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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission to the atmosphere is of great concern to semiconductor manufacturing industries, research laboratories, the public, and regulatory agencies. Some industries are seeking ways to reduce emissions by reducing VOCs at the point of use (or generation). This paper discusses the requirements, design, calibration, and use of a sampling inlet/quadrupole mass spectrometer system for monitoring VOCs in a semiconductor manufacturing production line. The system uses chemical ionization to monitor compounds typically found in the lithography processes used to manufacture semiconductor devices (e.g., acetone, photoresist). The system was designed to be transportable from tool to tool in the production line and to give the operator real-time feedback so the process(es) can be adjusted to minimize VOC emissions. Detection limits ranging from the high ppb range for acetone to the low ppm range fore other lithography chemicals were achieved using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy at a data acquisition rate of approximately 1 mass spectral scan (30 to 200 daltons) per second. A demonstration of exhaust VOC monitoring was performed at a working semiconductor fabrication facility during actual wafer processing.

Thornberg, S.M.; Mowry, C.D.; Keenan, M.R.; Bender, S.F.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gas Analysis Lab.; Owen, T. [Intel Corp., Rio Rancho, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Naming chemical compounds: Calculator drill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

36. Bits and pieces, 13. A calculator can be programmed to drill students on chemical compound naming rules.

David Holdsworth; Evelyn Lacanienta

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process that includes electron transport and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process would cause severe problems if special mechanisms did not protect the photosynthetic system from energy or photon units. Irradiance is the amount of energy that falls on a flat sensor of known area per

Ehleringer, Jim

6

Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Organic chemical contaminants in Biosolids Sally Brown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the general classification "dioxins." Dioxins are one of the well known dangerous organic chemicals. Dioxins had commercial uses, primarily in the pulp and paper industry, but have been outlawed due. There are many types of dioxins. "Dioxin" is actually a general term for a large number of compounds that contain

Brown, Sally

11

Volatile Organic Compounds — Emissions from Biomass Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from biomass combustion have been investigated. VOC contribute both to ... 0.5–10 MW. A variety of biomass fuel types and combustion equipment was covered. The su...

Lennart Gustavsson; Mats-Lennart Karlsson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A knowledge base of the chemical compounds of intermediary metabolism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Press August 1992 other ORIGINAL PAPERS A knowledge base of the chemical compounds of intermediary...paper describes a publicly available knowledge base of the chemical compounds involved...consider the motivations for constructing a knowledge base of metabolic compounds, the methodology......

Peter D. Karp

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology Technology...

26

Supercritical CO2 extraction of organic compounds from soil-water slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPERCRITICAL COi EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering SUPERCRITICAL COz FXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Carter, Brian Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Title Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6257E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords indoor air quality, Passive Sampling, Uptake Rates, vocs Abstract Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick's Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

29

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater, Surface, Ground.W., Meyer, M.T., and Zaugg, S.D., 2004, Presence and distri- bution of organic wastewater compounds in wastewater, surface, ground, and drinking waters, Minnesota, 2000-02: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific

30

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

32

Sorption to soil of hydrophobic and ionic organic compounds: measurement and modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The sorption of organic compounds to soil, sediments and dissolved organic matter affects the fate of organic compounds. Given the central role of this process… (more)

Laak, Thomas Laurens ter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

34

Chemical degradation of fluorosulfonamide fuel cell membrane polymer model compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane, along with high proton conductivity and mechanical performance is critical to the success of these energy conversion devices. Extending our work in perfluorinated membrane stability, aromatic trifluoromethyl sulfonamide model compounds were prepared, and their oxidative degradation was examined. The chemical structures for the models were based on mono-, di- and tri-perfluorinated sulfonamide modified phenyl rings. Durability of the model compounds was evaluated by exposure to hydroxyl radicals generated using Fenton reagent and UV irradiation of hydrogen peroxide. LC–MS results for the mono-substituted model compound indicate greater stability to radical oxidation than the di-substituted species; loss of perfluorinated fonamide side chains appears to be an important pathway, along with dimerization and aromatic ring hydroxylation. The tri-substituted model compound also shows loss of side chains, with the mono-substituted compound being a major oxidation product, along with a limited amount of hydroxylation and dimerization of the starting material.

Jamela M. Alsheheri; Hossein Ghassemi; David A. Schiraldi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Diversity of the Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by 55 Species of Tropical Trees: a Survey in French Guiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in French Guiana Elodie A. Courtois & C. E. Timothy Paine & Pierre-Alain Blandinieres & Didier Stien & Jean, LLC 2009 Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are pro- duced by a broad range of organisms, from tropical tree species in a lowland rainforest of French Guiana. We discovered a remarkably high chemical

Chave, Jérôme

36

Performance specifications for technology development: Application for characterization of volatile organic compounds in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information about technology development for the monitoring and remediation of environmental pollution caused by the release of volatile organic compounds. Topics discussed include: performance specification processes, gas chromatography, mass spectrometer, fiber-optic chemical sensors, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, piezoelectric sensors and electrochemical sensors. These methods are analyzed for their cost efficiency, accuracy, and the ability to meet the needs of the customer.

Carpenter, S.E.; Doskey, P.V.; Erickson, M.D.; Lindahl, P.C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Volatile Organic Compound Investigation Results, 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were discovered while drilling in the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site’s 300 Area during 2006. The discovery involved an interval of relatively finer-grained sediment within the unconfined aquifer, an interval that is not sampled by routine groundwater monitoring. Although VOC contamination in the unconfined aquifer has been identified and monitored, the concentrations of newly discovered contamination are much higher than encountered previously, with some new results significantly higher than the drinking water standards. The primary contaminant is trichloroethene, with lesser amounts of tetrachloroethene. Both chemicals were used extensively as degreasing agents during the fuels fabrication process. A biological degradation product of these chemicals, 1,2-dichloroethene, was also detected. To further define the nature and extent of this contamination, additional characterization drilling was undertaken during 2007. Four locations were drilled to supplement the information obtained at four locations drilled during the earlier investigation in 2006. The results of the combined drilling indicate that the newly discovered contamination is limited to a relatively finer-grained interval of Ringold Formation sediment within the unconfined aquifer. The extent of this contamination appears to be the area immediately east and south of the former South Process Pond. Samples collected from the finer-grained sediment at locations along the shoreline confirm the presence of the contamination near the groundwater/river interface. Contamination was not detected in river water that flows over the area where the river channel potentially incises the finer-grained interval of aquifer sediment. The source for this contamination is not readily apparent. A search of historical documents and the Hanford Waste Information Data System did not provide definitive clues as to waste disposal operations and/or spills that might have resulted in groundwater contamination in this sediment, although several relatively small accidental releases of VOCs have occurred in the past in the northern portion of the 300 Area. It is likely that large quantities of degreasing solutions were disposed to the North and South Process Ponds during the 1950s and 1960s, and that evidence for them in the upper portion of the unconfined aquifer has been removed because of groundwater movement through the much more transmissive sediment. Also, investigations to date have revealed no evidence to suggest that a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid remains undetected in the subsurface. Potential pathways for contamination to migrate from this finer-grained sediment include groundwater movement through the interval to offshore locations in the Columbia River channel, dispersion out of the finer-grained interval into the overlying transmissive sediment (again, with transport to the riverbed), and potential future withdrawal via water supply wells.

Peterson, Robert E.; Williams, Bruce A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

Treatment of biorefractory organic compounds in wool scour effluent by hydroxyl radical oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wool scouring effluent that had been treated with chemical flocculation and aerobic biological treatment (Sirolan CFB effluent) was tertiary treated by hydroxyl radical oxidation to remove residual organic compounds. These compounds impart a high chemical oxygen demand of 500–3000 mg/L and dark colour. However, a H2O2/UV process was found to effectively treat the majority of residual compounds, with up to 75% COD, 85% total organic carbon, and 100% removal of colour (T480 nm) achieved. This was despite the effluent being strongly absorbing in the UV region, with a film thickness of 0.21 mm reducing T254 nm by 50%. Treatment was unaffected by pH over the range 3–9. H2O2/UV treatment increased the biodegradability of the effluent (5-day biochemical oxygen demand increased from wool scour effluent of approximately 97.5%. This degree of treatment is sufficient for discharge in many, but not all, circumstances.

Andrew J Poole

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethyleneMS, gas chromatographyemass spectrometry; HDPE, high density polyethylene; HULYs, human blood lymphocytes

Short, Daniel

45

Solar-Powered Electrochemical Oxidation of Organic Compounds Coupled with the Cathodic Production of Molecular Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar-Powered Electrochemical Oxidation of Organic Compounds Coupled with the Cathodic Production of Molecular Hydrogen ... The volume percent of the headspace was calculated assuming that it was directly proportional to the ion current measured by the mass spectrometer and that the transfer of all gases through the membrane and their 70 eV electron ionization cross-sections were approximately equivalent. ... In addition, even if hydrogen is mixed with carbon dioxide, CO2 can be readily removed just by chemical absorption process (e.g., flowing carbon dioxide gas through amine solution), which is a typical CO2 separation process in gas turbine power plants. ...

Hyunwoong Park; Chad D. Vecitis; Michael R. Hoffmann

2008-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

Neutral-ionic transitions in organic mixed-stack compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Torrance et al. have made the interesting observation that several mixed-stack organic compounds undergo transitions from neutral states to ionic states as the temperature or pressure is varied. We examine a simple model of such transitions including Coulomb interaction and hybridization of neutral and ionic states. In the limit of weak hybridization and long-range repulsive interaction between ionic planes, it is proven that there is a complete devil's staircase where the degree of ionicity assumes an infinity of rational values. For attractive interactions between ionic planes, the neutral-ionic transition is shown to be first order for weak hybridization. Comparison with experiment indicates that this situation applies to tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) chloranil. For strong hybridization the transition is continuous but goes through a metallic phase. It is shown, for the first time, that the spectrum of the charge-transfer Hamiltonian contains both a bound spectrum, the observed charge-transfer excitations, and a continuum.

Bruinsma, R.; Bak, P.; Torrance, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic chemical compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... in burn pits include, but...

49

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Michael G. Apte Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 43 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5626-5632 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THUVOC and aldehyde emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehydeconcentrations ranged from 378 µg m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 µg m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 µg m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 µg m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and materialspecific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was theonly one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 µg m-2 h-1 in the morning and 257 to 347 µg m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 µg m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 µg/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 µg/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (materialsurface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde

50

New Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U S  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil Volatile Organic Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y N a t i o n a l E n e r g y T e c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y Successes AdvAnced ReseARch To support coal and power systems development, NETL's Advanced Research Program conducts a range of pre-competitive research focused on breakthroughs in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, computational energy science, and bioprocessing-opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality. NETL also sponsors cooperative educational initiatives in University Coal Research, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Other Minority Institutions. Accomplishments P Process improvement P Cost reduction P Greater efficiency

51

Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of...6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl...

Keunhee Park; Seungsik Oh; Donggeun Jung; Heeyeop Chae…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extracellular organic compounds...directly to the cells with a graphite...dioxide to organic compounds...microbial production of multicarbon...to convert solar energy that...hydrogen production was verified...outlet, but a solar-powered...a) H-cell device for...errors of the organic acid and...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

Michaels, E.D.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic organic compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

57

Hygroscopicity of Water-Soluble Organic Compounds in Atmospheric Aerosols:? Amino Acids and Biomass Burning Derived Organic Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the hygroscopic measurement, the chemicals were first dissolved in ultrapure water to make stock solutions that were used to generate particles by a piezoelectric droplet generator (Uni-Photon Inc., NY., USA, Model 201). ... Together with the measurements of the hygroscopicity of glucose, glycerol, humic-like substances, and arginine, which have been detected in biomass burning aerosols and found noncrystallizing in single particle measurements (8,9,16,20,28,41), these results suggest that organic species derived from biomass burning may retain water at low RH in the atmosphere. ... (6)?Zhang, Q.; Anastasio, C. Free and combined amino compounds in atmospheric fine particles (PM2.5) and fog waters from Northern California. ...

Man Nin Chan; Man Yee Choi; Nga Lee Ng; Chak K. Chan

2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

Volatile organic compound monitoring by photo acoustic radiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods for sampling and analyzing volatile organics in subsurface pore gas were developed for use at the Hazardous Waste Disposal Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One is Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TDGCMS), the other is Photoacoustic Radiometry (PAR). Presented here are two years worth of experience and lessons learned as both techniques matured. The sampling technique is equally as important as the analysis method. PAR is a nondispersive infrared technique utilizing band pass filters in the region from 1 to 15 {mu}m. A commercial instrument, the Model 1302 Multigas Analyzer, made by Bruel and Kjaer, was adapted for field use. To use the PAR there must be some a priori knowledge of the constellation of analytes to be measured. The TDGCMS method is sensitive to 50 analytes. Hence TDGCMS is used in an initial survey of the site to determine what compounds are present and at what concentration. Once the major constituents of the soil-gas vapor plume are known the PAR can be configured to monitor for the five analytes of most interest. The PAR can analyse a sample in minutes, while in the field. The PAR is also quite precise in controlled situations.

Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Surface Tension for Pure Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Surface Tension for Pure Organic Compounds ... This study investigates the applicability of artificial neural networks as an efficient tool for the prediction of pure organic compounds’ surface tensions for a wide range of temperatures. ... The most accurate network among several constructed configurations has one hidden layer with 20 neurons. ...

Aliakbar Roosta; Payam Setoodeh; Abdolhossein Jahanmiri

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Opportunities for reducing volatile organic compound emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions: a feasibility analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A feasibility analysis is reported of reduction opportunities for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions. The pollution prevention (P2) methodology as defined by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment ... Keywords: emissions, manufacturing, office furniture, pollution prevention, volatile organic compound

Frank S. Luisser; Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Title Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3979e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ortiz, Anna C., Marion L. Russell, Wen-Yee Lee, Michael G. Apte, and Randy L. Maddalena Pagination 29 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 μg/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to >500 μg/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~ 15 μg/m2/h while the new wood material emitted > 100 μg/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs

63

Investigations of release phenomenon of volatile organic compounds and particulates from residual storage chip piles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the method for estimating Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from wood handling and storage operations at a pulp mill. Fugitive particulate matter emissions from wood handling and storage operations are due to material load/dropout operations, wind erosion from storage piles and vehicular traffic on paved roads. The particulate matter emissions are a function of a number of variables like windspeed, surface moisture content, material silt content, and number of days of precipitation. Literature review attributes VOC emissions to biological, microbiological, chemical, and physical processes occurring in wood material storage pile. The VOC emissions are from the surface of these piles and the VOC released during retrieval of chips from the pile. VOC emissions are based on the chip throughput, number of turnovers, moisture content and surface area of the pile. The emission factors with the requisite calculation methodology to be utilized for quantifying VOC emissions from chip piles has been discussed in this paper.

Mohan, S.; Nagarkatti, M. [Trinity Consultants, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

1. PRECONCENTRATION, THERMAL DESORPTION & ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: peltier, liq. N?.. Heated transfer line 2) Desorption & transfer by fastheatlng Cooled & heated trap jas trap. The trap is then quickly heated, under a low flow of hélium, to desorb and inject thé compounds. This highly concentrated plug of sample is transferred via a heated transfer line, to a capillary

Boyer, Edmond

65

Mechanisms for formation of organic and inorganic by-products and their control in nonthermal plasma chemical processing of VOCs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the major by-products derived from Nonthermal Plasma (NTP) chemical processing of different types of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), mechanisms for their formation, effects of reactor types and additives such as water and gaseous oxygen on by-product distribution, and safe operations of NTP reactors for the removal of VOCs.

Shigeru Futamura; Masami Sugasawa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: A review of current understanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: (1) polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides; (2) carbamate and organophosphorus; (3) herbicides; (4) phenols; (5) halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (6) phthalate esters; (7) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and (8) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Process that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate process are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the US are discussed. 699 refs., 26 figs., 47 tabs.

Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, P.J.; Fusillo, T.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Growth Yields of Bacteria on Selected Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...calculate heats of combustion of an exceedingly...carbohydrates, and hydrocarbons, wehave calculated...9, 10), heats of combustion per available...microbial cells on hydrocarbons. Science...S. 1929. Heats of combustion of organic...

W. R. Mayberry; G. J. Prochazka; W. J. Payne

1967-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. Sublimation, Vaporization and Fusion Enthalpies From  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. Sublimation, Vaporization and Fusion Enthalpies From 1880 to 2010 William Acree, Jr. Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 James S. Chickosa... Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Chickos, James S.

70

Electrospun Polyurethane Fibers for Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrospun polyurethane fibers for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air with rapid VOC absorption and desorption have been developed. Polyurethanes based on 4,4-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) (MDI) and ...

Scholten, Elke

71

Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

Hudson, Rondall James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

Fortner, E. C.

73

Control of spider mites on cotton by organic sulphur compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of two species of spider mites using 8 gallons of spray per acre. . 57 10. Results of laboratory ovicidal tests for control of two species of spider mites using 100 gallons of spray per acre.................................................. 59 11...-volurae sprays in the control of cotton pests has presented the problem of getting enough effective sulphur into these sprays to control the spider mites# A series of tests was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of various sulphur compounds in low...

King, Charles Edward

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Progress in Understanding Low-Temperature Organic Compound Oxidation Using a Jet-Stirred Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Progress in Understanding Low-Temperature Organic Compound Oxidation Using a Jet-Stirred Reactor Lorraine, CNRS, ENSIC, BP 20451, 1 rue Grandville, 54000 Nancy, France Abstract The jet-stirred reactor compounds that can be found in fuels and biofuels. Such an improvement in understanding requires

75

Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds Ethylbenzene Carbon tetrachloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Ethylbenzene Ethylbenzene is a colorless, flammable liquid found in natural products such as coal tar and petroleum. It is also found in manufactured products such as inks, insecticides, and paints. Ethylbenzene in the air. In surface water, ethylbenzene breaks down by reacting with other chemicals found naturally

76

APPLICATION OF STIR BAR SORPTIVE EXTRACTION TO ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IN SOLIDS AND AQUEOUS SAMPLES FROM THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stir bar sorptive extraction was applied to aqueous and solid samples for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds from the Hanford chemicals of potential concern list, as identified in the vapor data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory analyzed these compounds from vapor samples on thermal desorption tubes as part of the Hanford Site industrial hygiene vapor sampling effort.

FRYE JM; KUNKEL JM

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

What are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

back into space. However, greenhouse gases will not let all the infrared light pass throughWhat are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as greenhouse gases the land and oceans. The warmed Earth releases this heat in the form of infrared light (longwave radiation

79

A Tree's Response to Herbivory: Quantification of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Tree's Response to Herbivory: Quantification of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions an abundant source of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). These emissions are known to vary in quantity and composition due to both biogenic and anthropogenic stressors. In this study, BVOC emissions from bristlecone

Collins, Gary S.

80

Developing carbon-based "organic" compounds for microelectronic applications is a promising, rapidly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Performance and production solutions to electronics, displays, solar cells, white lighting and room lightingDeveloping carbon-based "organic" compounds for microelectronic applications is a promising inorganic materials such as silicon and copper, organic microelectronics are flexible, lighter weight, less

Hayden, Nancy J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...powered by solar energy is...converted to organic compounds...strategies for the production of fuels...harvesting solar energy...electrodes to cells, has received...microbial fuel cells. Bioresour...microbial production platform...challenges in solar energy utilization...conversion of organic matter to...

Kelly P. Nevin; Sarah A. Hensley; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Jianhong Ou; Trevor L. Woodard; Oona L. Snoeyenbos-West; Derek R. Lovley

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

82

REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM WASTEWATER BY SURFACTANT SEPARATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research presents a novel hybrid process for removing organic chemicals from contaminated water. The process uses surfactant to carry out two unit operations (1) Extraction; (2) Foam flotation. In the first step, surfactant is used to extract most of the amounts of organic contaminants in the stream. In the second step, foam flotation is used to further reduce organic contaminants and recover surfactant from the stream. The process combines the advantages of extraction and foam flotation, which allows the process not only to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, but also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in the stream and reduce it to a very low level. Surfactant regeneration can be done by conventional methods. This process is simple and low cost. The wastes are recoverable. The objective of this research is to develop an environmentally innocuous process for the wastewater or reclaimed water treatment with the ability to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in contaminated water and reduce it to a very low level, finally, provides simpler, less energy cost and economically-practical process design. Another purpose is to promote the environmental concern in minority students and encourage minority students to become more involved in environmental engineering research.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development of a Fundamental Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structure in Spinel Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos national Laboratory (LANL). Hundreds of ceramic compounds possess the spinel crystal structure and exhibit a remarkable variety of properties, ranging from compounds that are electrical insulators to compounds that are superconducting, or from compounds with ferri- and antiferromagnetic behavior to materials with colossal magnetoresistive characteristics. The unique crystal structure of spinel compounds is in many ways responsible for the widely varying physical properties of spinels. The objective of this project is to investigate the nature of chemical bonding, point defects, and electronic structure in compounds with the spinel crystal structure. Our goal is to understand and predict the stability of the spinel structure as a function of chemical composition, stoichiometry, and cation disorder. The consequences of cation disorder in spinel materials can be profound . The ferromagnetic characteristics of magnesioferrite, for instance, are entirely attributable to disorder on the cation sublattices. Our studies provide insight into the mechanisms of point defect formation and cation disorder and their effects on the electronic band structure and crystal structure of spinel-structure materials. our ultimate objective is to develop a more substantive knowledge of the spinel crystal structure and to promote new and novel uses for spinel compounds. The technical approach to achieve our goals is to combine first-principles calculations with experimental measurements. The structural and electronic properties of spinel samples were experimentally determined primarily with X-ray and neutron scattering, optical and X-ray absorption, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Total energy electronic structure calculations were performed to determine structural stability, band structure, density of states, and electron distribution. We also used shell-model total -energy calculations to assess point-defect formation and migration energies in magnesio-aluminate spinel.

Sickafus, K.E.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.-P.; Terry, J.H., Jr.; Hartmann, T.; Sheldon, R.I.

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M. [Yuan Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS – FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urea Formaldehyde Foam Insulation (UFFI), Consumer Productdiisobutyrate Urea Formaldehyde Foam Insulation orexpandable foam insulation Volatile Organic Chemical TMPD-

Maddalena, Randy L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Stripping of organic compounds from wastewater as an auxiliary fuel of regenerative thermal oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic solvents with different volatilities are widely used in various processes and generate air and water pollution problems. In the cleaning processes of electronics industries, most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are vented to air pollution control devices while most non-volatile organic solvents dissolve in the cleaning water and become the major sources of COD in wastewater. Discharging a high-COD wastewater stream to wastewater treatment facility often disturbs the treatment performance. A pretreatment of the high-COD wastewater is therefore highly desirable. This study used a packed-bed stripping tower in combination with a regenerative thermal oxidizer to remove the COD in the wastewater from a printed circuit board manufacturing process and to utilize the stripped organic compounds as the auxiliary fuel of the RTO. The experimental results showed that up to 45% of the COD could be removed and 66% of the RTO fuel could be saved by the combined treatment system.

