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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Volatile organic compound emissions from composting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is a review of the aerobic composting process and the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from this process. To understand why and… (more)

Harris, Stephanie Rose Renée

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Opportunities for reducing volatile organic compound emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions: a feasibility analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility analysis is reported of reduction opportunities for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions. The pollution prevention (P2) methodology as defined by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment ... Keywords: emissions, manufacturing, office furniture, pollution prevention, volatile organic compound

Frank S. Luisser; Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Volatile organic compound emissions from usaf wastewater treatment plants in ozone nonattainment areas. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), this research conducts an evaluation of the potential emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from selected Air Force wastewater treatment plants. Using a conservative mass balance analysis and process specific simulation models, volatile organic emission estimates are calculated for four individual facilities--Edwards AFB, Luke AFB, McGuire AFB, and McClellan AFB--which represent a cross section of the current inventory of USAF wastewater plants in ozone nonattainment areas. From these calculations, maximum facility emissions are determined which represent the upper limit for the potential VOC emissions from these wastewater plants. Based on the calculated emission estimates, each selected wastewater facility is evaluated as a potential major stationary source of volatile organic emissions under both Title I of the 1990 CAAA and the plant's governing Clean Air Act state implementation plan. Next, the potential impact of the specific volatile organics being emitted is discussed in terms of their relative reactivity and individual contribution to tropospheric ozone formation. Finally, a relative comparison is made between the estimated VOC emissions for the selected wastewater facilities and the total VOC emissions for their respective host installations.

Ouellette, B.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

Herndon, S. C.

5

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The effect of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide mixing ratios on the emission of Volatile organic compounds from Corymbia citriodora and Tristaniopsis laurina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bibliography: p. 120-124. Introduction  – Environmental factors affecting the emission of biogenic Volatile organic compounds  – Materials and experimental procedures  – Quantification using sold-phase microextraction… (more)

Camenzuli, Michelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Evolution and Transport of Pollutants over a Mediterranean Coastal Area: The Influence of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions on Ozone Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computational simulation of a typical sea-breeze situation and the transport and evolution of photochemical pollutants on the Spanish east coast is performed, and the influence of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions on the ozone ...

Spyros Andronopoulos; Artemis Passamichali; Nikos Gounaris; John G. Bartzis

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

9

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hippelein 4 . Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found informaldehyde, phenol, and TMPB-DIB. As reported by Maddalenamay have contributed to high TMPB-DIB emission factors. The

Parthasarathy, Srinandini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). One method is a thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented in an engine test cell with a spark ignited direct injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. SIDI is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency compared to other SI engines, however, the efficiency benefit comes with greater PM emissions and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based PM regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition.

Matthias, Nicholas; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Michael; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul M.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun S.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Southern California Edison's (SCE) Research Program for Industrial Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCE has developed and implemented a research program for customer retention through VOC emission control. Following characterization of problematic emission sources, SCE has identified and evaluated a number of alternative solutions and is currently implementing four demonstrations for promising technologies. The SCE program focuses on three major strategies: (1) reformulation, (2) application improvements, and (3) add-on controls. Vendors were identified, contacted, and evaluated for system performance. Industrial targets were selected based on need for assistance, magnitude of emissions, and number of facilities affected. Many facility operators were approached, interviewed, and analyzed. Three technologies were selected for installation at four host sites, with continuous monitoring of inlet and outlet VOC quantities. SCE intends to continue this demonstration project and to develop an effective technology transfer program to our industrial and commercial customers.

Sung, R. D.; Cascone, R.; Reese, J.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Study of volatile organic compound emissions from consumer and commercial products. Economic incentives to reduce VOC emissions from consumer and commercial products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents a preliminary assessment of the feasibility and desirability of employing Federal economic incentive programs to reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the use of consumer and commercial products. The principal tasks of the study are to examine alternative economic incentives and to compare them to a hypothetical command-and-control program, VOC content standards, which would consist of product-specific limitations on maximum VOC content (grams of VOC per unit of product). It is the basis of comparison because the ultimate purpose of this investigation is to search for the most desirable instrument in the set of potential instruments, which obviously would include instruments based on command-and-control. The purposes of comparison are to determine how well the instruments accomplish certain policy objectives and to appraise their ability to cope with the complexities inherent in the task of environmental regulation.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 1. Project summaries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Phase II research project on emission of potentially toxic organic compounds (PTOCs) from wastewater treatment plants were fivefold: (1) assessment of the importance of gaseous emissions from municipal wastewater collection systems; (2) resolution of the discrepancy between the measured and estimated emissions (Phase I), from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP) operated by the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (CSDLAC); (3) determination of airborne concentrations of PTOCS immediately downwind of an activated sludge aeration process at the City of Los Angeles' Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP); (4) a modeling assessment of the effects of transient loading on emissions during preliminary and primary treatment at a typical municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP); (5) a preliminary investigation of effects of chlorination practices on haloform production. Volume 1, for which the abstract was prepared, contains a summary of results from each project; Volume 2 contains the discussion regarding the modeling of collection system emissions; Volume 3 addresses methods development and field sampling efforts at the JWPCP and HTP, data on emissions from a mechanically ventilated sewer and results of some preliminary haloform formation studies in wastewaters; and Volume 4 discusses aspects of the emissions modeling problem.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Schroeder, E.D.; Corsi, R.L.; Guensler, R.; Meyerhofer, J.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Regen, W.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4083E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Parthasarathy, Srinandini, Randy L. Maddalena, Marion L. Russell, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors were evaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using the

19

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning using activated carbon fiber media with nightly regeneration Title Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound...

28

Analysis of C1, C2, and C10 through C33 particle-phase and semi-volatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engines Aftertreatment technology Diesel particulate filter Chemical speciation a b s t r a c t To meet by individual aftertreatment components using the same engine and fuel has been assessed and published engine emissions have made it necessary to implement exhaust aftertreat- ment technology to lower

Wu, Mingshen

29

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

30

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

31

Source Footprint Considerations in the Determination of Volatile Organic Compound Fluxes from Forest Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Above-canopy sampling of trace gases to determine volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions should be interpreted in terms of footprint considerations. This can be accomplished by defining the upwind canopy areas effectively sampled under the ...

S. K. Kaharabata; P. H. Schuepp; J. D. Fuentes

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

33

Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Hu, Jianli (Kennewick, WA); Hart, Todd R. (Kennewick, WA); Neuenschwander, Gary G. (Burbank, WA)

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations and Emission ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 4 Page 5. and air conditioning equipment, and price. ... quantified. Acetic acid, an apparently abundant VOC, also was not quantified. The target VOCs ...

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 3. Waste-water treatment-plant emissions. Experimental phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 3 describes the measurements and experimental data obtained to assess emissions from various points within a POTW. Included are a discussion of sampling methods development, emissions studies of activated carbon bed odor control units located at various points of a large municipal wastewater treatment plant and its collection system, upwind/downwind sampling from an activated sludge aeration basins at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant, and preliminary studies of haloform formation as a result of chlorination of wastewater.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Guensler, R.; Kim, J.O.; Chou, T.L.; Uyeminami, D.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

IRRADIATION METHOD OF CONVERTING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for changing the distribution of organic compounds from that produced by the irradiation of bulk alkane hydrocarbons. This method consists of depositing an alkane hydrocarbon on the surface of a substrate material and irradiating with gamma radiation at a dose rate of more than 100,000 rads. The substrate material may be a metal, metal salts, metal oxides, or carbons having a surface area in excess of 1 m/sup 2//g. The hydrocarbons are deposited in layers of from 0.1 to 10 monolayers on the surfaces of these substrates and irradiated. The product yields are found to vary from those which result from the irradiation of bulk hydrocarbons in that there is an increase in the quantity of branched hydrocarbons.

Allen, A.O.; Caffrey, J.M. Jr.

1960-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

38

Tritium labeling of organic compounds deposited on porous structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for labeling organic compounds with tritium is carried out by depositing the selected compound on the extensive surface of a porous structure such as a membrane filter and exposing the membrane containing the compound to tritium gas activated by the microwave discharge technique. The labeled compound is then recovered from the porous structure.

Ehrenkaufer, Richard L. E. (Speonk, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY); Hembree, Wylie C. (Woodcliff Lake, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Volatile organic compound remedial action project  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews a proposed project that is planned to reduce the levels of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants present in the Mound domestic water supply. The potable and industrial process water supply for Mound is presently obtained from a shallow aquifer via on-site production wells. The present levels of VOCs in the water supply drawn from the on-site wells are below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) permissible for drinking water under Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA; 40 CFR 141); however, Mound has determined that remedial measures should be taken to further reduce the VOC levels. The proposed project action is the reduction of the VOC levels in the water supply using packed tower aeration (PTA). This document is intended to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and associated Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508) as implemented through U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5440.1D and supporting DOE NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662), as amended (54 FR 12474; 55 FR 37174), and as modified by the Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN) 15-90 and associated guidance. As required, this EA provides sufficient information on the probable environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives to support a DOE decision either to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Emission of complex fragments in compound nucleus decay  

SciTech Connect

The compound nucleus mechanism for complex fragment emission is discussed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The role of the potential energy as a function of mass asymmetry is shown in experimental charge distributions. This process is followed from near the threshold up to bombarding energies of several tens of MeV A. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Moretto, L.G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Michael G. Apte Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 43 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5626-5632 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THUVOC and aldehyde emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehydeconcentrations ranged from 378 µg m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 µg m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 µg m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 µg m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and materialspecific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was theonly one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 µg m-2 h-1 in the morning and 257 to 347 µg m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 µg m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 µg/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 µg/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (materialsurface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde

43

Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about -10.degree. C. to about 30.degree. C. or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about [minus]10 C to about 30 C or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers is provided. Each emissive layer may define an exciton formation region, allowing exciton formation to occur across the entire emissive region. By aligning the energy levels of each emissive layer with the adjacent emissive layers, exciton formation in each layer may be improved. Devices incorporating multiple emissive layers with multiple exciton formation regions may exhibit improved performance, including internal quantum efficiencies of up to 100%.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (625 Gulfwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37923)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Natural organic compounds as tracers for biomass combustion in aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Biomass combustion is an important primary source of carbonaceous particles in the global atmosphere. Although various molecular markers have already been proposed for this process, additional specific organic tracers need to be characterized. The injection of natural product organic tracers to smoke occurs primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion temperature. The degree of alteration increases as the burn temperature rises and the moisture content of the fuel decreases. Although the molecular composition of organic matter in smoke particles is highly variable, the molecular structures of the tracers are generally source specific. The homologous compound series and biomarkers present in smoke particles are derived directly from plant wax, gum and resin by volatilization and secondarily from pyrolysis of biopolymers, wax, gum and resin. The complexity of the organic components of smoke aerosol is illustrated with examples from controlled burns of temperate and tropical biomass fuels. Burning of biomass from temperate regions (i.e., conifers) yields characteristic tracers from diterpenoids as well as phenolics and other oxygenated species, which are recognizable in urban airsheds. The major organic components of smoke particles from tropical biomass are straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and triterpenoids. The precursor-to-product approach of organic geochemistry can be applied successfully to provide tracers for studying smoke plume chemistry and dispersion.

Simoneit, B.R.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Coll. of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences; Abas, M.R. bin [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Cass, G.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Environmental Engineering Science Dept.; Rogge, W.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Florida International Univ., University Park, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Standley, L.J. [Academy of Natural Sciences, Avondale, PA (United States). Stroud Water Research Center; Hildemann, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units ...

51

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Title Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6257E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords indoor air quality, Passive Sampling, Uptake Rates, vocs Abstract Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick's Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

52

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

New Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Volatile Organic Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y N a t i o n a l E n e r g y T e c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y Successes AdvAnced ReseARch To support coal and power systems development, NETL's Advanced Research Program conducts a range of pre-competitive research focused on breakthroughs in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, computational energy science, and bioprocessing-opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality. NETL also sponsors cooperative educational initiatives in University Coal Research, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Other Minority Institutions. Accomplishments P Process improvement P Cost reduction P Greater efficiency

56

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Title Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3979e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ortiz, Anna C., Marion L. Russell, Wen-Yee Lee, Michael G. Apte, and Randy L. Maddalena Pagination 29 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 ÎĽg/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to >500 ÎĽg/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~ 15 ÎĽg/m2/h while the new wood material emitted > 100 ÎĽg/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs

57

Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

59

Predicting flammability of gas mixtures containing volatile organic compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One requirement regarding the transportation of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste containers currently limits the total concentration of potentially flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and flammable gases in the headspace of the waste container. Typical VOCs observed in the drums include aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, alcohols, cyclohexane, as well as chlorinated hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes). Flammable gases, such as hydrogen and methane, may be generated in the containers by radiation-induced decomposition (radiolysis) of water and hydrocarbon waste forms. An experimental program was initiated to identify an accurate means for predicting flammability for gas mixtures containing one or more of the following species: hydrogen, carbon tetrachloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, toluene, or 2-butanone. The lower flammability limits (LFL) of gas mixtures containing equimolar quantity for each species were determined in a 19-liter laboratory flammability chamber using a strong spark ignition source. The group factor contribution method was determined to be more accurate than the LeChatelier method for estimating the LFL for these gas mixtures.

Liekhus, K. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Zlochower, I. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Lab.; Djordjevic, S.; Loehr, C. [Benchmark Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST OTHER CHANGES TO VOC MONITORING PROGRAM Page 1 of 21 VOC 3·1: PMR Section 3, Topic 1, Table 1 Recalculated Waste Matrix Code Group Weighting Factors based on the 2004 Compliance Recertification Contact Handled (CH) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Inventory (m 3 ) The new weighting factors appear to be based on CH TRU waste only and do not include remote handled (RH) TRU waste. There was no discussion in the PMR addressing possible differences in Waste Matrix Code Group (WMCG) for RH TRU that could potentially impact the weighting factors. Please provide data characterizing the differences in emissions between the two types of waste, in support of the assertion that modeling data from CH TRU waste adequately

63

Catalytic reforming and hydrocracking of organic compounds employing promoted zinc titanate as the catalytic agent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound or the hydrocracking of a feedstock which contains at least one hydrocrackable organic compound is carried out in the presence of a catalyst composition comprising zinc, titanium and rhenium.

Drehman, L.E.; Farha, F.E.

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Catalytic reforming and hydrocracking of organic compounds employing zinc titanate as the catalytic agent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound or the hydrocracking of a feedstock which contains at least one hydrocrackable organic compound is carried out in the presence of a catalyst composition comprising zinc and titanium.

Drehman, L.E.; Farha, F.E.; Walker, D.W.

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

65

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

The impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile organic compounds in residences Title The impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile organic...

67

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building  

SciTech Connect

The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 mu g/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to>500 mu g/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~;;15 mu g/m2/h while the new wood material emitted>100 mu g/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs.

Ortiz, Anna C.; Russell, Marion; Lee, Wen-Yee; Apte, Michael; Maddalena, Randy

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

68

RADIOLYSIS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ADSORBED STATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>A method of forming branch chained hydrocarbons by means of energetic penetrating radiation is described. A solid zeolite substrate is admixed with a cobalt ion and is irradiated with a hydrocarbon adsorbed therein. Upon irradiation with gamma rays, there is an increased yield of branched and lower molecular straight chain compounds. (AEC)

Sutherland, J.W.; Allen, A.O.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Study on the Performance and Exhaust Emissions of Motorcycle Engine Fuelled with Hydrogen-Gasoline Compound Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The motorcycle plays an important role in the life for the people of Taiwan. However, the motorcycles' emissions are the main moving air pollution sources. Therefore, it's important to develop more efficient combustion technology in order to save energy ... Keywords: Emissions, Emissions Pollution, Hydrogen-Gasoline Compound Fuel, Performance Test, Solid State Hydrogen Storage

Chang-Huei Lin; Li-Ming Chu; Hsiang-Chen Hsu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Electrospun Polyurethane Fibers for Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrospun polyurethane fibers for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air with rapid VOC absorption and desorption have been developed. Polyurethanes based on 4,4-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) (MDI) and ...

Scholten, Elke

72

Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

Fortner, E. C.

73

ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was the only one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 mu g m-2 h 1 in the morning and 257 to 347 mu g m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 mu g m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 mu g/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 mu g/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (material surface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde.

Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

2008-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

75

Unburned lubricant produces 60%90% of organic carbon emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the most polluting of conventional petroleum-based fuels, emissions from gasoline engines can more, lubricants, and engine operating conditions. NREL's Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE vehicles without aftertreatment emission control systems exhibited OC emissions approxi- mately one order

76

Sorption of organic compounds in the aqueous phase onto tire rubber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch sorption tests were conducted to investigate the sorption capacity of organic compounds by ground tire and to assess the effects of the presence of other organic compounds, ionic strength, pH, ground tire particle size, and temperature on sorption. None of the factors were significant under the conditions tested, m-Xylene had the highest partition coefficient, followed by ethylbenzene, toluene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, and methylene chloride (13 L/kg). The partition coefficients had a logarithmic linear relationship with the octanol-water partition coefficients. The diffusion coefficients of the compounds tested were in the range of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s. The diffusion coefficients did not correlate well with the physical/chemical properties, such as molecular size, of the compounds tested. The heat of solutions of the compounds tested had relatively low values. Thus, the sorption may not be affected significantly by temperature change. Organic compounds sorbed onto tire rubber appear to be sorbed primarily onto tire rubber polymeric materials and partially carbon black in the tire rubber. Overall, ground tire shows significant capacity as a sorbent of organic compounds.

Kim, J.Y.; Park, J.K.; Edil, T.B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Composites for removing metals and volatile organic compounds and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Functionalized hydrophobic aerogel/solid support structure composites have been developed to remove metals and organic compounds from aqueous and vapor media. The targeted metals and organics are removed by passing the aqueous or vapor phase through the composite which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The composites adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous or vapor stream. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific functionalization of the aerogels tailored towards specific metals and/or organics. After adsorption, the composites can be disposed of or the targeted metals and/or organics can be reclaimed or removed and the composites recycled.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermal engine driven heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for separating volatile organic compounds from a stream of process gas. An internal combustion engine drives a plurality of refrigeration systems, an electrical generator and an air compressor. The exhaust of the internal combustion engine drives an inert gas subsystem and a heater for the gas. A water jacket captures waste heat from the internal combustion engine and drives a second heater for the gas and possibly an additional refrigeration system for the supply of chilled water. The refrigeration systems mechanically driven by the internal combustion engine effect the precipitation of volatile organic compounds from the stream of gas.

