, in turn, to (1) the input shaft and (2) the second sun gear. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being the one clutchable to either the input shaft or to the second sun gear. The other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, is connected in driving relation to the first sun gear. A brake grounds the carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft is also clutchable to the second ring gear of the compound planetary assembly.

Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Observations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production and Soot Aging under Atmospheric Conditions Using a Novel Environmental Aerosol Chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, heterogeneous surface reactions, cloud processing, and gas-to-particle partitioning through the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by organic gases (Pankow 1994). Moreover, SOA has been linked to adverse health effects as they typically contain... 1985; Ng et al. 2006; Presto et al. 2005; Saathoff et al. 2003). Such classes include cycloalkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, and terpenes, most of which are cyclic compounds. When these compounds undergo atmospheric oxidation, 3 they produce first-generation...

Glen, Crystal

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

473

Selling body organs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selling body organs Selling body organs Name: Betty A Laliberte Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If a tissue donor dies and some of his/her tissue is donated, should the family be given money or some other benefit? I am a freshman at York HS and am doing a bioethics project. Replies: An interesting question. In my opinion, a family should not receive payment for organ donation. That would introduce an economic element into the decision, which does not seem appropriate. One problem is: Who will pay? The recipient? What if he can't afford it? Who gets the organ? The highest bidder? I guess part of my problem with selling organs and tissues is religious in nature. To me, my life and my body were given freely to me and they are not mine to sell to someone else. They certainly do not belong to my family to profit from.

474

-ray Irradiation Enhanced Boron-10 Compound Accumulation in Murine Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gamma-ray Irradiation Enhanced Boron-10 Compound Accumulation in Murine Tumors...effects of gamma-ray irradiation on boron-10 compound accumulation in a murine...sodium) administration. Then, the boron-10 concentrations in tumor and normal......

Yong Liu; Kenji Nagata; Shin-ichiro Masunaga; Minoru Suzuki; Genro Kashino; Yuko Kinashi; Hiroki Tanaka; Yoshinori Sakurai; Akira Maruhashi; Koji Ono

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

A knowledge base of the chemical compounds of intermediary metabolism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Press August 1992 other ORIGINAL PAPERS A knowledge base of the chemical compounds of intermediary...paper describes a publicly available knowledge base of the chemical compounds involved...consider the motivations for constructing a knowledge base of metabolic compounds, the methodology......

Peter D. Karp

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); White, James F. (Richland, WA); Holladay, Johnathan E. (Kennewick, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA); Muzatko, Danielle S. (Kennewick, WA); Orth, Rick J. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition.

Trkula, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organization Organization Organization View Office of Management Organization Chart in PDF format. Office of Resource Management and Planning The Office of Resource Management and Planning provides the leadership and centralized management and direction of the Office of Management (MA) planning, budgeting, financial, human resources, and program execution processes; ensures that these processes are effective, and fully integrated and consistent with the Department-wide processes and requirements. Office of Aviation Management The Department of Energy, Aviation Program is the management function for all fleet aircraft and contracted aviation services for the Department. The program and its management personnel operate world-wide. To take advantage of the best communications and information services available, we have

480

Organic solar cell optimizations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents recent experimental and theoretical approaches for optimizing organic solar cell efficiencies in both space and energy/time...D/A...) blend film, a corresponding DBAB- block copolymer film ex...

S. Sun; Z. Fan; Y. Wang; J. Haliburton

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compounds voc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Us » Organization Us » Organization Organization The organizational structure of the Office of Policy and International Affairs is as follows: *Office of Resource Management (PI-10) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Eurasia, Africa and the Middle East (PI-20) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia, Europe, and the Americas (PI-30) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy Analysis (PI-40) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change Policy and Technology (PI-50) The organizational chart can be found here. A brief synopsis of each sub-organization follows. Office of Resource Management (PI-10) The mission of the Office of Resource Management is to support the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI) by: (1) minimizing the

482

Organics Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. Because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected, two verification studies were performed to address the 303(d) segments that were listed for metal and organic contaminants in marine sediment. The Metals Verification Study (MVS) was conducted in 2003; the final report, Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington, was published in March 2004 (Kohn et al. 2004). This report describes the Organics Verification Study that was conducted in 2005. The study approach was similar to the MVS in that many surface sediment samples were screened for the major classes of organic contaminants, and then the screening results and other available data were used to select a subset of samples for quantitative chemical analysis. Because the MVS was designed to obtain representative data on concentrations of contaminants in surface sediment throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, aliquots of the 160 MVS sediment samples were used in the analysis for the Organics Verification Study. However, unlike metals screening methods, organics screening methods are not specific to individual organic compounds, and are not available for some target organics. Therefore, only the quantitative analytical results were used in the organics verification evaluation. The results of the Organics Verification Study showed that sediment quality outside of Sinclair Inlet is unlikely to be impaired because of organic contaminants. Similar to the results for metals, in Sinclair Inlet, the distribution of residual organic contaminants is generally limited to nearshore areas already within the actively managed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility Superfund Site, where further source-control actions and monitoring are under way.