Meng-Wen Chang; Jia-Ming Chern

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

Volatile organic chemical emissions from carpets. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research, was to measure the emission rates of selected individual VOC, including low molecular-weight aldehydes, released by samples of four new carpets that are typical of the major types of carpets used in residences, schools and offices. The carpet samples were collected directly from the manufacturers` mills and packaged to preserve their chemical integrity. The measurements of the concentrations and emission rates of these compounds were made under simulated indoor conditions in a 20-M{sup 3} environmental chamber designed specifically for investigations of VOC. The measurements were conducted over a period of one week following the installation of the carpet samples in the chamber. Duplicate experiments were conducted for one carpet. In addition, the concentrations and emission rates of VOC resulting from the installation of a new carpet in a residence were measured over a period of seven weeks. The stabilities of the week-long ventilation rates and temperatures were one percent relative standard deviation. The four carpets emitted a variety of VOC, 40 of which were positively identified. Eight of these were considered to be dominant. They were (in order of chromatographic retention time) formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane), 1,2-propanediol (propylene glycol), styrene, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), and 2,6 di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). With the exception of formaldehyde, only limited data are available on the toxicity and irritancy of these compounds at low concentrations. Therefore, it is difficult to determine at this time the potential magnitude of the health and comfort effects that may occur among the population from exposures to emissions from new carpets. The concentrations and emission rates of most compounds decreased rapidly over the first 12 h of the experiments.

Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Determination of Migration Parameters for Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Terephthalate and Nylon 6 by Dynamic Permeation Cell Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Migration Parameters for Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Terephthalate, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP); however

Heller, Barbara

91

Enthalpies of Sublimation of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. James S. Chickosa...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enthalpies of Sublimation of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. 1910­2001 James S. Chickosa... Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri 63121 William E. Acree, Jr.b... Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 Received 22 October 2001; accepted 11

Chickos, James S.

92

Intake of Toxic and Carcinogenic Volatile Organic Compounds from Secondhand Smoke in Motor Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BR.Measurement of emissions from air pollution sources. 5. C1-C32 organic compounds...Ott W , Klepeis N, Switzer P.Air change rates of motor vehicles and...experimental investigation of tobacco smoke pollution in cars.Nicotine Tob Res 2009...

Gideon St.Helen; Peyton Jacob III; Margaret Peng; Delia A. Dempsey; S. Katharine Hammond; and Neal L. Benowitz

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Rejection and fate of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) during membrane distillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rejection and fate of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) during membrane distillation Kaushalya COCs) Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) Volatility Fate and transport Hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity a b s t r a c t In this study, we examined the feasibility of membrane distillation (MD) for removing

94

A Critical Review on Studies of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Sorption by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Critical Review on Studies of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Sorption by Building Materials (RP the pros and cons of existing sorption models, as well as experimental methods. In addition, it summarizes existing sorption data in order to understand the phenomenon of VOC sorption on building materials better

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

95

ARTIFACT FORMATION IN HIGH VOLUME SAMPLING OF VOC's AND SOLID ORGANIC COMPOUNDS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when sampling polluted air. Purified air containing 180 ppbv ozone seems to destroy PAH according Atmospheriques, Boite 7059, UNIVERSITE PARIS 7, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 PARIS Cedex 05 ABSTRACT Pollutants from well äs solid (SOC's) organic compounds. High volume samplers are commonly used m air quality

Boyer, Edmond

96

In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...abundance, as compared to an ambient run (i.e., gas-phase and particle-phase...carbon number. Because n-alkanes are straight chained, and have very low polarity, they do not enter the particle...Diurnal and seasonal variability of gasoline-related volatile organic compound emissions...

Brent J. Williams; Allen H. Goldstein; Nathan M. Kreisberg; Susanne V. Hering

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Use of sonication for in-well softening of semivolatile organic compounds. 1997 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'This project investigates the in-situ degradation of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using in-well sonication, in-well vapor stripping, and bioremediation. Pretreating groundwaters with sonication techniques in-situ would form VOCs that can be effectively removed by in-well vapor stripping and bioremediation. The mechanistic studies focus on the coupling of megasonics and ultrasonics to soften (i.e., partially degrade) the SVOCs; oxidative reaction mechanism studies; surface corrosion studies (on the reactor walls/well); enhancement due to addition of oxidants, quantification of the hydroxyl radical formation; identification/quantification of degradation products; volatility/degradability of the treated waters; development of a computer simulation model to describe combined in-well sonication/in-well vapor stripping/bioremediation; systems analysis/economic analysis; large laboratory-scale experiment verification; and field demonstration of the integrated technology. Benefits of this approach include: (1) Remediation is performed in-situ; (2) The treatment systems complement each other; their combination can drastically reduce or remove SVOCs and VOCs; (3) Ability to convert hard-to-degrade organics into more volatile organic compounds; (4) Ability to remove residual VOCs and softened SVOCs through the combined action of in-well vapor stripping and biodegradation; (5) Does not require handling or disposing of water at the ground surface; and (6) Cost-effective and improved efficiency, resulting in shortened clean-up times to remediate a site.'

Peters, R.W.; Manning, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Hoffman, M.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (US); Gorelick, S. [Stanford Univ., CA (US)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Classification of Compounds with Distinct or Overlapping Multi-Target Activities and Diverse Molecular Mechanisms Using Emerging Chemical Patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classification of Compounds with Distinct or Overlapping Multi-Target Activities and Diverse Molecular Mechanisms Using Emerging Chemical Patterns ... Basic input data for building an ECP classifier consist of descriptor values of learning set compounds. ... posterior segregation family member (pos-1) ...

Vigneshwaran Namasivayam; Ye Hu; Jenny Balfer; Jürgen Bajorath

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

100

Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Northeastern Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Northeastern Colorado ... Only 4% of all samples at BAO had high ROH+VOCO&NG and were from the western sector where the nearest wells are located indicating that they were not the dominant O&NG source at BAO. ... parameters were measured concurrently at a site on the western perimeter of Boulder, Colorado, during Feb., 1991. ...

J. B. Gilman; B. M. Lerner; W. C. Kuster; J. A. de Gouw

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Stress-induced chemical detection using flexible metal-organic frameworks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we demonstrate the concept of stress-induced chemical detection using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by integrating a thin film of the MOF HKUST-1 with a microcantilever surface. The results show that the energy of molecular adsorption, which causes slight distortions in the MOF crystal structure, can be efficiently converted to mechanical energy to create a highly responsive, reversible, and selective sensor. This sensor responds to water, methanol, and ethanol vapors, but yields no response to either N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}. The magnitude of the signal, which is measured by a built-in piezoresistor, is correlated with the concentration and can be fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, we show that the hydration state of the MOF layer can be used to impart selectivity to CO{sub 2}. We also report the first use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure of a MOF film. We conclude that the synthetic versatility of these nanoporous materials holds great promise for creating recognition chemistries to enable selective detection of a wide range of analytes. A force field model is described that successfully predicts changes in MOF properties and the uptake of gases. This model is used to predict adsorption isotherms for a number of representative compounds, including explosives, nerve agents, volatile organic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The results show that, as a result of relatively large heats of adsorption (> 20 kcal mol{sup -1}) in most cases, we expect an onset of adsorption by MOF as low as 10{sup -6} kPa, suggesting the potential to detect compounds such as RDX at levels as low as 10 ppb at atmospheric pressure.

Allendorf, Mark D.; Hesketh, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Gall, Kenneth A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Choudhury, A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Pikarsky, J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Andruszkiewicz, Leanne (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Chemical modification of simul wood with styrene–acrylonitrile copolymer and organically modified nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simul wood (Salmalia malabarica...) was chemically modified by treatment with styrene–acrylonitrile copolymer (SAN), glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), and organically modified nanoclay. The physical properties of wood...

R. R. Devi; T. K. Maji

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL's emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

Williams, C.H. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)); Eberhart, C.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL`s emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

Williams, C.H. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Eberhart, C.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Photochemical Modeling of Emissions Trading of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds in Houston, Texas. 2. Incorporation of Chlorine Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of the State Implementation Plan for attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality has created a Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOC) Emissions Cap and Trade Program for ...

Linlin Wang; Tammy Thompson; Elena C. McDonald-Buller; David T. Allen

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

Herndon, S. C.

110

Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electrocatalytic Materials and Techniques for the Anodic Oxidation of Various Organic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this thesis was first to characterize and improve the applicability of Fe(III) and Bi(V) doped PbO{sub 2} film electrodes for use in anodic O-transfer reactions of toxic and waste organic compounds, e.g. phenol, aniline, benzene, and naphthalene. Further, they investigated the use of alternative solution/electrode interfacial excitation techniques to enhance the performance of these electrodes for remediation and electrosynthetic applications. Finally, they have attempted to identify a less toxic metal oxide film that may hold promise for future studies in the electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis of O-transfer reactions using metal oxide film electrodes.

Stephen Everett Treimer

2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

Literature review of stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds and the implications for Hanford grouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted on the stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Based on this literature, it is likely that the limestone-containing grout will not permanently immobilize VOCs and that no presently available additives can guarantee permanent immobilization. The Westinghouse hanford company grout may be fairly effective at retarding aqueous leaching of VOCs, and commercial additives can improve this performance. Significant VOC losses do occur during stabilization/solidification, and the high temperatures of the Westinghouse Hanford Company waste and grout should exacerbate this problem. In fact, these high temperatures raise doubts about the presence of VOCs in the double-shell tanks supernates.

Spence, R.D.; Osborne, S.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The effect of mean cell residence time on the adsorbability of dissolved organic compounds found in petrochemical wastewaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THF EFFECT OF MEAN CELL RESIDENCE TIME ON THE ADSORBABILITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FOUND IN PETROCHEMICAL WASTEWATERS A Thesis by TIMOTHY LURING JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University ir, Partia. fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE EFFECT OF MEAN CELL RESIDENCE TIME ON THE ADSORBABILITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FOUND IN PETROCHEMICAL WASTENATERS A Thesis by TIMOTHY LORING...

Johnson, Timothy Loring

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

Evans, Gordon Barcus

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Geobacter strains that use alternate organic compounds, methods of making, and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides new isolated strains of Geobacter species that are capable of using a carbon source that is selected from C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds selected from pyruvate or metabolic precursors of pyruvate as an electron donor in metabolism and in subsequent energy production. In other aspects, other preferred embodiments of the present invention include methods of making such strains and methods of using such strains. In general, the wild type strain of the microorganisms has been shown to be unable to use these C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds as electron donors in metabolic steps such as the reduction of metallic ions. The inventive strains of microorganisms are useful improving bioremediation applications, including in situ bioremediation (including uranium bioremediation and halogenated solvent bioremediation), microbial fuel cells, power generation from small and large-scale waste facilities (e.g., biomass waste from dairy, agriculture, food processing, brewery, or vintner industries, etc.) using microbial fuel cells, and other applications of microbial fuel cells, including, but not limited to, improved electrical power supplies for environmental sensors, electronic sensors, and electric vehicles.

Lovley, Derek R; Summers, Zarath Morgan; Haveman, Shelley Annette; Izallalen, Mounir

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

Neutron reflectometry reveals the internal structure of organic compounds deposited on aluminum oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils plays a significant role in the global C cycle, therefore understanding the structure and function of the OC–soil mineral interface is of high importance. To study the interface, films of simple OC compounds and natural organic matter (NOM) were deposited onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3) using spin coating and were exposed to humidity. The thickness, density and structure of the films were studied using a depth-sensitive, nano-scale technique of neutron reflectometry. A single homogenous layer was observed when NOM and glucose (GL) were adsorbed onto Al2O3. However, when stearic acid (SA) was added to either NOM or GL, separate layers attributed to SA and either NOM or GL were detected. The formation of distinct, immiscible layers is due to insolubility of SA with NOM and GL. In contrast, GL and NOM are both water-soluble, and therefore soluble with each other, forming a homogenous layer on the mineral surface. Our results suggest that the extent of complex layering formed on the OC–mineral interface may depend on the relative solubility of the compounds.

Melanie Mayes; Sindhu Jagadamma; Haile Ambaye; Loukas Petridis; Valeria Lauter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Reasoning and Representation: the Sketching of Organic Chemical Reaction Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is standard chemical iconography of atoms (vertices) and bonds (edges) in which each two-dimensional drawing concisely communicates three-dimensional structural information that is firmly grounded in chemical theory. Each illustration acts as a 2D interface between its creator and the reader in which the three

Marchese, Francis

118

Protecting aquatic organisms from chemicals: the harsh realities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diffuse sources. Many of these will be agrochemicals, including nutrients (used as fertilizers...few groups of chemicals (such as the agrochemicals) is there both temporal and spatial...mixtures of man-made chemicals whose composition is probably highly variable and continuously...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ozone-forming potential of a series of oxygenated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An incremental reactivity approach has been used to assess the relative ozone-forming potentials of various important oxygenated fuels/fuel additives, i.e., tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), dimethyl ether (DME), diethyl ether (DEE), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), in a variety of environments. Calculations were performed using a single-cell trajectory model, combined with the Lurmann-Carter-Coyner chemical mechanism, with (NMOC)/(NO{sub x}) ratios ranging from 4 to 20. This work provides the first quantitative assessment of the air quality impact of release of these important oxygenated compounds. ETBE and DEE are the two most reactive compounds on a per carbon equivalent basis, while TBA is the least reactive species. At a (NMOC)/(NO{sub x}) ratio of 8, which is generally typical of polluted urban areas in the United States, TBA, DME, MTBE, and ETBE all have incremental reactivities less than or equal to that of the urban NMHC mix. Thus, use of these additives in fuels may have a beneficial impact on urban ozone levels.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Rudy, S.J.; Chang, Tai Y. (Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

On-line Analysis of Organic Compounds in Diesel Exhaust Using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using H3O+ proton transfer in an ion drift tube (PTR-MS) was used to measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations on-line in diesel engine exhaust as a function on engine load. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the PTR-MS instrument as an analytical tool for diesel engine emissions abatement research. Measured sensitivities determined from gas standards were found to be between 30% and 100% greater than calculated sensitivities. A slight humidity dependent sensitivity was observed for non-polar species, implying that reactions with H+(H2O)2 were important for some organics. The mass spectra of diesel exhaust were complex but displayed a pattern of strong ion signals at 14n+1 (n=3..8) masses, with a relative ion abundance similar to that obtained from electron impact ionization of alkanes. Laboratory experiments verified that C8-C16 n-alkanes and C8-C13 1-alkenes react with H3O+ in dissociative proton transfer reaction resulting in alkyl cation ion products, primarily m/z 41, 43, 57, 71 and 85. Monitoring the sum of these ions signals may be useful for estimating alkane emissions from unburnt diesel fuel. Alkane fragmentation likely simplified the diesel exhaust mass spectrum and reduced potential mass interferences with isobaric aromatic compounds. It is shown that the relative abundances of VOCs changed as a function of engine load. Concentrations of aldehydes and ketones dominated those of aromatic species with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde estimated to be the most abundant VOCs in the PTR-MS mass spectrum at all engine loads. The relative abundances of benzene and toluene increased with engine load indicating their pyrogenic origin. The relative abundance of alkanes, aromatics, aldehydes, and alcohols was broadly consistent with literature publications of diesel exhaust analysis by gas chromatography. About 75% of the organic ion signal could be assigned. On line analysis of diesel exhaust using this technology may be valuable tool for diesel engine emission research.

Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Maupin, Gary D.; Muntean, George G.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST OTHER CHANGES TO VOC MONITORING PROGRAM Page 1 of 21 VOC 3·1: PMR Section 3, Topic 1, Table 1 Recalculated Waste Matrix Code Group Weighting Factors based on the 2004 Compliance Recertification Contact Handled (CH) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Inventory (m 3 ) The new weighting factors appear to be based on CH TRU waste only and do not include remote handled (RH) TRU waste. There was no discussion in the PMR addressing possible differences in Waste Matrix Code Group (WMCG) for RH TRU that could potentially impact the weighting factors. Please provide data characterizing the differences in emissions between the two types of waste, in support of the assertion that modeling data from CH TRU waste adequately

122

Thermogravimetric investigation on characteristic of biomass combustion under the effect of organic calcium compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Experiments were conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer to investigate thermal behavior of different organic calcium compounds (OCCs) and its blended fuels with three kinds of biomass. The effectiveness of synthesized method for OCC was assessed by the pyrolysis test. Effect of the mole ratio of calcium to sulfur on co-combustion characteristics was studied. Results indicated that preparation method of modified calcium acetate (MCA) had high precision and accuracy. Co-combustion characteristic of \\{OCCs\\} blended with biomass was controlled by OCCs’ additive amount and the content of volatile matter which is mainly composed of small hydrocarbon molecules. Combustion performance indexes for peanut shell and wheat straw impregnated by \\{OCCs\\} were improved, however, an inverse trend was found for rice husk because of lower additive amount of OCCs. The blended fuel show higher combustion performance indexes compared with combustion of individual biomass, and these indexes decrease with increases of Ca/S ratio.

Lihui Zhang; Feng Duan; Yaji Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Emissions of non-methane organic compounds from a grassland site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons (OxHCs), isoprene, and monoterpenes was detected in the emissions from a grassland site in the Midwestern United States. A plot dominated by crown vetch (Coronilla varia) and bluegrass (Poa spp.), exhibited a constant decrease in emissions of total non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) from 580 {mu}g m{sup -2} hr{sup -1} in June 1992 to 150 {mu}g m{sup - 2} hr{sup -1} in October 1992, except for a slight increase in August. Oxygenated hydrocarbons (methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and terpenes (isoprene, limonene, myrcene, {alpha}-pinene, and {beta}- pinene) composed about 90% and 10% of the identified NMOC emissions, respectively. Isoprene represented about 10% of the terpene emissions. Total NMOC emission rates based on vegetative biomass averaged 2.3 {mu}g g{sup -1} hr{sup -1}, with 10% of the identified NMOCs attributed to monoterpenes and the remainder mainly OxHCs. Over the course of the investigation, the relationship between the monoterpene emission rate and the temperature for a single plot was logarithmic and similar to the one between compound vapor pressure and temperature. However, emission rates normalized to temperature decreased throughout the summer and fall, indicating that parameterizations of emission rates from herbaceous plants must include a factor to compensate for environmental conditions such as soil moisture and nutrient deposition, which affect plant phenology and the seasonal pattern of species dominance.

Fukui, Yoshiko; Doskey, P.V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Selected Values of Heats of Combustion and Heats of Formation of Organic Compounds Containing the Elements C, H, N, O, P, and S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selected values of the heats of combustion and heats of formation of 719 organic compounds are reported here. The data tabulated pertain to compounds containing the elements carbon hydrogen nitrogen oxygen phosphorus and sulfur (CHNOPS). The information is arranged according to classes of compounds and within each class compounds are arranged by empirical formula. The general classes covered are: hydrocarbons alcohols phenols polyols ethers aldehydes ketones acids acid anhydrides esters steroids lactones carbohydrates heterocyclic oxygen compounds amines amides urea derivatives guanidine derivatives amino acids peptides alkaloids heterocyclic nitrogen compounds porphyrins organic sulfur compounds and organic phosphorus compounds. When a selection was made from among several investigators commentary is provided to indicate the choice and usually some relevant data. The number of references cited is 596. An alphabetical compound index is provided which gives the name page number empirical formula and the Wiswesser Line Notation (WLN) for each compound.

Eugene S. Domalski

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Organic Rankine Cycles for the Petro-Chemical Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considered to the limits of economic feasibility. However, both economic and technical feasibility limit the use of waste heat flows with conventional approaches in the 250 F to 350 F range. A packaged organic Rankine power cycle can technically...

Rose, R. K.; Colosimo, D. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Polymer and carbon nanotube materials for chemical sensors and organic electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis details the development of new materials for high-performance chemical sensing as well as organic electronic applications. In Chapter 2, we develop a chemiresistive material based on single-walled carbon nanotubes ...

Wang, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

http://www.jstor.org Chemical Ions Affect Survival of Avian Cholera Organisms in Pondwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://www.jstor.org Chemical Ions Affect Survival of Avian Cholera Organisms in Pondwater Author their work and the materials they rely upon, and to build a common research platform that promotes whether chemical ions affected survival of avian choleraorganismsin water collected from the Nebraska

Yandell, Brian S.

129

Effect of Cooking Temperatures on Chemical Changes in Species of Organic Arsenic in Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Cooking Temperatures on Chemical Changes in Species of Organic Arsenic in Seafood ... The results obtained showed that, in all of the types of seafood studied, TMA+ appeared after cooking, possibly because heating facilitates decarboxylation of AB to TMA+. ... Keywords: Arsenic; organoarsenical species; seafood; cooking; chemical changes ...

V. Devesa; A. Martínez; M. A. Súñer; D. Vélez; C. Almela; R. Montoro

2001-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

Single-reactor process for producing liquid-phase organic compounds from biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for preparing liquid fuel and chemical intermediates from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons. The method includes the steps of reacting in a single reactor an aqueous solution of a biomass-derived, water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon reactant, in the presence of a catalyst comprising a metal selected from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au, at a temperature, and a pressure, and for a time sufficient to yield a self-separating, three-phase product stream comprising a vapor phase, an organic phase containing linear and/or cyclic mono-oxygenated hydrocarbons, and an aqueous phase.

Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Simonetti, Dante A. (Middleton, WI); Kunkes, Edward L. (Madison, WI)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

131

The relation of certain organic phosphorus compounds to blood cholinesterase activity and their value as parasiticides in swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RELATION OF CERTAIN ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS TO BLOOD CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY AND THEIR VALUE AS PARASFIICIDES IN SWINE A Thesis By DELFIN DANCEL de LEON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College... of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1960 Major Subject: Animal Husbandry THE RELATION OF CERTAIN ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS CON/EXPOUNDS TO BLOOD CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITT AND THEIR VALUE...

Leon, Delfin Dancel de

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gas phase radiolysis and vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of heterocyclic organic compounds. Progress report, Feburary 1, 1979-February 1, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-range objective of our research group is to gain a better understanding of the processes by which complex organic molecules react when they absorb large amounts of energy. This progress report describes the results of our recent work in three areas: diradicals derived from heterocyclic compounds; trimethylene diradicals from various sources; and ion-molecule reactions.

Scala, A.A.; Nguyen, D.; Rourke, W.; Caputo, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Scale-up analysis and development of gliding arc discharge facility for volatile organic compounds decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influences of inlet gas flow rate and reactor configuration on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) decomposition efficiency in a traditional gliding arc (T-GA) facility are studied based on laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. The ratio of the nozzle diameter and the shortest distance of two electrodes should be maintained in a suitable value range to guarantee the decomposition efficiency, which indicates simply enlarging the nozzle inner diameter is not a proper way to raise the T-GA treatment capacity in a fixed supply voltage condition. A developed gliding arc gas discharge (D-GA) reactor based on a modified gas feed system is proposed: small flow rate air goes through the bottom nozzle to process the GA evolution, and high flow rate contaminated gas goes frontal through the plasma region and decomposes. The performances of D-GA reactor in the decomposition of \\{VOCs\\} with relative high gas flow rate, including decomposition efficiency and specific energy consumption, are better than T-GA reactor. D-GA reactor also avoids the drawbacks of the increases of power system amount and electric power consumption in multi-electrode GA system.