Drake, Richard L. (Schenectady, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Screening for organic solvents in Hanford waste tanks using total non- methane organic compound vapor concentrations  

SciTech Connect

The potential ignition of organic liquids stored in the Hanford high-level radioactive waste tanks is a safety issue because expanding gases could affect tank dome integrity. This report presents results of a screening test that was applied to 75 passively ventilated waste tanks at Hanford to determine those that might contain a significant amount of organic liquid waste. The screening test is based on a simple model of tank headspace, headspace organic vapor concentrations, and certain tank physical parameters. Analyses indicate that damage to the tank dome is credible only if the organic liquid burn rate is above a threshold value, and this can occur only if the surface area of organic liquid in a tank is above a corresponding threshold value of about one square meter. Twelve tanks were identified as potentially containing at least that amount of semivolatile organic liquid based on conservative estimates. Tank head space organic vapor concentrations and physical parameters required by the screening test have been compiled and are presented for each of the tanks studied. Estimates of the ventilation rates of the waste tanks were revised to reflect recent information obtained from hydrogen monitoring data. A simple analysis of the uncertainty in the test results suggests that the largest current uncertainty in the estimation of organic liquid surface area is that associated with knowledge of the tank ventilation rate. The uncertainty analysis is applied to determine 95% confidence limits for the estimated organic waste surface area in each tank.

Huckaby, J.L.; Glissmeyer, J.A.; Sklarew, D.S.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds. Phase 1, Conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The ``Toxic-Release Inventory`` of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M`s work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

Ho, Cliff

82

Linear driving force models for dynamic adsorption of volatile organic compound traces by porous adsorbent beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models for the dynamic adsorption of volatile organic compound (VOC) traces in air are considered. They are based on the linear driving force approximation associated with various adsorption isotherms characteristic of the couple VOC-adsorbent (Langmuir, ... Keywords: Comsol, Dubinin-Astakhov isotherm, Dynamic adsorption modelling, Finite element

Agnčs Joly; Alain Perrard

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Predicted concentrations in new relocatable classrooms of volatile organic compounds emitted from standard and alternate interior finish materials  

SciTech Connect

Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are widely employed by California school districts to satisfy rapidly expanding space requirements due to population growth and class size reduction policies. There is public concern regarding indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, particularly in RCs, but very little data to support or dispel these concerns. Several studies are investigating various aspects of IEQ in California schools. This laboratory-based study focused on evaluating the emissions of toxic and/or odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, from materials used to finish the interiors of new RCs. Furthermore, the study implemented a procedure for VOC source reduction by testing and selecting lower-emitting materials as substitutes for standard materials. In total, 17 standard and alternate floor coverings, wall panels and ceiling panels were quantitatively tested for emissions of VOCs using smallscale environmental chambers. Working with the largest northern California manufacturer of conventional RCs and two school districts, specifications were developed for four new RCs to be produced in early summer 2001. Two of these will be predominantly finished with standard materials. Alternate carpet systems, an alternate wall panel covering and an alternate ceiling panel were selected for the two other RCs based on the results of the laboratory study and considerations of cost and anticipated performance and maintenance. Particular emphasis was placed on reducing the concentrations of VOCs on California agency lists of toxic compounds. Indoor concentrations of toxic and odorous VOCs were estimated for the four classrooms by mass balance using the measured VOC emission factors, exposed surface areas of the materials in the RCs, and three ventilation rate scenarios. Results indicate that reductions in the concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde phenol, di(ethylene glycol) butyl ether, vinyl acetate, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone should be achieved as the result of the source reduction procedure.

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Fisk, William J.; Shendell, Derek G.; Apte, Michael G.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Characterization of the Sources and Concentrations of Formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds in four new manufactured houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentrations of formaldehyde, 52 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total VOCs (TVOC) were measured in four new manufactured houses on three occasions over a period of approximately nine months following completion of their construction. The houses were furnished, but unoccupied, model homes produced by a single U.S. manufacturer. Several of the houses incorporated interior finish materials with lower VOC emissions than standard materials. One house had a modified ventilation system. Ventilation rates were measured concurrently with the collection of air samples. A steady-state mass-balance model was used to calculate the area-specific emission rates of the target compounds and TVOC. The emissions of formaldehyde and VOCs from a specimen of plywood used as the floor sheeting were additionally quantified. The median formaldehyde concentration in the four houses was 37 parts-per-billion ( ppb). The formaldehyde concentrations were all less than the most restrictive guideline for this compound of 50 ppb. The concentrations of many of the target VOCs were low. Thirty-one of the VOCs had median concentrations that were at or below 1 ppb. Seven of the compounds were among the most abundant VOCs in all four houses. These compounds were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, ethylene glycol, hexanal, 2-butanone, and acetic acid. The concentrations of the aldehydes, hexanal, octanal and nonanal, in the four houses were either near or exceeded their respective odor thresholds. The concentrations of acetic acid increased with time. In the final sampling period, the odor threshold for acetic acid was exceeded in all of the houses. The range of TVOC concentrations in the four houses was 0.8 to 3 mg m{sup -3}, with a median value of 1.6 mg m{sup -3}. These concentrations were somewhat lower than TVOC concentrations previously measured in several new site-built houses, and the median concentration was only about twice the typical value for existing residences. The house with the modified ventilation system and several lower emitting materials had consistently low TVOC concentrations that were near 1 mg m{sup -3}. There were no large decreases with time in the emission rates of the individual VOCs or TVOC during the course of the study. However, the emission rates were often lowest in the final sampling with the notable exception of the acetic acid emission rate that increased with time. The source of the aldehydes was most likely engineered wood products, such as the plywood floor sheeting and possibly other structural or interior components. The source of the acetic acid was uncertain. The effects of the source substitution treatments were measurable but turned out to be relatively minor due to the predominance of other sources.

Hodgson, A.T.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Detection and classification of volatile organic compounds using Indium Tin Oxide sensor array and artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reveals the novel approach of fabricating Indium Tin Oxide thin films grown on glass substrate at 648 K temperatures using direct evaporation method for detection of small concentration volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their ... Keywords: ANNs, ITO thin films, VOC mixtures, VOCs, artificial neural networks, direct evaporation, indium tin oxide, sensor arrays, thin film sensors, volatile organic compounds

H. J. Pandya

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present detailed characterization of the NOC constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA can play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region.

Laskin, Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Julia

2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Zinn, Yuri [Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Gisladottir, Gudrun [University of Iceland; Ann, Russell [Iowa State University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Modeling Terrestrial Biogenic Sources of Oxygenated Organic Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, oxygenated volatile organic chemicals (OVOCs) likeacetone have been recognized as important atmospheric constituents due to their ability to sequester reactive nitrogen in the form peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and to be a source ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; David Bubenheim; Hanwant B. Singh; Ranga Myneni

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Moya, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 18502000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We-related combustion, 1850­2000, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 21, GB2018, doi:10.1029/2006GB002840. 1. Importance

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

91

Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends have been assessed under warmed-up and cold idle conditions. The speciated emissions show that the ...

Kar, Kenneth

93

Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractions of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Little is known about the relative health hazards presented by emissions from in-use gasoline and diesel engines. Adverse health effects have been ascribed to engine emissions on the basis of: (1) the presence of known toxic agents in emissions; (2) high-dose animal and bacterial mutagenicity tests; and (3) studies indicating gradients of health effects with proximity to roadways. Most attention has been given to the particulate fraction of emissions; little attention has been given to the semi-volatile organic fraction. However, the semi-volatile fraction overlaps the particulate fraction in composition and is always present in the vicinity of fresh emissions. Although the potential health effects of diesel emissions have been frequently studied and debated during the past 20 years (EPA, 2002), relatively little attention has been given to the toxicity of emissions from gasoline engines. In view of the considerable progress in cleaning up diesel emissions, it would be useful to compare the toxicity of emissions from contemporary on-road diesel technology with that of emissions from the in-use gasoline fleet that is well-accepted by the public. It would also be useful to have a set of validated tests for rapid, cost-effective comparisons of the toxicity of emission samples, both for comparisons among competing technologies (e.g., diesel, gasoline, natural gas) and for determining the impacts of new fuel, engine, and after-treatment strategies on toxicity. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has sponsored research aimed at developing and applying rapid-response toxicity tests for collected emission samples (Seagrave et al., 2000). This report presents selected results from that work, which is being published in much greater detail in the peer-reviewed literature (Seagrave et al., 2002).

Mauderly, Joe; Seagrave, JeanClare; McDonald, Jacob; Gigliotti,Andrew; Nikula, Kristen; Seilkop, Steven; Gurevich, Michael

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ... ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHENOL; PLASTICIZERS; ... of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl . ...

96

Geobacter strains that use alternate organic compounds, methods of making, and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides new isolated strains of Geobacter species that are capable of using a carbon source that is selected from C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds selected from pyruvate or metabolic precursors of pyruvate as an electron donor in metabolism and in subsequent energy production. In other aspects, other preferred embodiments of the present invention include methods of making such strains and methods of using such strains. In general, the wild type strain of the microorganisms has been shown to be unable to use these C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds as electron donors in metabolic steps such as the reduction of metallic ions. The inventive strains of microorganisms are useful improving bioremediation applications, including in situ bioremediation (including uranium bioremediation and halogenated solvent bioremediation), microbial fuel cells, power generation from small and large-scale waste facilities (e.g., biomass waste from dairy, agriculture, food processing, brewery, or vintner industries, etc.) using microbial fuel cells, and other applications of microbial fuel cells, including, but not limited to, improved electrical power supplies for environmental sensors, electronic sensors, and electric vehicles.

Lovley, Derek R; Summers, Zarath Morgan; Haveman, Shelley Annette; Izallalen, Mounir

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

Numerical Modelling of Light Emission and Propagation in (Organic) LEDs with the Green's Tensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light emitting diodes, light emission, light extraction, dipole radiation, stratified media, layered surpasses incandescent sources by a factor of 2 and with further improvements light emitting diodes could on light extraction techniques from inorganic light emitting diodes we recommend chapter 5 in 1 . Organic

Floreano, Dario

98

Atmospheric Aerosols Aging Involving Organic Compounds and Impacts on Particle Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first part of this dissertation, we study the aging of soot, a representative type of primary aerosols, in the presence of OH-initiated oxidation products of toluene. Monodisperse soot particles are introduced into an environmental chamber where toluene is oxidized by OH radicals. The variations in soot particle properties are simultaneously monitored, including particle size, mass, organic mass faction, hygroscopicity, and optical properties. The changes in particle properties are found to be largely governed by the thickness of the organic coating that is closely related to reaction time and initial reactant concentrations. Derived from particle size and mass, the effective density increases while dynamic shape factor decreases as the organic coating grows, suggesting a compaction of the soot morphology. As the organic coating grows, the particles become more hygroscopic and have enhanced light scattering and absorption. The second part discusses the potential reactions between amines and some aerosol constituents and alteration of aerosol properties. The reactions between alkylamines and ammonium sulfate/bisulfate have been studied using a low-pressure fast flow reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer at 293 K. Alkylamines react with ammonium sulfate/bisulfate to form alkylaminium sulfates, suggesting the existence of alkylaminium salts in particle phase. We have extended our study to characterize the physicochemical properties of alkylaminium sulfates. The hygroscopicity, thermostability, and density of five representative alkylaminium sulfates have been measured by an integrated aerosol analytical system. All alkylaminium sulfate aerosols show monotonic size growth when exposed to increasing relative humidity. Mixing ammonium sulfate with alkylaminium sulfates lowers the deliquescence point corresponding to ammonium sulfate. Alkylaminium sulfates are thermally comparable to or more stable than ammonium sulfate. The densities of alkylaminium sulfate particles are lower than that of ammonium sulfate. Our results suggest that the organic compounds can effectively alter the composition and properties of atmospheric aerosols, considerably influencing the impacts of aerosols on air quality, climate forcing, and human health.

Qiu, Chong

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Mass yields of secondary organic aerosols from the oxidation of alpha-pinene and real plant emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a significant source of global secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, quantifying their aerosol forming potential remains a challenge. This study presents smog chamber ...

Kroll, Jesse

100

Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

MARUSICH, R.M.

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organoarsenic compounds in oi.l shale process waters using aPresented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mass transport of volatile organic compounds between the saturated and vadose zones. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in the saturated zone are transported into the vadose zone primarily by gaseous phase diffusion. If the saturated zone is remediated, VOCs present in the vadose zone may become a secondary source of contamination for the groundwater. The amount of VOCs that remain in the vadose zone is dependent on site hydrology, soil properties, and the chemical properties of the contaminants. The purpose of this study was to determine what conditions caused VOC concentrations in the vadose zone to significantly recontaminate the saturated zone. A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to investigate the transport of a VOC, trichioroethylene, between the saturated and vadose zones under a variety of conditions. The model featured steady-state unsaturated water flow and transient contaminant transport. Transport mechanisms included aqueous phase advection-dispersion and gaseous phase diffusion. Partitioning between the water, gas, and soil compartments were modeled as equilibrium processes. Sensitivity analyses were performed on several variables including soil type (homogeneous and heterogeneous profiles), water infiltration rate and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant rate, and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant in the presence of heterogeneous soils, low infiltration rates and deep vadose zones.

Harner, M.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Membrane System for Recovery of Volatile Organic Compounds from Remediation Off-Gases.: Phase 1.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used methods of remediating soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration, the most common methods of treating these gas streams, suffer from significant drawbacks. This report covers the first phase of a two-phase project. The first phase involved the laboratory demonstration of the water separation section of the unit, the production and demonstration of new membrane modules to improve the separation, the design studies required for the demonstration system, and initial contacts with potential field sites. In the second phase, the demonstration system will be built and, after a short laboratory evaluation, will be tested at two field sites.

Wijmans, J.G.; Goakey, S.; Wang, X.; Baker, R.W.; Kaschemekat, J.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A General, Cryogenically-Based Analytical Technique for the Determination of Trace Quantities of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical technique for the determination of trace (sub-ppbv) quantities of volatile organic compounds in air was developed. A liquid nitrogen-cooled trap operated at reduced pressures in series with a Dupont Nafion-based drying tube and a ...

Randolph A. Coleman; Wesley R. Cofer III; Robert A. Edahl Jr.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cavalier 2 Keystone 1 Keystone 2 Keystone 3 Pilgrim1 Pilgrim 2 Manufacturer Fleetwood Fleetwood FleetwoodKeystone Keystone Keystone Pilgrim Pilgrim a Area (m 2 )

Parthasarathy, Srinandini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Common Indoor Sources of volatile organic compounds: emission rates and techniques for reducing consumer exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 1.3-cm thick, smooth plywood. These paints were appliedlatex paint combination. The plywood floor was covered withpaint consisted of two plywood panels each with surface

Hodgson, A.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Volatile organic compound concentrations and emission rates measured over one year in a new manufactured house  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

living area. The subfloor is plywood; 17 % of the floor areafiberboard passage doors, and plywood sub flooring underA possible source is the plywood subfloor. However, terpene

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nabinger, Steven J.; Persily, Andrew K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constructed with ?-inch plywood with a vinyl or PVC skin orto the high surface area of plywood paneling, all THUs hadstandards for all plywood and particleboard materials using

Parthasarathy, Srinandini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

OBSERVATION Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The possibility of providing the acetogenic microorganism Sporomusa ovata with electrons delivered directly to the cells with a graphite electrode for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic compounds was investigated. Biofilms of S. ovata growing on graphite cathode surfaces consumed electrons with the reduction of carbon dioxide to acetate and small amounts of 2-oxobutyrate. Electrons appearing in these products accounted for over 85 % of the electrons consumed. These results demonstrate that microbial production of multicarbon organic compounds from carbon dioxide and water with electricity as the energy source is feasible. IMPORTANCE Reducing carbon dioxide to multicarbon organic chemicals and fuels with electricity has been identified as an attractive strategy to convert solar energy that is harvested intermittently with photovoltaic technology and store it as covalent chemical bonds. The organic compounds produced can then be distributed via existing infrastructure. Nonbiological electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide has proven problematic. The results presented here suggest that microbiological catalysts may be a robust alternative, and when coupled with photovoltaics, current-driven microbial carbon dioxide reduction represents a new form of photosynthesis that might convert solar energy to organic products more effectively than traditional biomass-based strategies.

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Use of Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Volatile Organic Compound Sources at the La Porte Super Site During the Texas Air Quality Study 2000  

SciTech Connect

Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was deployed for continuous real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a site near the Houston Ship Channel during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000. Overall, 28 ions dominated the PTR-MS mass spectra and were assigned as anthropogenic aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, xylenes) and hydrocarbons (propene, isoprene), oxygenated compounds (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, C7 carbonyls), and three nitrogencontaining compounds (e.g., HCN, acetonitrile and acrylonitrile). Biogenic VOCs were minor components at this site. Propene was the most abundant lightweight hydrocarbon detected by this technique with concentrations up to 100+ nmol mol-1, and was highly correlated with its oxidation products, formaldehyde (up to ~40 nmol mol-1) and acetaldehyde (up to ~80 nmol/mol), with typical ratios close to 1 in propene-dominated plumes. In the case of aromatic species the high time resolution of the obtained data set helped in identifying different anthropogenic sources (e.g., industrial from urban emissions) and testing current emission inventories. A comparison with results from complimentary techniques (gas chromatography, differential optical absorption spectroscopy) was used to assess the selectivity of this on-line technique in a complex urban and industrial VOC matrix and give an interpretation of mass scans obtained by ‘‘soft’’ chemical ionization using proton-transfer via H3O+. The method was especially valuable in monitoring rapidly changing VOC plumes which passed over the site, and when coupled with meteorological data it was possible to identify likely sources.

Karl, Thomas G.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, Eric; Stutz, Jochen P.; Shetter, Rick; Hall, Samual R.; Goldan, P. D.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Lindinger, Werner

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

Speciation of inorganic and organometallic compounds in solid biological samples by thermal vaporization and plasma emission spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By means of thermal vaporization, inorganic, organic, and metallorganic species are separated and elemental emission in a microwave plasma is detected as a function of vaporization temperature. Solid samples of 250 mg or more are used to avoid problems with sample heterogeneity. The precision of characteristic appearance temperatures is +/-2/sup 0/C. The single electrode atmosphere pressure microwave plasma system is extremely tolerant to the introduction of water, organic solvents, and air. The measurement system contained a repetition wavelength scan device to allow background correction. The plasma temperature was 5500 K. The system was used to measure C, H, N, O, and Hg in orchard leaves and in tuna fish. 9 figures, 5 tables.