Kohn, Nancy P.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Niewolny, Laurie A.; Johnston, Robert K.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

483

XPS study of Eu(III) coordination compounds: Core levels binding energies in solid mixed-oxo-compounds EumXxOy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Literature is relatively sparse on XPS studies of europium compounds: it is essentially restricted to metallic compounds (EuM5, in which M is a transition metal) or to simple oxides. While particular interest have been devoted to understanding physical phenomenon in the beginning of shake-down and shake-up satellites evidenced on core-level regions of the lanthanides, few information on absolute binding energies (BE) was available. This paper reports an XPS binding energy data base for europium(III) compounds, in which Eu cation have various chemical environments: simple oxide Eu2O3, Eu mixed oxides with organic oxalate, acetylacetonate or inorganic sulfate, nitrate, carbonate ligands. The values of core-level BE (O1s, Eu3d and Eu4d) and the characteristics of shake-down satellites of Eu3d are reported, and their variations are attributed to ionicity/covalency changes. Such interpretation was already published for Group A mixed oxides and zeolites. These data are needed for determining Eu(III) species sorbed onto minerals in the presence of various ligands in the framework of retention studies for assessing the safety of future nuclear waste disposals.

F. Mercier; C. Alliot; L. Bion; N. Thromat; P. Toulhoat

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Organic Thin Film Magnet of Nickel-Tetracyanoethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid organic-inorganic materials consisting of a transition metal and an organic compound, TCNE form a unique class of organic magnets denoted by M(TCNE){sub x}(where M = transition metals, and TCNE = tetracyanoethylene). The organic thin film magnet of nickel-tetracyanoethylene, Ni(TCNE){sub x} is deposited on sputtered clean gold substrate using the physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate chemical and electronic properties of Ni(TCNE){sub x} film. XPS derived film thickness and stoichiometry are found to be 6 nm and 1:2 ratio between Ni and TCNE resulting Ni(TCNE){sub 2} film, respectively. In addition, XPS results do not show any signature of the presence of pure metallic Ni or Ni-clustering in the Ni(TCNE){sub x} film.

Bhatt, Pramod; Yusuf, S. M. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

Geothermal Drilling Organization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

Rankine cycle power plant with improved organic working fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a Rankine cycle power plant having a boiler for vaporizing an organic working fluid which is applied to a turbine in which vaporized working fluid produced by the boiler expands and produces work, a condenser for condensing expanded vaporized working fluid exhausted by the turbine and producing condensate, and means for returning the condensate to the boiler, the improvement is described comprising: (a) operating the boiler so that the organic fluid vaporizes at substantially constant pressure and a temperature not exceeding 400/sup 0/C; (b) applying only vaporized working fluid to the turbine; and (c) using as the working fluid, a compound selected from the group consisting of bicyclic hydrocarbons, substituted bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterobicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, substituted heterobicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bicyclic compounds where one ring is aromatic and the other condensed ring is nonaromatic, and their mixtures.

Yogev, A.; Mahlab, D.

1988-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

487

Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

Heller, Christian Maria Anton (Albany, NY)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

488

Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

Gary, Charles K.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

489

Recent developments in filamentary compound superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filamentary A15 Compound superconductors are indispensable for the generation of magnetic fields over 10 T at 4.2 K. The fabrication of Nb/sub 3/ Sn and Va/sub 3/Ga wires is based on the composite process in which a composite of niobium or vanadium cores in a Cu-Sn or Cu-Ca solid-solution alloy matrix is fabricated and then heat-treated. The addition of a third element, such as aluminum, titanium, hafnium, or magnesium, to the niobium or vanadium core affects the transition temperature and the upper critical field and produces fine Nb/sub 3/ Sn grains in an A15 compound. Other effects resulting from such an addition, in areas such as critical current densities in high magnetic fields and stress, are analyzed. Use of the in situ technique for the fabrication of filamentary A15 superconductors as an alternative to the composite process is described. The fabrication and potential of multifilamentary C15 V/sub 2/ (Hf or Zr) wires as a high-field superconductor for magnetic fusion reactor use are presented. Graphs and data analyses are included.