Zheng Bo; Jianhua Yan; Xiaodong Li; Yong Chi; Kefa Cen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Arid site characterization and technology assessment: Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) program was initiated in March 1991 to evaluate technologies for all phases of remediation of VOCs in soils and groundwater at DOE arid/semiarid sites. The primary site for field demonstrations under the VOC-Arid ID program is the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to describe (1) the bases for technologies currently under evaluation in the VOC-Arid ID program; (2) the types of subsurface contamination at DOE arid/semiarid sites; and (3) the areas of potential common technology interests based on perceived technology needs at other DOE sites. This report was compiled by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in response to DOE`s Office of Technology Development`s mission to carry out an aggressive program to accelerate the development and implementation of new and existing technologies to meet a 30-year goal set by DOE in June 1989 to clean up all of its sites and to bring all sites into compliance with current and future environmental regulations. A key component of this program is the development of technologies that are better, faster, safer, and cheaper than those technologies currently available. Included in this report are an evaluation of technologies currently (fiscal year 1993) being pursued at the Hanford Site under the auspices of the VOC-Arid ID program, an assessment of subsurface contaminants at arid/semiarid sites, a summarization of technologies under consideration at other DOE sites, a discussion of areas of potential common technology interests, and the conclusions. Also included are a summary of the extent of contamination at the DOE arid/semiarid sites under consideration and a bibliography of source documents from which this report was prepared.

Riley, R.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Atmospheric outflow of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds from East Asia in Spring 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To estimate the emissions of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) from East Asia and to identify unique SOC molecular markers in Asian air masses, high-volume air samples were collected on the island of Okinawa, Japan between 22 March and 2 May 2004. Contributions from different source regions (China, Japan, the Koreas, Russia, and ocean/local) were estimated by use of source region impact factors (SRIFs). Elevated concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorcyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and particulate-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were attributed to air masses from China. A large proportion of the variation in the current-use pesticides, gas-phase PAHs, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations was explained by meteorology. Chlordanes showed a technical mixture profile and similar concentrations regardless of source region. {alpha}/{gamma} HCH and trans/cis chlordane ratios did not vary significantly with different source regions and had regional averages of 2.5 {+-} 1.0 and 1.2 {+-} 0.3, respectively. Particulate-phase PAH concentrations were significantly correlated (p value {lt} 0.05) with other incomplete combustion byproduct concentrations, including elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}), CO, NOx{asterisk}, black carbon, submicrometer aerosols, and SO{sub 2}. By use of measured PAH, CO, and black carbon concentrations and estimated CO and black carbon emission inventories, the emission of six carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs was estimated to be 1518-4179 metric tons/year for Asia and 778-1728 metric tons/year for China, respectively. These results confirm that East Asian outflow contains significant emissions of carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs. 39 refs., 3 figs.

Toby Primbs; Staci Simonich; David Schmedding; Glenn Wilson; Dan Jaffe; Akinori Takami; Shungo Kato; Shiro Hatakeyama; Yoshizumi Kajii [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States). Departments of Chemistry and Environmental and Molecular Toxicology

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Organic Particles Kevin Wilson Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Studying the Chemical Transformations of for Studying the Chemical Transformations of Organic Particles Kevin Wilson Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Molecular weight growth and decomposition chemistries play important roles in the transformation of particles from soot formation to atmospheric aerosol oxidation. Understanding these complex reaction pathways requires novel methods of analyzing particle phase hydrocarbons. We are developing a suite of synchrotron-based tools to provide better insights into the molecular composition, isomer distribution, and elemental composition of complex hydrocarbon mixtures, aimed at developing simple yet realistic descriptions of molecular weight growth and decomposition that occur during a heterogeneous reaction.

140

Photochemical Modeling of Emissions Trading of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds in Houston, Texas. 1. Reactivity Based Trading and Potential for Ozone Hot Spot Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photochemical Modeling of Emissions Trading of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds in Houston, Texas. ... (12)?Thompson, T. M.; Wang, L.; Web, A.; McDonald-Buller, E.; Allen, D. T. Photochemical Modeling of the Air Quality Impacts of an Emissions Trading Program for Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) in Texas; Air and Waste Management Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, June, 2006. ...

Linlin Wang; Tammy Thompson; Elena C. McDonald-Buller; Alba Webb; David T. Allen

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electrochemical and quantum chemical studies of some azomethine compounds as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The corrosion inhibition effect of new azomethine compounds: PhNNC (COCH3)NC6H4Y {Y = OCH3 (SB1), CH3 (SB2), H (SB3), Br (SB4) and Y = Cl (SB5)} on mild steel in 1 M HCl, was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and quantum chemistry analysis. It has been found that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing inhibitor concentration. The polarization curves showed that these Schiff bases function as mixed inhibitors. The adsorption of studied compounds on mild steel surface was found to follow the Langmuir isotherm. Molecular modeling was used to correlate corrosion inhibition properties and calculated quantum chemical parameters.

Hanane Hamani; Tahar Douadi; Mousa Al-Noaimi; Saifi Issaadi; Djamel Daoud; Salah Chafaa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Versatile piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source for gaseous compounds and organic molecules with femtomole accuracy for UHV and surface science applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note describes the construction of a piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source based upon a design presented in an earlier work [D. Proch and T. Trickl, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 60, 713 (1988)]. The design features significant modifications that permit the determination of the number of molecules in a beam pulse with an accuracy of 1x10{sup 11} molecules per pulse. The 21 cm long plunger-nozzle setup allows the molecules to be brought to any point of the UHV chamber with very high intensity. Furthermore, besides typical gaseous compounds, also smaller organic molecules with a vapor pressure higher than 0.1 mbar at room temperature may serve as feed material. This makes the new design suitable for various applications in chemical and surface science studies.

Schiesser, Alexander; Schaefer, Rolf [Eduard-Zintl-Institut fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 20, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Comparing removal of trace organic compounds and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) at advanced and traditional water treatment plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stability of drinking water can be indicated by the assimilable organic carbon (AOC). This AOC value represents the regrowth capacity of microorganisms...254, and AOC) from water, experimental results indicate th...

Jie-Chung Lou; Chung-Yi Lin; Jia-Yun Han…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Isotopic constraints on the sources and associations of organic compounds in marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To provide a new perspective on the fate of both natural organic matter and hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in marine sediments, we have investigated the relationship between radiocarbon (14C) age and the different ...

White, Helen K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Discovery of Compounds Blocking the Proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum in a Chemical Space Based on Piperidinyl-Benzimidazolone Analogs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...explore the chemical space of piperidinyl-benzimidazolone...MATERIALS AND METHODS Library of piperidinyl-benzimidazolone...RESULTS Selection of the library of piperidinyl-benzimidazolone...exploration of the chemical space of halopemide analogs...purposes, we designed a library of 250 compounds to explore...

Nadia Saïdani; Cyrille Y. Botté; Michael Deligny; Anne-Laure Bonneau; Janette Reader; Ronald Lasselin; Goulven Merer; Alisson Niepceron; Fabien Brossier; Jean-Christophe Cintrat; Bernard Rousseau; Lyn-Marie Birkholtz; Marie-France Cesbron-Delauw; Jean-François Dubremetz; Corinne Mercier; Henri Vial; Roman Lopez; Eric Maréchal

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

Support Vector Machines in the Prediction of Mutagenicity of Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The classifier, that we derived from SVM methods, outperforms the available methods in performance and simplicity and people, hence their toxic activity has to be assessed. Biological active chemicals interact composition, are unfortunately largely unknown, thus toxicity tests are needed. Alongside classical methods

Gini, Giuseppina

147

Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C-130 T0 T1 G1 Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane n-ppbv) Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane Propene i-Butane n-Butanee.g. , ethane, ethene, propane, propane, methanol, ethanol,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Physics Vehicular emission of volatile organicY. , and Huang, Y. S. : Emission factors and characteristicslight-duty vehicle emissions, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 30,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Carbon isotope ratios of organic compound fractions in oceanic suspended particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiocarbon evidence of fossil-carbon cycling in sediments1968), Metabolic fractionation of carbon isotopes in marineof particulate organic carbon using bomb 14 C, Nature,

Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Chemical Composition of Aquatic Dissolved Organic Matter in Five Boreal Forest Catchments Sampled in Spring and Fall Seasons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition and carbon isotope signature of aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) in five boreal forest catchments in Scandinavia were investigated. The DOM was isolated during spring and fall seasons using a reverse osmosis technique. The DOM samples were analyzed by elemental analysis, FT-IR, solid-state CP-MAS {sup 13}C-NMR, and C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. In addition, the relative abundance of carbon isotopes ({sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}C) in the samples was measured. There were no significant differences in the chemical composition or carbon isotope signature of the DOM sampled in spring and fall seasons. Also, differences in DOM composition between the five catchments were minor. Compared to reference peat fulvic and humic acids, all DOM samples were richer in O-alkyl carbon and contained less aromatic and phenolic carbon, as shown by FT-IR, {sup 13}C-NMR, and C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. The DOM was clearly enriched in {sup 14}C relative to the NBS oxalic acid standard of 1950, indicating that the aquatic DOM contained considerable amounts of organic carbon younger than about 50 years. The weight-based C:N ratios of 31 {+-} 6 and the {delta}{sup 13}Cvalues of -29 {+-} 2{per_thousand}indicate that the isolated DOM is of terrestrial rather than aquatic origin. We conclude that young, hydrophilic carbon compounds of terrestrial origin are predominant in the samples investigated, and that the composition of the aquatic DOM in the studied boreal forest catchments is rather stable during low to intermediate flow conditions.

Schumacher,M.; Christl, I.; Vogt, R.; Barmettler, K.; Jacobsen, C.; Kretzschmar, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA Citation Nevin, K...attractive strategy to convert solar energy that is harvested intermittently...photosynthesis that might convert solar energy to organic products...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photosynthesis that might convert solar energy to organic products more effectively...nature of renewable sources of energy, most notably solar and wind, is leading to a search for strategies to capture the electrical energy produced from these sources in...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Removal of organic and inorganic compounds from landfill leachate using reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this work was to evaluate an effectiveness of removing organic and inorganic pollutants from landfill leachate in a long-term reverse osmosis (RO) study. Investigations were carried out...4 ...

I. A. Talalaj

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Radionuclides, Trace Metals, and Organic Compounds in Shells of Native Freshwater Mussels Along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River: 6000 Years Before Present to Current Times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents concentrations of radionuclides, trace metals, and semivolatile organic compounds measured in shell samples of the western pearl shell mussel collected along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

B. L. Tiller; T. E. Marceau

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

155

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Chromatographic Enrichment of Acidic Compounds from Organic Solvents Using Alkali Metal Silicates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fox, D.S. Farrier, and R.E. Paulson. Chemical char- acterization and analytical considerations for an in situ oil shale process water. U.S. Department of Energy, LETC/RI-78/7. Laramie Energy Technology Center, Lara- mie, Wyoming......

D.L. Stalling; J.D. Petty; L.M. Smith

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...would not be able to conserve energy in this manner because it contains...part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department...planet: chemical challenges in solar energy utilization. Proc. Natl. Acad...

Kelly P. Nevin; Sarah A. Hensley; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Jianhong Ou; Trevor L. Woodard; Oona L. Snoeyenbos-West; Derek R. Lovley

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

Data Analysis of Multi-Laser Standoff Spectral identification of chemical and biological compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the availability of tunable broadband coherent sources that emit mid-infrared radiation with well-defined beam characteristics, spectroscopies that were traditionally not practical for standoff detection1 or for develop- ment of miniaturized infrared detectors2, 3 have renewed interest. While obtaining compositional information for objects from a distance remains a major challenge in chemical and biological sensing, recently we demonstrated that capitalizing on mid-infrared excitation of target molecules by using quantum cascade lasers and invoking a pump probe scheme can provide spectral fingerprints of substances from a variable standoff distance.3 However, the standoff data is typically associated with random fluctuations that can corrupt the fine spectral features and useful data. To process the data from standoff experiments toward better recognition we consider and apply two types of denoising techniques, namely, spectral analysis and Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT). Using these techniques, infrared spectral data have been effectively improved. The result of the analysis illustrates that KLT can be adapted as a powerful data denoising tool for the presented pump-probe infrared standoff spectroscopy.

Farahi, R H [ORNL; Zaharov, Viktor [ORNL; Tetard, Laurene [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL; Passian, Ali [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds. Progress report, 1993--1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the recent year, the authors extended investigations into insertion reactions by investigating the insertion of dicarboxylate acetylene into the metal-metal bond of Re{sub 2}(CO){sub 9}(NCMe). Secondly, the authors considered the ring opening reactions of the cyclic thioethers: tetrahydrothiophene and thiacyclohexane when complexed to Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(NCMe){sub 2}. In a third effort, various osmium complexes of cyclobutynes were synthesized and the subsequent reactivity probed. Finally, energy storage (via absorption of UV-visible photons) in osmium cluster compounds was investigated.

Adams, R.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cold Temperature and Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Speciated Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Diesel Trucks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions testing was conducted on a chassis dynamometer at two ambient temperatures (?7 and 22 °C) operating on two fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel and 20% soy biodiesel blend) over three driving cycles: cold start, warm start and heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving cycle. ... Different 2007+ aftertreatment technologies involving catalyst regeneration led to significant modifications of VOC emissions that were compound-specific and highly dependent on test conditions. ... However, emissions of other toxic partial combustion products such as carbonyls were not reduced in the modern diesel vehicles tested. ...

Ingrid J. George; Michael D. Hays; Richard Snow; James Faircloth; Barbara J. George; Thomas Long; Richard W. Baldauf

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

162

Air filters from HVAC systems as possible source of volatile organic compounds (VOC) – laboratory and field assays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air filters of HVAC systems was to be evaluated. In a first study carbonyl compounds (14 aldehydes and two ketones) were measured by reacting them with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). Analysis was done by HPLC and UV detection. In laboratory experiments pieces of used and unused HVAC filters were incubated in test chambers. Filters to be investigated were taken from a filter bank of a large HVAC system in the centre of Berlin. First results show that – among those compounds – formaldehyde and acetone were found in higher concentrations in the test chambers filled with used filters in comparison to those with unused filters. Parallel field measurements were carried out at the prefilter and main filter banks of the two HVAC systems. Here measurements were carried out simultaneously before and after the filters to investigate whether those aldehydes or ketones arise from the filter material on site. Formaldehyde and acetone significantly increased in concentration after the filters of one HVAC system. In parallel experiments microorganisms were proved to be able to survive on air filters. Therefore, a possible source of formaldehyde and acetone might be microbes.

Hans Schleibinger; Henning Rüden

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Correlation between gas-phase and solution-phase reactivities of hydroxyl radicals toward saturated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas-phase and aqueous-solution-phase reactivities of hydroxyl radicals with a wide variety of organic compounds are compared. When kinetic data are available for the same reaction occurring in both phases, this comparison provides useful information about the reaction mechanism. Through this comparison the authors can demonstrate a linear correlation between the gas/solution-phase OH reactivities for numerous saturated organic compounds. This empirical relationship can be used together with mechanistic information to estimate the OH reactivity in one phase from the measured rate constant in the other. In order to develop and extend the correlation, they have used the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique to measure rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with methanol-d/sub 4/, ethanol-d/sub 6/, 2-chloroethanol, 2,2,2-trichloroethanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, acetone-d/sub 6/, 1,1,1-trifluoroacetone, and 1,2-butylene oxide at 298 K. These results are reported herein.

Wallington, T.J.; Dagaut, P.; Kurylo, M.J.

1988-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

Atmospheric Aerosols Aging Involving Organic Compounds and Impacts on Particle Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and chemical reactions (oxidation of particles by gas-phase oxidants and heterogeneous reactions between gas molecules and particles).5 For example, when initially formed, soot particles are hydrophobic and fractal in morphology, with low effective density... particles have a ? value of 1.0; whereas fractal ones will have ? > 1.0. Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties The optical system consisted of a commercial integrating Nephelometer (Model 3563, TSI) and a CRDS connected in series.20 The particles...

Qiu, Chong

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hybrid membranes and their use in volatile organic compound/air separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the chemical modification of a tubular y-alumina membrane with octadecyltrichlorosilane, ODS. Following the modification, unbound chlorosilane material was extracted Irom the membrane by exposure to toluene. Despite 10 the extraction step, C-H bonds were..., it was concluded that the chlorosilane groups were forming covalent bonds with thc membrane surface hydroxyl groups. A proposed reaction is illustrated in Fig. I. Note that Stevens has presented data clarifying that, because of bond length and angle...

Krohn, John Eric

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Our planet is becoming increasingly polluted with inorganic and organic compounds, primarily as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced or expected to be present in organ- isms). Many of them are toxic and/or carcinogenic. Sources cleanup in the US, and $25­50 billion per year worldwide (Glass 1999; Tsao 2003). Most remediation that use plants to remove, reduce, degrade, or immobilize environmental pollutants from soil and water

167

"The disintegration of organic compounds by microorganisms is accompanied by the liberation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that of the better- known abiotic hydrogen- and methanol-driven fuel cells. For example, abiotic fuel cells require in a cost-effective manner. Over the past 40 years it has been suggested that microbial fuel cells might convert organic matter into electricity in devices known as microbial fuel cells. However, interest

Lovley, Derek

168

Thermodynamic properties of organic oxygen compounds XLIII. Vapour pressures of some ethers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vapour pressures of methyl propyl, isopropyl methyl, butyl methyl, ethyl propyl, t-butyl methyl, dipropyl, di-isopropyl, di-t-butyl, and decyl methyl ethers were measured at pressures up to 205 kPa. The measured values were fitted by Antoine and by Chebyshev equations, values already published from this laboratory for three aromatic ethers were recomputed uniformly with the present results, and published values for four additional compounds were incorporated in a scheme for correlation of the vapour pressures of ethers. Estimates were made of the vapour pressures of 10 other ethers. Between 5 and 200 kPa the vapour pressures of ethers may be represented by a single equation in which carbon number or an effective carbon number is a parameter. Chebyshev equations are given for interpolation between the upper bounds of the measurements and the critical pressures of 11 ethers for which this property has been previously determined.

D Ambrose; J.H Ellender; C.H.S Sprake; R Townsend

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by metal organic chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to calculate the cost of producing high temperature superconducting wire by the Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) process. The technology status is reviewed from the literature and a plant conceptual design is assumed for the cost calculation. The critical issues discussed are the high cost of the metal organic precursors, the material utilization efficiency and the capability of the final product as measured by the critical current density achieved. Capital, operating and material costs are estimated and summed as the basis for calculating the cost per unit length of wire. Sensitivity analyses of key assumptions are examined to determine their effects on the final wire cost. Additionally, the cost of wire on the basis of cost per kiloampere per meter is calculated for operation at lower temperatures than the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature. It is concluded that this process should not be ruled out on the basis of high cost of precursors alone.

Chapman, J.N.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

Radiocarbon Measurements of Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds:? Quantifying the Biogenic Contribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to obtain quality (interpretable) [14C]VOC measurements however relies on additional factors:? (1) transferring individual VOCs to the measurement system in a manner that preserves their original relative concentrations in the atmosphere (recovery), (2) quantifying limitations in the VOC isolation process (bias), and 3) quantifying chemical and isotopic contamination (blanks). ... The fM results for the VOC fractions from calibration mixtures and ambient samples are corrected for CO2 contamination using eq 2, where ?BLK in this case is defined as in which mCO2 is the carbon mass of residual atmospheric CO2 following LiOH treatment plus the carbon mass of CO2 contamination from the O2 used for VOC oxidation, and mREC is the total recovered carbon (Table 3). ... During pressurized sampling of humid air, water will be condensed in the canisters. ...

George A. Klouda; Charles W. Lewis; Reinhold A. Rasmussen; George C. Rhoderick; Robert L. Sams; Robert K. Stevens; Lloyd A. Currie; Douglas J. Donahue; A. J. Timothy Jull; Robert L. Seila

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Behavior of partially miscible organic compounds in simulated ground water systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serious ground water contamination problems result from leaks or spills of organic liquids which are partially miscible in water. Two important categories of these liquids include low molecular weight chlorinated solvents and gasoline. 1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCA) abiotically degrades in water forming approximately 17-25% 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) via an elimination reaction. Brominated analogs of TCA hydrolyze 11-13 times faster than TCA. As the number of bromines increase, the percent of elimination products increases. These geminal trihalides degrade by a unimolecular mechanism (E1/SN1). The rate coefficient for TCA degradation in buffered water at elevated temperature is approximately six times greater than hydrolysis of 1-chloropropane (SN2 mechanism) and more than 100 times greater than 1,1-dichloroethane. In the presence of sodium thiosulfate, the 1-chloropropane degradation rate increased by more than a factor of 100, 1,1-dichloroethane rate by 22 and TCA degradation by approximately two. The range of concentrations for major components of gasoline which partition into water was determined for 65 gasoline samples. Benzene concentrations in the water extracts ranged from 12.3-130 mg/l and toluene concentrations ranged from 23-185 mg/l. Fuel/water partition coefficients of seven major aromatic constituents were measured for 31 gasoline types and showed a standard deviation of 10-30%. These coefficients were highly correlated with the pure component solubilities. Chemometric techniques were applied to 20 peaks measured in the aqueous extracts of the 65 gasolines. Bivariate plots and principal component analyses show selected brands have distinguishing equilibrium concentrations, but complete separation of brands was not observed.

Cline, P.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

173

The use of radon (Rn-222) and volatile organic compounds in monitoring soil gas to localize NAPL contamination at a gas station in Rio Claro, São Paulo State, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focuses on the presence of radon (222Rn) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gases at a gas station located in the city of Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil, where a fossil fuel leak occurred. The spatial distribution results show a correlation between 222Rn and VOCs, consistent with the fact that radon gas has a greater chemical affinity with organic phases than with water. This finding demonstrates that the presence of a residual hydrocarbon phase in an aquifer can retain radon, leading to a reduced radon content in the soil gas. The data in this study confirm the results of previous investigations, in which the method used in this study provided a preliminary fingerprint of a contaminated area. Furthermore, the data analysis time is brief, and only simple equipment is required.

E.Q. Barbosa; J.A. Galhardi; D.M. Bonotto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Studies on the chemical synthesis and characterization of lead oxide nanoparticles with different organic capping agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead oxide (PbO) nanoparticles were chemically synthesized using Lead (II) acetate as precursor. The effects of organic capping agents such as Oleic acid, Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) and Cetryl Tri Methyl Butoxide (CTAB) on the size and morphology of the nanoparticles were studied. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Photoluminescence (PL) Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to analyse the prepared nanoparticles for their physical, structural and optical properties. The characterization studies reveal that the synthesized PbO nanoparticles had well defined crystalline structure and sizes in the range of 25 nm to 36 nm for capping agents used and 40 nm for pure PbO nanoparticles.