Hanamura, S.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Daily combined economic emission scheduling of hydrothermal systems with cascaded reservoirs using self organizing hierarchical particle swarm optimization technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily optimum economic emission scheduling of hydrothermal systems is an important task in the operation of power systems. Many heuristic techniques such as differential evolution, and particle swarm optimization have been applied to solve this problem ... Keywords: Cascaded reservoirs, Combined economic emission scheduling (CEES), Hydrothermal systems, Self-organizing particle swarm optimization with time-varying acceleration coefficients (SOHPSO_TVAC)

K. K. Mandal; N. Chakraborty

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A tall tower flux measurement setup was established in metropolitan Houston, Texas, to measure trace gas fluxes from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in… (more)

Park, Chang Hyoun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Isotopic constraints on the sources and associations of organic compounds in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide a new perspective on the fate of both natural organic matter and hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in marine sediments, we have investigated the relationship between radiocarbon (14C) age and the different ...

White, Helen K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018  

SciTech Connect

We present an emission inventory of primary black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We reconstruct fossil fuel consumption and represent changes in technology on a national and sectoral basis. Our estimates rely on new estimates of biofuel consumption, and updated emission factors for old technologies. Emissions of black carbon increase almost linearly, totaling about 1000 Gg in 1850, 2200 Gg in 1900, 3000 Gg in 1950, and 4400 Gg in 2000. Primary organic carbon shows a similar pattern, with emissions of 4100 Gg, 5800 Gg, 6700 Gg, and 8700 Gg in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, respectively. Biofuel is responsible for over half of BC emission until about 1890, and dominates energy-related primary OC emission throughout the entire period. Coal contributes the greatest fraction of BC emission between 1880 and 1975, and is overtaken by emissions from biofuel around 1975, and by diesel engines around 1990. Previous work suggests a rapid rise in BC emissions between 1950 and 2000. This work supports a more gradual increase between 1950 and 2000, similar to the increase between 1850 and 1925; implementation of clean technology is a primary reason.

Bond, T.C.; Bhardwaj, E.; Dong, R.; Jogani, R.; Jung, S.K.; Roden, C.; Streets, D.G.; Trautmann, N.M. [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lll67C Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden,~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.expanded by the Division of Oil, Gas, and Shale Technology

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references.

Silviera, D.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evaluation of EPA Region IV Standard Operating Procedures for decontamination of field equipment when sampling for volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination procedures for use at CERCLA sites where the US Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region IV is the lead agency are specified in their Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) document. Under certain circumstances, the objectives of proper decontamination can be obtained without utilizing the full procedure as specified in the SOP. Because some treatment methods may introduce low levels of organic constituents into water (e.g., chlorination), the use of treated potable water would actually have an adverse effect on the decontamination procedure compared to the use of an untreated potable supply. Certified organic-free water, the cost of which ranges from five dollars per gallon to over sixty dollars per gallon may also be unnecessary in some cases. Distilled water samples from seven different suppliers (at a cost of less than a dollar per gallon) were analyzed for Target Compound List (TCL) volatile, organic compounds (VOCs) or benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Fifty of the samples analyzed for BTEX contained no detectable amounts of these compounds, and twenty-six of the samples analyzed for TCL VOCs contained no detectable concentration. The use of solvent rinses may cause false positives during sampling. Field experiments have shown that isopropanol may degrade to acetone under some circumstances. In many cases, particularly when sampling ground water or decontaminating drilling equipment, the elimination of this step should not adversely affect sample quality. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Brice, D.A. (Westinghouse Materials Co. of Ohio, Cincinnati, OH (USA). Feed Materials Production Center); Kelley, M.E. (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

Testoni, A. L.

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

123

Recovery of semi-volatile organic compounds during sample preparation: Compilation for characterization of airborne particulate matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semi-volatile compounds present special analytical challenges not met by conventional methods for analysis of ambient particulate matter (PM). Accurate quantification of PM-associated organic compounds requires validation of the laboratory procedures for recovery over a wide volatility and polarity range. To meet these challenges, solutions of n-alkanes (nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 40}) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs (naphthalene to benzo[ghi]perylene) were reduced in volume from a solvent mixture (equal volumes of hexane, dichloromethane and methanol), to examine recovery after reduction in volume. When the extract solution volume reached 0.5 mL the solvent was entirely methanol, and the recovery averaged 60% for n-alkanes nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 25} and PAHs from naphthalene to chrysene. Recovery of higher MW compounds decreased with MW, because of their insolubility in methanol. When the walls of the flasks were washed with 1 mL of equal parts hexane and dichloromethane (to reconstruct the original solvent composition), the recovery of nC{sub 18} and higher MW compounds increased dramatically, up to 100% for nC{sub 22}-nC{sub 32} and then slowly decreasing with MW due to insolubility. To examine recovery during extraction of the components of the High Capacity Integrated Gas and Particle Sampler, the same standards were used to spike its denuders and filters. For XAD-4 coated denuders and filters, normalized recovery was > 95% after two extractions. Recovery from spiked quartz filters matched the recovery from the coated surfaces for alkanes nC{sub 18} and larger, and for fluoranthene and larger PAHs. Lower MW compounds evaporated from the quartz filter with the spiking solvent. This careful approach allowed quantification of organics by correcting for volatility- and solubility-related sample preparation losses. This method is illustrated for an ambient sample collected with this sampler during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000.

Swartz, Erick; Stockburger, Leonard; Gundel, Lara

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

QSAR Modeling of Genotoxicity onNon-congeneric Sets of Organic Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-linear (ML) and artificial neural network (ANN) approaches have been used to derive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) between the genotoxicity (mutagenicity) and molecular structure of compounds by using large initial pools ... Keywords: Ames test, QSAR, forward selection, molecular descriptors, multi-linear regression, mutagenicity, neural network, quantum chemical descriptors

Uko Maran; Sulev Slid

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction.

Schilling, J.B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 11 TLC-FID with Special Reference to Marine Lipids and Other High-Molecular-Weight Organic Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 11 TLC-FID with Special Reference to Marine Lipids and Other High-Molecular-Weight Organic Compounds Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books D

128

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal OriginChapter 1 Definitions of Concepts and Description of the Elemental Analysis of Organic Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin Chapter 1 Definitions of Concepts and Description of the Elemental Analysis of Organic Compounds Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology Press Downloadable pdf...

129

Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes: a promising molecular design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes Light Emitting Diode (OLED), intermolecular p­p interactions should be usually suppressed to avoid any Emitting Diodes (SMOLEDs) is almost absent from the literature. In this work, three aryl-substituted Di

130

Kinetics of biological methane oxidation in the presence of non-methane organic compounds in landfill bio-covers  

SciTech Connect

In this experimental program, the effects of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) on the biological methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation process were examined. The investigation was performed on compost experiments incubated with CH{sub 4} and selected NMOCs under different environmental conditions. The selected NMOCs had different concentrations and their effects were tested as single compounds and mixtures of compounds. The results from all experimental sets showed a decrease in CH{sub 4} oxidation capacity of the landfill bio-cover with the increase in NMOCs concentrations. For example, in the experiment using compost with 100% moisture content at 35 deg. C without any NMOCs the V{sub max} value was 35.0 mug CH{sub 4}h{sup -1}g{sub wetwt}{sup -1}. This value was reduced to 19.1 mug CH{sub 4}h{sup -1}g{sub wetwt}{sup -1} when mixed NMOCs were present in the batch reactors under the same environmental conditions. The experimental oxidation rates of CH{sub 4} in the presence of single and mixed NMOCs were modeled using the uncompetitive inhibition model and kinetic parameters, including the dissociation constants, were obtained. Additionally, the degradation rates of the NMOCs and co-metabolic abilities of methanotrophic bacteria were estimated.

Albanna, Muna, E-mail: muna.albanna@gju.edu.j [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Warith, Mostafa; Fernandes, Leta [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Hybrid membranes and their use in volatile organic compound/air separations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid organic/inorganic membranes were produced by chemical grafting of octadecyltrichlorosilane onto ?-alumina membranes. Separation factors are presented showing strong evidence of capillary condensation in ungrafted membranes. The grafted membranes exhibit a much improved separation factor, over the bare membranes, in the low-toluene feed concentration range. The separation factor appeared to decrease slightly with increasing feed toluene concentration, and it was approximately 1/8 the magnitude of the separation factors reported for polydimethylsiloxane under similar feed conditions.

Krohn, John Eric

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Organic emissions from coal pyrolysis: mutagenic effects. Environ. Health Perspect. 73  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four different types of coal have been pyrolyzed in a laminar flow, drop tube furnace in order to establish a relationship between polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) evolution and mutagenicity. Temperatures of 900K to 1700K and particle residence times up to 0.3 sec were chosen to best simulate conditions of rapid rate pyrolysis in pulverized (44-53,um) coal combustion. The specific mutagenic activity (i.e., the activity per unit sample weight) of extracts from particulates and volatiles captured on XAD-2 resin varied with coal type according to the order: subbituminous> high volatile bituminous> lignite> anthracite. Total mutagenic activity (the activity per gram of coal pyrolyzed), however, varied with coal type according to the order: high volatile bituminous>> subbituminous = lignite>> anthracite, due primarily to high organic yield during high volatile bituminous coal pyrolysis. Specific mutagenic activity peaked in a temperature range of 1300K to 1500K and generally appeared at higher temperatures and longer residence times than peak PAC production.

Andrew G. Braun; Mary J. Wornat; T Amitava Mitra; Adel F. Sarofimt

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Single-reactor process for producing liquid-phase organic compounds from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for preparing liquid fuel and chemical intermediates from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons. The method includes the steps of reacting in a single reactor an aqueous solution of a biomass-derived, water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon reactant, in the presence of a catalyst comprising a metal selected from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au, at a temperature, and a pressure, and for a time sufficient to yield a self-separating, three-phase product stream comprising a vapor phase, an organic phase containing linear and/or cyclic mono-oxygenated hydrocarbons, and an aqueous phase.

Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Simonetti, Dante A. (Middleton, WI); Kunkes, Edward L. (Madison, WI)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Phase 1 of a project conducted by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of VOC solvents from process gas streams. In Phase 1, MTI has evaluated solvent recovery applications within New York State (NYS), identified host sites willing to implement their application, and conducted a preliminary design of the equipment required. The design and applications were evaluated for technical and economic feasibility. The solvent recovery heat pump system concept resulting from the Phase 1 work is one of a mobile unit that would service multiple stationary adsorbers. A large percentage of solvent recovery applications within the state can be serviced by on-site carbon bed adsorbers that are desorbed at frequencies ranging from once per to once per month. In this way, many users can effectively share'' the substantial capital investment associated with the system's reverse Brayton hardware, providing it can be packaged as a mobile unit. In a typical operating scenario, a carbon adsorption module will be located permanently at the industrial site. The SLA will be ducted through the adsorber and the solvents removed, thus eliminating an air emission problem. Prior to VOC breakthrough, by schedule or by request, the mobile unit would arrive at the site to recover the concentrated solvent. An engine driven, natural gas fueled system, the mobile unit utilizes conditioned engine exhaust gases as the inert gas for desorption. Hot inert gas is directed through the carbon bed, heating it and volatilizing the adsorbed solvent. Using a revere Brayton-cycle refrigeration system to create low temperatures, the solvent vapors are condensed and collected from the inert gas stream. The solvent can then be recycled to the production process or sold for other uses and the adsorber returned to service.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Phase 1 of a project conducted by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of VOC solvents from process gas streams. In Phase 1, MTI has evaluated solvent recovery applications within New York State (NYS), identified host sites willing to implement their application, and conducted a preliminary design of the equipment required. The design and applications were evaluated for technical and economic feasibility. The solvent recovery heat pump system concept resulting from the Phase 1 work is one of a mobile unit that would service multiple stationary adsorbers. A large percentage of solvent recovery applications within the state can be serviced by on-site carbon bed adsorbers that are desorbed at frequencies ranging from once per to once per month. In this way, many users can effectively ``share`` the substantial capital investment associated with the system`s reverse Brayton hardware, providing it can be packaged as a mobile unit. In a typical operating scenario, a carbon adsorption module will be located permanently at the industrial site. The SLA will be ducted through the adsorber and the solvents removed, thus eliminating an air emission problem. Prior to VOC breakthrough, by schedule or by request, the mobile unit would arrive at the site to recover the concentrated solvent. An engine driven, natural gas fueled system, the mobile unit utilizes conditioned engine exhaust gases as the inert gas for desorption. Hot inert gas is directed through the carbon bed, heating it and volatilizing the adsorbed solvent. Using a revere Brayton-cycle refrigeration system to create low temperatures, the solvent vapors are condensed and collected from the inert gas stream. The solvent can then be recycled to the production process or sold for other uses and the adsorber returned to service.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modeling the heat and mass transfers in temperature-swing adsorption of volatile organic compounds onto activated carbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical model was built to simulate the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto activated carbons in a fixed bed. This model was validated on a set of experimental data obtained for the adsorption of acetone, ethyl formate, and dichloromethane onto five commercial activated carbons. The influence of operating conditions was modeled with various VOC contents at the inlet of the adsorber and superficial velocities of the gas-phase from 0.14 to 0.28 m.s{sup -1}. Breakthrough times and maximum temperature rises were computed with a coefficient of determination of 0.988 and 0.901, respectively. The simulation was then extended to the adsorption of mixtures of VOCs. From the comparison of simulation and experimental results, the advantage of accounting for dispersions of heat and mass is shown and the importance in taking into account the temperature effect on the equilibrium data is demonstrated. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Sylvain Giraudet; Pascaline Pre; Pierre Le Cloirec [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Nantes (France)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Composition, sources, and formation of secondary organic aerosols from urban emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type Mobile motor sources Petroleum production and refiningfrom petroleum operation and biogenic sources. In addition,petroleum operation, categorized as having near-zero emissions in recent source

Liu, Shang; Liu, Shang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Emission estimates for air pollution transport models.  

SciTech Connect

The results of studies of energy consumption and emission inventories in Asia are discussed. These data primarily reflect emissions from fuel combustion (both biofuels and fossil fuels) and were collected to determine emissions of acid-deposition precursors (SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}) and greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) appropriate to RAINS-Asia regions. Current work is focusing on black carbon (soot), volatile organic compounds, and ammonia.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

139

State-of-the-Art Measurement of Organics and Very Low CO Emissions from Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As new regulations emerge from EPA controlling emissions from stationary sources of air pollution, emission limits are increasing driven into the low part per million (ppm) and part per billion (ppb) range. There is concern regarding the ability of test methods and instrumentation to produce reliable data at these very low concentrations. Sampling and interference issues that could be ignored when measuring higher pollutant concentrations become major issues at low concentration measurement. The two poll...

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

140

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

SciTech Connect

A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Composition, sources, and formation of secondary organic aerosols from urban emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles200 5.1v aerosol Chapter 3 Meteorological conditions during theSecondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources

Liu, Shang; Liu, Shang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

TECHNICAL JUSTIFICATION FOR CHOOSING PROPANE AS A CALIBRATION AGENT FOR TOTAL FLAMMABLE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) DETERMINATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the technical justification for choosing and using propane as a calibration standard for estimating total flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an air matrix. A propane-in-nitrogen standard was selected based on a number of criteria: (1) has an analytical response similar to the VOCs of interest, (2) can be made with known accuracy and traceability, (3) is available with good purity, (4) has a matrix similar to the sample matrix, (5) is stable during storage and use, (6) is relatively non-hazardous, and (7) is a recognized standard for similar analytical applications. The Waste Retrieval Project (WRP) desires a fast, reliable, and inexpensive method for screening the flammable VOC content in the vapor-phase headspace of waste containers. Table 1 lists the flammable VOCs of interest to the WRP. The current method used to determine the VOC content of a container is to sample the container's headspace and submit the sample for gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The driver for the VOC measurement requirement is safety: potentially flammable atmospheres in the waste containers must be allowed to diffuse prior to processing the container. The proposed flammable VOC screening method is to inject an aliquot of the headspace sample into an argon-doped pulsed-discharge helium ionization detector (Ar-PDHID) contained within a gas chromatograph. No actual chromatography is performed; the sample is transferred directly from a sample loop to the detector through a short, inert transfer line. The peak area resulting from the injected sample is proportional to the flammable VOC content of the sample. However, because the Ar-PDHID has different response factors for different flammable VOCs, a fundamental assumption must be made that the agent used to calibrate the detector is representative of the flammable VOCs of interest that may be in the headspace samples. At worst, we desire that calibration with the selected calibrating agent overestimate the value of the VOCs in a sample. By overestimating the VOC content of a sample, we want to minimize false negatives. A false negative is defined as incorrectly estimating the VOC content of the sample to be below programmatic action limits when, in fact, the sample,exceeds the action limits. The disadvantage of overestimating the flammable VOC content of a sample is that additional cost may be incurred because additional sampling and GC-MS analysis may be required to confirm results over programmatic action limits. Therefore, choosing an appropriate calibration standard for the Ar-PDHID is critical to avoid false negatives and to minimize additional analytical costs.

DOUGLAS, J.G.

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

143

Determination of white phosphorus residues in ducks: An atomic emission detection/compound-independent calibration-based method of generating residue data for risk assessment and environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of phosphorus concentrations in the gizzards of ducks harvested from munitions sites is necessary to ascertain if acute phosphorus toxicity was the cause of death and to estimate potential secondary hazards to predators and scavengers, such as eagles that readily consume the dead ducks. Gas chromatography-atomic emission detection analysis permitted compound-independent quantification of white phosphorus standards following analysis of the stable phosphorus-containing compound triethyl phosphate. The white phosphorus standards were then used to quantify white phosphorus residues in duck gizzard extracts by gas chromatography-flame photometric detection analysis. For gizzards containing less than 0.01 {micro}g of phosphorus, quantification was based on a three-point calibration curve. For gizzards containing 0.01 {micro}g or more of white phosphorus, single-point calibration was used. Mean recoveries for phosphorus-fortified gizzards ranged from 73 to 91%. The method limit of detection was 0.013 {micro}g of phosphorus. This method was successfully applied to the quantification of white phosphorus in ducks collected from Eagle River Flats, AK. Potential applications to risk assessment and environmental monitoring are also discussed.

Johnston, J.J.; Goldade, D.A.; Kohler, D.J.; Cummings, J.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

On-line tests of organic additives for the inhibition of the precipitation of silica from hypersaline geothermal brine II. Tests of nitrogen-containing compounds, silanes, and additional ethoxylated compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several new classes of organic compounds have been screened as potential geothermal scale control agents by examining their effect on the precipitation of silica from Magmamax No. 1 brine. The substances were tested using the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Brine Treatment Test System at the Niland, California, Test Site. Solutions of the test substances were injected into flowing brine at 210{sup 0}C, the brine was flashed to 125{sup 0}C, and then the kinetics of solids and silica precipitation from effluent brine held at 90{sup 0}C were measured. Three new types of compounds were shown to have activity as precipitation inhibitors: polyethylene imines, polyethyloxazalines, and quaternary ammonium compounds containing polyoxyethylene. Among the latter, Ethoquad 18/25, which is methyl-polyoxyethylene(15) octadecylammonium chloride, is the leading candidate antiscalant. It is a more powerful inhibitor of silica precipitation than the pure polyoxyethylene polymers, and it apparently has no high temperature solubility limitations. Measurements were made of the concentrations of monomeric silica and the effect of addition of inhibitor at various points in the Brine Treatment Test System. Five different silane compounds showed no activity toward silica.