Tachikawa, I.T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of organic matter on iron oxide: II. Displacement and transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The competitive interactions between organic matter compounds and mineral surfaces are poorly understood, yet these interactions may play a significant role in the stability and co-transport of mineral colloids and/or environmental contaminants. In this study, the processes of competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SR-NOM) are investigated with several model organic compounds in packed beds of iron oxide-coated quartz columns. Results demonstrated that strongly-binding organic compounds are competitively adsorbed and displace those weakly-bound organic compounds along the flow path. Among the four organic compounds studied, polyacrylic acid (PAA) appeared to be the most competitive, whereas SR-NOM was more competitive than phthalic and salicylic acids. A diffuse adsorption and sharp desorption front (giving an appearance of irreversible adsorption) of the SR-NOM breakthrough curves are explained as being a result of the competitive time-dependent adsorption and displacement processes between different organic components within the SR-NOM. The stability and transport of iron oxide colloids varied as one organic component competitively displaces another. Relatively large quantities of iron oxide colloids are transported when the more strongly-binding PAA competitively displaces the weakly-binding SR-NOM or when SR-NOM competitively displaces phthalic and salicylic acids. Results of this study suggest that the chemical composition and hence the functional behavior of NOM (e.g., in stabilizing mineral colloids and in complexing contaminants) can change along its flow path as a result of the dynamic competitive interactions between heterogeneous NOM subcomponents. Further studies are needed to better define and quantify these NOM components as well as their roles in contaminant partitioning and transport. 37 refs., 10 figs.

Gu, B; Mehlhorn, T.L.; Liang, Liyuan [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Organic modification of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed ... and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects: organic covalent modificat...

Luqi Liu; Zhixin Guo; Liming Dai; Daoben Zhu

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Carbon Sequestration in Organic Farming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic farming has been developed as a new mode of farming vs. conventional farming. Evidence showed that organic farming management can well maintain the soil carbon up to 23 times higher in organic matter ...

Raymond Liu; Jianming M. Xu; C. Edward Clapp

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and specific natural organic matter (NOM) fractions during ozonation of phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ozonation of natural surface water increases the concentration of oxygen-containing low molecular weight compounds. Many of these compounds support microbiological growth and as such are termed assimilable organic carbon (AOC). Phytoplankton can contribute substantially to the organic carbon load when surface water is used as source for drinking water treatment. We have investigated dissolved organic carbon (DOC) formation from the ozonation of a pure culture of Scenedesmus vacuolatus under defined laboratory conditions, using a combination of DOC fractionation, analysis of selected organic acids, aldehydes and ketones, and an AOC bioassay. Ozonation of algae caused a substantial increase in the concentration of DOC and AOC, notably nearly instantaneously upon exposure to ozone. As a result of ozone exposure the algal cells shrunk, without disintegrating entirely, suggesting that DOC from the cell cytoplasm leaked through compromised cell membranes. We have further illustrated that the specific composition of newly formed AOC (as concentration of organic acids, aldehydes and ketones) in ozonated lake water differed in the presence and absence of additional algal biomass. It is therefore conceivable that strategies for the removal of phytoplankton before pre-ozonation should be considered during the design of drinking water treatment installations, particularly when surface water is used.

Frederik Hammes; Sbastien Meylan; Elisabeth Salhi; Oliver Kster; Thomas Egli; Urs von Gunten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series 71. Nitromethane with Water or Organic Solvents: Binary Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mutual solubilities and liquidliquid equilibrium of nitromethane binary systems with liquidsolvents are reviewed. The solvents include water inorganic compounds and a variety of organic compounds as hydrocarbons halogenated hydrocarbons alcohols acids esters and nitrogen compounds. A total 474 systems published through 1993 are compiled. For 39 systems sufficient data were available to allow critical evaluation. All data are expressed as mass and mole fractions as well as the originally reported units. Similar reviews of gas liquid and solid solubilities for other systems were published in the frame of Solubility Data Series.

Valerii P. Sazonov; Kenneth N. Marsh; Glenn T. Hefter

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Introduction to Organic Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic solar cells (OSCs) have attracted strong attention in ... the basics of OSCs. The basics of organic semiconductors are first described. We then provide...

Dixon D. S. Fung; Wallace C. H. Choy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

84-2004 84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1184-2004 iii Foreword The