Arulmozhi, K. T., E-mail: arulsheelphy@gmail.com [Physics Wing (DDE), Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India); Mythili, N. [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India)] [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Chemical Form Matters: Differential Accumulation of Mercury Following Inorganic and Organic Mercury Exposures in Zebrafish Larvae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versus L-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of L-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with L-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-L-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

Korbas, Malgorzata; MacDonald, Tracy C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Krone, Patrick H. (Saskatchewan)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

VOLUME 77, NUMBER 19 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 4 NOVEMBER 1996 Incommensurate Intermodulation of an Organic Intergrowth Compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intermodulation of an Organic Intergrowth Compound Observed by Neutron Scattering R. Lefort,1 J. Etrillard,1 B occurs around 160 K. The neutron scattering experiments were performed at

Boyer, Edmond

177

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

178

Effects of organic silicon compounds as additives on charge–discharge cycling efficiencies of lithium in nonaqueous electrolytes for rechargeable lithium cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Influence of mixing organic silicon compounds into 1 M (M: mol L?1) LiPF6-ethylene carbonate (EC)/ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) (mixing volume ratio = 3:7) mixed solvent electrolytes on charge–discharge cycling efficiencies of lithium metal negative electrodes is examined. As organic silicon compounds, polyether-modified siloxanes with polyethylene oxide chains, chlorotrimethylsilane, tetraethoxysilane, cis-tetra [isobutyl (dimethylsiloxy)] cyclotetrasiloxane and cage-type silsesquioxane are investigated. Charge–discharge cycling tests of lithium are galvanostatically carried out using stainless steel working electrodes. Charge–discharge cycling efficiencies of lithium tend to improve by mixing organic silicon compounds. A cage-type silsesquioxane, octaphenyloctasilsesquioxane (Ph8T8) exhibits the highest cycling efficiency of approximately 80% with small mixing amount of 0.02 M Ph8T8. Mechanism of enhancement of lithium cycling efficiencies by mixing organic silicon compounds is considered to be due to the suppression of excess reduction of LiPF6-EC/EMC by lithium and the growth of surface film on lithium.

Ryota Yanagisawa; Hisayuki Endo; Masafumi Unno; Hideyuki Morimoto; Shin-ichi Tobishima

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Dictionary of Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... an illustration of the considerable increase in the number of entries, the section from “Carene” to “Carvoxime” has grown from 3£ to 7 pages. In a work ...

JOHN READ

1943-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Control of insects and spider mites by translocated compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applied to soil could be detected in a bioassay method using Aedes larvae. Schrader (1947a), working in Germany during World War II, prepared several phosphorus and fluorine compounds that were shown to be systemic. These compounds were taken up... ............................ .. . . . 113 Attempts to Isolate a Toxic Principle from Plants Treated with Octamethyl Pyrophosphoramide ? ? ? ? ? ? . . ? 118 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND SYSTEMIC ACTIVITY OF ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS............... 125 Derivatives...

Ivy, Edward Everett

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparative evaluation of several small mammal species as monitors of heavy metals, radionuclides, and selected organic compounds in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate which small mammal species are the best monitors of specific environmental contaminants. The evaluation is based on the published literature and on an analysis of small mammals trapped at several sites on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Studies on the uptake of heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic chemicals are reviewed in Chapter II to evaluate several small mammal species for their capacity to serve as sentinels for the presence, accumulation, and effects of various contaminants. Where several species were present at a site, a comparative evaluation was made and species are ranked for their capacity to serve as monitors of specific contaminants. Food chain accumulation and food habits of the species are used to establish a relationship with suitability as a biomonitor. Tissue-specific concentration factors were noted in order to establish target tissues. Life histories, habitat, and food habits are reviewed in order to make generalizations concerning the ability of similar taxa to serve as biomonitor. Finally, the usefulness of several small mammal species as monitors of three contaminants -- benzo(a)pyrene, mercury, and strontium-90 -- present on or near the ORNL facilities was investigated. 133 refs., 5 figs., 20 tabs.

Talmage, S.S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High-precision optical measurements of 13C/12C isotope ratios in organic compounds at natural abundance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-precision...compounds at natural abundance...catalytic combustor, and an isotopic...challenge to the high-cost and...carbon dioxide gas, using...temperature and pressure from which...of carbon gases . Spectrochim...2008 ) High precision...compounds at natural abundance...catalytic combustor, and...

Richard N. Zare; Douglas S. Kuramoto; Christa Haase; Sze M. Tan; Eric R. Crosson; Nabil M. R. Saad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Side by Side Comparison of Chemical Compounds Generated by Aqueous Pretreatments of Maize Stover, Miscanthus and Sugarcane Bagasse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) are dehydration products of pentose and hexose ... fermentation, but could also serve as industrial platform chemicals [40, 41...] and thus may be problematic or valuable...

Leonardo D. Gómez; Ruben Vanholme; Susannah Bird; Geert Goeminne…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Structurally Integrated Photoluminescent Chemical and Biological Sensors: An Organic Light-Emitting Diode-Based Platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chapter describes the development, advantages, challenges, and potential of an emerging, compact photoluminescence-based sensing platform for chemical and biological analytes, including multiple analytes. In ...

J. Shinar; R. Shinar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of semiconducting polymers and their use In organic photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have received significant interest for their potential low cost, high mechanical flexibility, and unique functionalities. OPVs employing semiconducting polymers in the photoactive layer have ...

Borrelli, David Christopher

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Project Profile: Hybrid Organic Silicone HTF Utilizing Endothermic Chemical Reactions for Latent Heat Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Los Alamos National Laboratory, under an ARRA CSP Award, is developing a thermally stable, working heat transfer fluid (HTF) that is integrated with chemical reactions as a methodology to store large amounts of latent heat.

189

The breakthrough time and permeation rate of three organic chemicals for selected glove combinations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study of polymer and plastic gloves and the chemicals and solvents used in their production, permeability tests were performed on twelve brands of gloves made from neoprene, nitrile, natural rubber, and polyvinyl-chloride. The test solvents were... study of polymer and plastic gloves and the chemicals and solvents used in their production, permeability tests were performed on twelve brands of gloves made from neoprene, nitrile, natural rubber, and polyvinyl-chloride. The test solvents were...

Binion, Pete Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fatty Acids from Lipids of Marine Organisms: Molecular Biodiversity, Roles as Biomarkers, Biologically Active Compounds, and Economical Aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of their characteristic living environments, marine organisms produce a variety of lipids. Fatty acids constitute the essential part of triglycerides and wax esters, which are the major components ...

Jean-Pascal Bergé; Gilles Barnathan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Oxidative and initiated chemical vapor deposition for application to organic electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the first discovery of polymeric conductors in 1977, the research area of "organic electronics" has grown dramatically. However, methods for forming thin films comprised solely of conductive polymers are limited by ...

Im, Sung Gap

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Rapid Screening of Fluids for Chemical Stability in Organic Rankine Cycle Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Description of the SMR cycle, which combines fluid elements of steam and organic Rankine cycles ... isomerization of 1-pentyl radical to 2-pentyl radical, which proceeds via a five-membered, cyclic transition state. ...

Wendy C. Andersen; Thomas J. Bruno

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

193

Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Pressure dependence of phonons and excitons in InSe films prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pressure dependence of the Raman spectra of phase-pure InSe thin films prepared by the low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition technique has been studied using a diamond-anvil high-pressure cell. Enhancement in the intensities of the Raman modes has been observed as a result of pressure-induced “tuning” of the energy of the M1-type hyperbolic exciton in InSe at ?2.54 eV through discrete incident laser photon energies. The pressure coefficients of the phonon modes and of the hyperbolic exciton in InSe have been determined.

In-Hwan Choi and Peter Y. Yu

2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

195

A method for using polyethylene passive samplers to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon chemical activity in sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to aid in the determination of the hazards posed by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediment beds, a method for the use of polyethylene (PE) sheets as passive sampling devices for measuring chemical ...

Fernandez, Loretta A. (Loretta Ana)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The development of a sensitive method to study volatile organic compounds in gaseous emissions of lung cancer cell lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HCO3 producing excess H+ ions in the medium and therefore a fall in pH. This is seen as a color change. 10 When the confluence has reached 90% the cells are ready to be sub-cultured (Fig 2). 50 % cells in media Thawed... patients with no prior treatment for lung cancer. We have used an alternative method for the spectrometric analysis and quantitation of the selected chemical markers. The pre-concentration method involved a Purge and Trap unit with a thermal desorber...

Maroly, Anupam

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mechanisms of synfuel degradation 1. Effects of organic nitrogen compounds on the stability of a shale derived diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable accelerated fuel stability test regimen has been developed and applied to the study of the storage stability of a shale derived diesel fuel marine (DFM). The results of a survey of nitrogen compounds as dopants in a stable shale DFM base fuel indicate that some pyrroles and indoles may play significant roles in storage stability. A complete stability test matrix has been developed for the temperatures of 43, 65 and 80/sup 0/C, for time periods between 4 and 179 days, and for a ten-fold concentration range of a model dopant, 2,5-dimethylpyrrole (DMP). Stability was defined by the amount of total insoluble material (filterable sediment and adherent gum) produced after stress, and also by the amount of titratable peroxide present in the filtrates of stressed fuel samples. A very regular pattern for insolubles formation was found within the test matrix. Deposit formation rates exhibited a first-order dependence on DMP concentration, with an apparent activation energy of 11-12 kcal/mol. The sediment was found to contain 12% nitrogen and 18-20% oxygen irrespective of the stress conditions employed.

Cooney, J.V.; Beal, E.J.; Huzlett, R.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Influence of Wetting and Mass Transfer Properties of Organic Chemical Mixtures in Vadose Zone Materials on Groundwater Contamination by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies have found that organic acids, organic bases, and detergent-like chemicals change surface wettability. The wastewater and NAPL mixtures discharged at the Hanford site contain such chemicals, and their proportions likely change over time due to reaction-facilitated aging. The specific objectives of this work were to (1) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on surface wettability, (2) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on CCl4 volatilization rates from NAPL, and (3) accurately determine the migration, entrapment, and volatilization of organic chemical mixtures. Five tasks were proposed to achieve the project objectives. These are to (1) prepare representative batches of fresh and aged NAPL-wastewater mixtures, (2) to measure interfacial tension, contact angle, and capillary pressure-saturation profiles for the same mixtures, (3) to measure interphase mass transfer rates for the same mixtures using micromodels, (4) to measure multiphase flow and interphase mass transfer in large flow cell experiments, all using the same mixtures, and (5) to modify the multiphase flow simulator STOMP in order to account for updated P-S and interphase mass transfer relationships, and to simulate the impact of CCl4 in the vadose zone on groundwater contamination. Results and findings from these tasks and summarized in the attached final report.

Charles J Werth; Albert J Valocchi, Hongkyu Yoon

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

199

A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary 5 layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/800 OD tube 150m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the 10 tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect 15 from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

Mak, J. E.; Su, L.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hydrogen Safety Project chemical analysis support task: Window C'' volatile organic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package contains the results obtained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff in the characterization of samples for the 101-SY Hydrogen Safety Project. The samples were submitted for analysis by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) under the Technical Project Plan (TPP) 17667 and the Quality Assurance Plan MCS-027. They came from a core taken during Window C'' after the May 1991 gas release event. The analytical procedures required for analysis were defined in the Test Instructions (TI) prepared by the PNL 101-SY Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) Project Management Office in accordance with the TPP and the QA Plan. The requested analysis for these samples was volatile organic analysis. The quality control (QC) requirements for each sample are defined in the Test Instructions for each sample. The QC requirements outlined in the procedures and requested in the WHC statement of work were followed.

Gillespie, B.M.; Stromatt, R.W.; Ross, G.A.; Hoope, E.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hydrogen Safety Project chemical analysis support task: Window ``C`` volatile organic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package contains the results obtained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff in the characterization of samples for the 101-SY Hydrogen Safety Project. The samples were submitted for analysis by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) under the Technical Project Plan (TPP) 17667 and the Quality Assurance Plan MCS-027. They came from a core taken during Window ``C`` after the May 1991 gas release event. The analytical procedures required for analysis were defined in the Test Instructions (TI) prepared by the PNL 101-SY Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) Project Management Office in accordance with the TPP and the QA Plan. The requested analysis for these samples was volatile organic analysis. The quality control (QC) requirements for each sample are defined in the Test Instructions for each sample. The QC requirements outlined in the procedures and requested in the WHC statement of work were followed.

Gillespie, B.M.; Stromatt, R.W.; Ross, G.A.; Hoope, E.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The growth of CdTe/GaAs heteroepitaxial films by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A process for the growth of CdTe/GaAs heteroepitaxialfilms using metal–organic chemical vapor deposition(MOCVD) has been developed. The initial results of the determination of the deposition mechanism are reported. A pilot production demonstration using experimentally determined operating conditions has been completed. This is the first reported pilot production of CdTe/GaAs using 2 in. diam GaAs substrates in a multiple slice commercially manufactured MOCVD system. The results reported therein demonstrate that MOCVD is a reliable reproducible production worthy process for preparation of CdTe/GaAs heterostructures. These results are applicable to a wide variety of CdTe based device technologies including IR detection fiber optics solar cells and others.

Philip L. Anderson

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Characterization of the crude oil polar compound extract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is designed to determine if there are any naturally occurring constituents in crude oils that can be chemically altered to bring about increased oil production. An extract containing only the polar organic compounds of the crude oil was obtained by using a modification of the ASTM-2007 procedure. Chemical characterization of the polar compounds were carried out using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography. The HPLC analyses indicated a range of polar organic compound content of 10 crude oils from 1.6% to 12.7%. Wettability determinations show that by adding a small amount of the polar fraction from a crude oil, to a mineral oil, a 40 to 111% change of wettability toward a more oil-wet system will occur, depending on the specific extract used.

Donaldson, E.C.; Crocker, M.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organization Print Organization Print 2012-12 org chart A complete ALS organization chart (June 2013) is available in PDF. Appointed and elected members of advisory panels provide guidance to Berkeley Lab and ALS management in developing the ALS scientific and user programs. ALS Staff Photo staff photo thumb Click on the image to see a recent photo of ALS staff in front of the dome. The photo was taken on May 14, 2013. ALS Management and Advisory Team Steve Kevan, Deputy Division Director, Science Michael J. Banda, Deputy Division Director, Operations Robert W. Schoenlein, Senior Staff Scientist, Next Generation Light Source Initiative Janos Kirz, Scientific Advisor Paul Adams, Division Deputy for Biosciences ALS Scientific, Technical, and User Support Groups Accelerator Physics

205

Complex Compound Chemical Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial heat pumps. The main emphasis was directed towards a conceptual temperature amplifier bench scale prototype design, which allows for the conversion to heat amplifier operation by the mere exchange of adsorbent working fluid component without...

Rockenfeller, U.; Langeliers, J.; Horn, G.

206

Fluorine Speciation Analysis Using Reverse Phase Liquid Chromatography Coupled Off-Line to Continuum Source Molecular Absorption Spectrometry (CS-MAS): Identification and Quantification of Novel Fluorinated Organic Compounds in Environmental and Biological Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1-4) Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are especially well-known for their unusual solubility, being simultaneously hydro- and lipophobic. ... (5, 6) This recognition has triggered a boost in interest in the monitoring of PFCs in water, wildlife and food. ... Chemicals used for AAS modifiers, reported by Gleisner et al.,(17) included gallium nitride (99.9%, ...

Zhiwei Qin; David McNee; Heike Gleisner; Andrea Raab; Kwaku Kyeremeh; Marcel Jaspars; Eva Krupp; Hai Deng; Jörg Feldmann

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

207

Removal of organic compounds and trace metals from oil sands process-affected water using zero valent iron enhanced by petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oil production generates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), referring to the water that has been in contact with oil sands or released from tailings deposits. There are concerns about the environmental impacts of the release of OSPW because of its toxicity. Zero valent iron alone (ZVI) and in combination with petroleum coke (CZVI) were investigated as environmentally friendly treatment processes for the removal of naphthenic acids (NAs), acid-extractable fraction (AEF), fluorophore organic compounds, and trace metals from OSPW. While the application of 25 g/L ZVI to OSPW resulted in 58.4% removal of \\{NAs\\} in the presence of oxygen, the addition of 25 g petroleum coke (PC) as an electron conductor enhanced the \\{NAs\\} removal up to 90.9%. The increase in ZVI concentration enhanced the removals of NAs, AEF, and fluorophore compounds from OSPW. It was suggested that the electrons generated from the oxidation of ZVI were transferred to oxygen, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radicals and oxidation of NAs. When OSPW was de-oxygenated, the \\{NAs\\} removal decreased to 17.5% and 65.4% during treatment with ZVI and CZVI, respectively. The removal of metals in ZVI samples was similar to that obtained during CZVI treatment. Although an increase in ZVI concentration did not enhance the removal of metals, their concentrations effectively decreased at all ZVI loadings. The Microtox® bioassay with Vibrio fischeri showed a decrease in the toxicity of ZVI- and CZVI-treated OSPW. The results obtained in this study showed that the application of ZVI in combination with PC is a promising technology for OSPW treatment.

Parastoo Pourrezaei; Alla Alpatova; Kambiz Khosravi; Przemys?aw Drzewicz; Yuan Chen; Pamela Chelme-Ayala; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Exhaust emissions of volatile organic compounds of powered two-wheelers: Effect of cold start and vehicle speed. Contribution to greenhouse effect and tropospheric ozone formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Powered two-wheeler (PTW) vehicles complying with recent European type approval standards (stages Euro 2 and Euro 3) were tested on chassis dynamometer in order to measure exhaust emissions of about 25 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the range C1–C7, including carcinogenic compounds as benzene and 1,3-butadiene. The fleet consists of a moped (engine capacity ? 50 cm3) and three fuel injection motorcycles of different engine capacities (150, 300 and 400 cm3). Different driving conditions were tested (US FPT cycle, constant speed). Due to the poor control of the combustion and catalyst efficiency, moped is the highest pollutant emitter. In fact, fuel injection strategy and three way catalyst with lambda sensor are able to reduce VOC motorcycles' emission of about one order of magnitude with respect to moped. Cold start effect, that is crucial for the assessment of actual emission of \\{PTWs\\} in urban areas, was significant: 30–51% of extra emission for methane. In the investigated speed range, moped showed a significant maximum of VOC emission factor at minimum speed (10 km/h) and a slightly decreasing trend from 20 to 60 km/h; motorcycles showed on the average a less significant peak at 10 km/h, a minimum at 30–40 km/h and then an increasing trend with a maximum emission factor at 90 km/h. Carcinogenic \\{VOCs\\} show the same pattern of total VOCs. Ozone Formation Potential (OFP) was estimated by using Maximum Incremental Reactivity scale. The greatest contribution to tropospheric ozone formation comes from alkenes group which account for 50–80% to the total OFP. VOC contribution effect on greenhouse effect is negligible with respect to CO2 emitted.

M. Antonietta Costagliola; Fabio Murena; M. Vittoria Prati

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development of efficiency-enhanced cogeneration system utilizing high-temperature exhaust-gas from a regenerative thermal oxidizer for waste volatile-organic-compound gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a gas-turbine cogeneration system that makes effective use of the calorific value of the volatile organic compound (VOC) gases exhausted during production processes at a manufacturing plant. The system utilizes the high-temperature exhaust-gas from the regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) which is used for incinerating VOC gases. The high-temperature exhaust gas is employed to resuperheat the steam injected into the gasturbine. The steam-injection temperature raised in this way increases the heat input, resulting in the improved efficiency of the gas-turbine. Based on the actual operation of the system, we obtained the following results: • Operation with the steam-injection temperature at 300 °C (45 °C resuperheated from 255 °C) increased the efficiency of the gasturbine by 0.7%. • The system can enhance the efficiency by 1.3% when the steam-injection temperature is elevated to 340 °C (85 °C resuperheated). In this case, up to 6.6 million yen of the total energy cost and 400 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions can be reduced annually. • A gas-turbine cogeneration and RTO system can reduce energy consumption by 23% and CO2 emission by 30.1% at the plant.

Masaaki Bannai; Akira Houkabe; Masahiko Furukawa; Takao Kashiwagi; Atsushi Akisawa; Takuya Yoshida; Hiroyuki Yamada

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Thermal treatment induced change of diluted oxygen doped ZnTe films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the authors report the growth of diluted oxygen doped ZnTe films (ZnTe:O) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The effect of a post thermal annealing on the properties of the highly mismatched films has been investigated. It is found that the in-situ doping leads to an effective incorporation of oxygen into ZnTe films with different occupation configurations either on Zn or on Te site. The subsequent annealing process in a vacuum ambient leads to an enhancement of the oxygen incorporation into the ZnTe:O films due to the diffusion of the residual oxygen while the annealing with the same as-grown sample covered on top of the surface (denoted as “face-to-face” annealing in the text) is beneficial to the improvement of the film quality with manifest intermediate band emission at around 1.9?eV as revealed by the low-temperature photoluminescence. This study indicates that the mass-productive MOCVD technique may be suitable for the growth of highly mismatched ZnTe:O films for the application of the intermediate band solar cell.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Chemical Composition of the Organic Matter of Oil Shale (Kerogen-70) from Leningrad Oblast (Benzene-Ethanol Extract)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detailed data are reported on the chemical composition of the benzene-ethanol extract of oil shale (kerogen-70).

V. V. Platonov; V. A. Proskuryakov; A. V. Glybina

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing ... BEFORE any chemical sales organization, can meet or establish new trends in marketing, it must be completely aware of the problem it faces. ...

W. M. RUSSELL

1955-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

213

Chromatographic separations of soil organic matter for purposes of investigating the physico-chemical role of organic matter in soil aggregation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between clay and organic matter the greater and longer lasting will be the stabilizing action on the soil aggre? gate . Chromatographic separations using adsorbents, such as clays, are dependent upon differential adsorption of the solute molecules...-like materials as adsorbents. Chromato? graphic separations of soil-organic matter with soil-like material are functions of the clay-organic matter inter? actions. The use of soil-like constituents as adsorbents should prove of value in estimating the behavior...

Gerard, C. J.

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

214

Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

Polyethylene passive samplers for measuring hydrophobic organic chemical concentrations in sediment porewaters and their use in predicting bioaccumulation in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) from sites near Boston, MA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to determine the hazards posed by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediment beds, the following areas of research were explored: (1) the use of polyethylene (PE) sheets as passive sampling devices in ...

Fernandez, Loretta A. (Loretta Ana)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electronic and spatial structure of five-membered oxygen-or sulfur-containing cyclic phosphorus and arsenic compounds based on quantum-chemical calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have carried out nonempirical quantum-chemical calculations for five-membered heterocyclic molecules containing O ... of their geometry. We have studied their electronic and spatial structure and the character...

V. P. Feshin; E. V. Feshina; L. I. Zhizhina

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hyperpolarizable compounds and devices fabricated therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Substituted compounds having relatively large molecular first order hyperpolarizabilities are provided, along with devices and materials containing them. In general, the compounds bear electron-donating and electron-withdrawing chemical substituents on a polyheterocyclic core. 13 figs.