Harrar, J.E.; Locke, F.E.; Otto, C.H. Jr.; Lorensen, L.E.; Frey, W.P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

146

Complete detoxification of short chain chlorinated aliphatic compounds: Isolation of halorespiring organisms and biochemical studies of the dehalogenating enzyme systems. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'Widespread use and careless handling, storage and disposal practices, have lead to the dissemination of chlorinated short chain aliphatics into groundwater systems. These compounds are toxic and the presence of chlorinated ethenes and chlorinated propanes in the environment is of public concern. Halorespiration is a newly recognized anaerobic process by which certain bacteria use chlorinated compounds as terminal electron acceptors in their energy metabolism. In contrast to co-metabolic dechlorination, which is fortuitous, slow, and without benefit to the organisms, halorespiration, characterized by high dechlorination rates, is a specific metabolic process beneficial to the organism. The goals are to isolate and characterize organisms which use chlorinated ethenes (including tetrachloroethene [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE], cis-dichloroethene [cis-DCE], and vinyl chloride [VC], or 1,2-dichloropropane [1,2-D]) as electron acceptors in their energy metabolism. Better understanding of the physiology and phylogeny of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems, will greatly enhance the authors knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites. This report summarizes the results of 1.5 years of a 2-year project. Anaerobic microcosms were established using a variety of geographically distinct sediments. In several microcosms complete dechlorination of PCE to ethene (ETH), and 1,2-D to propene was observed. Upon subsequent transfers to anaerobic medium, four sediment-free, methanogenic enrichment cultures were obtained that dechlorinated PCE to ETH, and two cultures that dechlorinated 1,2-D to propene. 2-Bromoethanesulfonate (BES), a well known inhibitor of methanogens, did not inhibit the dechlorination of 1,2-D to propene or the dechlorination of PCE to cis-DCE. However, the complete dechlorination of PCE to VC and ETH was severely inhibited. They could also show that BES inhibited the dechlorination of chloroethenes in cultures without methanogens. Therefore, BES should not be used to attribute dechlorination activities to methanogens.'

Tiedje, J.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Modeling of the fluidized bed combustion process and NOx emissions using self-organizing maps: An application to the diagnosis of process states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts to reduce harmful emissions and the increasing demands for combustion efficiency have generated a number of challenges for power plants. Changes in the operation of a combustion process, for example, can induce fluctuations that have unexpected ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Energy production, Fluidized bed, K-means, Nitrogen oxide, Self-organizing map

M. Liukkonen; T. Hiltunen; E. Hälikkä; Y. Hiltunen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Print Organization Print 2012-12 org chart A complete ALS organization chart (June 2013) is available in PDF. Appointed and elected members of advisory panels provide guidance to Berkeley Lab and ALS management in developing the ALS scientific and user programs. ALS Staff Photo staff photo thumb Click on the image to see a recent photo of ALS staff in front of the dome. The photo was taken on May 14, 2013. ALS Management and Advisory Team Steve Kevan, Deputy Division Director, Science Michael J. Banda, Deputy Division Director, Operations Robert W. Schoenlein, Senior Staff Scientist, Next Generation Light Source Initiative Janos Kirz, Scientific Advisor Paul Adams, Division Deputy for Biosciences ALS Scientific, Technical, and User Support Groups Accelerator Physics

149

Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Control R&D Emission Control R&D The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research and development of aftertreatment technologies to control advanced combustion engine exhaust emissions. All engines that enter the vehicle market must comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's emissions regulations. Harmful pollutants in these emissions include: Carbon monoxide Nitrogen oxides Unburned hydrocarbons Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) Particulate matter The energy required for emission control often reduces vehicle fuel economy and increases vehicle cost. VTO's Emission Control R&D focuses on developing efficient, durable, low-cost emission control systems that complement new combustion strategies while minimizing efficiency losses. VTO often leverages the national laboratories' unique capabilities and facilities to conduct this research.

150

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Adv. Low-NOx Burner Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Fine Particulate Emissions using Subcritical Water Characterization of Fine Particulate Emissions using Subcritical Water As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. One of the primary activities of this effort is the development of a procedure using subcritical water to fractionate organics in air particulates, and test the toxicity of the fractionated organics using various tests. In contrast to inorganic aerosols, which are often well characterized, only ca. 15%–50% of the organic carbonaceous (OC) particulate mass has been characterized. The characterized compounds are almost exclusively nonpolar. The limited knowledge on OC fractions is due to the use of organic solvents which are able to extract only nonpolar or slightly polar organics. Subcritical water has not previously been used to fractionate OC from air particulates, but should have the ability to extract a broad range of polar to low-polarity OC, as well as to provide extracts in a solvent (water) which is directly useful for biological tests. Earlier studies have shown that compounds of different polarities, such as phenols, PAHs, and alkanes, can be sequentially extracted from a petroleum waste sludge by increases in subcritical water temperature.

151

The impact of bark beetle infestations on monoterpene emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation in western North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last decade, extensive beetle outbreaks in western North America have destroyed over 100 000 km2 of forest throughout British Columbia and the western United States. Beetle infestations impact monoterpene emissions ...

Berg, A. R.

152

Speciated Engine-Out Organic Gas Emissions from a PFI-SI Engine Operating on Ethanol/Gasoline Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine-out HC emissions from a PFI spark ignition engine were measured using a gas chromatograph and a flame ionization detector (FID). Two port fuel injectors were used respectively for ethanol and gasoline so that the ...

Kar, Kenneth

153

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

154

Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory  

SciTech Connect

An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

Boardman, R.D.; Lamb, K.M.; Matejka, L.A.; Nenni, J.A.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory  

SciTech Connect

An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

Boardman, Richard Doin; Lamb, Kenneth Mitchel; Matejka, Leon Anthony; Nenni, Joseph A

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Review of BEIS3 Formulation and Consequences Relative to Air Quality Standards: Estimation of Effects of Uncertainties in BEIS3 Emissions on Uncertainties in Ozone Predictions by Chemical Transport Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Biogenics Emissions Inventory System, Version 3 (BEIS3) to estimate emissions of biogenic substances such as isoprene, monoterpenes, oxygenated volatile organic compounds, and biogenic nitric oxide. These biogenic emissions are inputs to chemical transport models (CTMs) used for calculating ambient concentrations of ozone and other pollutants. The outputs of the CTMs are then used to set policies concerning emission reductions needed from indus...

2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) forIndoor Air Applications: Conversion of Volatile Organic Compounds at LowPart-per-Billion Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Efficient removal of indoor generated airborne particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in office buildings and other large buildings may allow for a reduction in outdoor air supply rates with concomitant energy savings while still maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in these buildings. Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners have the potential to achieve the necessary reductions in indoor VOC concentrations at relatively low cost. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted with a scaled, prototype UVPCO device designed for use in a duct system. The experimental UVPCO contained two 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths coated with titanium dioxide and 3% by weight tungsten oxide. The monoliths were irradiated with 12 UVC lamps arranged in four banks. The UVPCO was challenged with four mixtures of VOCs typical of mixtures encountered in indoor air. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A cleaning product mixture contained three cleaning products with high market shares. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. A fourth mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady-state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} environmental chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate air samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor section. Concentrations of the mixtures were manipulated, with concentrations of individual VOCs mostly maintained below 10 ppb. Device flow rates were varied between 165 and 580 m{sup 3}/h. Production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid as reaction products was investigated. Conversion efficiency data were generated for 48 individual VOCs or groups of closely related compounds. Alcohols and glycol ethers were the most reactive chemical classes with conversion efficiencies often near or above 70% at the low flow rate and near 40% at the high flow rate. Ketones and terpene hydrocarbons were somewhat less reactive. The relative VOC conversion rates are generally favorable for treatment of indoor air since many contemporary products used in buildings employ oxygenated solvents. A commercial UVPCO device likely would be installed in the supply air stream of a building and operated to treat both outdoor and recirculated air. Assuming a recirculation rate comparable to three times the normal outdoor air supply rate, simple mass-balance modeling suggests that a device with similar characteristics to the study unit has sufficient conversion efficiencies for most VOCs to compensate for a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply without substantially impacting indoor VOC concentrations. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid were produced in these experiments as reaction byproducts. No other significant byproducts were observed. A coupled steady-state mass balance model is presented and applied to VOC data from a study of a single office building. For the operating assumptions described above, the model estimated a three-fold increase in indoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations. The outcome of this limited assessment suggests that evaluation of the potential effects of the operation of a UVPCO device on indoor concentrations of these contaminants is warranted. Other suggested studies include determining VOC conversion efficiencies in actual buildings and evaluating changes in VOC conversion efficiency as monoliths age with long-term operation.

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Top-emission Si-based phosphor organic light emitting diode with Au doped ultrathin n-Si film anode and bottom Al mirror  

SciTech Connect

We report a highly efficient top-emission Si-based phosphor organic light emitting diode (PhOLED) with an ultrathin polycrystalline n-Si:Au film anode and a bottom Al mirror. This anode is formed by magnetron sputtering followed by Ni induced crystallization and then Au diffusion. By optimizing the thickness of the n-Si:Au film anode, the Au diffusion temperature, and the other parameters of the PhOLED, the highest current and power efficiencies of the n-Si:Au film anode PhOLED reached 85{+-}9 cd/A and 80{+-}8 lm/W, respectively, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 21{+-}2% and a power conversion efficiency of 15{+-}2%, respectively, which are about 60% and 110% higher than those of the indium tin oxide anode counterpart and 70% and 50% higher than those of the bulk n{sup +}-Si:Au anode counterpart, respectively.

Li, Y. Z.; Xu, W. J.; Ran, G. Z. [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qin, G. G. [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Lab of Semiconductor Materials, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the gas phase flow and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones is indispensable to develop effective environmental remediation strategies, to create precautions for fresh water protection, and to provide guidance for land and water resources management. Atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations are two important natural processes at the upper and lower boundaries of the unsaturated zone, respectively. However, their significance has been neglected in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi-analytical and numerical solutions are developed to calculate the subsurface gas flow field and the gas phase transport of VOCs in active soil vapor extraction (SVE), barometric pumping (BP) and natural attenuation taking into account the atmospheric pressure and the water table fluctuations. The accuracy of the developed solutions are checked by comparing with published analytical solutions under extreme conditions, newly developed numerical solutions in COMSOL Multiphysics and field measured data. Results indicate that both the atmospheric pressure and the tidal-induced water table fluctuations significantly change the gas flow field in active SVE, especially when the vertical gas permeability is small (less than 0.4 Darcy). The tidal-induced downward moving water table increases the depth-averaged radius of influence (ROI) for the gas pumping well. However, this downward moving water table leads to a greater vertical pore gas velocity away from the gas pumping well, which is unfavorable for removing VOCs. The gas flow rate to/from the barometric pumping well can be accurately calculated by our newly developed solutions in both homogeneous and multi-layered unsaturated zones. Under natural unsaturated zone conditions, the time-averaged advective flux of the gas phase VOCs induced by the atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux. The time-averaged advective flux is comparable with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is very small (less than 0.05). The density-driven flux is negligible.

You, Kehua

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Quantifying the ecosystem-scale emission and deposition fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) and their oxidation products above plant canopies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

schedule on the 18 m tall tower during BEARPEX 2009. Theschedule on the 18 m tall tower during BEARPEX 2009. The2010). A new 18 m tall scaffolding tower was built in 2007

Park, Jeong-Hoo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

163

Air Pollution Control Systems for Stack and Process Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strict environmental regulations at the federal and local levels require that industrial facilities control emissions of particulates, nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants. To comply with regulations, industries must either modify the processes or fuels they use to limit the generation of air pollutants, or remove the pollutants from the process gas streams before release into the atmosphere. This report provides a comprehensive disc...

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Complete Detoxification of Short Chain Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds: Isolation of Halorespiring Organisms and Biochemical Studies of the Dehalogenating Enzyme Systems - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work focused on the isolation and characterization of halorespiring populations, and the initial investigation of the dechlorinating enzyme systems. In addition, tools to evaluate the presence/activity to halorespiring populations in the environment were developed. The tools developed in this work (measurements of hydrogen consumption thresholds, molecular probes) are relevant for regulatory agencies in order to facilitate decisions on which bioremediation technology (biostimulation or bioaugmentation) is most promising at a particular site. In addition, a better understanding of the physiology of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems enhances our knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

Tiedje, J.M.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

167

Low emission turbo compound engine system  

SciTech Connect

A diesel or HHCI engine has an air intake and an exhaust for products of combustion. A pair of turbochargers receive the products of combustion in a series relationship and an exhaust aftertreatment device receive the products of combustion from the downstream turbine. A power turbine receives the output from the exhaust aftertreatment device and an EGR system of the power turbine passes a selected portion of the output to a point upstream of the upstream turbocharger compressor. A device adds fuel to the aftertreatment device to regenerate the particulate filter and the power turbine recoups the additional energy. The power turbine may be used to drive accessories or the prime output of the engine.

Vuk; Carl T. (Denver, IA)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Catalyst vendors take aim at emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standards for emissions of air pollutants from stationary sources are expected to become more stringent under the 1990 U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA). For years, scrubbing, incineration and other end-of-pipe methods have been used to reduce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from chemical and hydrocarbon processes. This paper reports that operating companies are now looking to catalyst manufacturers for technologies to meet higher standards. For the most part, development efforts have been centered on reducing emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) and VOCs for attainment of national ambient air quality standards for ozone under CAA's Title I. Now though, catalyst manufacturers are setting their sights on NO{sub x}.

Matthey, J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Vibronic states in organic semiconductors based on non-metal naphthalocyanine. Detection of heterocyclic phthalocyanine compounds in a flexible dielectric matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vibronic properties of semiconductor structures based on non-metal naphthalocyanine molecules are studied using IR and Raman spectroscopy methods. New absorption lines in the transmission spectra of such materials are detected and identified. Three transmission lines are observed in the range 2830-3028 cm{sup -1}, which characterize carbon-hydrogen bonds of peripheral molecular groups. Their spectral positions are 2959, 2906, and 2866 cm{sup -1}. It is detected that the phthalocyanine ring can also exhibit its specific vibronic properties in the Raman spectra at 767, 717, and 679 cm{sup -1}. The naphthalocyanine molecule in the organic dielectric matrix of microfibers is described using IR spectroscopy. It is shown that the set of vibrations characterizing the isoindol group, pyrrole ring, naphtha group, and C-H bonds, allows an accurate enough description of the vibronic states of the naphthalocyanine complex in complex heterostructures to be made. The spectral range with fundamental modes, characterizing a naphthalocyanine semiconductor in a heterostructure, is 600-1600 cm{sup -1}. A comparison of the compositions of complex systems with a similar heterostructure containing lutetium diphthalocyanine demonstrated few errors.

Belogorokhov, I. A., E-mail: jugqwerty@mail.ru [State Research and Project Institute of Rare-Metal Industry GIREDMET (Russian Federation); Tikhonov, E. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Dronov, M. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Belogorokhova, L. I. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Ryabchikov, Yu. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Tomilova, L. G.; Khokhlov, D. R. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS AND PROCESS FOR THEIR PREPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to certain new compounds of plutonium, and to the utilization of these compounds to effect purification or separation of the plutonium. The compounds are organic chelate compounds consisting of tetravalent plutonium together with a di(salicylal) alkylenediimine. These chelates are soluble in various organic solvents, but not in water. Use is made of this property in extracting the plutonium by contacting an aqueous solution thereof with an organic solution of the diimine. The plutonium is chelated, extracted and effectively separated from any impurities accompaying it in the aqueous phase.

Wolter, F.J.; Diehl, H.C. Jr.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2001, the Technical Area 3 steam plant was the primary source of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while research and development activities were the primary source of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from chemical use for research and development activities were also reported.

Margorie Stockton

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Impact of biochar application on nitrogen nutrition of rice, greenhouse-gas emissions and soil organic carbon dynamics in two paddy soils of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two field microcosm experiments and 15N labeling techniques were used to investigate the first-year effects of biochar addition on rice N nutrition and GHG emissions in an Inceptisol and an Ultisol. Biochar N bioavailability and effect of biochar on fertilizer nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were studied by 15N-enriched wheat biochar (7.8803 atom% 15N) and fertilizer urea (5 atom% 15N) (Experiment I). Corn biochar and corn stalks were applied at 12 Mg ha-1 to study their effects on GHG emissions (Experiment II). Biochar had no significant impact on rice production and less than 2% of the biochar N was available to plants in the first season. Biochar addition increased soil C and N contents and decreased urea NUE.. Seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions with biochar were similar to the controls, but significantly lower than the local practice of straw amendment. Soil emissions of N2O with biochar amendment were similar to the control in the acidic Ultisol, but significantly higher in the slightly alkaline Inceptisol. Carbon-balance calculations found no major losses of biochar-C. Low bio-availability of biochar N did not make a significant impact on rice production or N nutrition during the first year.. Replacement of straw amendments with biochar could decrease CH4 emissions and increase SOC stocks.

Xie, Zubin; Xu, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Liu, Qi; Zhu, Jianguo; Tu, Cong; Amonette, James E.; Cadisch, Georg; Yong, Jean W.; Hu, Shuijin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.geiacenter.org/ References: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA)[1] "The GEIA /ACCENT data portal provides gridded emission data; emission data are usually separated into three main categories : anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning emissions, and natural emissions: anthropogenic emissions include emissions from fossil fuel and biofuel consumption, industry and agricultural sources. biomass burning emissions include emissions from forest fires, savannah fires, and sometimes large croplands fires.

174

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

175

Bismaleimide compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

Adams, Johnnie E. (Grandview, MO); Jamieson, Donald R. (Merriam, KS)

1986-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) PYRolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) is a shielding material consisting of depleted uranium UO2 or UC in either pellet...

177

Uranium and Its Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Its Compounds Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects...

178

Indoor Air Quality and Volatile Organic Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The unit was sized to comply with the outdoor air requirements in ASHRAE Standard 62.2 Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Effect of E85 on Tailpipe Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E85, which consists of nominally 85% fuel grade ethanol and 15% gasoline, must be used in flexible-fuel (or 'flexfuel') vehicles (FFVs) that can operate on fuel with an ethanol content of 0-85%. Published studies include measurements of the effect of E85 on tailpipe emissions for Tier 1 and older vehicles. Car manufacturers have also supplied a large body of FFV certification data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, primarily on Tier 2 vehicles. These studies and certification data reveal wide variability in the effects of E85 on emissions from different vehicles. Comparing Tier 1 FFVs running on E85 to similar non-FFVs running on gasoline showed, on average, significant reductions in emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 54%), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs; 27%), and carbon monoxide (CO; 18%) for E85. Comparing Tier 2 FFVs running on E85 and comparable non-FFVs running on gasoline shows, for E85 on average, a significant reduction in emissions of CO (20%), and no significant effect on emissions of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs). NOx emissions from Tier 2 FFVs averaged approximately 28% less than comparable non-FFVs. However, perhaps because of the wide range of Tier 2 NOx standards, the absolute difference in NOx emissions between Tier 2 FFVs and non-FFVs is not significant (P 0.28). It is interesting that Tier 2 FFVs operating on gasoline produced approximately 13% less NMOGs than non-FFVs operating on gasoline. The data for Tier 1 vehicles show that E85 will cause significant reductions in emissions of benzene and butadiene, and significant increases in emissions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in comparison to emissions from gasoline in both FFVs and non-FFVs. The compound that makes up the largest proportion of organic emissions from E85-fueled FFVs is ethanol.

Yanowitz, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall Title Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Moya Melody, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary Name: Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional and Policy Lessons AgencyCompany Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and...

182

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach AgencyCompany Organization: GTZ...

183

Evaluation of radionuclide, inorganic constituent, and organic compound data from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho, 1989--1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, evaluated the water quality data collected from 55 wells and springs during 1989 and 1990 through 1992 from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho. Water samples collected in 1989-92 were analyzed for selected radionuclides, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds. A statistical comparison between data collected in 1989 and data collected in 1990-92 along with a comparison of replicate pairs was used to evaluate changes in water quality between samples and to assess sampling and analysis precision for individual constituents. The comparisons of radionuclide data showed no pattern of water quality change between samples as concentrations randomly increased or decreased. Tritium concentrations did show a consistent pattern with location in the aquifer. The largest tritium concentrations occurred in water from wells in the Big Wood and Little Wood River drainages and in the southern part of the study area where heavy irrigation occurs. The variability of radionuclide concentrations may be attributed to the change in the contract laboratory used for radiochemical analyses between 1989 and 1990. The replicate data for radionuclides showed better overall reproducibility for data collected in 1990-92 than for 1989, as 70 of 76 replicate pairs were statistically equivalent for 1990-92 data whereas only 55 of 73 replicate pairs were equivalent for 1989 data. The comparisons of most of the inorganic constituent data showed no statistical change between samples. Exceptions include nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and orthophosphate as phosphorus data. Fifteen sample pairs for nitride plus nitrate and 18 sample pairs for orthophosphate were not statistically equivalent and concentrations randomly increased or decreased.

Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M.; Campbell, L.J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbonyl compounds present in motor vehicle exhaust, rangingfrom gasoline and diesel motor vehicles. Environ. Sci. Tech.composition and toxicity of motor vehicle emission samples.

Jakober, Chris A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

M. Stockton

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

Ecology and Air Quality Group

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

Environmental Stewardship Group

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

Ecology and Air Quality Group

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass & Biomass Model Compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an innovative, modern, and effective destruction process for the treatment of organic compounds. Hydrogen production using SCWG of biomass or… (more)

Youssef, Emhemmed A.E.A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from Pulp Mills  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program various plasma technologies were evaluated under project FWP 49885 ''Experimental Assessment of Low-Temperature Plasma Technologies for Treating Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Pulp Mills and Wood Products Plants''. The heterogeneous pulsed corona discharge was chosen as the best non-equilibrium plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. The technology for removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from gas emissions with conditions typical of the exhausts of the paper industry by means of pulsed corona plasma techniques presented in this work. For the compounds of interest in this study (methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfide and ? -pinene), high removal efficiencies were obtained with power levels competitive with the present technologies for the VOCs removal. Laboratory experiments were made using installation with the average power up to 20 W. Pilot plant prepared for on-site test has average plasma power up to 6.4 kW. The model of the Pilot Plant operation is presented.

Fridman, Alexander A.; Gutsol, Alexander; Kennedy, Lawrence A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Korobtsev, Sergey V.; Shiryaevsky, Valery L.; Medvedev, Dmitry

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

COMPILATION AND ANALYSES OF EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE NOAA ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY PROJECT. PROGRESS REPORT, AUGUST 1997.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for circa 1985 and 1990 and Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOCs) for circa 1990 have been compiled by this project. Work on the inventories has been carried out under the umbrella of the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program. The 1985 NO{sub x} inventory was compiled using default data sets of global emissions that were refined via the use of more detailed regional data sets; this inventory is being distributed to the scientific community at large as the GEIA Version 1A inventory. Global emissions of NO{sub x} for 1985 are estimated to be 21 Tg N y{sup -1}, with approximately 84% originating in the Northern Hemisphere. The 1990 inventories of NO{sub x} and NMVOCs were compiled using unified methodologies and data sets in collaboration with the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Rijksinstituut Voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuhygiene, RIVM) and the Division of Technology for Society of the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, (IMW-TNO); these emissions will be used as the default estimates to be updated with more accurate regional data. The NMVOC inventory was gridded and speciated into 23 chemical categories. The resulting global emissions for 1990 are 31 Tg N yr{sup -1} for NO{sub x} and 173 Gg NMVOC yr{sup -1}. Emissions of NO{sub x} are highest in the populated and industrialized areas of eastern North America and across Europe, and in biomass burning areas of South America, Africa, and Asia. Emissions of NMVOCs are highest in biomass burning areas of South America, Africa, and Asia. The 1990 NO{sub x} emissions were gridded to 1{sup o} resolution using surrogate data, and were given seasonal, two-vertical-level resolution and speciated into NO and NO{sub 2} based on proportions derived from the 1985 GEIA Version 1B inventory. Global NMVOC emissions were given additional species resolution by allocating the 23 chemical categories to individual chemical species based on factors derived from the speciated emissions of NMVOCs in the U.S. from the U.S. EPA's 1990 Interim Inventory. Ongoing research activities for this project continue to address emissions of both NO{sub x} and NMVOCs. Future tasks include: (a) evaluation of more detailed regional emissions estimates and update of the default 1990 inventories with the appropriate estimates, (b) derivation of quantitative uncertainty estimates for the emission values, and (c) development of emissions estimates for 1995.

BENKOVITZ,C.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM AND THORIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds of Th and U are extracted with an organic solvent in the presence of an adsorbent substance which has greater retentivity for impurities present than for the uranium and/or thorium. The preferred adsorbent material is noted as being cellulose. The uranium and thoriumcontaining substances treated are preferably in the form of dissolved nitrates, and the preferred organic solvent is diethyl ether.

Arden, T.V.; Burstall, F.H.; Linstead, R.P.; Wells, R.A.

1955-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Ozone Weekend Effect in California: Evidence Supporting NOx Emission Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ozone is typically higher on weekends (WE) than on weekdays (WD) at many of California’s air-monitoring stations. Sometimes called the “ozone WE effect, ” this phenomenon occurs despite substantially lower estimates of WE emissions for the major ozone precursors – volatile organic compounds (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Compared to WD emissions, WE emissions of NOx decrease more (proportionally) than do the WE emissions of VOC. Because the WE increases in ozone coincide with the relatively large WE reductions in NOx, some conclude that regulations that would reduce NOx emissions on all days would undermine ozone attainment efforts by causing ozone to decrease more slowly (or even to increase). At this time, public discussion of the ozone WE effect has mostly reflected the viewpoint that NOx emission reductions would not help reduce ambient ozone levels. A large body of published research from this perspective has accumulated over the last 10 to 20 years. Nevertheless, the presently available scientific evidence can also lead to the conclusion that NOx emission reductions may be needed to maintain or even to expedite progress toward attainment

Lawrence C. Larsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel economy vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the full cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into reductions in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns, particularly under the High Market Share Scenario.

Mintz, M.M.; Wang, M.Q.; Vyas, A.D.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Title Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3938E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Willem, Henry, and Brett C. Singer Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords resave Abstract This report is prepared in the context of a larger program whose mission is to advance understanding of ventilation and indoor air quality in U.S. homes. A specific objective of this program is to develop the scientific basis ? through controlled experiments, monitoring and analysis ? for health risk-based ventilation standards. Appropriate and adequate ventilation is a basic element of a healthy home. Ventilation provides outdoor air and in the process removes indoor odors and contaminants including potentially unhealthful chemicals emitted by indoor materials, products and activities. Ventilation traditionally was assured to occur via infiltration of outdoor air through cracks and other leakage pathways in the residential building envelope. As building air tightness is improved for energy efficiency, infiltration can be reduced to inadequate levels. This has lead to the development of standards requiring mechanical ventilation. Though nominally intended to ensure acceptable indoor air quality, the standards are not explicitly tied to health risk or pollutant exposure targets. LBNL is currently designing analyses to assess the impact of varying ventilation standards on pollutant concentrations, health risks and energy use. These analyses require information on sources of chemical pollutant emissions, ideally including emission rates and the impact of ventilation on emissions. Some information can be obtained from recent studies that report measurements of various air contaminants and their concentrations in U.S. residences. Another way to obtain this information is the bottom-up approach of collecting and evaluating emissions data from construction and interior materials and common household products. This review contributes to the latter approach by summarizing available information on chemical emissions from new residential products and materials. We review information from the scientific literature and public sources to identify and discuss the databases that provide information on new or low-emission materials and products. The review focuses on the primary chemical or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior surface materials, furnishings, and some regularly used household products; all of these emissions are amenable to ventilation. Though it is an important and related topic, this review does not consider secondary pollutants that result from reactions of ozone and unsaturated organics bound to or emitted from material surfaces. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been largely excluded from this review because ventilation generally is not an effective way to control SVOC exposures. Nevertheless, health concerns about exposures to SVOCs emitted from selected materials warrant some discussion.

198

Novel amine-based presursor compounds and composite membranes thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel amine-based precursor compounds comprising the condensation products of dialkylenetriamine and alpha, beta-unsaturated acid halides are disclosed, as well as composite membranes containing such compounds, the membranes being useful in RO-type processes for desalination and the removal of low molecular weight organic compounds such as phenols and carboxylic acids.

Lee, Eric K. L. (Wilmington, DE); Tuttle, Mark E. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Impacts of reducing shipboard NOx? and SOx? emissions on vessel performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The international maritime community has been experiencing tremendous pressures from environmental organizations to reduce the emissions footprint of their vessels. In the last decade, air emissions, including nitrogen ...

Caputo, Ronald J., Jr. (Ronald Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nuclear evaporation process with simultaneous multiparticle emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear evaporation process is reformulated by taking into account simultaneous multiparticle emission from a hot compound nucleus appearing as an intermediate state in many nuclear reaction mechanisms. The simultaneous emission of many particles is particularly relevant for high excitation energy of the compound nucleus.These channels are effectively open in competition with the single particle emissions and fission in this energy regime. Indeed, the inclusion of these channels along the decay evaporating chain shows that the yield of charged particles and occurrence of fission are affected by these multiparticle emission processes of the compounded nucleus, when compared to the single sequential emission results. The effect also shows a qualitative change in the neutron multiplicity of different heavy compound nucleus considered. This should be an important aspect for the study of spallation reaction in Acceleration Driven System (ADS) reactors. The majority of neutrons generated in these reactions come from the evaporation stage of the reaction, the source of neutron for the system. A Monte Carlo simulation is employed to determine the effect of these channels on the particle yield and fission process. The relevance of the simultaneous particle emission with the increasing of excitation energy of the compound nucleus is explicitly shown.

Leonardo P. G. De Assis; Sergio B. Duarte; Bianca M. Santos

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

SEPARATION PROCESS FOR ZIRCONIUM AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of zirconium from columbium, rare earths, yttrium and the alkaline earth metals, such mixtures of elements occurring in zirconium ores or neutron irradiated uranium is described. According to the invention a suitable separation of zirconium from a one normal acidic aqueous solution containing salts, nitrates for example, of tetravalent zirconium, pentavalent columbium, yttrium, rare earths in the trivalent state and alkaline earths can be obtained by contacting the aqueous solution with a fluorinated beta diketonc alone or in an organic solvent solution, such as benzene, to form a zirconium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present the zirconium chelate compound is directly extracted; otherwise it is separated by filtration. The zirconium may be recovered from contacting the organic solvent solution containing the chelated compound by back extraction with either an aqueous hydrofluoric acid or an oxalic acid solution.

Crandall, H.W.; Thomas, J.R.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Biological Air Emissions Control for an Energy Efficient Forest Products Industry of the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. wood products industry is a leader in the production of innovative wood materials. New products are taking shape within a growth industry for fiberboard, plywood, particle board, and other natural material-based energy efficient building materials. However, at the same time, standards for clean air are becoming ever stricter. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during production of wood products (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and mercaptans) must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOC and HAP emission control techniques such as regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) and regenerative catalytic oxidation (RCO) require significant amounts of energy and generate secondary pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and spent carbon. Biological treatment of air emissions offers a cost-effective and sustainable control technology for industrial facilities facing increasingly stringent air emission standards. A novel biological treatment system that integrates two types of biofilter systems, promises significant energy and cost savings. This novel system uses microorganisms to degrade air toxins without the use of natural gas as fuel or the creation of secondary pollutants. The replacement of conventional thermal oxidizers with biofilters will yield natural gas savings alone in the range of $82,500 to $231,000 per year per unit. Widespread use of biofilters across the entire forest products industry could yield fuel savings up to 5.6 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year and electricity savings of 2.1 trillion Btu per year. Biological treatment systems can also eliminate the production of NOx, SO2, and CO, and greatly reduce CO2 emissions, when compared to conventional thermal oxidizers. Use of biofilters for VOC and HAP emission control will provide not only the wood products industry but also the pulp and paper industry with a means to cost-effectively control air emissions. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a novel sequential treatment technology that integrates two types of biofilter systems – biotrickling filtration and biofiltration – for controlling forest product facility air emissions with a water-recycling feature for water conservation. This coupling design maximizes the conditions for microbial degradation of odor causing compounds at specific locations. Water entering the biotrickling filter is collected in a sump, treated, and recycled back to the biotrickling filter. The biofilter serves as a polishing step to remove more complex organic compounds (i.e., terpenes). The gaseous emissions from the hardboard mill presses at lumber plants such as that of the Stimson Lumber Company contain both volatile and condensable organic compounds (VOC and COC, respectively), as well as fine wood and other very small particulate material. In applying bio-oxidation technology to these emissions Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK) and Bio•Reaction (BRI) evaluated the potential of this equipment to resolve two (2) control issues which are critical to the industry: • First, the hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions (primarily methanol and formaldehyde) and • Second, the fine particulate and COC from the press exhaust which contribute to visual emissions (opacity) from the stack. In a field test in 2006, the biological treatment technology met the HAP and COC control project objectives and demonstrated significantly lower energy use (than regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) or regenerative catalytic oxidizers (RCOs), lower water use (than conventional scrubbers) all the while being less costly than either for maintenance. The project was successfully continued into 2007-2008 to assist the commercial partner in reducing unit size and footprint and cost, through added optimization of water recycle and improved biofilm activity, and demonstration of opacity removal capabilities.

Jones, K; Boswell, J.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

205

IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Emissions Data IGES GHG Emissions Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES GHG Emissions Data Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_kyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data[1] Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at providing comprehensive, organised information on the GHG emissions from Annex I countries to the UNFCCC in an easy-to-understand way. All information is extracted from the publicly available sources on the UNFCCC web-site and this data will be updated regularly. " References ↑ "IGES GHG Emissions Data" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IGES_GHG_Emissions_Data&oldid=383109"

206

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared in the context of a larger program whose mission is to advance understanding of ventilation and indoor air quality in U.S. homes. A specific objective of this program is to develop the scientific basis ? through controlled experiments, monitoring and analysis ? for health risk-based ventilation standards. Appropriate and adequate ventilation is a basic element of a healthy home. Ventilation provides outdoor air and in the process removes indoor odors and contaminants including potentially unhealthful chemicals emitted by indoor materials, products and activities. Ventilation traditionally was assured to occur via infiltration of outdoor air through cracks and other leakage pathways in the residential building envelope. As building air tightness is improved for energy efficiency, infiltration can be reduced to inadequate levels. This has lead to the development of standards requiring mechanical ventilation. Though nominally intended to ensure acceptable indoor air quality, the standards are not explicitly tied to health risk or pollutant exposure targets. LBNL is currently designing analyses to assess the impact of varying ventilation standards on pollutant concentrations, health risks and energy use. These analyses require information on sources of chemical pollutant emissions, ideally including emission rates and the impact of ventilation on emissions. Some information can be obtained from recent studies that report measurements of various air contaminants and their concentrations in U.S. residences. Another way to obtain this information is the bottom-up approach of collecting and evaluating emissions data from construction and interior materials and common household products. This review contributes to the latter approach by summarizing available information on chemical emissions from new residential products and materials. We review information from the scientific literature and public sources to identify and discuss the databases that provide information on new or low-emission materials and products. The review focuses on the primary chemical or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior surface materials, furnishings, and some regularly used household products; all of these emissions are amenable to ventilation. Though it is an important and related topic, this review does not consider secondary pollutants that result from reactions of ozone and unsaturated organics bound to or emitted from material surfaces. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been largely excluded from this review because ventilation generally is not an effective way to control SVOC exposures. Nevertheless, health concerns about exposures to SVOCs emitted from selected materials warrant some discussion.

Willem, Henry; Singer, Brett

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

XAFS Model Compound Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

Newville, Matthew

208

Preparation of uranium compounds  

SciTech Connect

UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

209

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

211

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

212

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January – December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...

215

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mozambique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mozambique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mozambique image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mozambique...

216

CO2 Emissions - Macau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Macau CO2 Emissions from Macau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macau...

217

CO2 Emissions - Guadeloupe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guadeloupe Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guadeloupe...

218

CO2 Emissions - Ghana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Ghana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Ghana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ghana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ghana...

219

CO2 Emissions - Ireland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ireland CO2 Emissions from Ireland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ireland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ireland...

220

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CO2 Emissions - Kyrgyzstan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Kyrgyzstan CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kyrgyzstan...

222

CO2 Emissions - Mali  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Mali Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mali Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mali image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mali...

223

CO2 Emissions - Portugal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Portugal CO2 Emissions from Portugal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Portugal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Portugal...