Therien, M.J.; DiMagno, S.G.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

218

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The plants used in the rooftop greenhouse and on the floors were made up of a number of species selected for the following functions: daytime metabolic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absorption, nighttime metabolic CO{sub 2} absorption, and volatile organic compound (VOC) and inorganic gas absorption/removal for air cleaning. The building contains a reported 910 indoor plants. Daytime metabolic species reported by the PBC include Areca Palm, Oxycardium, Rubber Plant, and Ficus alii totaling 188 plants (21%). The single nighttime metabolic species is the Sansevieria with a total of 28 plants (3%). The 'air cleaning' plant species reported by the PBC include the Money Plant, Aglaonema, Dracaena Warneckii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm with a total of 694 plants (76%). The plants in the greenhouse (Areca Palm, Rubber Plant, Ficus alii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm) numbering 161 (18%) of those in the building are grown hydroponically, with the room air blown by fan across the plant root zones. The plants on the building floors are grown in pots and are located on floors 1-6. We conducted a one-day monitoring session in the PBC on January 1, 2010. The date of the study was based on availability of the measurement equipment that the researchers had shipped from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in the U.S.A. The study date was not optimal because a large proportion of the regular building occupants were not present being New Year's Day. An estimated 40 people were present in the building all day during January 1. This being said, the building systems were in normal operations, including the air handlers and other HVAC components. The study was focused primarily on measurements in the Greenhouse and 3rd and 5th floor environments as well as rooftop outdoors. Measurements included a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes, with a more limited set of observations of indoor and outdoor particulate and carbon dioxide concentrations. Continuous measurements of Temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) were made selected indoor and outdoor locations.

Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

220

Volume 130, number 1,2 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 26 September 1986 OPTICAL DEPHASING OF CHROMOPHORES IN AN ORGANIC GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN AN ORGANIC GLASS: PICOSECOND PHOTON ECHO AND HOLE BURNING EXPERIMENTS C.A. WALSH, M. BERG, L.R. NARASIMHAN The homogeneous optical dephasing time T2for the organic glass system resorufin in ethanol is measured-temperature properties of glasses are dis- tinctly different from those of crystals as has been demonstrated by thermal

Fayer, Michael D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Supplementary Material for: A Comparison of the chemical sinks of atmospheric organics in the gas and aqueous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

panel: daytime OH conditions with LWC = 0.5 g m-3 . Upper right panel: nighttime OH conditions with LWC = 0.5 g m-3 . Lower left panel: daytime OH conditions with LWC = 0.001 g m-3 . Upper right panel photolysis, Y, as a function of solar zenith angle and altitude for compounds where the absorption cross

Nizkorodov, Sergey

222

Chemical behavior of degradation products of tributylphosphate in purex reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical behavior of butyl nitrate/butyl alcohol, degradation products from dealkylation of tri-n-butylphosphate(TBP) in PUREX reprocessing, which has not so far been reported, was investigated. No accumulation of those compounds in the organic phase of TBP(30%)-dodecane was observed in any separation cycle of PUREX despite the fact that the apparent distribution of the compounds lies to the organic phase at their high concentrations. The distribution of butyl nitrate/butyl alcohol between organic/aqueous phases is found to be dependent on their concentrations and on nitric acid concentration, which could explain the above phenomena. Only butyl nitrate of the above two compounds was slightly detected in the organic streams. It is probable from this investigation that butyl nitrate is removed into aqueous waste stream primarily through alkali scrubber.

Kuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Masui, J. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Chemical Signals Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Signals · Types · Production · Transmission · Reception · Reading: Ch 10 except boxes 10.1 and 10.2 #12;What is chemical communication? · Movement of molecules from sender to receiver · Methods compounds are volatile. - 5-20 carbon compounds - carbon (MW=12) + hydrogen is less dense than oxygen (MW

Wilkinson, Gerald S.

224

The optimization of interfaces in InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattice (SLS) semiconductors by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under a variety of conditions. Presence of an InGaAsSb interface layer is indicated by x-ray diffraction patterns. Optimized growth conditions involved the use of low pressure, short purge times, and no reactant flow during the purges. MOCVD was used to prepare an optically pumped, single heterostructure InAsSb/InGaAs SLS/InPSb laser which emitted at 3.9 {mu}m with a maximum operating temperature of approximately 100 K.

Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Kurtz, S.R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

226

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

227

Installation and Operation of Sorbathene Solvent Vapor Recovery Units to Recover and Recycle Volatile Organic Compounds at Operating Sites within the Dow Chemical Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Proprietary Dow research data is used in the selection of the optimum adsorbent mixture. The adsorption and desorption steps are batch processes that occur simultaneously in alternating twin beds to maintain steady state operation of the SORBATHENE unit...

Hall, T. L.; Larrinaga, L.

228

Chemical and Nutritional Ecology of Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as Related to Volatile Organic Compounds and Associated Essential Amino Acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nutritional resources on blow fly larval performance. One GFP producing Providencia was successfully constructed to be used to visualize bacteria along the alimentary canal of L. sericata larvae to implement investigation of its impact on the physiology...

Liu, Wenqi

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Application of the PC-SAFT equation of state to modeling of solid-liquid equilibria in systems with organic components forming chemical compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Equilibrium diagrams of liquid and solid phases were calculated by the equation of state, based on the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) for binary and ternary systems constituted by....

I. V. Prikhod’ko; F. Tumakaka; G. Sadowski

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Volume 134, number 3 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 27 February 1987 ULTRAFAST OPTICAL DEPHASING IN A LOW-TEMPERATURE ORGANIC GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-TEMPERATURE ORGANIC GLASS C.A. WALSH, M. BERG, L.R. NARASIMHAN, Karl A. LITTAU and M.D. FAYER Department of Chemistry The optical dephasing of pentacene in an o-terphenyl glass at 1.5 K is examined with picosecond photon echo measurements on glass-chromophore systems in which the homogeneous 7'*are two to three orders of magnitude

Fayer, Michael D.

231

Analysis of C1, C2, and C10 through C33 particle-phase and semi-volatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from heavy-duty diesel engines Z. Gerald Liu a,*, Devin R. Berg a , Victoria N. Vasys a , Melissa E engines Aftertreatment technology Diesel particulate filter Chemical speciation a b s t r a c t To meet increasingly stringent regulations for diesel engines, technologies such as combustion strategies

Wu, Mingshen

232

Complete Detoxification of Short Chain Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds: Isolation of Halorespiring Organisms and Biochemical Studies of the Dehalogenating Enzyme Systems - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work focused on the isolation and characterization of halorespiring populations, and the initial investigation of the dechlorinating enzyme systems. In addition, tools to evaluate the presence/activity to halorespiring populations in the environment were developed. The tools developed in this work (measurements of hydrogen consumption thresholds, molecular probes) are relevant for regulatory agencies in order to facilitate decisions on which bioremediation technology (biostimulation or bioaugmentation) is most promising at a particular site. In addition, a better understanding of the physiology of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems enhances our knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

Tiedje, J.M.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Systematic screening of targeted chemical combinations for cancer therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Res, Volume 47, 2006 Chemical proteomics and characterization...of select compounds of this chemical class. These compounds were...4-d]-pyrimidin-4-one chemical scaffold provides a unique platform for the design and optimization...

Adrian Heilbut; Joseph Lehar; Glenn Short; Grant Zimmermann; and Curtis Keith

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling the Uptake of Semivolatile Organic Compounds by Passive Air Samplers: Importance of Mass Transfer Processes within the Porous Sampling Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

E+, E– and ?USA are interrelated (illustrated in SI Figure S6) through(8)Using the model, we also investigated the chemical uptake curve with the intention of explaining a rapid decrease in the PSR of the PUF-PAS after the first few weeks of sampling. ... Both adsorption and desorption processes are assumed to occur simultaneously and a numerical model was developed with a non-linear driving force in conjunction with the Langmuir model for predicting the overall adsorption process. ...

Xianming Zhang; Frank Wania

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

236

Communication accepte: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997Communication accepte: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997 DISCRIMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication acceptée: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997Communication acceptée: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997 DISCRIMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC manuscript, published in "4th International Conference on Healthy Buildings'97, Washington : United States

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Epitaxial growth of CdTe thin film on cube-textured Ni by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CdTe thin film has been grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Ni(100) substrate. Using x-ray pole figure measurements we observed the epitaxial relationship of {111}CdTe// {001}Ni with [110]CdTe//[010]Ni and [112] CdTe//[100]Ni. The 12 diffraction peaks in the (111) pole figure of CdTe film and their relative positions with respect to the four peak positions in the (111) pole figure of Ni substrate are consistent with four equivalent orientational domains of CdTe with three to four superlattice match of about 0.7% in the [110] direction of CdTe and the [010] direction of Ni. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) images show that the CdTe domains are 30 degrees orientated from each other.

GIARE, C [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); RAO, S [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); RILEY, M [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); CHEN, L [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Goyal, Amit [ORNL; BHAT, I [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); LU, T [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); WANG, G [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Semivolatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a group of compounds that includes some  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Triclosan Antimicrobial Toothpaste, hand/dish soaps Polychlorinated Biphenyls Heat-transfer fluid Food

Iglesia, Enrique

240

Design and Synthesis of Chemically and Electronically Tunable Nanoporous Organic Polymers for Use in Hydrogen Storage Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Hani M. El-Kaderi (Primary Contact), Mohammad G. Rabbani, Thomas E. Reich, Karl T. Jackson, Refaie M. Kassab Virginia Commonwealth University Department of Chemistry 1001 West Main St Richmond, VA 23284-2006 Phone: (804) 828-7505 Email: helkaderi@vcu.edu DOE Program Officer: Michael Sennett Phone: (301) 903-6051 Email: Michael.Sennett@science.doe.go Objectives Design and synthesis of new classes of low density * nanoporous organic polymers that are linked by strong covalent bonds and composed of chemically and electronically tunable building blocks. Use gas sorption experiments to investigate porosity and * determine hydrogen storage at variable temperature and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Optimization of InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattice growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for use in infrared emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices (SLSs) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using a variety of growth conditions. Presence of an InGaAsSb interface layer was indicated by x-ray diffraction. This interface effect was minimized by optimizing the purge times, reactant flows, and growth conditions. The optimized growth conditions involved the use of low pressure, short purge times between the growth of the layers, and no reactant flow during the purges. Electron diffraction indicates that CuPt-type compositional ordering occurs in InAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} alloys and SLSs which explains an observed bandgap reduction from previously accepted alloy values.

Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1989-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

243

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water-sediment interface in sewer network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water- sediment interface in sewer parameters and concentrations of major ions, trace metals and sulphur species in wastewater but also, to the biogeochemical transformation of inorganic and organic compounds present in the wastewater (Ashley et al., 2004

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds n-alkyl Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... chemicals...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... chemicals...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds efecto Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... chemicals...

247

Questions and Answers - Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atoms make up sugar? atoms make up sugar? Previous Question (What atoms make up sugar?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (In the equation for methane, why is there more hydrogen than carbon?) In the equation for methane, why isthere more hydrogen than carbon? Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic matter? The answer is yes and no. Yes, carbon IS found in all organic matter, but NOT in inorganic matter. Although there are many definitions of "organic," in the scientific disciplines, the basic definition comes from chemistry. In chemistry, organic means chemical compounds with carbon in them. In a more general sense, organic refers to living things. And this is connected to the idea of organic chemistry being based on carbon compounds. Organic

248

Boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNH) compounds: recent developments in hydrogen storage, applications in hydrogenation and catalysis, and new syntheses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The strong efforts devoted to the exploration of BNH compounds for hydrogen storage have led to impressive advances in the field of boron chemistry. This review summarizes progress in this field from three aspects. It starts with the most recent developments in using BNH compounds for hydrogen storage, covering NH3BH3, B3H8¯ containing compounds, and CBN compounds. The following section then highlights interesting applications of BNH compounds in hydrogenation and catalysis. The last part is focused on breakthroughs in the syntheses and discovery of new BNH organic analogues. The role of N?H?+•••H?-?B dihydrogen interactions in molecule packing, thermal hydrogen evolution, and syntheses is also discussed within the review. Part of this research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle.

Huang, Zhenguo; Autrey, Thomas

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

A numerical solution to three-dimensional multiphase transport of volatile organic compounds in unsaturated soils -- with an application to the remedial method of in-situ volatilization. Part I: Theoretical development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this paper presents the development and application of a numerical model for determining the fate and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in the unsaturated zone resulting from forced volatilization and gaseous advection-dispersion of organic vapor in a multipartitioned three-dimensional environment. The model allows for single-component transport in the gas and water phases. The hydrocarbon is assumed to be in specific retention and, therefore, immobile. Partitioning of the hydrocarbon between the oil, water, gas, and soil is developed as rate-limited functions that are incorporated into sink/source terms in the transport equations. The code for the model was developed specifically to investigate in-situ volatilization (ISV) remedial strategies, predict the extent of cleanup from information obtained at a limited number of measurement locations, and to help design ISV remedial systems. Application of the model is demonstrated for a hypothetical one-dimensional ISV system. Part II of this paper will present the analysis of an existing ISV system using the full three-dimensional capability of the model.

Filley, T.; Tomasko, D.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Comparison of Agricultural Runoff between Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Agricultural Runoff between Organic Farming and Conventional Chemical Farming Nicole release #12;Organic Walnuts Filter strips Compost Organic pesticides Cover crops Monitoring of insects

251

Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditons. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Monitoring Estrogen Compounds in Wastewater Recycling Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in treated wastewater is gaining attention due to their potential ... quantify estrogen compounds in sa...

Deborah M. Kvanli; Sreelatha Marisetty; Todd A. Anderson…

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in diesel exhaust

257

Organic and inorganic components in estuarine colloids: Implications for sorption and transport of pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In colloids isolated from Chesapeake Bay and its subestuaries the concentrations of Al, Fe, and a number of trace elements were determined to vary with the clay mineral fraction that was most abundant in freshwater samples collected during the winter. The elements As, Ba, Sb, and Zn, however, increased with increasing organic content, indicating a covariance with the organic component. Organic analyses for amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids indicate that these biopolymers comprised 4 to 22%, 20 to 60%, and less than 1%, respectively, of the colloidal organic carbon in these samples. The results are significant because amino acids and carbohydrates contain oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functional groups capable of reacting with trace metals and organic pollutants. The sorption properties of several neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, including PAHs and herbicides, and several aromatic amines were investigated using the estuarine colloidal material. The effects of several environmental variables on these sorption properties were determined. The results indicate that colloids have the capacity to sorb and transport relatively insoluble pollutants that otherwise might remain immobile in the environment. Colloidal organic matter in natural water systems may serve as substrates for the sorption or binding of organic contaminants. Although most of the data has been developed using neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, data also exist for selected polar compound groups such as aromatic amines. The chemical behavior of these compound groups in interaction with DOM appears to have some similarity to their chemical interaction with sediments and soils. Partitioning constants are linear, except for polar compounds, and appear to be closely correlated to fundamental compound properties such as solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. 84 references.

Sigleo, A.C.; Means, J.C. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Integrating solar Organic Rankine Cycle into a coal-fired power plant with amine-based chemical absorption for CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel system integrating solar Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) into a power plant with amine-based chemical absorption for CO2 capture is proposed. The condensation heat of ORC provides the required heat for solvent regeneration, which avoids the energy penalty caused by the steam extraction traditionally. The cascade utilization of solar energy is realized through a combined supply of power generation and condensation heat. From the aspects of technology and economics, a performance analysis is presented to compare the proposed system and three other systems based on a 300 MWe power plant. The proposed system shows better performance than that of reference systems in the power generation and emission reductions. Economic evaluation was conducted in terms of levelized costs of electricity (LCOE) and cost of CO2 removed (COR). In order to achieve lower LCOE and COR compared to the power plant integrated with solar assisted post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC), the price of ORC has to be lower than 1284.46 USD/kW under the conditions that the price of the solar field is 120 USD/m2. It is believed that the proposed system has a satisfied potential to meet the thermal demand for the solvent regeneration in the power plant with PCC.

Li Zhao; Ruikai Zhao; Shuai Deng; Yuting Tan; Yinan Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Chemical characteristics, migration and fate of radionuclides at commercial shallow-land burial sites. [Maxey Flats, KY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface migration of radionuclides has been studied at a commercial, shallow-land burial site of low-level nuclear waste at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. A variety of radionuclides including /sup 3/H, /sup 238,239,240/Pu, /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr have migrated short distances on-site (meters to tens of meters). A number of the mobile radionuclides, notably plutonium and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic species with organic properties. As a result, we have studied the organic chemistry of radioactive leachates pumped from a number of waste burial trenches throughout the site. The major aim of the organic research is to elucidate the role of organic compounds in mediating the subsurface migration of the mobile radionuclides in groundwater. A survey study of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic content of the waste leachates has revealed that organic compounds are readily leached from the buried waste. Organic chelating agents like EDTA, HEDTA, and ED3A are the major hydrophilic organic compounds in the leachates, their concentrations ranging from 78 ppB to 19.5 ppM. A number of carboxylic acids are also present in the leachates, ranging from 671 ppB to 8.8 ppM, collectively. A variety of hydrophobic organic compounds including barbiturates and other aromatic compounds, presumably waste-derived, are also present in the leachates, generally at much lower ppB concentrations. A detailed chemical speciation study, aimed at determining whether any of the organic compounds identified in the survey study are associated with the mobile radionuclides, was undertaken using leachate from one of the waste trenches. It is clear that EDTA is chelated to plutonium and /sup 60/Co in the leachate, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. Other radionuclides, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr, may be associated with polar organic compounds such as carboxylic acids.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Persistence and transport potential of chemicals in a multimedia environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Persistence in the environment and potential for long-range transport are related since time in the environment is required for transport. A persistent chemical will travel longer distances than a reactive chemical that shares similar chemical properties. Scheringer (1997) has demonstrated the correlation between persistence and transport distance for different organic chemicals. However, this correlation is not sufficiently robust to predict one property from the other. Specific chemicals that are persistent mayor may not exhibit long-range transport potential. Persistence and long-range transport also present different societal concerns. Persistence concerns relate to the undesired possibility that chemicals produced and used now may somehow negatively affect future generations. Long-range transport concerns relate to the undesired presence of chemicals in areas where these compounds have not been used. Environmental policy decisions can be based on either or both considerations depending on the aim of the regulatory program. In this chapter, definitions and methods for quantifying persistence and transport potential of organic chemicals are proposed which will assist in the development of sound regulatory frameworks.

van de Meent, D.; McKone, T.E.; Parkerton, T.; Matthies, M.; Scheringer, M.; Wania, F.; Purdy, R.; Bennett, D.H.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Microwave plasma conversion of volatile organic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MHz; Gerling Laboratory) and a resonant plasma tuner (ASTEX) were used to generate an argon/steam- based plasma at one atmosphere

Ko, Y; Yang, G S; Chang, DPY; Kennedy, Ian M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................... ltudy by Means of Carbon Dioxide Formed 8 ............................... lomparison of . Various Materials 9 ...................................... lffect of Nature of Soil 14 ..................................... Ixidation of Soil Carbon 18... was drawn to take out the carbon dioxide. Althongl~ such experi- ments are well adapted to estimate carbon cliosicle, obviously, such con- ditions do not prevail in the soil, and while it is possible that Wollnp's conclusions may appl~r to the soil uncler...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Organic geochemical studies at a commercial shallow-land disposal site of low-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface migration of radionuclides has been studied at a commercial, shallow-land burial site of low-level nuclear waste at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. A variety of radionuclides including /sup 3/H, /sup 238/ /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr have migrated short distances on-site (meters to tens of meters). A number of the mobile radionuclides, notably plutonium and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic species with organic properties. As a result, we have studied the organic geochemistry of radioactive leachates pumped from a number of waste burial trenches throughout the site. The major aim of the organic research is to elucidate the role of organic compounds in mediating the subsurface migration of the mobile radionuclides in groundwater. A survey study of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic content of the waste leachates has revealed that organic compounds are readily leached from the buried waste. Organic chelating agents like EDTA, HEDTA and ED3A are the major hydrophilic organic compounds in the leachates, their concentrations ranging from 78 ppB to 19,511 ppB. A number of carboxylic acids are also present in the leachates, ranging from 675 ppB to 8757 ppB, collectively. A variety of hydrophobic organic compounds including barbiturates and other aromatic compounds, presumably waste-derived, are also present in the leachates, generally at lower ppB concentrations. A detailed chemical speciation study, aimed at determining whether any of the organic compounds identified in the survey study are associated with the mobile radionuclides, was undertaken using leachate from one of the waste trenches. It is clear that EDTA is chelated to plutonium and /sup 60/Co in the leachate, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. Other radionuclides, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr, may be associated with polar organic compounds such as carboxylic acids. 14 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition.

Trkula, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Emission Zone Control in Blue Organic Electrophosphorescent Devices...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrophosphorescent Devices Through Chemical Modification of Host Materials . Emission Zone Control in Blue Organic Electrophosphorescent Devices Through Chemical...

267

The Importance of Chemical and Physical Properties of New Agrochemicals for Their Sorption to Bulk Soil Material and Dissolved Organic Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increasing number of new pesticides raises the problem of predicting the sorption behaviour for many compounds with different properties. In order to reduce the analytical expenditure models are used to pr...

Helmut Deschauer; Ingrid Kögel-Knabner

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Current Challenges in Air Sampling of Semivolatile Organic Contaminants: Sampling Artifacts and Their Influence on Data Comparability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current Challenges in Air Sampling of Semivolatile Organic Contaminants: Sampling Artifacts and Their Influence on Data Comparability ... Unlike AAS, passive air samplers (PAS) do not need electricity; instead chemicals are trapped by diffusive uptake to a sorbent material. ... A big question when using PAS for SVOCs is their performance for particle-associated compounds. ...

Lisa Melymuk; Pernilla Bohlin; Ond?ej Sá?ka; Karla Pozo; Jana Klánová

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

269

Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from CBM samples) range from 50 to 100 ?g/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 1–4 mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8 mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500 mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000 s of ?g/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20 days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250 days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

William Orem; Calin Tatu; Matthew Varonka; Harry Lerch; Anne Bates; Mark Engle; Lynn Crosby; Jennifer McIntosh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Chemical Storage and Pumping of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical heat storage is familiar to us, in the form of carbon compounds, which are the basis of our present energy economy (wood - coal - natural gas - oil).

A. Vialaron

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

269 Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis, in organic geochemistry cases highlighting subtle yet important details not revealed by bulk analyses alone. For example

Long, Bernard

273

Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); White, James F. (Richland, WA); Holladay, Johnathan E. (Kennewick, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA); Muzatko, Danielle S. (Kennewick, WA); Orth, Rick J. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Organic tanks safety program FY96 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive by-products and contaminated process chemicals, which are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of salt cakes, metal oxide sludges, and partially saturated aqueous brine solutions. The tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes may be at risk for fuel- nitrate combustion accidents. The purpose of the Waste Aging Task is to elucidate how chemical and radiological processes will have aged or degraded the organic compounds stored in the tanks. Ultimately, the task seeks to develop quantitative measures of how aging changes the energetic properties of the wastes. This information will directly support efforts to evaluate the hazard as well as to develop potential control and mitigation strategies.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Clauss, S.A.; Sharma, A.K.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mixed crystal organic scintillators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Novel amine-based presursor compounds and composite membranes thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel amine-based precursor compounds comprising the condensation products of dialkylenetriamine and alpha, beta-unsaturated acid halides are disclosed, as well as composite membranes containing such compounds, the membranes being useful in RO-type processes for desalination and the removal of low molecular weight organic compounds such as phenols and carboxylic acids.

Lee, Eric K. L. (Wilmington, DE); Tuttle, Mark E. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Sorption of naphthoic acids and quinoline compounds to estuarine sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of naphthoic acids and quinoline compounds to estuarine sediment William D. Burgos The sorption of 16 ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) to an estuarine sediment was measured in synthetic were quinoline compounds. The linear sorption distribution coefficient (Kd) was used to correlate

Burgos, William

278

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

279

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

280

Chapter 9 - Chemical and Physical Properties of Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Hydrocarbons are the simplest organic compounds and contain only carbon and hydrogen but they can be straight chain or branched chain with the same empirical formula but showing differences in properties. Chemical change results in the hydrocarbon yielding a product that may be entirely different in composition to the starting hydrocarbon—the exception is the isomerization reaction where a straight-chain hydrocarbon is converted to a branched-chain hydrocarbon. Chemical properties of hydrocarbons describe the potential of hydrocarbons to undergo chemical change or reaction by virtue of the hydrocarbon structure. Physical properties can be observed or measured without changing the composition of matter. Physical properties are used to observe and describe matter. Physical properties that are of interest in the current context include: boiling point, melting point, density, vapor density, flash point, ignition temperature, and dew point.

James G. Speight

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Organic Thin Film Magnet of Nickel-Tetracyanoethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid organic-inorganic materials consisting of a transition metal and an organic compound, TCNE form a unique class of organic magnets denoted by M(TCNE){sub x}(where M = transition metals, and TCNE = tetracyanoethylene). The organic thin film magnet of nickel-tetracyanoethylene, Ni(TCNE){sub x} is deposited on sputtered clean gold substrate using the physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate chemical and electronic properties of Ni(TCNE){sub x} film. XPS derived film thickness and stoichiometry are found to be 6 nm and 1:2 ratio between Ni and TCNE resulting Ni(TCNE){sub 2} film, respectively. In addition, XPS results do not show any signature of the presence of pure metallic Ni or Ni-clustering in the Ni(TCNE){sub x} film.

Bhatt, Pramod; Yusuf, S. M. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Mononuclear Organolead Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tetraorganolead compounds in general exhibit lower thermal stability and greater reactivity than the corresponding compounds of the lighter Group 14 elements. The thermal stability is strongly dependent on the...

Friedo Huber; Wolfgang Petz

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

2, 21672208, 2002 Chemical mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results simulating water soluble organic compound production by gas-to-particle conversion an important role in the atmosphere for several reasons. They transport material through the atmosphere, affect

Boyer, Edmond

284

Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Exhaust Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in...

285

Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12;Nucleus Electrons Cloud of negative charge (2 electrons) Fig. 2.5: Simplified model of a Helium (He) Atom He 4.002602 2 Helium Mass Number (~atomic mass) = number of Neutrons + Protons = 4 for Helium Atomic

Frey, Terry

286

Competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of organic matter on iron oxide: II. Displacement and transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The competitive interactions between organic matter compounds and mineral surfaces are poorly understood, yet these interactions may play a significant role in the stability and co-transport of mineral colloids and/or environmental contaminants. In this study, the processes of competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SR-NOM) are investigated with several model organic compounds in packed beds of iron oxide-coated quartz columns. Results demonstrated that strongly-binding organic compounds are competitively adsorbed and displace those weakly-bound organic compounds along the flow path. Among the four organic compounds studied, polyacrylic acid (PAA) appeared to be the most competitive, whereas SR-NOM was more competitive than phthalic and salicylic acids. A diffuse adsorption and sharp desorption front (giving an appearance of irreversible adsorption) of the SR-NOM breakthrough curves are explained as being a result of the competitive time-dependent adsorption and displacement processes between different organic components within the SR-NOM. The stability and transport of iron oxide colloids varied as one organic component competitively displaces another. Relatively large quantities of iron oxide colloids are transported when the more strongly-binding PAA competitively displaces the weakly-binding SR-NOM or when SR-NOM competitively displaces phthalic and salicylic acids. Results of this study suggest that the chemical composition and hence the functional behavior of NOM (e.g., in stabilizing mineral colloids and in complexing contaminants) can change along its flow path as a result of the dynamic competitive interactions between heterogeneous NOM subcomponents. Further studies are needed to better define and quantify these NOM components as well as their roles in contaminant partitioning and transport. 37 refs., 10 figs.

Gu, B; Mehlhorn, T.L.; Liang, Liyuan [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbo Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk Electric Turbo Compounding Highlights Electric...

288

Determination of Selenium in Seleno Compounds and Marine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Journalof Analytical I Atomic I Spectrometry M. DEAKER AND W. MAHER determination; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry; seleno compounds; marine biological tissues; chemical modijcation Electrothermal (graphite furnace) atomic absorption spec- trometry (ETAAS

Canberra, University of

289

Extended Characterization of Chemical Processes in Hot Cells Using Environmental Swipe Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental sampling is used extensively by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verification of information from State declarations or a facility’s design regarding nuclear activities occurring within the country or a specific facility. Environmental sampling of hot cells within a facility under safeguards is conducted using 10.2 cm x 10.2 cm cotton swipe material or cellulose swipes. Traditional target analytes used by the IAEA to verify operations within a facility include a select list of gamma-emitting radionuclides and total and isotopic U and Pu. Analysis of environmental swipe samples collected within a hot-cell facility where chemical processing occurs may also provide information regarding specific chemicals used in fuel processing. However, using swipe material to elucidate what specific chemical processes were/are being used within a hot cell has not been previously evaluated. Staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) teamed to evaluate the potential use of environmental swipe samples as collection media for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. This evaluation was initiated with sample collection during a series of Coupled End-to-End (CETE) reprocessing runs at ORNL. The study included measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides, total and isotopic U and Pu, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. These results allowed us to elucidate what chemical processes used in the hot cells during reprocessing of power reactor and identify other legacy chemicals used in hot cell operations which predate the CETE process.

Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Thomas, M-L; Lepel, Elwood A.; Brunson, Ronald R.; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Survey of Alternative Feedstocks for Commodity Chemical Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current high prices for petroleum and natural gas have spurred the chemical industry to examine alternative feedstocks for the production of commodity chemicals. High feedstock prices have driven methanol and ammonia production offshore. The U.S. Chemical Industry is the largest user of natural gas in the country. Over the last 30 years, alternatives to conventional petroleum and natural gas feedstocks have been developed, but have limited, if any, commercial implementation in the United States. Alternative feedstocks under consideration include coal from unconventional processing technologies, such as gasification and liquefaction, novel resources such as biomass, stranded natural gas from unconventional reserves, and heavy oil from tar sands or oil shale. These feedstock sources have been evaluated with respect to the feasibility and readiness for production of the highest volume commodity chemicals in the United States. Sources of organic compounds, such as ethanol from sugar fermentation and bitumen-derived heavy crude are now being primarily exploited for fuels, rather than for chemical feedstocks. Overall, government-sponsored research into the use of alternatives to petroleum feedstocks focuses on use for power and transportation fuels rather than for chemical feedstocks. Research is needed to reduce cost and technical risk. Use of alternative feedstocks is more common outside the United States R&D efforts are needed to make these processes more efficient and less risky before becoming more common domestically. The status of alternative feedstock technology is summarized.

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Robinson, Sharon M [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Physical and Chemical Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

data image data image Physical and Chemical Applications Research in this area includes: Chemical analysis (femtosecond laser ablation). Advanced sensors (laser ultrasonics). Advanced materials and nanotechnology for clean energy- hydrogen storage, nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes, nanowires, and nanoparticles). Photons to fuels (biosynthetic pathways for generating hydrocarbon biofuels in photosynthetic organisms). Advanced Sensor Development Sensor-based control of industrial processes can help companies: Decrease production costs; Reduce waste of raw materials on manufacturing lines; Lower manufacturing downtime from equipment maintenance; Increase the energy efficiency of manufacturing processes; Detect equipment failure early, before it becomes a major liability;

293

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

294

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

295

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

296

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

297

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

298

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

299

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

Interim Report: CHEMICAL SPECIES OF MIGRATING RADIONUCLIDES AT COMMERCIAL SHALLOW LAND BURIAL SITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly report for .the project "Chemical Species of Migrating Radionuclides at Commercial Shallow Land Burial Site" under the new reporting schedule requested by the sponsor. Future reports will be issued following each fiscal quarter, with the next report scheduled in October, 1982. The primary purpose of this project is to develop an understanding of the processes responsible for radionuclide migration at low-level waste burial sites. Chemical measurements of waste trench leachate and identification of chemical changes in leachate during migration will provide a basis for geochemical waste transport models. This project will produce for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information to support guidance for implementation of 10 CFR 61, particularly in the development of criteria for low level waste disposal site selection, management, permanent closure and monitoring. Topics covered include: Experimental Trench and Well Study; Chemical Species Characterization; Specific Radionuclide Mapping; Organic Complexing Compounds,

Kirby,, L. J.; Rickard,, W. H.; Toste,, A. P.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Beauchamp, R.O. Jr. [Center for Information on Toxicology and Environment, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

In silico prediction of dermal penetration rate of chemicals from their molecular structural descriptors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dermal penetration rate of some volatile and non-volatile organic compounds was estimated by quantitative structure–activity relationship approaches by using interpretable molecular descriptors. Linear and nonlinear models were developed using multiple linear regressions (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) methods. Robustness and reliability of the constructed MLR and ANN models were evaluated by using the leave-one-out cross-validation method, which produces the statistics of Q MLR 2 = 0.786 , Q ANN 2 = 0.833 for non-volatiles and Q MLR 2 = 0.639 , Q ANN 2 = 0.712 for volatile compounds. Furthermore, the chemical applicability domains of these models were determined via leverage approach. The results of this study indicated the ability of developed QSAR models in the prediction of dermal penetration rate of various chemicals from their calculated molecular descriptors.

Mohammad H. Fatemi; Hanieh Malekzadeh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Organics Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. Because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected, two verification studies were performed to address the 303(d) segments that were listed for metal and organic contaminants in marine sediment. The Metals Verification Study (MVS) was conducted in 2003; the final report, Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington, was published in March 2004 (Kohn et al. 2004). This report describes the Organics Verification Study that was conducted in 2005. The study approach was similar to the MVS in that many surface sediment samples were screened for the major classes of organic contaminants, and then the screening results and other available data were used to select a subset of samples for quantitative chemical analysis. Because the MVS was designed to obtain representative data on concentrations of contaminants in surface sediment throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, aliquots of the 160 MVS sediment samples were used in the analysis for the Organics Verification Study. However, unlike metals screening methods, organics screening methods are not specific to individual organic compounds, and are not available for some target organics. Therefore, only the quantitative analytical results were used in the organics verification evaluation. The results of the Organics Verification Study showed that sediment quality outside of Sinclair Inlet is unlikely to be impaired because of organic contaminants. Similar to the results for metals, in Sinclair Inlet, the distribution of residual organic contaminants is generally limited to nearshore areas already within the actively managed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility Superfund Site, where further source-control actions and monitoring are under way.

Kohn, Nancy P.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Niewolny, Laurie A.; Johnston, Robert K.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Development of FRET-based Technologies for Dynamic and Quantitative Measurement of Protein-protein Interactions and High-throughput Screening of Small Chemical Inhibitors of the SUMO Pathway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughput platform to screen small chemical compounds thatscreening platforms to look for small chemical inhibitorsplatform provides a new strategy to identify small chemical

Song, Yang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demonstrates self-catalytic schemes for large-scale synthesis of compound semiconductor nanowire powders for inorganic-organic hybrid thermoelectric cells

306

Enhanced formulations for neutralization of chemical, biological and industrial toxants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An enhanced formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The enhanced formulation according to the present invention is non-toxic and non-corrosive and can be delivered by a variety of means and in different phases. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator and water.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuqueque, NM) [Albuqueque, NM

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Metal Organic Framework Research: High Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal Organic Framework for CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: LBNL is developing a method for identifying the best metal organic frameworks for use in capturing CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Metal organic frameworks are porous, crystalline compounds that, based on their chemical structure, vary considerably in terms of their capacity to grab hold of passing CO2 molecules and their ability to withstand the harsh conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Owing primarily to their high tunability, metal organic frameworks can have an incredibly wide range of different chemical and physical properties, so identifying the best to use for CO2 capture and storage can be a difficult task. LBNL uses high-throughput instrumentation to analyze nearly 100 materials at a time, screening them for the characteristics that optimize their ability to selectively adsorb CO2 from coal exhaust. Their work will identify the most promising frameworks and accelerate their large-scale commercial development to benefit further research into reducing the cost of CO2 capture and storage.

None

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

Erbil, A.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents, and degrading various compounds.

Hawthorne, Steven B. (Grand Forks, ND); Miller, David J. (Grand Forks, ND); Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie (Grand Forks, ND); Hammond, Peter James (York, GB); Clifford, Anthony Alan (Leeds, GB)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Olefin Metathesis of Renewable Platform Chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Olefinic double bonds are often found in the structure of natural compounds. This makes olefin metathesis a powerful tool for their transformation into valuable renewable platform chemicals and, in some cases, di...

Lucas Montero de Espinosa; Michael A. R. Meier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Exploratory and Newer Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In writing a chapter on “Exploratory and Newer Compounds” in a book concerned with anesthesia, the authors feel that it is most important to have a clear idea of the aims of their work. The “Why?” must never b...

T. H. S. Burns; A. Bracken

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

1983-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

XPS study of Eu(III) coordination compounds: Core levels binding energies in solid mixed-oxo-compounds EumXxOy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Literature is relatively sparse on XPS studies of europium compounds: it is essentially restricted to metallic compounds (EuM5, in which M is a transition metal) or to simple oxides. While particular interest have been devoted to understanding physical phenomenon in the beginning of “shake-down” and “shake-up” satellites evidenced on core-level regions of the lanthanides, few information on absolute binding energies (BE) was available. This paper reports an XPS binding energy data base for europium(III) compounds, in which Eu cation have various chemical environments: simple oxide Eu2O3, Eu mixed oxides with organic oxalate, acetylacetonate or inorganic sulfate, nitrate, carbonate ligands. The values of core-level BE (O1s, Eu3d and Eu4d) and the characteristics of shake-down satellites of Eu3d are reported, and their variations are attributed to ionicity/covalency changes. Such interpretation was already published for Group A mixed oxides and zeolites. These data are needed for determining Eu(III) species sorbed onto minerals in the presence of various ligands in the framework of retention studies for assessing the safety of future nuclear waste disposals.

F. Mercier; C. Alliot; L. Bion; N. Thromat; P. Toulhoat

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

316

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-56787 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(9) Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential bedrooms (n=4), bathrooms (n=2), and a furnished test chamber. Rooms were studied "as-is" with material surfaces and furnishings unaltered. Surface materials were characterized and areas quantified. Experiments included rapid volatilization of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with the room closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase, followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. The mixture included n-alkanes, aromatics, glycol ethers, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, dichlorobenzene, and organophosphorus compounds. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at one surface sink and one potential embedded sink. The 2-parameter sink model tracked measurements for most compounds, but improved fits were obtained for some VOCs with a 3-parameter sink-diffusion or a 4-parameter two-sink model. Sorptive partitioning and initial adsorption rates increased with decreasing vapour pressure within each chemical class.

317

The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. [Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Chemical studies of the Ames oxydesulfurization process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The validity of the Ames claim of up to 40% removal of organic sulfur from coal was assessed by subjecting model compounds to the Ames Process which utilizes 0.2 M aqueous Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ at 150/sup 0/C under pressure of 300 psi O/sub 2/ for one hour. This type of oxydesulfurization has been described as a two step process involving initial oxidation at sulfur to produce sulfoxides and sulfones. This step is then thought to be followed by the thermal and, in the Ames Process, base assisted extrusion of SO/sub x/. In this concept, the initial oxidation at sulfur facilitates desulfurization by polarizing and weakening the carbon to sulfur bond. The conclusions concerning the oxydesulfurization process are: (1) thiophenols and disulfides are the only groups oxidized at sulfur; (2) sulfides, including thiophenes, are not oxidized at sulfur; (3) reactive sulfides are oxidized at reactive carbon-hydrogen bonds; (4) reactive carbon-hydrogen bonds in functions not containing sulfur also react; (5) the Ames Process is directly analogous to hydrocarbon autoxidation; and (6) more efficient sulfur removal without severe degradation of the coal is not possible under the present process conditions. The success which these model compound studies have had in defining the limits of the efficacy of the Ames oxydesulfurization process encourage one to believe that this approach will be quite valuable in the evaluation of other proposed chemical coal cleaning techniques.

Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.; Chang, L.W.; Schmidt, T.E.

1981-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marketed separately from conventionally grown produce in order to be profitably sold. Because of the amount of organic material include compost, Purdue University · Cooperative Extension Service · Knowledge to Go

322

Sludge organics bioavailability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Organic Photochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CHEMICAL SOCIETY 83 : 2789 ( 1961 ). MULLIKEN, R.S., THE TWISTING FREQUENCY AND THE BARRIER HEIGHT FOR FREE ROTATION IN ETYLENE, CHEMICAL REVIEWS 41 : 219 ( 1947 ). MUSTAFA, A, DIMERIZATION REACTIONS IN SUNLIGHT, CHEMICAL REVIEWS 51 : 1 ( 1952...

George S. Hammond; Nicholas J. Turro

1963-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

325

Multi-view spectral clustering and its chemical application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clustering is an unsupervised method that allows researchers to group objects and gather information about their relationships. In chemoinformatics, clustering enables hypotheses to be drawn about a compound's biological, chemical and physical property in comparison to another. We introduce a novel improved spectral clustering algorithm, proposed for chemical compound clustering, using multiple data sources. Tensor-based spectral methods, used in this paper, provide chemically appropriate and statistically significant results when attempting to cluster compounds from both the GSK-Chembl Malaria data set and the Zinc database. Spectral clustering algorithms based on the tensor method give robust results on the mid-size compound sets used here. The goal of this paper is to present the clustering of chemical compounds, using a tensor-based multi-view method which proves of value to the medicinal chemistry community. Our findings show compounds of extremely different chemotypes clustering together, this is a hint to the chemogenomics nature of our method.

Adeshola A. Adefioye; Xinhai Liu; Bart De Moor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Giant magnetoresistive cobalt oxide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are disclosed for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties. 58 figs.

Schultz, P.G.; Xiang, X.; Goldwasser, I.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NO{sub x} vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180{degrees}C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200{degrees}C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time.

Pierce, R.A.; Smith, J.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microoptical compound lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, David D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

329

Unsaturated macrocyclic carbonyl bridge compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unsaturated macrocyclic carbonyl bridge compounds ... Catalytic Ring-Closing Metathesis of Doubly Armed, Bridged Bicyclic Sulfones. ...

C. F. H. Allen; J. A. VanAllan

1953-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The chemical organization of signaling interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......aset of reaction mechanisms. Solid light gray blocks represent replicating reaction...T. (2000) Evidence for a distinct light-induced calcium-dependent potassium...Thorsson,V., Ranish,J.A., Christmas,R., Buhler,J., Eng,J.K......

Upinder S. Bhalla

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Compound floating pivot micromechanisms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

332

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Imperial Oil/Champion Chemicals, Monmouth County, NJ. (Second remedial action), September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 9.67-acre Industrial Latex site is a chemical adhesives and natural and synthetic rubber compounds manufacturer in Wallington, Bergen County, New Jersey. From 1951 to 1980, the Industrial Latex Corporation manufactured both chemical adhesives and natural and synthetic rubber compounds. Adhesives were initially formulated using vegetable protein in a solvent base. The ROD addresses the final remedy for the contamination present in the soil, sediment, buildings and equipment, drums, sludge, septic system, and hardened latex, as the first of two operable units. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, sludge, and debris are VOCs including PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; other organics, including PAHs, PCBs, pesticides, and phenols; and metals, including arsenic and lead.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Profiles in Chemistry: A Historical Perspective on the National Organic Symposium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, he also must have been thinking of his upcoming talk at the first Symposium on Organic Chemistry that was to begin in two weeks in Rochester, NY, because in the weeks leading up to the Symposium, Norris was inspired to change the title of his talk(2, 3) from the advertised Quantitative Measurement of Chemical Reactivity of Organic Compounds to the actual talk he gave on December 29, which was entitled The Opportunities for Research in Aliphatic Chemistry. ... Photo by Bachrach and courtesy of the School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois. ... Ihde, A. J. Chemistry as Viewed from Bascom’s Hill; Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin: Madison, 1990; pp 611– 612. ...

Edward E. Fenlon; Brian J. Myers

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Organic solvent topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

Cowley, W.L.

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

CHEMICAL MARKETING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKETING ... The reason, I believe, is that the chemical industry has been blind (until very recently) to the need for paying attention to marketing. ... Its marketing needs are now like those of a mature—no longer a growing—industry. ...

1960-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Occurrence of pharmaceutically active and non-steroidal estrogenic compounds in three different wastewater recycling schemes in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discovery that natural and synthetic chemicals, in the form of excreted hormones and pharmaceuticals, as well as a vast array of compounds with domestic and industrial applications, can enter the environment via wastewater treatment plants and cause a wide variety of environmental and health problems even at very low concentrations, suggests the need for improvement of water recycling. Three Australian wastewater recycling schemes, two of which employ reverse osmosis (RO) technology, the other applying ozonation and biological activated carbon filtration, have been studied for their ability to remove trace organic contaminants including 11 pharmaceutically active compounds and two non-steroidal estrogenic compounds. Contaminant concentrations were determined using a sensitive analytical method comprising solid phase extraction, derivatization and GC with MS using selected ion monitoring. In raw wastewater, concentrations of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications were comparable to those found in wastewaters around the world. Remarkably, removal efficiencies for the three schemes were superior to literature values and RO was responsible for the greatest proportion of contaminant removal. The ability of RO membranes to concentrate many of the compounds was demonstrated and highlights the need for continued research into monitoring wastewater treatment, concentrate disposal, improved water recycling schemes and ultimately, safer water and a cleaner environment.

Jawad H. Al-Rifai; Candace L. Gabelish; Andrea I. Schäfer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Genome Sequences of Two Thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis Strains, Efficient Producers of Platform Chemical 2,3-Butanediol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Efficient Producers of Platform Chemical 2,3-Butanediol...3-BD is a crucial platform compound, which could...antibiotics, and chemicals and have been identified...efficient producers of platform chemical 2,3-butanediol...

Lixiang Li; Fei Su; Yu Wang; Lijie Zhang; Cuicui Liu; Jingwen Li; Cuiqing Ma; Ping Xu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Definition: Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and elemental analysis is a process where a sample of some material (e.g., soil, waste or drinking water, bodily fluids, minerals, chemical compounds) is analyzed for its elements and compounds and sometimes its isotopic composition. Elemental analysis can be qualitative (determining what elements are present), and it can also be quantitative (determining how much of each type are present).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elemental_analysis Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The adsorption of selected chemical compounds on soil clays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, California. The Yolo soil series is discussed in the U. S. D. A. Contra Costa County, California Soil Survey, Series 1933, No. 26. Montmorillonite de osit material. The relatively "pure" montmorillonite clay was purchased as Panther Creek Bentonite from..., California. The Yolo soil series is discussed in the U. S. D. A. Contra Costa County, California Soil Survey, Series 1933, No. 26. Montmorillonite de osit material. The relatively "pure" montmorillonite clay was purchased as Panther Creek Bentonite from...