224

CO2 Emissions - Paraguay  

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Paraguay Graphics CO2 Emissions from Paraguay Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Paraguay image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Paraguay...

225

CO2 Emissions - Macedonia  

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Western Europe Macedonia CO2 Emissions from Macedonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macedonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macedonia...

226

CO2 Emissions - Malawi  

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Malawi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Malawi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malawi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malawi...

227

CO2 Emissions - Gabon  

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Africa Gabon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gabon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gabon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gabon...

228

CO2 Emissions - Grenada  

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Grenada Graphics CO2 Emissions from Grenada Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Grenada image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Grenada...

229

CO2 Emissions - Kiribati  

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Oceania Kiribati Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kiribati Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kiribati image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kiribati...

230

CO2 Emissions - Israel  

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Israel Graphics CO2 Emissions from Israel Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Israel image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Israel...

231

CO2 Emissions - Phillippines  

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Far East Phillippines CO2 Emissions from Phillippines Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Phillippines image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Phillippines...

232

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

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Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

233

CO2 Emissions - Mauritius  

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Africa Mauritius Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritius Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritius image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritius...

234

CO2 Emissions - Malaysia  

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Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malaysia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malaysia...

235

CO2 Emissions - Reunion  

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Reunion Graphics CO2 Emissions from Reunion Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Reunion image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Reunion...

236

CO2 Emissions - Guatemala  

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Guatemala Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guatemala Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guatemala image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guatemala...

237

CO2 Emissions - Iceland  

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Iceland CO2 Emissions from Iceland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iceland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iceland...

238

CO2 Emissions - Mongolia  

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Asia Mongolia CO2 Emissions from Mongolia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mongolia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mongolia...

239

CO2 Emissions - Romania  

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Centrally Planned Europe Romania CO2 Emissions from Romania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Romania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Romania...

240

CO2 Emissions - Panama  

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Panama Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Panama...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CO2 Emissions - Madagascar  

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Madagascar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Madagascar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Madagascar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Madagascar...

242

CO2 Emissions - Netherlands  

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Netherlands CO2 Emissions from Netherlands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherlands image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Netherlands...

243

CO2 Emissions - Greenland  

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Greenland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Greenland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greenland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greenland...

244

CO2 Emissions - Norway  

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Norway CO2 Emissions from Norway Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Norway image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Norway...

245

CO2 Emissions - Guyana  

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Guyana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guyana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guyana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guyana...

246

CO2 Emissions - Mauritania  

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Africa Mauritania Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritania...

247

CO2 Emissions - Lithuania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Lithuania CO2 Emissions from Lithuania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lithuania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lithuania...

248

CO2 Emissions - Kenya  

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Africa Kenya Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kenya Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kenya image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kenya...

249

CO2 Emissions - Latvia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Latvia CO2 Emissions from Latvia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Latvia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Latvia...

250

CO2 Emissions - Georgia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Georgia CO2 Emissions from Georgia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Georgia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Georgia...

251

CO2 Emissions - Gambia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gambia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gambia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gambia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gambia...

252

CO2 Emissions - Montenegro  

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Centrally Planned Europe Montenegro CO2 Emissions from Montenegro Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montenegro image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Montenegro...

253

CO2 Emissions - Oman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Oman Graphics CO2 Emissions from Oman Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Oman image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Oman...

254

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait  

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Middle East Kuwait Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kuwait Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kuwait image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kuwait...

255

CO2 Emissions - Lebanon  

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Middle East Lebanon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Lebanon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lebanon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lebanon...

256

CO2 Emissions - Nigeria  

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Africa Nigeria Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nigeria Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nigeria image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nigeria...

257

CO2 Emissions - Maldives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Maldives CO2 Emissions from Maldives Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Maldives image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Maldives...

258

CO2 Emissions - Morocco  

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Morocco Graphics CO2 Emissions from Morocco Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Morocco image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Morocco...

259

CO2 Emissions - Pakistan  

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Far East Pakistan CO2 Emissions from Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Pakistan...

260

CO2 Emissions - Palau  

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Oceania Palau CO2 Emissions from Palau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Palau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Palau...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CO2 Emissions - Qatar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Qatar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Qatar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Qatar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Qatar...

262

CO2 Emissions - Guam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Guam Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guam image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guam...

263

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda  

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Africa Rwanda Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda...

264

CO2 Emissions - Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea...

265

CO2 Emissions - Luxembourg  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Luxembourg CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Luxembourg...

266

CO2 Emissions - Liberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Liberia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Liberia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Liberia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Liberia...

267

CO2 Emissions - Haiti  

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Haiti Graphics CO2 Emissions from Haiti Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Haiti image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Haiti...

268

CO2 Emissions - Iraq  

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Iraq Graphics CO2 Emissions from Iraq Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iraq image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iraq...

269

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

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Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

270

CO2 Emissions - Nepal  

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Far East Nepal CO2 Emissions from Nepal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nepal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nepal...

271

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

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Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

272

CO2 Emissions - Myanmar  

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Myanmar CO2 Emissions from Myanmar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Myanmar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Myanmar...

273

Glossary Term - Neutron Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Previous Term (Neutron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Niobe) Niobe Neutron Emission After neutron emission, an atom contains one less neutron. Neutron emission is one...

274

Glossary Term - Proton Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Previous Term (Proton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Quark) Quark Proton Emission After proton emission, an atom contains one less proton. Proton emission is one process...

275

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

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Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

276

CO2 Emissions - Greece  

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Western Europe Greece CO2 Emissions from Greece Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greece image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greece...

277

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG emissions specifically from the combustion of fuels in stationary sources such as boilers and furnaces. AgencyCompany Organization World Resources Institute, World Business...

278

J-51: Effect of Phonon Emission and Absorption in Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present investigation on effects of phonon emission/absorption in ... Energy Harvesting and Cooling with Flexible and Light-Weight Organic Nanocomposites.

279

ORGANICS: YARD TRIMMINGS AND FOOD SCRAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for yard trimmings and food scraps beginning at the point of waste generation. The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with these two organic material types in the following three

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

282

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

283

Greenhouse Gas Emission Impacts of Carsharing in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts that result from individuals participating in carsharing organizations within North America. The authors conducted an online survey with members of major carsharing organizations and evaluated ...

Elliot W. Martin; Susan A. Shaheen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

New organically templated photoluminescence iodocuprates(I)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of organic cyclic aliphatic diamine molecules piperazine (pip) and 1,3-bis(4-piperidyl)propane (bpp) were used, respectively, to react with an inorganic mixture of CuI and KI in the acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions under the solvothermal conditions, generating finally three new organically templated iodocuprates as 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 (tmpip=N,N,N',N'-tetramethylpiperazinium) and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Note that the templating agent tmpip{sup 2+} in compound 2 originated from the in situ N-alkylation reaction between the pip molecule and the methanol solvent. The photoluminescence analysis indicates that the title compounds emit the different lights: yellow for 1, blue for 2 and yellow-green for 3, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The solvothermal self-assemblies of CuI, KI and pip/bpp in acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions created three iodocuprates 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Highlights: > A new layered iodocuprate(I) with 20-membered rings was hydrothermally prepared. > A simple approach to prepare the new organic templating agent was reported. > Photoluminescence analysis indicates the emission for iodocuprate(I) is associated with the Cu...Cu interactions.

Hou Qin [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Zhao Jinjing [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Zhao Tianqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Jin Juan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Yu Jiehui, E-mail: jiehuiyu@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xu Jiqing, E-mail: xjq@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

1983-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Implementing Strategies for Drying and Pressing Wood Without Emissions Controls  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drying and pressing wood for the manufacture of lumber, particleboard, oriented strand board (OSB), veneer and medium density fiberboard (MDF) release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. These emissions require control equipment that are capital-intensive and consume significant quantities of natural gas and electricity. The objective of our work was to understand the mechanisms through which volatile organic compounds are generated and released and to develop simple control strategies. Of the several strategies developed, two have been implemented for OSB manufacture over the course of this study. First, it was found that increasing final wood moisture by about 2-4 percentage points reduced the dryer emissions of hazardous air pollutants by over 70%. As wood dries, the escaping water evaporatively cools the wood. This cooling tapers off wood when the wood is nearly dry and the wood temperature rises. Thermal breakdown of the wood tissue occurs and VOCs are released. Raising the final wood moisture by only a few percentage points minimizes the temperature rise and reduces emissions. Evaporative cooling also impacts has implications for VOC release from wood fines. Flaking wood for OSB manufacture inevitable generates fines. Fines dry out rapidly because of their high surface area and evaporative cooling is lost more rapidly than for flakes. As a result, fines emit a disproportionate quantity of VOCs. Fines can be reduced in two ways: through screening of the green furnish and through reducing their generation during flaking. The second approach is preferable because it also increased wood yield. A procedure to do this by matching the sharpness angle of the flaker knife to the ambient temperature was also developed. Other findings of practical interests are as follows: Dielectric heating of wood under low-headspace conditions removes terpenes and other extractives from softwood; The monoterpene content in trees depend upon temperature and seasonal effects; Method 25A emissions from lumber drying can be modeled from a knowledge of the airflow through the kiln; A heat transfer model shows that VOCs released during hot-pressing mainly originate from the surface of the board; and Boiler ash can be used to adsorb formaldehyde from air streams.

Sujit Banerjee; Terrance Conners

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC) for Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2003, the Technical Area 3 steam plant and the air curtain destructors were the primary sources of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while the air curtain destructors and chemical use associated with research and development activities were the primary sources of volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions were reported from chemical use as well as from all combustion sources. In addition, estimates of particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 micrometers and ammonia were provided as requested by the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau.

M. Stockton

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modeling the Effect of Chlorine Emissions on Ozone Levels over the Eastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents model estimates of the effect of chlorine emissions on atmospheric ozone concentrations in the eastern United States. The model included anthropogenic molecular chlorine emissions, anthropogenic hypochlorous acid emissions from cooling towers and swimming pools, and chlorine released from sea-salt aerosols. The release of chlorine emissions from sea-salt aerosols was modeled using heterogeneous reactions involving chloride ions in aerosols and three gas-phase species. The gas-phase chlorine chemistry was combined with the Carbon Bond Mechanism and incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system. Air quality model simulations were performed for July 2001 and the results obtained with and without chlorine emissions were analyzed. When chlorine emissions were included in the model, ozone concentrations increased in the Houston, Texas, and New York–New Jersey areas. The daily maximum 1-h ozone concentrations increased by up to 12 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) in the Houston area and 6 ppbv in the New York–New Jersey area. The daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations increased by up to 8 ppbv in the Houston area and 4 ppbv in the New York–New Jersey area. The monthly average daily maximum 1-h ozone concentration increased by up to 3 ppbv in the Houston area, but the increases in the monthly average daily maximum 1-h ozone concentration in the New York–New Jersey area were small. Chlorine emissions and chemistry enhanced the volatile organic compound oxidation rates and, thereby, increased the ozone production rate. 1.

Golam Sarwar; Prakash; V. Bhave

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

293

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

294

WASTE SEPARATION-DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE SEPARATION- DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS? A. John Chandler A a commendable job in proving that trace emissions from a modem waste to energy plant have little to do with the trace compounds in individual components of municipal solid waste. Ogden, the leader in designing

Columbia University

295

Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Organization Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mission Organization Staff - Organization Chart About Us Bob Cottingham, 865-241-0554 Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Meghan Drake 865-241-8288 Michael...

297

Science Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

298

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

299

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Agency/Company /Organization: American Public Transportation Association Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.aptastandards.com/Portals/0/SUDS/SUDSPublished/APTA_Climate_Change This Recommended Practice provides guidance to transit agencies for quantifying their greenhouse gas emissions, including both emissions generated by transit and the potential reduction of emissions through efficiency and displacement How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes

300

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Project Summary Full Title: Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Project ID: 269 Principal Investigator: Amgad Elgowainy Brief Description: Argonne National Laboratory examined the potential fuel cycle energy and emissions benefits of integrating hydrogen storage with renewable power generation. ANL also examined the fuel cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative energy storage systems, including pumped hydro storage (PHS), compressed air energy storage (CAES), and vanadium-redox batteries (VRB). Keywords: Hydrogen; Emissions; Greenhouse gases (GHG); Energy storage; Life cycle analysis Performer Principal Investigator: Amgad Elgowainy Organization: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

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301

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy, Water Focus Area: Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_ers.html Cost: Free CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Screenshot References: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series[1] "IGES ERs Calculation Sheet aims at providing a simplified spreadsheet for demonstrating emission reductions based on the approved methodologies corresponding to eligible project activities. The sheet will provide you

302

Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Agency/Company /Organization: Local Governments for Sustainability Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health, GHG inventory, Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.environmenttools.co.uk/directory/tool/name/harmonized-emissions-an Cost: Free Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Screenshot References: ICLEI-HEAT[1] Related Tools Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) ICCT Roadmap Model ... further results Find Another Tool

303

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

304

CO2 Emissions - Peru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Peru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Peru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

305

CO2 Emissions - Bolivia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Bolivia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Bolivia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Bolivia image Per capita CO2 Emission...

306

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

307

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

308

Source Emissions and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation Source Emissions and Transport Investigators conduct research here to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment. This research includes studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential human health effects. Contacts Randy Maddalena RLMaddalena@lbl.gov (510) 486-4924 Mark Mendell MJMendell@lbl.gov (510) 486-5762 Links Pollutant Sources, Dynamics and Chemistry Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy Technologies Environmental Impacts

309

8-fluoropurine compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An efficient, regiocontrolled approach to the synthesis of 8-fluoropurines by direct fluorination of purines with dilute elemental fluorine, or acetyl hypofluorite, is provided. In a preferred embodiment, a purine compound is dissolved in a polar solvent and reacted with a dilute mixture of F.sub.2 in He or other inert gas.

Barrio, Jorge R. (Agoura Hills, CA); Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Namavari, Mohammad (Los Angeles, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Encino, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Compound semiconductor MOSFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhancement mode, high electron mobility MOSFET devices have been fabricated using an oxide high-@k gate dielectric stack developed using molecular beam epitaxy. A template layer of Ga"2O"3, initially deposited on the surface of the III-V device unpins ... Keywords: Compound semiconductors, GaAs gate dielectric, III-V MOSFETs

R. Droopad; K. Rajagopalan; J. Abrokwah; P. Zurcher; M. Passlack

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A compound parabolic concentrator  

SciTech Connect

A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for solar energy applications is presented in this work. A prototype was built and its thermal performance was determined. Operating temperatures of the order of 150 /sup 0/C with a reasonable efficiency can be attained by means of a fixed CPC.

Manrique, J.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel-economy vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the fill fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low-sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. Results were obtained for three scenarios: a Reference Scenario without PNGVs, a High Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for 60% of new light-duty vehicle sales by 2030, and a Low Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for half as many sales by 2030. Under the higher of these two, the fuel-efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into a nearly 50% reduction in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sulfur oxide, (SO{sub x}), and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM{sub 10}) for most of the engine-fuel combinations examined. The key exceptions were diesel- and ethanol-fueled vehicles for which PM{sub 10} emissions increased.

Mintz, M. M.; Vyas, A. D.; Wang, M. Q.

1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

313

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions: November 28, 2006 - March 31, 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project was a pilot investigation of how fuels and crankcase lubricants contribute to the formation of particulate matter (PM) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in vehicle exhaust. As limited vehicles were tested, results are not representative of the whole on-road fleet. Long-term effects were not investigated. Pairs of vehicles (one normal PM emitting, one high-PM emitting) from four categories were selected: light-duty (LD) gasoline cars, medium-duty (MD) diesel trucks, heavy-duty (HD) natural-gas-fueled buses, and HD diesel buses. HD vehicles procured did not exhibit higher PM emissions, and thus were labeled high mileage (HM). Fuels evaluated were non-ethanol gasoline (E0), 10 percent ethanol (E10), conventional low-sulfur TxLED diesel, 20% biodiesel (B20), and natural gas. Temperature effects (20 degrees F, 72 degrees F) were evaluated on LD and MD vehicles. Lubricating oil vintage effects (fresh and aged) were evaluated on all vehicles. LD and MD vehicles were operated on a dynamometer over the California Unified Driving Cycle, while HD vehicles followed the Heavy Duty Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule. Regulated and unregulated emissions were measured. Chemical markers from the unregulated emissions measurements and a tracer were utilized to estimate the lubricant contribution to PM.

Carroll, J. N.; Khalek, I. A.; Smith, L. R.; Fujita, E.; Zielinska, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

CO2 Emissions - Montserrat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Montserrat Graphics CO2 Emissions from Montserrat Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montserrat image Per capita CO2...

315

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

316

CO2 Emissions - Honduras  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Honduras Graphics CO2 Emissions from Honduras Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Honduras image Per capita CO2...

317

CO2 Emissions - Nicaragua  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Nicaragua Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua image Per capita CO2...

318

Trends Online Methane Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Introduction Annual Estimates of Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions: 1860-1994 - D.I. Stern and R.K. Kaufmann Contents-Trends | CDIAC Home 102001...

319

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

320

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controlling NOx emissions from lean engines is challenging. Traditionally, for the stoichiometric gasoline engine vehicles that dominate the U.S. passenger car market, a three-way...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

List of Organizations that Exchange Data with Portfolio Manager...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas emissions. Click here for the ENERGY STAR List of Organizations that Exchange Data with Portfolio Manager. Energy Efficient Products Learn about ENERGY STAR Products...

322

Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

323

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us Organization Organization Leadership Organization History Careers Contact Us Organization...

324

Hydrogen in compound semiconductors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the understanding of hydrogen and its interactions in III/V and II/VI compound semiconductors is reviewed. Donor, acceptor and deep level passivation is well established in III/V compounds based on electrical measurements and on spectroscopic studies. The hydrogen donor levels in GaAs and GaP are estimated to lie near E{sub v}+0.5 eV and E{sub v}+0.3 eV, respectively. Arsenic acceptors have been passivated by hydrogen in CdTe and the very first nitrogen-hydrogen local vibrational model spectra in ZnSe have been reported. This long awaited result may lead to an explanation for the poor activation of nitrogen acceptors in ZnSe grown by techniques which involve high concentrations of hydrogen.

Haller, E.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Injection Molding Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Common thermoplastic and thermoset molding compounds...(r) (s) (t) Phenolic Distributor caps, plastic ash trays (a) (b) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) (l) (m) (n) (o) (q) (r) (s) (t) Urethane Automotive body panels, bumpers (a) (d) (e) (g) (i) (l) (m) (o) (q) (r) (t) Vinyl ester Composite car/truck springs, wheels (b) (d) (e) (g) (i) (j) (k) (l) (m) (n) (o) (p)...

326

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Single Substance Organic Redox Flow Battery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Z Z - + Z + E 0 -2.8V A Single Substance Organic Redox Flow Battery -+- -+- Components Compound Z Tetraethylammonium Tetrafluoroborate (TEA-BF 4 )...

327

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth by W. G. Breiland, L. A. Bruskas, A. A. Allerman, and T. W. Hargett Motivation-Temperature is a critical factor in the growth of thin films by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is particularly important in compound semiconductor growth because one is often challenged to grow materials with specific chemical compositions in order to maintain stringent lattice-matching conditions or to achieve specified bandgap values. Optical pyrometry can be used to measure surface temperatures, but the thin film growth causes significant changes in the emissivity of the surface, leading to severe errors in the pyrometer measurement. To avoid these errors, emissivity changes must be measured and

328

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Composition of carbonaceous smoke particles from prescribed burning of a Canadian boreal forest: 1. Organic aerosol characterization by gas chromatography  

SciTech Connect

In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as smoke particles from a Canadian boreal forest prescribed burn. Of special interest are (1) the molecular identity of polar organic aerosols, and (2) the amount of polar organic matter relative to the total mass of aerosol particulate carbon. Organic extracts of smoke aerosol particles show complex distributions of the lipid compounds when analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The molecular constituents present as smoke aerosol are grouped into non-polar (hydrocarbons) and polar {minus}2 oxygen atoms) subtractions. The dominant chemical species found in the boreal forest smoke aerosol are unaltered resin compounds (C20 terpenes) which are abundant in unburned conifer wood, plus thermally altered wood lignins and other polar aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results show that smoke aerosols contain molecular tracers which are related to the biofuel consumed. These smoke tracers can be related structurally back to the consumed softwood and hardwood vegetation. In addition, combustion of boreal forest materials produces smoke aerosol particles that are both oxygen-rich and chemically complex, yielding a carbonaceous aerosol matrix that is enriched in polar substances. As a consequence, emissions of carbonaceous smoke particles from large-scale combustion of boreal forest land may have a disproportionate effect on regional atmospheric chemistry and on cloud microphysical processes.

Mazurek, M.A.; Laterza, C.; Newman, L.; Daum, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Winstead, E.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, Hampton, VA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

331

Organizations and Networks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organizations and Networks Organizations and Networks (Redirected from Gateway:International/Networks) Jump to: navigation, search Registered Technical and Research Organizations Networks Climate Eval "The website promotes active debate on areas relevant to evaluation of climate change and development evaluation by bringing relevant topics to a peer to peer discussion forum." Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) CLEAN aims to improve communication and coordination by bringing together national and international organizations that are assisting developing countries with preparation and implementation of low greenhouse gas emission plans and strategies. This includes support for technology needs assessments, for low carbon and clean energy development plans, and

332

NIST Organization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... What We Do; Organization Chart; Budget Information; Office of the Director; Laboratories & Major Programs; Locations; Staff Directory; Working With ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

333

Symposium Organizer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volunteer Training Module. March 2013. 1. Your Professional Partner for Career Advancement. Symposium Organizer. Online Training Module. March 2013 ...

334

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

335

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

336

Ventilation Control of Volatile Organic Compounds in New U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods were used for VOC concentration measurements, and passive perfluorocarbon tracer gas emitters with active sampling were used to determine the overall air exchange rate...

337

Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO.sub.2 and CuCl. The CO.sub.2 is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH.sub.3 I to form CH.sub.3 Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio.

Holt, Ben D. (Hindsdale, IL); Sturchio, Neil C. (Oswego, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds - Energy Innovation Portal  

Benefits A hydrogen storage method that requires neither pressurized gas nor liquid hydrogen. Applications and Industries Transportation Patents and ...

339

Determinants for nasal trigeminal detection of volatile organic compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIGURE 2b-APPENDIX – Small jars nonanal 1-octanol eugenollarge vessels or small jars. Notice that the same order ofversus when using the small jars. Each point represents the

Cometto-Muńiz, J Enrique; Cain, William S; Abraham, Michael H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING PENETRATING RADIATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of hydrogenating an olefinic hydrocarbon by irradiating a substrate catalyst and increasing its catalytic activity is described. Ferric oxide with about 0.005% by weight of at least one oxide of a metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, magnesium, nickel, zirconium, and manganese incorporated therein is irradiated. Then an alkane is placed upon the surface of the catalyst and irradiated in an atmosphere of hydrogen. Any olefin produced from this radiolysis becomes hydrogenated. (AEC)

Caffrey, J.M. Jr.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Hydrogen and Methane Data Validation Checklist (WP 12-VC3209) * EDD Review and Data Package Validation Table (WP 12-VC3209) * VacuumPressure Comparison between Field and...

342

METHODS OF MAKING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY METATHESIS - Energy ...  

Abraham, Timothy W. (Minnetonka, MN), Kaido, Hiroki (Eden Prairie, MN), Lee, Choon Woo (La Canada, CA), Pederson, Richard L. (San Gabriel, CA), ...

343

Electroluminescence in ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission in ion gel gated, thin film organic semiconductor tran- sistors and investigates the light emission mechanism behind these devices. We report that ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors emit light when the drain source volt- age... the organic light emitting devices become mainstream, there are several challenges that need to be resolved and current research focus is to ad- dress those challenges. One particular challenge is relatively high operating volt- ages of light emitting organic...

Bhat, Shrivalli

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Emissions Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis Federal agencies should establish planned changes in operations that could have a substantial impact on emissions for each greenhouse gas (GHG) emission source: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Such changes could represent either an additional significant hurdle to overcome or a significant reduction in the effort required to drive emissions down-in the absence of any direct GHG mitigation reduction strategies. This will help each organization establish its "business as usual" emission profile in 2020, the year agencies are expected to meet their Scope 1 and 2 and Scope 3 GHG emission-reduction goals.

345

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.iea.org/co2highlights/co2highlights.pdf CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Screenshot References: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion[1] Overview "This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2008 selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information" Excel Spreadsheet References ↑ "CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion"

346

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Profile Emissions Profile Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile October 7, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. While the data required for annual GHG reporting are sufficient to establish an agency's overall emission inventory, these data are not typically enough information for effectively managing emissions. A detailed, bottom-up assessment can provide the foundation for much more robust Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans. Because detailed analyses of all assets can be time-intensive, strategic planning helps the

347

UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programme Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Name UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), European Union Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.undp.org/climatestr References UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme[1] UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Screenshot "This collaborative programme aims to strengthen technical and institutional capacities at the country level, while at the same time facilitating inclusion and coordination of the public and private sector in national initiatives addressing climate change. It does so by utilizing the

348

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

349

UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) Guidance Manuals and Toolkits Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) Guidance Manuals and Toolkits Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Finance, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.undp.org/environment/climatestrategies_toolkits.shtml Cost: Free UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) Guidance Manuals and Toolkits Screenshot

350

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country Mexico Central America References Greenhouse Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials for Buildings[1] Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report represents the first comprehensive description of the factors that determine the present and future impacts of residential and commercial

351

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

352

Organic Aerosol Partition Module Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM-2.5), data and analytical tools are needed to support their implementation. This report documents an EPRI modeling component for efficiently simulating aspects of organic aerosol formation. Without this component, simulations would tend to overestimate the contribution of power plant emissions to atmospheric aerosol mass.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

353

Raman studies of organic superconductors.  

SciTech Connect

The temperature-dependence of the frequency of one of the components of the v9 (Ag) doublet in the Raman spectra of several organic superconductors has been measured. The frequency of this mode was observed to soften below 100K, in those compounds in which NMR data indicates antiferromagnetic oscillations in the same temperature range. This is evidence for spin-phonon interactions.

Lin, Y.; Eldridge, J. E.; Wang, H. H.; Kini, A. M.; Schlueter, J. A.; Materials Science Division; Univer. of British Columbia

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Dilution-based emissions sampling from stationary sources: part 2 - gas-fired combustors compared with other fuel-fired systems  

SciTech Connect

With the recent focus on fine particle matter (PM2.5), new, self- consistent data are needed to characterize emissions from combustion sources. Emissions data for gas-fired combustors are presented, using dilution sampling as the reference. The sampling and analysis of the collected particles in the presence of precursor gases, SO{sub 2}, nitrogen oxide, volatile organic compound, and NH{sub 3} is discussed; the results include data from eight gas fired units, including a dual- fuel institutional boiler and a diesel engine powered electricity generator. These data are compared with results in the literature for heavy-duty diesel vehicles and stationary sources using coal or wood as fuels. The results show that the gas-fired combustors have very low PM2.5 mass emission rates in the range of {approximately}10{sup -4} lb/million Btu (MMBTU) compared with the diesel backup generator with particle filter, with {approximately} 5 x 10{sup -3} lb/MMBTU. Even higher mass emission rates are found in coal-fired systems, with rates of {approximately} 0.07 lb/MMBTU for a bag-filter-controlled pilot unit burning eastern bituminous coal. The characterization of PM2.5 chemical composition from the gas-fired units indicates that much of the measured primary particle mass in PM2.5 samples is organic or elemental carbon and, to a much less extent, sulfate. Metal emissions are low compared with the diesel engines and the coal- or wood-fueled combustors. The metals found in the gas- fired combustor particles are low in concentration. The interpretation of the particulate carbon emissions is complicated by the fact that an approximately equal amount of particulate carbon is found on the particle collector and a backup filter. It is likely that measurement artifacts are positively biasing 'true' particulate carbon emissions results. 49 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

England, G.C.; Watson, J.G.; Chow, J.C.; Zielinska, B.; Chang, M.C.O.; Loos, K.R.; Hidy. G.M. [GE Energy, Santa Ana, CA (United States)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Property:Event/Organizer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organizer Organizer Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Event/Organizer Property Type String Description The entity or entities responsible for organizing the event. This is typically a person or organization. More than one organizer can be attributed to each event. Pages using the property "Event/Organizer" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading + International Energy Agency (IEA) + 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Day 2 + International Energy Agency (IEA) + 15th International Business Forum: Low Carbon High Growth - Business Models for a Changing Climate + German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) + 18th Africa Partnership Forum + African Partnership Forum +

356

EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26-29, 1979 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INLBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INl·. LBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN

Gullberg, G.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Emissions and performance evaluation of a dedicated compressed natural gas saturn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as a transportation fuel has been identified as one strategy that can help ameliorate some problems, which include a growing dependence on imported oil (and all its ramifications) and the persistent contributions that mobile sources make to urban air pollution, associated with the use of conventional petroleum fuels. The attributes and limitations of CNG as a fuel for spark-ignition engines have been presented by others. The attributes are associated with its high octane rating, low cost relative to other alternative fuels, its availability, the absence of running and diurnal evaporative emissions, and its demonstrated potential for producing extremely low exhaust emissions-particularly if the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted are expressed in terms of reactivity adjusted non-methane organic gases (RANMOG). The limitations associated with the use of CNG include its limited refueling infrastructure, the cost of refueling facilities, the cost of on-board fuel storage tanks, and its relatively low energy density. Because one impediment to CNG use is the cost associated with producing a CNG-powered vehicle, a study was initiated at the University of Tennessee under sponsorship by the Saturn Corporation to determine how a CNG vehicle (specifically, a 1991 Saturn SL1) could be engineered so it could be produced with a minimal impact on the production of the base vehicle. The present study was undertaken to further investigate the emissions reduction potential of the Saturn CNG vehicle. In the previous study the role of exhaust gas recirculation was not thoroughly investigated. Those involved in the study agreed that the NO{sub x} levels could be brought down well below California ULEV levels without increasing either the non-methane organic gases or the CO levels.

Hodgson, J.W.; Taylor, J.D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

360

Excess Emissions (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Organization Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spacer spacer spacer About DOE Organization News Contact Us Search Search Go spacer U.S. Department of Energy header image Science & Technology Energy Sources Energy Efficiency...

362

The cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure to carcinogens in Harris County by a abating chemical plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

The work examines the engineering reasonableness and the cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure to carcinogens n ambient air by abating emissions of organic chemicals in waste gas streams from chemical plants in Harris County, Texas, which contains the large chemical manufacturing complex in the Houston ship channel areas. The work also examined the cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure through changing the way vent streams are released to the atmosphere. The achievable exposure reductions are estimated by use of 1980 census data and of ambient concentration estimates. The ambient concentration estimates are calculated using the Texas Climatological Model Version 2 (TCM-2) and publicly available emissions inventory collected by the Texas Air Control Board. The TCM-2 is based on the steady state Gaussian plume hypothesis, Briggs plume rise formations, Pasquill-Gifford dispersion coefficient approximations, and first order pollutant decay. The cost estimates rely on published studies and on the waste gas stream parameters of the chemical plant vents. The cost effectiveness results are compared with the cost effectiveness of controls typically applied to new sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are controlled because of their contribution to ozone air pollution, not because of the carcinogenicity of their emissions.

Price, J.H. Jr.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

CO2 Emissions - Guinea Bissau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guinea Bissau Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea Bissau...

364

CO2 Emissions - Peninsular Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Far East Peninsular Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia image Per...

365

CO2 Emissions - New Caledonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Caledonia Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Caledonia...

366

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

367

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in press), Organic aerosols in the earth's atmosphere,loss, and trace gas and aerosol emissions during laboratoryproperties of biomass burn aerosols, Geophysical Research

McMeeking, Gavin R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

369

The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1): an extended and updated framework for modeling biogenic emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1) is a modeling framework for estimating fluxes of biogenic compounds between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere using simple mechanistic ...

Guenther, A. B.

370

Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1985--1990  

SciTech Connect

The Earth`s capacity to support life depends on the moderating influences of gases that envelop the planet and warm its surface and protect it from harmful radiation. These gases are referred to as ``greenhouse gases.`` Their warming capacity, called ``the greenhouse effect,`` is essential to maintaining a climate hospitable to all plant, animal, and human life. In recent years, however, there has been increasing concern that human activity may be affecting the intricate balance between the Earth`s absorption of heat from the sun and its capacity to reradiate excess heat back into space. Emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities may be an important mechanism that affects global climate. Thus, research is intensifying to improve our understanding of the role human activities might play in influencing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. On the basis of scientific findings of the past few decades, the US Government and the international community at large are now taking steps toward stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. This report contributes to that process. Mandated by Congress this report provides estimates of US emissions of the principal greenhouse gases--carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorcarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds. Estimates are for the period 1985 to 1990. Preliminary estimates for 1991 have also been included, whenever data were available.

Not Available

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 7, vehicle emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions from Clean Fleet vans running on M-85, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), propane gas, and a control gasoline (RF-A) are presented. Three vans from each combination of vehicle manufacturer and fuel were tested at the California Air Resources Board (ARB) as they accumulated mileage in the demonstration. Data are presented on regulated emissions, ozone precursors, air toxics, and greenhouse gases. The emissions tests provide information on in-use emissions. That is, the vans were taken directly from daily commercial service and tested at the ARB. The differences in alternative fuel technology provide the basis for a range of technology options. The emissions data reflect these differences, with classes of vehicle/fuels producing either more or less emissions for various compounds relative to the control gasoline.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Compound Semiconductor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compound Semiconductor Science and Technology Thrust The Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center's vision for Compound Semiconductors is to develop the science of compound...

374

Design and synthesis of organic chromophores for imaging, lithography and organic electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The absorption and emission maxima, photostabilities and photoreactivities of small-molecule organic chromophores can be tailored by (a) the choice of an appropriate parent structure and (b) the deliberate introduction of ...

Andrew, Trisha Lionel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emission Factors (EMFAC) Emission Factors (EMFAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EMFAC Agency/Company /Organization: California Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways and local roads in California. EMFAC2007 is the most recent version of this model.

376

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

378

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

379

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool [1] NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool This interactive tool enables the user to look at both total and power sector CO2 emissions from the use of coal, oil, or natural gas, over the period 1990 to 2030. One can use the tool to compare five of the larger CO2 emitters to each other or to overall world emissions. The data are from the

380

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/biogenic_emissions.html Cost: Free References: EPA, 40 CFR Part 60[1] Tailoring Rule[2] Biogenic Emissions[3] The 'EPA Climate Change - Green House Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) Project Summary Full Title: MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) Previous Title(s): New Generation Mobile Source Emissions Model (NGM) Project ID: 179 Principal Investigator: Margo Oge Brief Description: Estimates emissions for on-road and nonroad sources, multiple pollutants, fine-scale analysis to national inventory estimation. Keywords: Vehicle; transportation; emissions Purpose Estimate emissions for on-road and nonroad sources, cover a broad range of pollutants, and allow multiple scale analysis, from fine-scale analysis to national inventory estimation. When fully implemented MOVES will serve as the replacement for MOBILE. Performer Principal Investigator: Margo Oge Organization: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

382

High-Value Fluorine Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compounds Baseline plans call for production of anhydrous or aqueous Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) from the DU hexafluoride conversion plant and subsequent recycle of these...

383

The Use of Positive Matrix Factorization with Conditional Probability Functions in Air Quality Studies: An Application to Hydrocarbon Emissions in Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study to identify groups of compounds (‘source categories’) associated with different processing facilities, a multivariate receptor model called Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to hourly average concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured at five Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) located near the Ship Channel in Houston, Texas. The observations were made between June and October, 2003, and limited to nighttime measurements (21:00 pm – 6:00 am) in order to remove the complexity of photochemical processing and associated changes in the concentrations of primary and secondary VOCs. Six to eight volatile organic compounds source categories were identified for the five Ship Channel sites. The dominant source categories were found to be those associated with petrochemical, chemical industries and fuel evaporation. In contrast, source categories associated with on-road vehicles were found to be relatively insignificant. Although evidence of biogenic emissions was found at almost all the sites, this broad category was significant only at the Wallisville site, which was also the site furthest away from the Ship Channels area and closest to the northeast forest of Texas. Natural gas, accumulation and fuel evaporation sources were found to contribute most to the ambient VOCs, followed by the petrochemical emission of highly reactive ethene and propylene. Solvent / paint industry and fuel evaporation and emission from refineries were next in importance while the on-road vehicle exhaust generally contributed less than 10% of the total ambient VOCs. Specific geographic areas associated with each source category were identified through the use of a Conditional Probability Function (CPF) analysis that related elevated concentrations of key VOCs in each category to a network of grids superimposed on the source inventories of the VOCs.

Xie, YuLong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

METHOD OF REDUCING PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing plutonium compounds in aqueous solution from a higher to a lower valence state. This reduction of valence is achieved by treating the aqueous solution of higher valence plutonium compounds with hydrogen in contact with an activated platinum catalyst.