Hoover, William Leroy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall Title Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Moya Melody, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations

343

Polybenzimidazole Compounds, Polymeric Media, and Methods of Post-Polymerization Modifications  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

INL has developed a patented process to handle and process polybenzimdazole (PBI) compounds that previously could only be handled in very heavy low vapor pressure organic solvents. With the new process the resulting compounds are modified to provide increased solubility in higher vapor pressure solvents and at significantly greater concentrations. These compounds may be utilized in a wide array of applications where high temperature and polymeric materials are utilized. Compounds made with...

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

344

Chemical and Materials Sciences Building | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Facilities and Capabilities SHARE Chemical and Materials Sciences Building Chemical and Materials Sciences Building, 411 ORNL's Chemical and Materials Sciences Building provides modern laboratory and office space for researchers studying and developing materials and chemical processes for energy-related technologies. The Chemical and Materials Sciences Building is a 160,000 square foot facility that provides modern laboratory and office space for ORNL researchers who are studying and developing materials and chemical

345

Science Organizations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

346

A novel property of spider silk: chemical defence against ants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...GC-MS) to identify the chemicals on the surface of the silk...possible identification of any chemicals. The identified compound...bioassay apparatus consisted of a platform with a baiting station and...silk thread). The surface chemicals on the silk threads for the...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A unified algorithm for predicting partition coefficients for PBPK modeling of drugs and environmental chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The algorithms in the literature focusing to predict tissue:blood PC (P{sub tb}) for environmental chemicals and tissue:plasma PC based on total (K{sub p}) or unbound concentration (K{sub pu}) for drugs differ in their consideration of binding to hemoglobin, plasma proteins and charged phospholipids. The objective of the present study was to develop a unified algorithm such that P{sub tb}, K{sub p} and K{sub pu} for both drugs and environmental chemicals could be predicted. The development of the unified algorithm was accomplished by integrating all mechanistic algorithms previously published to compute the PCs. Furthermore, the algorithm was structured in such a way as to facilitate predictions of the distribution of organic compounds at the macro (i.e. whole tissue) and micro (i.e. cells and fluids) levels. The resulting unified algorithm was applied to compute the rat P{sub tb}, K{sub p} or K{sub pu} of muscle (n = 174), liver (n = 139) and adipose tissue (n = 141) for acidic, neutral, zwitterionic and basic drugs as well as ketones, acetate esters, alcohols, aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers. The unified algorithm reproduced adequately the values predicted previously by the published algorithms for a total of 142 drugs and chemicals. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated the relative importance of the various compound properties reflective of specific mechanistic determinants relevant to prediction of PC values of drugs and environmental chemicals. Overall, the present unified algorithm uniquely facilitates the computation of macro and micro level PCs for developing organ and cellular-level PBPK models for both chemicals and drugs.

Peyret, Thomas [DSEST, Universite de Montreal, Canada H3T 1A8 (Canada); Poulin, Patrick [Consultant, 4009 rue Sylvia Daoust, Quebec City, Quebec, G1X 0A6 (Canada); Krishnan, Kannan, E-mail: kannan.krishnan@umontreal.ca [DSEST, Universite de Montreal, H3T 1A8 (Canada)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 72. Nitromethane with Water or Organic Solvents: Ternary and Quaternary Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mutual solubilities and liquid–liquid equilibria of nitromethane ternary and quaternary systems with liquidsolvents are reviewed. The solvents include water inorganic compounds and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons halogenated hydrocarbons alcohols acids esters and nitrogen compounds. A total of 107 ternary and eight quaternary systems whose properties were described in the chemical literature through 1998 are compiled. For 22 systems sufficient data were available to allow critical evaluation. All data are expressed as mass and mole fractions as well as the originally reported units. Similar reviews of gas liquid and solid solubilities for other systems have been published in the frame of Solubility Data Series. This is the 72 volume of this series.

Valerii P. Sazonov; Kenneth N. Marsh; David G. Shaw; Valerii P. Sazonov; Mariya F. Chernysheva; Nikolai V. Sazonov; Hideo Akaiwa

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 77. C 2+ Nitroalkanes With Water or Organic Solvents: Binary and Multicomponent Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mutual solubilities and liquid-liquid equilibria of binary and multicomponent systems composed of C 2+ nitroalkanes with solvents are reviewed. The solvents (mainly in liquid phase) include water inorganic compounds and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons halogenated hydrocarbons alcohols acids esters and nitrogen compounds. A total 81 binary 21 ternary 2 quaternary and 1 five component systems whose properties were described in the chemical literature through 1998 are compiled. For 14 systems sufficient data were available to allow critical evaluation. All data are expressed as mass and mole fractions as well as the originally reported units. Similar reviews of gas liquid and solid solubilities for other systems have been within the Solubility Data Series. This is volume 77 of this series.

Valerii P. Sazonov; David G. Shaw

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

CHARACTERISTICS Nitrated compounds constitute a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds. If there is a chance of an explosive reaction, conduct the operation behind a blast shield

Wilcock, William

352

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.

1992-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, Stephen B. (Portola Valley, CA); Koo, Myoung-Seo (San Francisco, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate Matter Formation in the Atmosphere: Successes and Challenges Speaker(s): James F. Pankow Date: March 6, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 James F. Pankow. The thermodynamic principles according to which organic particulate matter (OPM) forms in the atmosphere have become well identified because of research progress made since about the mid 1990s. These are, ahem, known knowns. However, many unknowns exist regarding the concentrations and chemical characteristics of the biogenic and anthropogenic compounds present in the atmosphere that are important in OPM formation. In this context, since we know what we need to know more about, these are, well, known unknowns. Other known important unknowns are

356

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

About Us Organization Organization Organization Printable PDF News & Blog CIO Leadership Organization Contact Us...

357

Organization | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

About Us Organization Organization Organization News Leadership Organization History Careers Contact Us...

358

Synthesis and thermal studies of flexible polyurethane nanocomposite foams obtained using nanoclay modified with flame retardant compound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents thermal studies of nanocomposites based on the flexible polyurethane (PU) matrix and filled using montmorillonite organically modified with organophosphorus flame retardant compound. Flexibl...

?ukasz Piszczyk; Magdalena Danowska…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Sanyo Chemical Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Industries Chemical Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name Sanyo Chemical Industries Place Tokyo, Japan Zip 103-0023 Product String representation "Sanyo is a petr ... uction process." is too long. References Sanyo Chemical Industries[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sanyo Chemical Industries is a company located in Tokyo, Japan . References ↑ "Sanyo Chemical Industries" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sanyo_Chemical_Industries&oldid=350614" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

360

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

(7-9/94)(10/96)(06,9-11/04) Neuman Chapter 13 Carbonyl Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Carboxylic Acids from Organic Chemistry by Robert C. Neuman, Jr. Professor of Chemistry, emeritus University Outline of the Book ************************************************************************************** I. Foundations 1. Organic Molecules and Chemical Bonding 2. Alkanes and Cycloalkanes 3. Haloalkanes

Reed, Christopher A.

362

2 Extracting and trapping biogenic 3 volatile organic compounds stored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Subcritical water extraction; UAE, Ultrasound-assisted extraction 36 1. Introduction Plants release

Goldstein, Allen

363

The Effect of Organic Compounds in Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBSTATIONS P. L. DowNs, President, Temple.. . .. ................... .. .. ... ... . ... .. .. .. .. ... .. .. ... .. ... ... .. . ...... Term expires 1919 CHARLES RoGAN, Vice Preszdenl, Austin...... ... .. .. .. . Term expires 1917 W . P. HoBBY, Beaumont... Secretary CHAS. A. FELKER, Chief Clerk J. H. RoGERS, Inspector W. H. WooD, Inspector T. H. WoLTERS, Inspector S. D. PEARCE, Inspector J. M. ScHAEDEL, Inspector W. M. WICKES, Inspector SUBSTATION NO. 1: Beeville, Bee County E. E .. BINFORD, B. S...

Fraps, G. S.

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Degradation of organic phosphorus compounds in anoxic Baltic Sea ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Public Affairs · Join the Policy Action Network · Science Education · Science ... in anoxic Baltic Sea sediments: A 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study. Ahlgren ...

365

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the target list or not, according to proposed language in Permit Attachment N. If a TIC is determined to contribute more than one percent of the risk, then it will be added to...

366

Biodegradation of organic compounds in vadose zone and aquifer sediments.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rotary head. Conventional, steam-cleaned, hollow-stem augers...phos- phorus, by using the ignition method (34); total nitrogen...mineral nitrogen, by using steam distillation (22); and exchangeable...substrates. This suggestion is based on the assumption that the affinities...

A Konopka; R Turco

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nanoparticle Formation of Organic Compounds With Retained Biological Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Pediatric, Radiology, Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive

Zare, Richard N.

368

Three-Dimensional Simulation of Volatile Organic Compound Mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulations using data from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, where carbon tetrachloride is present in a low permeability zone about 30 m above the...

369

Chemical Occurrences  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

370

Bioavailability to plants of sludge-borne toxic organics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large numbers of man-made organic chemicals occur in sewage sludge and many are thought to represent an environmental hazard. This is particularly true of the compounds classified as priority pollutants (TOs) which typically occur in sludges in the mg/kg concentration range. Concerns about their environmental fate, specifically their bioavailability to food-chain crops, have disrupted land application of sludges. A review of the pertinent literature (especially field studies utilizing sludge-amended soils and confirmational analysis for parent compound) suggest the concern is largely groundless. The vast majority of TOs in sludge occur at low concentrations and when applied to soil are strongly sorbed in the soil-sludge matrix, degraded, or are otherwise lost from the soil during the cropping season. Plant bioconcentration factors for most TOs are less 0.01 DW. Even if taken up by plants the TOs may be metabolized within the plant or accumulate in plant parts that are usually not consumed. In contrast a second general group of man-made organics (aromatic surfactants) exist in sludge at much greater concentrations (g/kg).

O'Connor, G.A.; Chaney, R.L.; Ryan, J.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Chemical Forms of Mercury And Selenium in Fish Following Digestion With Simulated Gastric Fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish is a major dietary source of potentially neurotoxic methylmercury compounds for humans. It is also a rich source of essential selenium. We have used in situ mercury L{sub III}-edge and selenium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy to chemically characterize the methylmercury and selenium in both fresh fish and fish digested with simulated gastric fluid. For the mercury, we confirm our earlier finding [Harris et al. (2003) Science301, 1203] that the methylmercury is coordinated by a single thiolate donor, which resembles cysteine, and for the selenium, we find a mixture of organic forms that resemble selenomethionine and an aliphatic selenenyl sulfide such as Cys-S-Se-Cys. We find that local chemical environments of mercury and selenium do not change upon digestion of the fish with simulated gastric fluid. We discuss the toxicological implications for humans consuming fish.

George, G.N.; Singh, S.P.; Prince, R.C.; Pickering, I.J.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this paper, we present and evaluate a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3_, SO42_, Cl_, and F_ in rivers draining YNP for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). These solutes were chosen because they are likely derived in part, from the magmatic volatiles CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF (Symonds et al., 2001). Weekly to

373

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

374

The design of new ligands and transition metal compounds for the oxidation of organic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................... 2 1.3 Epoxidation of ?,?-unsaturated carboxylic acids with catalytic sodium tungstate and hydrogen peroxide ........................................ 3 1.4 The Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation reaction.............................. 4 1.5... as Jacobsen?s catalyst 1-3 but generally only olefins with cis geometry or trisubstituted olefins are epoxidized in high ee. 6 Scheme 1.5. Salen ligands A crystallographic study of these catalysts provides valuable insight...

Grill, Joseph Michael

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

"Optimization of Zero Length Chromatographic System and Measuring Properties of Model Compounds from Biomass Pyrolysis"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compounds from Biomass Pyrolysis" Ross Kendall Faculty Mentor: Dr. Paul Dauenhauer, Chemical Engineering by using what he made to measure many of the compounds involved in biomass pyrolysis. If we can understand to retrieve diffusion coefficients of many intermediates of the biomass pyrolysis reaction. From this data

Mountziaris, T. J.

376

Chemoprevention by Fruit Phenolic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes available information on the chemopreventive effects of fruit phenolic compounds in various experimental systems. Emphasis is placed on the anticarcinogenic activity of these phenolics ...

Gary D. Stoner PhD; Bruce C. Casto ScD

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Coupled Physical/Chemical and Biofiltration Technologies to Reduce Air Emissions from Forest Products Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research is a laboratory and bench-scale investigation of a system to concentrate and destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including hazardous air pollutants, formed from the drying of wood and the manufacture of wood board products (e.g., particle board and oriented strandboard). The approach that was investigated involved concentrating the dilute VOCs (<500 ppmv) with a physical/chemical adsorption unit, followed by the treatment of the concentrated voc stream (2,000 to 2,500 ppmv) with a biofiltration unit. The research program lasted three years, and involved three research organizations. Michigan Technological University was the primary recipient of the financial assistance, the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and Mississippi State University (MSU) were subcontractors to MTU. The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a pilot-scale demonstration of the technology with sufficient data to provide for the design of an industrial system. No commercialization activities were included in this project.

Gary D. McGinnis

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C. [and others

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Title Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3938E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Willem, Henry, and Brett C. Singer Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords resave Abstract This report is prepared in the context of a larger program whose mission is to advance understanding of ventilation and indoor air quality in U.S. homes. A specific objective of this program is to develop the scientific basis ? through controlled experiments, monitoring and analysis ? for health risk-based ventilation standards. Appropriate and adequate ventilation is a basic element of a healthy home. Ventilation provides outdoor air and in the process removes indoor odors and contaminants including potentially unhealthful chemicals emitted by indoor materials, products and activities. Ventilation traditionally was assured to occur via infiltration of outdoor air through cracks and other leakage pathways in the residential building envelope. As building air tightness is improved for energy efficiency, infiltration can be reduced to inadequate levels. This has lead to the development of standards requiring mechanical ventilation. Though nominally intended to ensure acceptable indoor air quality, the standards are not explicitly tied to health risk or pollutant exposure targets. LBNL is currently designing analyses to assess the impact of varying ventilation standards on pollutant concentrations, health risks and energy use. These analyses require information on sources of chemical pollutant emissions, ideally including emission rates and the impact of ventilation on emissions. Some information can be obtained from recent studies that report measurements of various air contaminants and their concentrations in U.S. residences. Another way to obtain this information is the bottom-up approach of collecting and evaluating emissions data from construction and interior materials and common household products. This review contributes to the latter approach by summarizing available information on chemical emissions from new residential products and materials. We review information from the scientific literature and public sources to identify and discuss the databases that provide information on new or low-emission materials and products. The review focuses on the primary chemical or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior surface materials, furnishings, and some regularly used household products; all of these emissions are amenable to ventilation. Though it is an important and related topic, this review does not consider secondary pollutants that result from reactions of ozone and unsaturated organics bound to or emitted from material surfaces. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been largely excluded from this review because ventilation generally is not an effective way to control SVOC exposures. Nevertheless, health concerns about exposures to SVOCs emitted from selected materials warrant some discussion.

380

Improving GC-PPC-SAFT equation of state for LLE of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds with water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The GC-PPC-SAFT model has been shown to be useful for predicting the liquid–liquid phase split with water [Nguyen-Huynh et al. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 50 (2011) 7467–7483]. In order to extend the use of this model to oxygenated compounds for a large number of families (aliphatic ethers, aldehydes, ketones, formates, acetates, propionates/butyrates, n-aliphatic acids), it is proposed to consider cross-association in addition to a binary interaction parameter lij on the combining rules for the cross-segment diameter between water and the investigated compound. The binary interaction parameters lij, u ? ? , and w ? ? are fitted on mutual solubilities of water and organic compounds. The regressed values which are obtained for each chemical family, are subsequently used for predicting infinite dilution activity coefficient in water and n-octanol/water partition coefficient. In general, the results obtained are very much improved compared to the predictive approach discussed previously [Nguyen et al. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 52 (2013) 7014–7029]. The global deviation values on the decimal log scale for infinite dilution activity coefficient in water, water solubility and n-octanol/water partition coefficient are 0.377, 0.419, and 0.469, respectively.

Thanh-Binh Nguyen; Jean-Charles de Hemptinne; Benoit Creton; Georgios M. Kontogeorgis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Organic combustion fingerprints of three common home heating fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the chemical structures of three common home heating fuels: wood, coal, and No. 2 fuel oil. GC and GC/MS data are then presented which demonstrate how the thermal destruction of each fuel results in the production of a characteristic group of organic 'fingerprint' compounds. For wood, where the chief structural element is lignin polymer, they are methoxy benzenes, methoxy phenols, and alkyl bezenes. For coal, where the polymer contains more fused-ring structures, the chief products are fused-ring aromatics with structures of three or more rings, benzothiophenes, and to a lesser extent methyl-substituted phenols. For oil, the chief byproducts are unburned droplets of the oil. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of how these fingerprints can be used as apportionment guides in complex airsheds.

Steiber, R.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Engineering (FYE) 2 CHEM 112 General Chemistry 3 CHEM 111 General Chemistry 3 CHEG 112 Introduction I 3 CHEG 345 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I 3 CHEM 333 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 CHEM 332CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FALL 2010 Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction

Lee, Kelvin H.

383

Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested-volt region. Thus chemical accelerators can provide the same type of information for elemen- tary chemical

Zare, Richard N.

384

Modeling Semivolatile Organic Aerosol Mass Emissions from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in diluted diesel and wood combustion exhaust are interpreted using a two-component absorptive with dilution of both wood smoke and diesel exhaust can be described by two lumped compounds in roughly equal. Introduction Sources of organic aerosol such as diesel engines and wood stoves emit semivolatile organic

Stanier, Charlie

385

Organic aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Bulk heterojunction organic solar cell based on a novel fluorescent fluorine–boron complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic materials in solar cells are a promising alternative to inorganic ones...1–4...]. Moreover, the chemical flexibility for modifications on organic materials via chemical synthesis methods drives the...5–7....

Fen Qiao; Aimin Liu; Ying Zhou; Yi Xiao; Ping Ou Yang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Humic and fluvic acids and organic colloidal materials in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment, occurring in all soils, waters, and sediments of the ecosphere. Humic substances arise from the decomposition of plant and animal tissues yet are more stable than their precursors. Their size, molecular weight, elemental composition, structure, and the number and position of functional groups vary, depending on the origin and age of the material. Humic and fulvic substances have been studied extensively for more than 200 years; however, much remains unknown regarding their structure and properties. Humic substances are those organic compounds found in the environment that cannot be classified as any other chemical class of compounds. They are traditionally defined according to their solubilities. Fulvic acids are those organic materials that are soluble in water at all pH values. Humic acids are those materials that are insoluble at acidic pH values (pH < 2) but are soluble at higher pH values. Humin is the fraction of natural organic materials that is insoluble in water at all pH values. These definitions reflect the traditional methods for separating the different fractions from the original mixture. The humic content of soils varies from 0 to almost 10%. In surface waters, the humic content, expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varies from 0.1 to 50 ppm in dark-water swamps. In ocean waters, the DOC varies from 0.5 to 1.2 ppm at the surface, and the DOC in samples from deep groundwaters varies from 0.1 to 10 ppm. In addition, about 10% of the DOC in surface waters is found in suspended matter, either as organic or organically coated inorganic particulates. Humic materials function as surfactants, with the ability to bind both hydrophobic and hydrophyllic materials, making numic and fluvic materials effective agents in transporting both organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Clark, S.B. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1992) 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

389

Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Organic Photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfying the world's growing demand for energy is an urgent societal challenge. Organic photovoltaics holds promise as a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly solution.

Kippelen, Bernard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Chemical Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

392

 COMPOUND-SPECIFIC RADIOCARBON ANALYSES OF PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACIDS AND n -ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Analyses of Phospholipid Fatty Acids and n-Alkanes in Ocean Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Initial-phase optimization for bioremediation of munition compound-contaminated soils.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the first stage of remediation was between 6.5 and...of the first stage of remediation of munition compound-contaminated...bioremediation explosives ground water herbicides Oregon organic...pollutants pollution remediation soil treatment soils...

S B Funk; D J Roberts; D L Crawford; R L Crawford

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Pajarito Canyon Watershed LA-UR-10-1362 1 March 2010 Summary: organic compounds, dioxins, and furans should be added to the analytical suite for each sample (NMED 2009... in...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Pajarito Canyon Watershed LA-UR-10-1362 1 March 2010 Summary: organic compounds, dioxins, and furans should be added to the analytical suite for each sample (NMED 2009......

397

Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

398

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

Stowell, M.S.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis of organic sulfur and nitrogen in coal via tandem degradation methods. Final technical report, 1 September 1991--31 October 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the recent increase in concern for environmental issues and the implication of sulfur and nitrogen in coal combustion preducts as prime causes of acid rain, it has become clear that there is an urgent need for alternative methods for determining the nature of organic sulfur and nitrogen compounds in coal. The principal impediment to the molecular characterization of organic sulfur and nitrogen forms in coal is the polymeric nature of coal`s molecular structure, rendering coal insoluble and impossible to analyze by the necessary gas chromatographic (GC) methods. In our research, we apply mild chemical degradation techniques in order to render coal soluble in common organic solvents and thus amenable to standard GC characterization. The study also seeks to apply the degradative techniques to coal asphaltenes, since they are believed to be polymeric structures similar to the whole coal, but smaller and more readily analyzed. Of the degradation techniques used to date, oxidation by sodium dichromate provides the best chemical structure information. A variety of major sulfur compounds were detected in the dichromate oxidation products of demineralized IBC101 coal, including thiazoles (compounds which contains both sulfur and nitrogen) and a series of isomers of C{sub 2}-, C{sub 3}- and C{sub 4}-alkylthiophene derivatives. Precise agreement between GC-MS and sulfur-selective GC-FPD data was obtained for these compounds, which probably originated as short alkyl chains on exterior portions of the original peat macromolecular structure that were sulfurized shortly after burial by H{sub 2}S. The results were further confirmed by the analysis of a non-Illinois Basin coal with nearly twice the organic sulfur content of IBC101.

Kruge, M.A.; Palmer, S.R. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

MC-CAM Research Topics Organic LEDs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MC-CAM Research Topics Organic LEDs Phosphors and materials for solid state lighting Battery materials with highly- controlled microstructures Next generation optical storage media Products based for advanced display technologies Mitsubishi Chemical Center for Advanced Materials MRL Building University

Bigelow, Stephen

403

In-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductor in MOCVD system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ deposition of high-k materials to passivate the GaAs in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system was well demonstrated. Both atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods ...

Cheng, Cheng-Wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Insights into Chemical Reactivity /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern Physical Organic Chemistry University Science Books:Modern Physical Organic Chemistry University Science Books:

Burke, Kathryn D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Microbial transformations of sulfur compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oct 13, 1978 ... tains a large part of the chemical energy transferred ... ical energy is partly preserved in the bio- mass of .... ethanol to remove elemental sulfur.