Johns, I.B.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

386

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

387

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

388

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

389

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

390

Devices for collecting chemical compounds  

SciTech Connect

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

392

Mercury Emissions Data Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the visual materials included in presentations given at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on April 3, 2002. Participants included representatives from EPRI, DOE, RMB Consulting & Research, and EERC. The MACT Working Group gave a presentation on "Variability in Hg Emissions Based on SCEM Data." The visuals in the report are a set of graphs documenting results of mercury emissions over time, using semi-continuous emissions monitor (SCEM) data. The EPA Utility Working Group gave a ...

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies Program Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies Program Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Energy, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Sector Energy, Land Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS Program Start 2010 Program End 2014 Country Albania, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Republic of Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Peru, Philippines, Serbia, South Africa, Thailand, Ukraine, Vietnam, Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies Program[1]

394

General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations Country: Kenya, Thailand UN Region: Eastern Africa, Caribbean Coordinates: 13.7240216°, 100.5798602°

395

Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNDP Bratislava Regional Center Partner Interministerial committees headed by the national focal point on climate change Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://europeandcis.undp.org/e Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Kazakhstan, Moldova, Republic of Kosovo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

396

Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE): Case of Batangas City,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE): Case of Batangas City, Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE): Case of Batangas City, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE): Case of Batangas City, Philippines Agency/Company /Organization: International Resources Group (IRG), Clean Air Asia, Chreod Ltd. Partner: United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Ministry of Planning Sector: Land Focus Area: Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Case studies/examples

397

South Africa-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in South Africa-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Agency/Company /Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, European Commission, UN Habitat Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, People and Policy Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iclei.org/fileadmin Program Start 2012 Program End 2015 Country South Africa Southern Africa

398

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Stationary Combustion Guidance[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for stationary combustion is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

399

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

400

Proceedings of the 1998 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop [DEER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop was held July 6--9, 1998 in Castine, Maine. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on reduction of diesel engine emissions. Attention was focused on the following: agency/organization concerns on engine emissions; diesel engine issues and challenges; health risks from diesel engines emissions; fuels and lubrication technologies; non-thermal plasma and urea after-treatment technologies; and diesel engine technologies for emission reduction 1 and 2.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

SF6 Emissions Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emissions Overview Joanna Eckstein and Penny Avery Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned...

403

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

404

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

405

U.S. zero emission coal alliance techology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For coal to maintain its major role in supplying the world's energy, eventually all emissions to the atmosphere must be eliminated. Not only must conventional pollutants, like sulfur compounds and dust particles be kept out of the air, but also the far larger quantities of carbon dioxide that result from the combustion of carbon. We present a new technology for coal-based power that generates hydrogen from carbon and water, avoids emissions to the atmosphere, and disposes of the carbon dioxide as inert, solid mineral carbonates. Based on the available resources, coal power is sustainable for centuries. Our zero emission technology makes coal energy as clean as renewable energy.

Lackner, K. S. (Klaus S.); Ziock, H. J. (Hans-Joachim)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Simultaneous multiparticle emissions in hot nuclei evaporation process  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a new mechanism for the evaporation with simultaneous particles emission mechanism in the evaporation chain as new channels opened to high excitation energy regime of the compound nucleus. The probability of multiple simultaneous emissions is determined based on phase space approach. A Monte Carlo simulation is employed to compute the final average yield of emitted particles after the decay chain. The neutron, proton, alpha and fission yields are obtained and compared to the conventional calculation with sequential simple particles emission and the relevance of the different channels in competition is also analyzed.

Santos, B. M. [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade Federal Fluminense Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, 24210-346 Niteroi. RJ (Brazil); De Assis, L. P.; Duarte, S. B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - CBPF Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro. RJ (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMPOSITION AND TOXICITY OF ENGINE EMISSION SAMPLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differences in the lung toxicity and bacterial mutagenicity of seven samples from gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions were reported previously [1]. Filter and vapor-phase semivolatile organic samples were collected from normal and high-emitter gasoline and diesel vehicles operated on chassis dynamometers on the Unified Driving Cycle, and the compositions of the samples were measured in detail. The two fractions of each sample were combined in their original mass collection ratios, and the toxicity of the seven samples was compared by measuring inflammation and tissue damage in rat lungs and mutagenicity in bacteria. There was good agreement among the toxicity response variables in ranking the samples and demonstrating a five-fold range of toxicity. The relationship between chemical composition and toxicity was analyzed by a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLS, also known as projection to latent surfaces). The PCA /PLS analysis revealed the chemical constituents co-varying most strongly with toxicity and produced models predicting the relative toxicity of the samples with good accuracy. The results demonstrated the utility of the PCA/PLS approach, which is now being applied to additional samples, and it also provided a starting point for confirming the compounds that actually cause the effects.

(1)Mauderly, J; Seagrave, J; McDonald; J (2)Eide,I (3)Zielinska, B (4)Lawson, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for controlling NOx from lean engines are studied in great detail at FEERC. Lean NOx Traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are two catalyst technologies of interest. Catalysts are studied from the nanoscale to full scale. On the nanoscale, catalyst powders are analyzed with chemisorptions techniques to determine the active metal surface area where catalysis occurs. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is used to observe the chemical reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during catalyst operation. Both powder and coated catalyst samples are analyzed on bench flow reactors in controlled simulated exhaust environments to better characterize the chemical

409

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

410

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

415

Possible explosive compounds in the Savannah River Site waste tank farm facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will be revised upon completion of current testing investigating the radiolytic stability of additional energetic materials and the analysis of tank farm samples for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds.

Hobbs, D.T.

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines. Paper No. 27-1.diesel) engines. The gas turbine engine which is usedhave been measured in gas turbine exhausts. The effect of

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

ORGANICS CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF ALTERNATIVE REDUCTANT SIMULANTS, GLYCOLIC ACID, AND ANTIFOAM 747  

SciTech Connect

The present study examines the fate of glycolic acid and other organics added in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as part of the glycolic alternate flowsheet. Adoption of this flowsheet is expected to provide certain benefits in terms of a reduction in the processing time, a decrease in hydrogen generation, simplification of chemical storage and handling issues, and an improvement in the processing characteristics of the waste stream including an increase in the amount of nitrate allowed in the CPC process. Understanding the fate of organics in this flowsheet is imperative because tank farm waste processed in the CPC is eventually immobilized by vitrification; thus, the type and amount of organics present in the melter feed may affect optimal melt processing and the quality of the final glass product as well as alter flammability calculations on the DWPF melter off gas. To evaluate the fate of the organic compounds added as the part of the glycolic flowsheet, mainly glycolic acid and antifoam 747, samples of simulated waste that was processed using the DWPF CPC protocol for tank farm sludge feed were generated and analyzed for organic compounds using a variety of analytical techniques at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These techniques included Ion Chromatography (IC), Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy. A set of samples were also sent to the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for analysis by NMR Spectroscopy at the University of Maryland, College Park. Analytical methods developed and executed at SRNL collectively showed that glycolic acid was the most prevalent organic compound in the supernatants of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) products examined. Furthermore, the studies suggested that commercially available glycolic acid contained minor amounts of impurities such as formic and diglycolic acid that were then carried over in the SME products. Oxalic acid present in the simulated tank farm waste was also detected. Finally, numerous other compounds, at low concentrations, were observed present in etheric extracts of aqueous supernate solutions of the SME samples and are thought to be breakdown products of antifoam 747. The data collectively suggest that although addition of glycolic acid and antifoam 747 will introduce a number of impurities and breakdown products into the melter feed, the concentrations of these organics is expected to remain low and may not significantly impact REDOX or off-gas flammability predictions. In the SME products examined presently, which contained variant amounts of glycolic acid and antifoam 747, no unexpected organic degradation product was found at concentrations above 500 mg/kg, a reasonable threshold concentration for an organic compound to be taken into account in the REDOX modeling. This statement does not include oxalic or formic acid that were sometimes observed above 500 mg/kg and acetic acid that has an analytical detection limit of 1250 mg/kg due to high glycolate concentration in the SME products tested. Once a finalized REDOX equation has been developed and implemented, REDOX properties of known organic species will be determined and their impact assessed. Although no immediate concerns arose during the study in terms of a negative impact of organics present in SME products of the glycolic flowsheet, evidence of antifoam degradation suggest that an alternative antifoam to antifoam 747 is worth considering. The determination and implementation of an antifoam that is more hydrolysis resistant would have benefits such as increasing its effectiveness over time and reducing the generation of degradation products.

White, T.; Wiedenman, B.; Lambert, D.; Crump, S.; Fondeur, F.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: wbcarbonfinance.org/docs/REDD_Mosaic_Methodology.pdf Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Screenshot References: Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation[1] Overview "This methodology is for project activities that reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) from mosaic deforestation and, where relevant and

419

Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

420

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Agency/Company /Organization: Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.nwcouncil.org/energy/grac/20090130_Supply%20Curves_NWPCC_FINAL.pdf Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Screenshot References: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves[1] Background "The ECL supply curve model includes data on potential emission reductions for approximately 60 separate technology options. It allows the examination of multiple scenarios involving the inclusion or exclusion of technology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

422

Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1: Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1. Data set prepared by J.T. Randerson, G.R. van der Werf, L. Giglio, G.J. Collatz, and P.S. Kasibhatla. This data set provides monthly burned area, and monthly and annual fire emissions data from July 1996 to February 2012. Emissions data are available for carbon (C), dry matter (DM), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), particulate matter 2.5 micron (PM2p5), total particulate matter (TPM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) among others. The C4 fraction of

423

Preparing Low-emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preparing Low-emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies Preparing Low-emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) - Executive Summary Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Preparing Low-Emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) - Executive Summary Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.beta.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/ourwork/environmentandenergy/fo Cost: Free Language: English Preparing Low-Emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) - Executive Summary Screenshot References: Preparing Low-Emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) - Executive Summary[1] This report serves as the Executive Summary to a series of manuals and

424

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOBILE6 Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm Cost: Free References: http://www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Particulate Matter (PM), and toxics from cars, trucks, and motorcycles under various conditions. MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon

425

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Agency/Company /Organization: PEW Center Sector: Climate Focus Area: Transportation, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.pewclimate.org/DDCF-Briefs/Transportation Cost: Free References: Policies To Reduce Emissions From The Transportation Sector[1] Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Overview Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Outputs include: General Information

426

Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

427

Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Cambodia South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

428

CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Presentation, Training materials, Video, Webinar Website: en.openei.org/wiki/CLEAN References: CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps[1] Logo: CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps

429

Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh Southern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

430

Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia Jump to: navigation, search Name Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia Agency/Company /Organization European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics GHG inventory Resource Type Publications Website http://www.lahmeyer.de/fileadm Country Russia Eastern Europe References Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia[1] References ↑ "Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_of_the_Electricity_Carbon_Emission_Factors_for_Russia&oldid=383164" Category: Programs What links here Related changes Special pages

431

MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: www.epa.gov/otaq/models/moves/index.htm This emission modeling system estimates emissions from mobile sources, including cars, trucks, and motorcycles. The modeling tool covers a broad range of pollutants and allows multiple scale analysis. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions.

432

Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Nepal Southern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

433

Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+ framework.

434

Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Vietnam South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector

435

Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

436

Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Malaysia South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

437

Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Laos South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

438

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

SciTech Connect

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

Aza compounds as anion receptors  

SciTech Connect

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

A two-fold interpenetrating 3D metal-organic framework material constructed from helical chains linked via 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz fragments  

SciTech Connect

A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound {l_brace}[Ag(L){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (1) has been synthesized by self-assembly of 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz (L=4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz=3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole) and Ag{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} under hydrothermal conditions. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/acd with a=21.406(4) A, b=21.406(4) A, c=36.298(8) A, Z=32. X-ray single-crystal diffraction reveals that 1 has a three-dimensional framework with an unprecedented alternate left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net. Photoluminescent investigation reveals that the title compound displays interesting emissions in a wide region, which shows that the title compound may be a good potential candidate as a photoelectric material. - Graphical abstract: A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound [Ag(4,4'-bpz){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}] shows unprecedented alternating left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net.

Xie Yiming [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 35002 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, the Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Quanzhou, Fujian 362021 (China); Zhao Zhenguo; Wu Xiaoyuan; Zhang Qisheng; Chen Lijuan; Wang Fei; Chen Shanci [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 35002 (China); Lu Canzhong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 35002 (China)], E-mail: czlu@fjirsm.ac.cn

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Characterizing toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant demonstrating the AFGD ICCT Project and a plant utilizing a dry scrubber/baghouse system: Bailly Station Units 7 and 8 and AFGD ICCT Project. Final report. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of assessment of the risk of emissions of hazardous air pollutants at one of the electric power stations, Bailly Station, which is also the site of a Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating the Pure Air Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization process (wet limestone). This station represents the configuration of no NO{sub x} reduction, particulate control with electrostatic precipitators, and SO{sub 2} control with a wet scrubber. The test was conducted September 3--6, 1993. Sixteen trace metals were determined along with 5 major metals. Other inorganic substances and organic compounds were also determined.

Dismukes, E.B.

1994-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08(96) 08(96) Distribution Category UC-950 Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting October 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. For More Information Individuals or members of organizations wishing to report reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases under the auspices of the Voluntary Reporting Program can contact the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Energy Information Administration U.S. Department

446

Businaro-Gallone transition as observed in complete charge distributions from compound nucleus decay  

SciTech Connect

The compound nucleus emission of fragments covering the entire mass range has been observed in reactions exploiting both ordinary and reverse kinematics. The compound nucleus mechanism has been inferred from full momentum transfer, angular independence of the fragment center of mass kinetic energies and excitation functions. The drastic change in the observed charge distributions as one crosses A approx. = 100 illustrates the effect of the Businaro-Gallone point.

Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

CO2 Emissions - New Zealand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania New Zealand Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Zealand Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Zealand image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Zealand...

448

CO2 Emissions - Hong Kong  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Hong Kong CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hong Kong...

449

CO2 Emissions - Wake Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Wake Island Graphics CO2 Emissions from Wake Island Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Wake Island image Per capita CO2...

450

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

451

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Organizations and Networks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Registered Technical and Research Organizations Networks Climate Eval "The website promotes active debate on areas relevant to evaluation of climate change and development evaluation by bringing relevant topics to a peer to peer discussion forum." Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) CLEAN aims to improve communication and coordination by bringing together national and international organizations that are assisting developing countries with preparation and implementation of low greenhouse gas emission plans and strategies. This includes support for technology needs assessments, for low carbon and clean energy development plans, and for technology roadmaps and deployment programs. Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21)

453

Emissions from small-scale energy production using co-combustion of biofuel and the dry fraction of household waste  

SciTech Connect

In sparsely populated rural areas, recycling of household waste might not always be the most environmentally advantageous solution due to the total amount of transport involved. In this study, an alternative approach to recycling has been tested using efficient small-scale biofuel boilers for co-combustion of biofuel and high-energy waste. The dry combustible fraction of source-sorted household waste was mixed with the energy crop reed canary-grass (Phalaris Arundinacea L.), and combusted in both a 5-kW pilot scale reactor and a biofuel boiler with 140-180 kW output capacity, in the form of pellets and briquettes, respectively. The chlorine content of the waste fraction was 0.2%, most of which originated from plastics. The HCl emissions exceeded levels stipulated in new EU-directives, but levels of equal magnitude were also generated from combustion of the pure biofuel. Addition of waste to the biofuel did not give any apparent increase in emissions of organic compounds. Dioxin levels were close to stipulated limits. With further refinement of combustion equipment, small-scale co-combustion systems have the potential to comply with emission regulations.

Hedman, Bjoern [Chemistry Department, Environmental Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden)]. E-mail: bjorn.hedman@chem.umu.se; Burvall, Jan [Unit for Biomass Technology and Chemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 4097, SE-904 03 Umeaa (Sweden); Nilsson, Calle [NBC Defence, NBC Analysis, The Swedish Defence Research Agency, SE-901 82 Umeaa (Sweden); Marklund, Stellan [Chemistry Department, Environmental Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4'-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidene) phenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl) 4'-[(4'-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it.

Stupp, Samuel I. (Champaign, IL); Son, Sehwan (Savoy, IL); Lin, Hong-Cheu (Taipei, TW)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

456

Syntheses and studies of organosilicon compounds  

SciTech Connect

The syntheses of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as silicon carbide ceramic precursors have been active research areas in the Barton Research Group. In this thesis, the work is focused on the preparation of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as stoichiometric silicon carbide precursor polymers. The syntheses of the precursor polymers are discussed and the conversions of these precursors to silicon carbide via pyrolysis are reported. The XRD pattern and elemental analyses of the resulting silicon carbide ceramics are presented. Silicon monoxide is an important intermediate in the production of silicon metal. The existence of silicon monoxide in gap phase has been widely accepted. In the second part of this thesis, the generation of gaseous silicon monoxide in four different reactors and the reactions of gaseous silicon monoxide towards organic compounds are discussed.

Xie, R.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

457

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

458

Method for purifying bidentate organophosphorus compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bidentate organophosphorus compounds useful for extracting actinide elements from acidic nuclear waste solutions are purified of undesirable acidic impurities by contacting the compounds with ethylene glycol which preferentially extracts the impurities found in technical grade bidentate compounds.

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic compound emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles Graphics CO2 Emissions from Netherland Antilles Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherland...

462

CO2 Emissions - Ryukyu Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Ryukyu Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands image...

463

CO2 Emissions - Leeward Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Leeward Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands image...

464

carbon emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity carbon emissions energy demand Energy Generation fossil fuels GHG emissions UK Data applicationvnd.openxmlformats-office...

465

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Advanced NOx Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Advanced NOx Emissions Control Adv....

466

Engines - Emissions Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are attractive options for increasing vehicle fuel economy and reducing emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases. Two automobile manufacturers have already introduced HEVs, and other manufacturers are planning to introduce their own models. One available HEV combines mass reduction (also applicable to conventional vehicles) with idle-stop, regenerative braking, and electric-drive assist to achieve a fuel economy more than 2.5 times the current Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard. The second HEV combines idle-stop, regenerative braking, electric assist acceleration, and continuously variable transmission (CVT) to achieve a fuel economy of more than twice the current CAFÉ standard, qualifying as a super ultra-low emissions vehicle (SULEV).

467

Pulsar Emission Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission spectrum is calculated for a weak axisymmetric pulsar. Also calculated are the observed spectrum, efficiency, and the observed efficiency. The underlying flow of electrons and positrons turns out to be curiously intricate.

Gruzinov, Andrei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

China Energy and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2 nd Edition) David Fridley, Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou, Jing Ke, Ali Hasanbeigi, Bill Morrow, and Lynn Price China Energy Group, Energy...

469

Control of emissions from cofiring of coal and RDF. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research has been conducted toward developing technology for co-firing of coal with municipal solid waste (MSW) in order to reduce emissions of chlorinated organic compounds, particularly polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDDs and PCDFs). Previous bench-