2000-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reactions of Lignin Model Compounds in Ionic Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin, a readily available form of biomass, awaits novel chemistry for converting it to valuable aromatic chemicals. Recent work has demonstrated that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for processing woody biomass and lignin. Seeking to exploit ionic liquids as media for depolymerization of lignin, we investigated reactions of lignin model compounds in these solvents. Using Brønsted acid catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate at moderate temperatures, we obtained up to 11.6% yield of the dealkylation product guaiacol from the model compound eugenol and cleaved phenethyl phenyl ether, a model for lignin ethers. Despite these successes, acid catalysis failed in dealkylation of the unsaturated model compound 4-ethylguaiacol and did not produce monomeric products from organosolv lignin, demonstrating that further work is required to understand the complex chemistry of lignin depolymerization.

Holladay, John E.; Binder, Joseph B.; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Measurement of chemical emissions under the influence of low-NO{sub x} combustion modifications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effect of low-NO{sub x} firing. There was no clear-cut effect on the emission of trace metals or acid gases. The data give marginal evidence for a decreased emission of Cr(VI), which would be a favorable change but is not certain by any means. The effect on aldehydes and ketones cannot be stated because of the loss of samples for baseline conditions; no credible data on these compounds were obtained for baseline conditions. The change in volatile organics appeared to be a reduction in emissions, whereas that for semi-volatiles seemed to be an increase. Inasmuch as low-NO{sub x} firing is sometimes accompanied by large increases in the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, the result for semi-volatiles is more in line with expectation. Effect of the hot-side ESP. As indicated above, the hot-side ESP lowered trace-element emissions to the range roughly from 1 to 5% of the levels found in the inlet gas stream. Not surprisingly, the hot-side ESP had no measurable influence on the emissions of SO{sub x}, HF, and HCl. Quite surprisingly, on the other hand, the ESP seemed to suppress the emission of certain organic substances. Suppression of the emission of formaldehyde is particularly difficult to explain. Presumably, the apparent disappearance of organics in the vapor state may be due in part to chemical changes at the high temperature of the ESP or in the corona regions, where ozone and other high-energy reactants are present. Perhaps chemical destruction was aided in the instance of semi-volatile compounds by relatively long residence times at high temperature while the compounds were adsorbed on ash particles in the hoppers. Effect of the cold-side ESP. Limited data with the cold-side ESP in operation made it difficult to detect any but the most emphatic effect of that ESP. No dramatic effect was seen.

Dismukes, E.B.

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

412

Chemical Biology DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005461  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a Platform for Integrating Chemical and Biological Research S. Elizabeth Hulme and George M. WhitesidesChemical Biology DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005461 Chemistry and the Worm: Caenorhabditis elegans* Angewandte Chemie Keywords: biochemistry · Caenorhabditis elegans · chemical biology · model organisms

Church, George M.

413

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nitroaromatic Compounds, from Synthesis to Biodegradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compounds that enter the TCA cycle. Interestingly, expression...and then converted to TCA cycle compounds, with salicylate...nitroaromatic compounds, but several fundamental aspects regarding their biosynthesis...Explosives development and fundamentals of explosives technology...

Kou-San Ju; Rebecca E. Parales

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

compound queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps...

418

Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

419

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion...

420

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Absorption-Enhanced Organic Photovoltaic By Incorporating Metallic Nano Pyramid Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Device Physics of Organic Solar Cells," 2011/12/21/ 2011. S.photogeneration in organic solar cells," Chemical reviews,for High Performance Inverted Organic Solar Cells," Advanced

Qasem, Hussamaldeen S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Intermediate-Volatility Organic Compounds: A Large Source of Secondary Organic Aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Schauer, J. J.; Kleeman, M. J.; Cass, G. R.; Simoneit, B. R. T.Measurement of emissions from air pollution sources. ... Measurement of Emissions from Air Pollution Sources. ... Schauer, J. J.; Kleeman, M. J.; Cass, G. R.; Simoneit, B. R. T.Measurement of emissions from air pollution sources. ...

Yunliang Zhao; Christopher J. Hennigan; Andrew A. May; Daniel S. Tkacik; Joost A. de Gouw; Jessica B. Gilman; William C. Kuster; Agnes Borbon; Allen L. Robinson

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Supporting Information:1 Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System Laboratory, National Center for22 Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO USA23 Now at: Air Pollution 8 Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France16 9 �cole des Mines de Douai, Douai, France17 10

Meskhidze, Nicholas

424

Polybenzimidazole compounds, polymeric media, and methods of post-polymerization modifications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about 15.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

426

Bis-Acridines as Lead Antiparasitic Agents: Structure-Activity Analysis of a Discrete Compound Library In Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diseases are of enormous public health significance...investigated a focused library of 18 structurally...focused compound libraries rather than the exhaustive...screening of chemical space often favored in...discrete compound library in vitro. | Parasitic...diseases are of enormous public health significance...

Conor R. Caffrey; Dietmar Steverding; Ryan K. Swenerton; Ben Kelly; Deirdre Walshe; Anjan Debnath; Yuan-Min Zhou; Patricia S. Doyle; Aaron T. Fafarman; Julie A. Zorn; Kirkwood M. Land; Jessica Beauchene; Kimberly Schreiber; Heidrun Moll; Alicia Ponte-Sucre; Tanja Schirmeister; Ahilan Saravanamuthu; Alan H. Fairlamb; Fred E. Cohen; James H. McKerrow; Jennifer L. Weisman; Barnaby C. H. May

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Phosphorus Compounds of Cotton Seed Meal and Wheat Bran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Phar. & Expt. Therapeutics 1,151) claims that ? the chief poisonous principle of cottonseed meal is a salt of pyrophos- phoric acid.? It has been shown by the writer (Bulletin 146) that the product which these writers thought was inorganic... compound as phytin, but do not report complete analyses of the product. Levine (Biochem. Ztscher. 16, 390) describes a semicrystalline barium salt of an organic phosphorus acid. Yorbrodt (Anzeiger. Akad. Wiss. Krakau, 1910. Series A. 414) separated...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List Chemicals on this list are routine use chemicals in the CAMD Cleanroom and are available to users for general use. All others (*) are approved for use...

429

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is prepared in the context of a larger program whose mission is to advance understanding of ventilation and indoor air quality in U.S. homes. A specific objective of this program is to develop the scientific basis ? through controlled experiments, monitoring and analysis ? for health risk-based ventilation standards. Appropriate and adequate ventilation is a basic element of a healthy home. Ventilation provides outdoor air and in the process removes indoor odors and contaminants including potentially unhealthful chemicals emitted by indoor materials, products and activities. Ventilation traditionally was assured to occur via infiltration of outdoor air through cracks and other leakage pathways in the residential building envelope. As building air tightness is improved for energy efficiency, infiltration can be reduced to inadequate levels. This has lead to the development of standards requiring mechanical ventilation. Though nominally intended to ensure acceptable indoor air quality, the standards are not explicitly tied to health risk or pollutant exposure targets. LBNL is currently designing analyses to assess the impact of varying ventilation standards on pollutant concentrations, health risks and energy use. These analyses require information on sources of chemical pollutant emissions, ideally including emission rates and the impact of ventilation on emissions. Some information can be obtained from recent studies that report measurements of various air contaminants and their concentrations in U.S. residences. Another way to obtain this information is the bottom-up approach of collecting and evaluating emissions data from construction and interior materials and common household products. This review contributes to the latter approach by summarizing available information on chemical emissions from new residential products and materials. We review information from the scientific literature and public sources to identify and discuss the databases that provide information on new or low-emission materials and products. The review focuses on the primary chemical or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior surface materials, furnishings, and some regularly used household products; all of these emissions are amenable to ventilation. Though it is an important and related topic, this review does not consider secondary pollutants that result from reactions of ozone and unsaturated organics bound to or emitted from material surfaces. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been largely excluded from this review because ventilation generally is not an effective way to control SVOC exposures. Nevertheless, health concerns about exposures to SVOCs emitted from selected materials warrant some discussion.

Willem, Henry; Singer, Brett

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic energy organization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6. A common trait of simple organic compounds is to have Lewis... in a certain organic molecule absorbs radiation that has a frequency of 6.0 x 1013 s1. a. What... is the...

431

Volatile compounds from marine algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile compounds from marine algae ... Seasonal Variations of Bromophenols in Brown Algae (Padina arborescens, Sargassum siliquastrum, and Lobophora variegata) Collected in Hong Kong ... Seasonal Variations of Bromophenols in Brown Algae (Padina arborescens, Sargassum siliquastrum, and Lobophora variegata) Collected in Hong Kong ...

Richard E. Moore

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Exhaust Materails from a Set of Gasoline and a Set of Diesel Engine Vehicles Operated at 30F In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate...

433

Organic Electronics and Photovoltaics CopyrightDaveWhite2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these techniques will provide a robust platform for science-based process control. Merck Chemicals · Corning development at Merck Chemicals, Corning, and other manufacturers. NIST is an organizer of the yearly to correlate chemical structure and process control variables to performance via micro- structure measurements

434

chemical analysis | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical analysis chemical analysis Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

435

Predicting the Net Heat of Combustion of Organosilicon Compounds from Molecular Structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicting the Net Heat of Combustion of Organosilicon Compounds from Molecular Structures ... ?Hc° is an important physicochemical property which can be used to calculate the reactive heat in many chemical engineering processes such as the processes of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of hydrocarbon. ... (4) In his paper, empirical equations have been developed to predict the gross and the net heats of combustion of organosilicon compounds based on the atomic contribution method. ...

Yong Pan; Juncheng Jiang; Yinyan Zhang

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

436

Chemical Safety Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Home Chemical Safety Topical Committee Library Program Contacts Related Links Site Map Tools 2013 Chemical Safety Workshop Archived Workshops Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Chemical Safety Program logo The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety web pages provide a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This page is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Noteworthy products are the Chemical Management Handbooks and the Chemical Lifecycle Cost Analysis Tool, found under the TOOLS menu. Chemical Management Handbook Vol (1) Chemical Management Handbook Vol (2)

437

Indoor Residential Chemical Exposures as Risk Factors for Asthmaand Allergy in Infants and Children: a Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most research into effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. This paper briefly reviews reported findings on associations of asthma or allergy in infants or children with risk factors related to indoor chemical emissions from residential materials or surface coatings. Associations, some strong (e.g., odds ratios up to 13), were reported. The most frequently identified risk factors were formaldehyde, aromatic organic compounds such as toluene and benzene, plastic materials and plasticizers, and recent painting. Exposures and consequent effects from indoor sources may be exacerbated by decreased ventilation. Identified risk factors may be proxies for correlated exposures. Findings suggest the frequent occurrence of important but preventable effects on asthma and allergy in infants and children worldwide from modern residential building materials and coatings.

Mendell, M.J.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters.

Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Handbook of GC/MS data and information for selected Clean Air Act amendments compounds. Report for January 1992-December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook presents a compilation of the results of laboratory experiments to test the applicability of GC/MS techniques using EPA methods 8270 and 5041, and the compatibility of the Title III organic compounds with organic solvents. The Handbook contains the following information: (1) Compounds that can and cannot be analyzed; (2) Relative response factors; (3) Chromatograms, reference mass spectra; and (4) Evaluation of compound compatibility for semivolatile organic compounds in isolation. Data and information included in the Handbook are intended to address analytical issues only; sample collection issues are not addressed.

Rice, J.; Bursey, J.T.; McGaughey, J.F.; Merrill, R.G.; Harvan, D.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

On modeling the potential impacts of CO2 sequestration on shallow groundwater: Transport of organics and co-injected H2S by supercritical CO2 to shallow aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solvent, and its use to decontaminate soils impacted by hazardous organic compounds is regarded as a “green”

Zheng, L.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Applicant Organization:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Broin Companies Broin Companies Corporate HQ: Sioux Falls, South Dakota Facility Location: Emmetsburg, Palo Alto County, Iowa Description: This Midwest-based company is an innovative corn dry mill technology provider and ethanol plant builder/owner. Their proposal will demonstrate the benefits of integrating an innovative corn waste to ethanol biochemical process into an existing dry corn mill infrastructure. CEO or Equivalent: Jeff Broin Participants: E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; Novozymes North America, Inc.; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Production: * 125 million gallons/year of ethanol, of which roughly 25 percent will be from lignocellulosics. * Ethanol from lignocellulosic stream and ethanol, chemicals and animal feed from

443

Applicant Organization:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Range Fuels, Inc. Range Fuels, Inc. (formerly Kergy, Inc.) Corporate HQ: Broomfield, CO Proposed Facility Location: Near Soperton, Treutlen County, Georgia Description: This venture has developed a promising thermo-chemical conversion process, whose success could expand the range of feedstocks available for ethanol production. CEO or Equivalent: Mitch Mandich Participants: Merrick and Company, PRAJ Industries Ltd., Western Research Institute, Georgia Forestry Commission, Yeomans Wood and Timber; Truetlen County Development Authority; BioConversion Technology; Khosla Ventures; CH2MHill, Gillis Ag and Timber Production: * 10 million gallons/year from first unit; ~40 million gallons/year of ethanol and about 9 million gallons/year of methanol from commercial unit

444

Definition: Chemical Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging Logging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Chemical Logging Chemical logging produces a chemical profile of the formation fluid within a well based on the measurement of changes in the chemical composition of the drilling fluid during drilling operations.[1] References ↑ http://www.osti.gov/bridge/servlets/purl/6076582-xtVTIk/6076582.pdf Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Chemical_Logging&oldid=600357" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

445

Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Chemicals for Plant Disease Control at Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. biological living agent: bacteria/fungus 2. botanical products derived from plants, typically oils 3. captan N-trichloromethylthio-4-cyclohexene-1,2 dicarboximide 4. chlorothalonil tetrachloroisophthalonitrile 5. copper various chemical forms of copper... bicarbonate 15. propaconizole 1-[[2(2,4-Dichlorophenyl)-4-propyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl]methyl]1-H-1,2,4-triazole 16. quarternary ammonium compound various forms of N-alkyl ammonium chloride 17. streptomycin sulfate streptomycin sulfate (antibiotic) 18. sulfur...

Ong, Kevin

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

Chemical Management Contacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

449

Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation on the Bioavailability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation components. Applications of these techniques to assess metal and organic chemical sorption/release, natural widely employed to provide an indirect assessment ofchemical speciation and association ofcontaminants

Sparks, Donald L.

450

Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

Sievers, Robert E. (Boulder, CO); Hansen, Brian N. (Boulder, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

About Chemical Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

452

4, 227265, 2004 Effect of organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Physics Discussions Effect of organic compounds on nanoparticle formation in diluted diesel exhaust U. Introduction Exhaust from diesel engines represents an important anthropogenic source of particles in ambient Print Version Interactive Discussion © EGU 2004 Abstract The nucleation of nanoparticles in the exhaust

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

453

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

454

Thermodynamic evaluation of the compounds of gold, silver, and other trace elements formed upon the combustion of brown coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermodynamically most probable main compounds of Ag, Au, Ge, Se, Sr, U, and ash-forming elements formed upon the combustion of brown coal, which was close in the composition of organic and mineral matter ...

M. Ya. Shpirt; A. A. Lavrinenko; I. N. Kuznetsova…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Muon-spin spectroscopy of the organometallic spin-1/2 kagome-lattice compound Cu(1,3-benzenedicarboxylate)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using muon-spin resonance, we examine the organometallic hybrid compound Cu(1,3-benzenedicarboxylate) [Cu(1,3-bdc)], which has structurally perfect spin-1/2 copper kagome planes separated by pure organic linkers. This ...

Marcipar, Lital

456

Modeling the Distribution of Sulfur Compounds in a Large Two Stroke Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling the Distribution of Sulfur Compounds in a Large Two Stroke Diesel Engine ... The model is formulated in MATLAB and applies the open source software CANTERA(10, 11) that is efficiently used to integrate chemical reaction rates, computing general chemical equilibrium and thermodynamic gas properties. ... The trapped cylinder gas at the time where compression starts is a mixture of fresh air and residual gas products from the previous engine cycle. ...

Rasmus Cordtz; Jesper Schramm; Anders Andreasen; Svend S. Eskildsen; Stefan Mayer

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic Ecosystems: The Role of Organic The distribution between sediments and water plays a key role in the food-chain transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals. Current models and assessment methods of sediment-water distribution predominantly rely

Gobas, Frank

458

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Applicant Organization:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC Corporate HQ: Chesterfield, Missouri Proposed Facility Location: Colwich, Kansas Description: This project from a committed long-term player has the potential to demonstrate dual biochemical and thermochemical capabilities. CEO or Equivalent: Javier Salgado (CEO of Abengoa Bioenergy) Gerson Santos-Leon, Director ABBK Participants: Abengoa Bioenergy R&D, Abengoa Engineering, Antares Corp., Taylor Enegineering Production: * 11. 4 million gallons/year and sufficient energy to power the operation and sell excess energy to the co-located dry-grind ethanol production plant * Both ethanol and syngas production, with long term strategy of using the syngas for ethanol and chemicals production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic chemical compounds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Utilization of renewably generated power in the chemical process industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical process industry, mainly the production of organic and inorganic ... On the contrary, the dependency of electricity supply in Germany on volatile wind and solar power increases. To use this power eff...

Julia Riese; Marcus Grünewald; Stefan Lier

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

Burnham, A.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Bibliography of work on the photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a bibliography of information in the open literature on work that has been done to date on the photocatalytic oxidation of compounds, principally organic compounds. The goal of the listing is removing hazardous oompounds from water or air. It contains lists of substances and literature citations. The bibliography includes information obtained through the middle of 1993 and some selected references for the balance of that year.

Blake, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Chemical Transformations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Chemical Transformations Chemical Transformations Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Scientific Highlights Reports & Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Chemical Transformations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Research themes include the characterization, control, and optimization of chemistry in many forms. Catalysis science underpins the design of new catalytic methods for the clean and efficient production of fuels and chemicals and emphasizes inorganic and organic complexes; interfacial chemistry, nanostructured and supramolecular catalysts, photocatalysis and electrochemistry, and bio-inspired catalytic processes. Heavy element

465

Affinity Adsorbents Based on Carriers Activated by Epoxy-compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The review is devoted to the synthesis and applications of affinity adsorbents based on carriers activated by epoxy-compounds. The methods for the introduction of epoxy-groups into carriers of different chemical types are discussed and conditions for the immobilisation of three-dimensional spacers and low-molecular-weight and polymeric ligands on carriers containing epoxy-groups are considered. Data are presented on the properties and applications of adsorbents of this type in affinity chromatography. The bibliography includes 144 references.

B A Klyashchitskii; P V Kuznetsov

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Large-area fiber-optic chemical sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a large-area chemical sensor that combines chemically selective coatings and optical spectroscopy to detect target compounds. The chemically selective material is incorporated into the cladding of an optical fiber waveguide. The material is interrogated using optical spectroscopic techniques to determine the concentration of target compounds. The optical interrogation method includes two spectroscopies: visible-near infrared absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. This work develops the physical and mathematical models of such a sensor and provides a set of tools with which to make design predictions for the large-area chemical sensors. The theoretical relationships derived herein allow the use of bulk absorption parameters and bulk Raman coefficients to predict sensor performance.

Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report gives the second year`s findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Bio-based production of the platform chemical 1,5-diaminopentane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the rising era of bio-economy, the five carbon compound 1,5-diaminopentane receives increasing interest as platform chemical, especially as innovative building block for bio...Corynebacterium glutamicum or Esc...

Stefanie Kind; Christoph Wittmann

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Selective Synthesis of "Left-Handed" or "Right-Handed" Chemicals...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selective Synthesis of "Left-Handed" or "Right-Handed" Chemicals A new series of catalysts is able to selectively make "left-handed" or "right-handed" nitrogen-containing compounds...

470

Design of a Fragment Library that maximally represents available chemical space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cheminformatics protocols have been developed and assessed that identify a small set of fragments which can represent the compounds in a chemical library for use in fragment-based ligand discovery. Six differe...

M. N. Schulz; J. Landström; K. Bright…

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

Johnson, Jr., Alan T. (Philadelphia, PA); Gelperin, Alan (Princeton, NJ); Staii, Cristian (Madison, WI)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

472

Controlled biosynthesis of odd-chain fuels and chemicals via engineered modular metabolic pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial systems are being increasingly developed as production hosts for a wide variety of chemical compounds. Broader adoption of microbial synthesis is hampered by a limited number of high-yielding natural pathways for ...

Tseng, Hsien-Chung

473

A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

474

Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Da Costa, Andre R. (Menlo Park, CA); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA); Amo, Karl D. (Mountain View, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

475

1 INTRODUCTION 1 Predicting drug-target interactions for new drug compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins including enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors. However, current drug and nuclear receptors [5]. Publicly available databases have been built and maintained, such as KEGG BRITE [6 using chemical and interaction information about known compounds in the dataset. The WNN method can

Marchiori, Elena

476

Selective extraction of BPA in milk analysis by capillary electrophoresis using a chemically modified molecularly imprinted polymer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting compound commonly found in consumer plastic goods. For environmental and food analyses, however, selective extraction of BPA in the presence of other organic compounds will be challenging unless a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is commercially available. An MIP was prepared in our lab using BPA as a template, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linking monomer and methacrylic acid as a functional co-monomer. Non-specific binding sites in the MIP were blocked by site-selective chemical modification with diazomethane to form a treated molecularly imprinted polymer (TMIP). Water and milk samples were spiked with BPA as well as zwitterionic, negatively and positively charged pharmaceutical and other compounds for binding tests. Unlike high-performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis (CE) demonstrated the ability to analyze milk samples after dilution with a background electrolyte. BPA was easily separated from all milk constituents on the basis of different electrophoretic mobility values. Repeatedly, CE binding test results demonstrated that the TMIP afforded superior selectivity than a commercial MIP.

Noof A. Alenazi; Jeffrey M. Manthorpe; Edward P.C. Lai

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Zirconia coating on stainless steel sheets from organozirconium compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability and the coating characteristics of a variety of organozirconium compounds have been investigated to coat ZrO/sub 2/ films on stainless steel sheets for the improvement of heat resistance against oxidation. Zirconium tetraoctylate and zirconium tetrakis(acetylacetonate). The authors discuss how the compounds were found to be more stable than zirconium alkoxides in an ambient atmosphere. The ZrO/sub 2/ films from zirconium alkoxides became white and discontinuous when the thickness of the films exceeded about 200 A (20nm). On the other hand, transparent ZrO/sub 2/ films were obtained from zirconium tetraoctylate and zirconium tetrakis(acetylacetonate). The IR spectra of the films showed that the heat treatment at 400{sup 0}C for 5 min produced organic-free ZrO/sub 2/ films. The heat resistance of stainless steel sheets against oxidation was improved by the ZrO/sub 2/ coating, depending on the film thickness.

Izumi, K.; Murakami, M.; Deguchi, T.; Morita, A. (Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Tohge, N.; Minami, T. (Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Mozu-Umekmachi, Sakai-Shi, Osaka- Fu 591 (JP))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Capacitive chemical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

479

Chemicals from Metabolic Pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A few basic raw materials, petroleum, natural gas, +S from oil or natural gas, and O2 + N2 from air, generate first primary (or platform) chemicals, next secondary (commodity) chem